2016 Election Coverage

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UNC-Chapel Hill faculty experts are available to offer analysis and insight on everything from record-breaking, early voter turnout to fluctuating poll numbers.

 

 

If you would like to schedule an interview with one of our experts please contact our media relations team at mediarelations@unc.edu or call our media line at (919) 445-8555.

 

 

Tom Carsey is a pa52b147a765ba6509a0843a3510c76c91468874389_lolitical science professor and the director of the Odum Institute for Research in Social Science at UNC-Chapel Hill. He can talk about what drives public opinion and what shapes voters’ partisan loyalties. His research includes electoral behavior, campaigns, political parties and legislative politics in the U.S.

Carsey’s thoughts on last night’s election results are available here.

 

 

 

Daniel Kreiuntitled1ss is an associate professor in the School of Media and Journalism. He is available to discuss the evolution of new media and innovations in online campaigning. Through his research, Kreiss explores the impact of technology in the world of politics. More specifically, how social and digital media have changed the way candidates not only communicate with potential voters but also how they structure and plan their campaign overall.

 

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Sarah Treul’s area of expertise includes an assistant professor in the political science department. Her area of expertise includes U.S. Congress, the court system and what factors contribute to a divisive Congress. More specifically, how the ripple effects of state politics create a less responsive and less-productive federal government. She can also talk about the possible repercussions of contested election results.

 

 

robertsJason Roberts is an associate professor of political science. He can offer big-picture analysis on this year’s election. He’s available to discuss battleground states and specific issues in each state, congressional elections and the politics of Supreme Court appointments.

 

 

 

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Erika Wilson is an assistant professor of law. She can discuss public policy,race discrimination, school reform, civil litigation and civil rights. One of her areas of expertise: where race and law intersect.

 

 

 

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James Stimson is a political science professor. He can discuss public opinion and help connect the dots between mass political behavior and how it impacts our current government system. His areas of expertise include the impact of policy changes to voting behavior and participation.

 

 

 

11untitledjpgJoseph Cabosky is a UNC-Chapel is an assistant professor in the School of Media and Journalism. He can offer perspective on polling and projections, insight on which voters each candidate needs to win over in the week ahead and the last days before Nov. 8. Cabosky is an expert in the fields of public relations, data analytics and the value of modern public relations, particularly in the areas of politics, entertainment and investor relations.

 

 

 

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Jonathan Oberlander is a professor of health care policy and management in the School of Medicine. His area of expertise includes health care costs and more specifically, the implementation of the Affordable Care Act. He can talk about possible changes to consumers’ health care coverage and the President’s health care plan in both the long and short-term.

 

 

 

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Christian Lundberg is an associate professor of communication and co-director of the University Program in Cultural Studies. He can help break through the campaign rhetoric and offer insight as to how that rhetoric influences voters.

 

 

 

 

fguilloryFerrel Guillory is a professor of the practice in the School of Media and Journalism and also director of the Program on Public Life. He can talk about battleground states, specifically North Carolina and its hotly contested races. He can also offer insight as to why North Carolinais a key factor in this year’s presidential election.