AIDS Memorial Quilt on Display at UNC-Chapel Hill

Not for publication

 

AIDS Memorial Quilt on Display at UNC-Chapel Hill  

 

UNC-Chapel Hill Student and Expert are Available for Interviews

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— Jan. 10, 2018) – The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill will host a panel of the AIDS Memorial Quilt from Jan. 10-31 in the West Lounge of the Frank Porter Graham Student Union. Carolina student Elizabeth Trefney and her family organized the effort to bring the panel, which features her uncle, Jeremy Trefney, who died of AIDS in 1988, to campus. The University will use the panel to raise awareness of the disease that still affects nearly 37 million people worldwide, according to the World Health Organization (WHO).

 

UNC-Chapel Hill is a global leader in HIV research. In 2017, three new HIV prevention studies were launched, two novel HIV cure clinical trials were ongoing, and the University’s Collaboratory of AIDS Researchers for Eradication received an additional $23 million in grants to extend studies.

 

Media availability (Friday, Jan. 12, 10-11:30 a.m.):

On Friday, Jan. 12, from 10-11:30 a.m., Carolina student Elizabeth Trefney and Dr. David Margolis, director of the UNC HIV Cure Center, and a professor of medicine, microbiology, immunology and epidemiology, will be available for interviews in the West Lounge of the Student Union, where the AIDS Memorial Quilt panel will be on display. Trefney can speak to the importance of raising HIV and AIDS awareness and her efforts to bring the quilt to Carolina, and Margolis can share how HIV treatment has changed over the years and discuss the latest in HIV cure research.

 

On-site contact: Audrey Smith: (919) 801-1936.

 

Campus event (Wednesday, Jan. 24, 7-8 p.m.):

On Wednesday, Jan. 24, at 7 p.m. the UNC Center for AIDS Research (CFAR) will host a public event in front of the AIDS Memorial Quilt panel in the West Lounge of the Student Union. Evelyn Foust, who has served as the branch head of the NC Department of Health and Human Services, NC Communicable Disease Branch, for 30 years, will share a long-term perspective on fighting against HIV and AIDS in the state. Students attending the event will be asked to shine lights from their cell phones onto the quilt in an act of unity.

 

On-site contact: Audrey Smith: (919) 801-1936.

 

For more information about UNC-Chapel Hill’s HIV and AIDS research, please visit the UNC Center for AIDS Research.

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 111 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 322,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and 165 countries. More than 175,000 live in North Carolina.

 

University Communications: Media Relations, (919) 445-8555, mediarelations@unc.edu

 

 

UNC-Chapel Hill Research Exceeds $1 Billion Annually for First Time

UNC-Chapel Hill Research Exceeds $1 Billion Annually for First Time

Fueled by over $1 billion in annual research activity, Carolina ranks as one of the world’s top research universities 

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— Dec. 1, 2017) – The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill has surpassed, for the first time, $1 billion in annual research expenditures, according to the nation’s annual Higher Education Research and Development (HERD) survey. This news continues UNC-Chapel Hill’s decade-long rise as one of the world’s top universities for sponsored research.

 

The latest survey covers fiscal year 2016 and was released on November 30.  Carolina ranked 11th nationally among all research institutions in overall research and development (R&D) expenditures, 6th nationally among public institutions, and 6th nationally in overall federal R&D.

 

“The sustained growth we have seen in our research enterprise since 2013 is a tribute to the excellence and dedication of the faculty, students and staff who are the heart of Carolina’s research and training programs,” said Chancellor Carol L. Folt. “Thanks to their concerted and sustained work and their efforts to increase and strengthen outside partnerships, Carolina has become one of the nation’s most powerful economic engines, known for teams of researchers who take on the toughest, most complex challenges of our times. By building upon this foundation of excellence, nurturing the culture of collaboration and innovation that our researchers have created and investing in areas of opportunity and need, we can ensure research thrives here and amazing discoveries can move quickly to practical applications that benefit our state, nation and world.”

 

“This news further confirms what we all know — that UNC’s commitment to research continues to yield huge dividends for North Carolina,” said Vice Chancellor for Research Terry Magnuson.  “Our researchers save and improve lives in our state by discovering new treatments and cures for diseases and by making groundbreaking advances in both basic and applied science every year.”

 

Research expenditures at UNC-Chapel Hill have more than doubled over the past decade, underscoring the confidence public and private sponsors place in science at Carolina. Since becoming one of the top-10 institutions for federal research expenditures in fiscal year 2010, the University has retained its position as the largest beneficiary in North Carolina of federal investments in research.

 

UNC-Chapel Hill expended $1,045,338,000 on R&D activity of all types in fiscal year 2016. Of that total, $632 million was sponsored by the federal government through agencies like the National Institutes for Health. The results strengthen the University’s reputation as a global leader in fields such as medicine, health and the physical and life sciences, as well as disciplines such as psychology and the social sciences.

 

“Roughly 90 percent of UNC’s research awards come from sources outside the state. They represent new dollars in North Carolina’s economy each year,” Magnuson said. “Much of this revenue comes from federal science agencies. State research universities like UNC represent an important way we bring federal tax dollars back to North Carolina and put them to work growing our economy.”

 

UNC-Chapel Hill’s research funding directly supports the salaries of more than 10,000 North Carolinians across the state, and has led to the start-up of more than 300 private businesses that employ an additional 8,000 workers across the state. The latest survey results show that industry funding for UNC research jumped 16% from 2015 to 2016, reflecting the University’s expertise and attractiveness to commercial partners.

 

Research at Carolina also provides students with unique learning opportunities through hands-on research projects. Currently, more than 60 percent of UNC-Chapel Hill’s graduating seniors conduct independent research and contribute to discoveries made by our research scientists.

 

The National Science Foundation (NSF) computes these national rankings annually as part of its HERD Survey, which evaluates hundreds of U.S. colleges and universities using a uniform methodology developed by NSF to establish the amount of university spending on research and development. Federal research agencies, private industry, and foundations fund the vast majority of research spending.

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 111 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 322,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and 165 countries. More than 175,000 live in North Carolina.

 

University Communications: Media Relations, (919) 445-8555, mediarelations@unc.edu

Three UNC-Chapel Hill Researchers Named AAAS Fellows

 

Three UNC-Chapel Hill Researchers Named AAAS Fellows

New Fellows Honored for Advances in Cancer and Virology, Autism, and Biomolecular Recognition

 

Professors Blossom Damania, Marcey Waters and Mark Zylka of UNC-Chapel Hill have each been named a fellow by the American Association of the Advancement of Science (AAAS), the world’s largest general scientific society.

 

The three Carolina researchers are among 396 new fellows being recognized by their peers for their distinguished efforts to advance science and its applications.

 

  • Professor Damania (UNC School of Medicine) is being honored for landmark discoveries and contributions to biomedical sciences in the fields of virology, cancer biology, and immunology, involving both basic science and translational research. Damania is the Boshamer Distinguished Professor in the department of microbiology and immunology and serves as vice dean for research at the UNC School of Medicine. Damania co-founded the Global Oncology Program at Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center. She is also a Kavli fellow of the National Academy of Sciences, an American Academy of Microbiology fellow, an AACR Gertrude Elion scholar, a Leukemia & Lymphoma Society scholar, and a Burroughs Wellcome Fund investigator.

 

  • Professor Waters (UNC Chemistry Department, College of Arts & Sciences) is being honored for fundamental studies of molecular recognition in water and its role in biomolecular recognition, with application to epigenetic regulation, which encompasses the factors that control gene expression. Waters is the Glen H. Elder, Jr. Distinguished Professor of chemistry and vice chair for education, as well as the current president of the American Peptide Society. She was the principal investigator on a study, backed by a $1M grant from the W.M. Keck Foundation, of protein methylation, which is a mechanism of epigenetic regulation implicated in many diseases, including cancer.

 

  • Professor Zylka (UNC School of Medicine) is being honored for distinguished contributions to the field of neuroscience, particularly for the study of autism-related genes and risk factors using high-throughput approaches. Zylka is the W.R. Kenan Jr. Distinguished Professor of cell biology and physiology and director of the UNC Neuroscience Center. He won a Hettleman Prize for his work in autism and chronic pain and has also received a five-year, $3.8M Pioneer Award from the National Institutes of Health to study the role that genetic and environmental factors play in autism.

 

The AAAS fellows program began in 1874 and, with this announcement, UNC-Chapel Hill now boasts 83 AAAS fellows among its current faculty.

 

The full list of new AAAS fellows will appear in the November 24 issue of Science.

 

New fellows will be recognized on Saturday, February 17, 2018 during the 2018 AAAS Annual Meeting in Austin, Texas.

 

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 111 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 322,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and 165 countries. More than 175,000 live in North Carolina.

 

University Communications contact: Audrey Smith, (919) 962-8596, mediarelations@unc.edu