UNC-Chapel Hill helps those who serve our nation succeed at Carolina

For immediate use

 

UNC-Chapel Hill helps those who serve our nation succeed at Carolina

 New Boot Print to Heel Print orientation provides community, skills and resources  

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.—Aug. 3, 2016) – The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill has inaugurated a new program – one segment for undergraduate students and another focused on graduate and professional students – for incoming students with prior military service. This inaugural program, Boot Print to Heel Print, was designed to serve the needs of newly enrolled, readmitted or deferred enrollment students who are active duty, veteran, reservist or National Guard.

 

Based on comments from current students who serve or have served in the military, Carolina’s Office of the Dean of Students and Veterans Resource Team created this program to help new students build personal skills to succeed in the academic environment; learn about on-campus resources while linking a face to a name; and develop camaraderie among the cohort of incoming military-affiliated students.

 

“College can be a bit daunting at first and I experienced some pitfalls when I transitioned out of the service and began my studies,” said Amber Mathwig, UNC-Chapel Hill’s Student Veterans Assistance Coordinator. “We see this program as another way to help our military-affiliated students hit the deck running. At Carolina, we are working hard to create every opportunity for success for our military veterans and active duty.”

 

The undergraduate student orientation will take place from Aug. 8 through Aug. 9. The graduate and professional student orientation will take place on Aug. 8. Overnight accommodations are available to support those attending the program.

 

The undergraduate program is funded by a grant from the Carolina Parents Council. The graduate and professional student program is funded by the university’s Office of the Dean of Students and The Graduate School.

 

In addition to building academic skills and learning about the many resources available on campus, the program also includes opportunities to meet the members of Carolina’s Veterans Resource Team and attend a social hosted by the Carolina Veterans Organization, UNC-Chapel Hill’s Student Veterans of America chapter.

 

Carolina has a proud tradition of supporting active duty and retired military and their spouses with programming that creates new opportunities and personal growth. In addition to the Student Veteran Assistance Coordinator, a full-time position in the Office of the Dean of Students, Carolina has established initiatives like the Green Zone Training Program, which educates faculty and staff about issues facing veterans.

 

Programs associated with educational opportunities at Carolina range from UNC CORE, which accelerates higher education opportunities for North Carolina active duty military, veterans, National Guard and Reserve members, to the UNC School of Medicine’s Physician Assistant (PA) master’s degree program, which was designed with input from the United States Army Special Operations Command team at Fort Bragg, North Carolina.

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 113 master’s, 68 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty – including two Nobel laureates – staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 308,000 alumni live in all 50 states and 150 countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

Communications and Public Affairs contact: Michael John, (919) 445-8555, michael.john@unc.edu

 

 

 

University to test emergency sirens on Thursday, June 23

For immediate use

University to test emergency sirens on Thursday, June 23

Alert Carolina System improvements to be tested

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C. – June 21, 2016) – The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill will test its emergency sirens and emergency communication notification systems on Thursday, June 23, between noon and 1 p.m. This test of the Alert Carolina System, an overlapping campus-wide safety awareness and emergency communication process, will be conducted to verify that new equipment and software installations are working properly.

 

No action is required. The sirens will sound an alert tone along with a brief prerecorded public address message. When testing is complete, a different siren tone and voice message will signal “All clear. Resume regular activities.” Samples of the alert and “all clear” audio tones are available at alertcarolina.unc.edu

 

People outside on or near campus may hear the sirens at six locations: Hinton James Residence Hall off Manning Drive; the Gary R. Tomkins Chilled Water Operations Center behind the Dogwood Parking Deck; Winston Residence Hall at the corner of Raleigh Street and South Road; near Hill Hall behind the University Methodist Church; University buildings and support facilities near the Giles Horney Building off Martin Luther King Boulevard; and near the William and Ida Friday Continuing Education Center about three miles east of the central campus.  People inside a building will most likely not hear the sirens.

 

To help educate faculty, staff and students about what to do when the sirens sound for an actual emergency or immediate threat to health and safety, the university created and distributed “What You Should Do For An Emergency Warning” posters to all campus classrooms, offices, residence halls and laboratory spaces. The poster is accessible on the Alert Carolina System website at http://www.alert.unc.edu/external/content/document/1395/1255639/1/
AlertClassroomPoster.pdf

 

The federal Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Crime Statistics Act requires universities to annually test emergency response procedures. UNC-Chapel Hill tests the operation of the emergency sirens (http://www.alertcarolina.unc.edu/go/doc/1395/206156/) at the beginning of each fall and spring semester and as needed to test new equipment and software installations. Campus officials regularly update response and communications plans based on lessons learned during an annual full-scale emergency preparedness drill, the siren tests and actual events.

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 113 master’s, 68 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty – including two Nobel laureates – staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 308,000 alumni live in all 50 states and 150 countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

Communications and Public Affairs contact: Michael John, (919) 445-8555, michael.john@unc.edu

 

 

 

Carolina Student Transfer Excellence Program moves forward with expansion to Robeson Community College

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Carolina Student Transfer Excellence Program moves forward with expansion to Robeson Community College

Partnership to increase the number of students transferring to and graduating from Carolina

 (Chapel Hill, N.C.—June 16, 2016) – The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s Carolina Student Transfer Excellence Program (C-STEP) and Robeson Community College (RCC) in Lumberton are partnering to increase the number of RCC students transferring to and graduating from UNC-Chapel Hill. With this agreement, RCC becomes the 10th North Carolina community college to partner with C-STEP and Carolina.

 

Through C-STEP, talented low and moderate income high school and community college students who enroll in one of the program’s partner colleges are guaranteed eventual admission to Carolina if they are admitted to and complete the community college portion of the program successfully.

 

“We are excited about our new partnership with C-STEP,” said Dr. Pamela Hilbert, Robeson Community College president. “This partnership will open new doors of opportunity for hard-working students, many of whom are from a diverse population, throughout Robeson County and help improve the prosperity of our community for years to come.”

 

“Carolina will be a better place because of the talents and perspectives brought by more students from Robeson County,” said Stephen Farmer, vice provost for enrollment and undergraduate admission. “We look forward to working with RCC to help students excel at Carolina, thrive here and ultimately graduate, thus achieving their goals of better lives for themselves and their families.”

 

Students invited to participate in C-STEP agree to earn an appropriate associate degree and participate actively in the program. While pursuing their associate degrees, C-STEP offers students special events, advising and transition and support services both at their home college and at Carolina. The program also provides transition and support services once students have enrolled at Carolina and are pursuing their bachelor degrees.

 

Now in its 10th year, the Carolina Student Transfer Excellence Program was launched with the support of the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation in an effort to enable more community-college students to transfer to and graduate from Carolina. Approximately 800 transfer students enter UNC-Chapel Hill annually, with about 25 percent coming from North Carolina community colleges.

 

C-STEP currently serves almost 580 students; 489 of those have already enrolled at Carolina and 271 have graduated. The remaining students are expected to enroll after completing their community college courses. The average C-STEP graduate GPA is 3.0 and the overall graduation rate is 79 percent (2016). Recent C-STEP graduates have become nurses, teachers, lawyers, university administrators and entrepreneurs following graduation.

 

Current partners include: Alamance Community College; Cape Fear Community College; Carteret Community College; Central Carolina Community College; Craven Community College; Durham Technical Community College; Fayetteville Technical Community College; Sandhills Community College; and Wake Technical Community College.

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 113 master’s, 68 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty – including two Nobel laureates – staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 308,000 alumni live in all 50 states and 150 countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

UNC-CH Admissions contact: Ashley Memory, (919) 843-2531, amemory@admissions.unc.edu

RCC contact: Dennis Watts, (910) 272-3369, dwatts@robeson.edu

Communications and Public Affairs contact: Michael John, (919) 445-8555, michael.john@unc.edu

 

 

 

Military Veterans attending Warrior-Scholar Project Academic Boot Camp at UNC-Chapel Hill

Military Veterans attending Warrior-Scholar Project Academic Boot Camp at UNC-Chapel Hill

Media invited to cover national program that aids enlisted servicemen and women transitioning from the military to four-year higher education opportunities

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.—June 6, 2016) – For the second year in a row, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is participating in the Warrior-Scholar Project (WSP), which is designed to help enlisted servicemen and women transition from the military to four-year higher education opportunities. WSP is hosting its one-week academic boot camp at Carolina from Sunday, June 5, through Saturday, June 11.

 

WSP attendees are enlisted veterans and transitioning service members who are enrolled or planning to enroll in or transfer into a four-year undergraduate program. Twenty WSP fellows are attending the academic boot camp at Carolina this year.

 

Members of the media are invited to cover the academic boot camp. Because of the intense schedule of classes, workshops, discussions and one-on-one tutoring sessions, media should coordinate an opportunity to cover the WSP program at Carolina with the Communications and Public Affairs contact listed on this media advisory.

 

WSP Background: The WSP launched its first program at Yale University in 2012 with nine participants. Since then, WSP has expanded to encompass 11 top schools, including Carolina. WSP boot camps consist of immersive academic preparation courses, assistance with academic reading and study techniques, personal advisement opportunities and one-on-one counselling that help enlisted military veterans who are returning to school and who have not been in a classroom setting for several years. The WSP has earned a track record of successfully assisting veterans in developing the skills and confidence necessary to pursue higher education opportunities.

 

Participation in the WSP is another way that the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill supports the military and its veterans.

 

-Carolina-

 

Communications and Public Affairs contact: Michael John, (919) 445-8555, michael.john@unc.edu

 

Media invited to attend event honoring former Gov. Jim Hunt as he receives inaugural lifetime award for service to North Carolina children and families

Not for publication

 

Media invited to attend event honoring former Gov. Jim Hunt as he receives inaugural lifetime award for service to North Carolina children and families

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— May 18, 2016) – Former North Carolina Gov. Jim Hunt will be honored on Monday, May 23, by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute (FPG) with its first-ever lifetime achievement award for public service for his work on behalf of children and families in North Carolina.

 

The event is open to the media and former Gov. Hunt and FPG director Sam Odom will be available to speak with the media. FPG director Sam Odom is also immediately available to speak with the media before the May 23 event about the significance of the lifetime achievement award and the 50th anniversary conference by contacting him by email or telephone: slodom@unc.edu  or (919) 966-4250.

 

Monday, May 23, schedule:

  • 8:20 p.m. – Media check in at the Carolina Club, George Watts Hill Alumni Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
  • 8:40 p.m. – Gov. Hunt will receive award Monday, May 23, followed by approximately 20-minute acceptance speech. The remarks will address the importance of high-quality care for the state’s youngest children and include a retrospective of the importance of early education in North Carolina.
  • 9:15 p.m. – FPG director Sam Odom and Gov. Hunt available to speak with media.

 

Location:

Carolina Club

George Watts Hill Alumni Center

550 Stadium Dr.

UNC-Chapel Hill

 

Media Parking: Parking is available at the Rams Head parking Deck (104 Ridge Road, Chapel Hill, NC 27514).

 

Media Contact: Dave Shaw, (919) 966-0871, Dave@unc.edu
 

To learn more about the conference, visit http://fpg.unc.edu/news/nc-foundations-join-forces-new-planning-conference-young-children. To learn more about FPG, visit http://fpg.unc.edu/

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 113 master’s, 68 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty – including two Nobel laureates – staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 308,000 alumni live in all 50 states and 150 countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

Former Gov. Hunt to receive lifetime achievement award for service to N.C. children and families

For immediate use

 Former Gov. Hunt to receive lifetime achievement award for service to N.C. children and families

Inaugural award recognizes exceptional dedication to public service

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C. – May 16, 2016) – Former North Carolina Gov. Jim Hunt will be honored by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute (FPG) with its first-ever lifetime achievement award for public service for his work on behalf of children and families in North Carolina. The special ceremony will take place on May 23 at the George Watts Hill Alumni Center.

 

The ceremony kicks off a two-day conference commemorating FPG’s 50th anniversary. The conference is designed to provide a new vision for the fields of child development and early education.

 

“Governor Hunt’s vision for our state’s Smart Start initiative has helped improve the quality of early learning in all 100 counties in North Carolina,” said FPG Director Sam Odom. “His service has benefited children of all ages and all abilities.”

 

During his acceptance speech, the former governor will discuss the importance of high-quality care for the state’s youngest children.

 

“I believe the Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute does the best work on child development in America,” said Hunt. “The institute was invaluable in the establishment of the North Carolina Smart Start program.”

 

Established under Hunt in 1993, the Smart Start initiative supports local nonprofit organizations across the state to help young children enter school healthy and prepared to succeed. Ron Haskins, senior fellow at Brookings Institution and former senior policy advisor to President George W. Bush, said Hunt relied on the field’s expertise to guide Smart Start.

 

“Research informed his decisions,” said Haskins, who serves on FPG’s executive leadership board. “Smart Start succeeded in part because of the FPG scientists who helped plan and lead it, and who evaluated it for a decade.”

 

During Hunt’s 16 years as the state’s chief executive, he created the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards, chaired the National Commission on Teaching and America’s Future, and worked with former FPG director Jim Gallagher and others to establish the North Carolina School of Science and Math. He also established a reading program in primary schools and put a full-time teaching assistant in every public classroom in grades one through three.

 

Odom said FPG is also commemorating its 50th anniversary by spearheading a groundbreaking conference May 24-25 that will bring experts to Chapel Hill to develop a strategic vision for the field. Major foundations across the state are backing the event.

 

“It’s an important and exciting time to work in early education and child development, especially in North Carolina,” said Odom. “With Smart Start and North Carolina’s pre-kindergarten program producing beneficial and persistent outcomes for young children, our state has the opportunity to remain a leader in early care and education.”

 

Hunt said North Carolina faced big challenges to make education the best it could be for all children in the state: “FPG’s work on early child care and education is crucial to our success.”

 

To learn more about the conference, visit http://fpg.unc.edu/news/nc-foundations-join-forces-new-planning-conference-young-children. To learn more about FPG, visit http://fpg.unc.edu/

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 113 master’s, 68 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty – including two Nobel laureates – staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 308,000 alumni live in all 50 states and 150 countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

FPG contact: Dave Shaw, (919) 966-0871, dave@unc.edu

Communications and Public Affairs contact: Michael John, (919) 445-8360, michael.john@unc.edu

Media invited to join UNC-Chapel Hill at celebration honoring next School of Education dean on April 26

Not for publication

 

Media invited to join UNC-Chapel Hill at celebration honoring next

School of Education dean on April 26

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— April 25, 2016) – Media are invited to join the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill for a celebration of its newly announced dean of the School of Education, Dr. Fouad Abd-El-Khalick, on Tuesday, April 26. Chancellor Carol L. Folt, Executive Vice Chancellor and Provost James W. Dean, Jr. and Dr. Abd-El-Khalick will address Carolina students, faculty, staff and university guests during the event, which will begin promptly at 1:00 p.m. in Hill Ballroom South at The Carolina Inn.

 

Abd-El-Khalick is currently the associate dean for research and research education in the College of Education at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He grew up in Lebanon, earning a bachelor of science degree in biology, a diploma in teaching secondary science and a Master of Arts in science education from the American University of Beirut. He came to the United States for graduate school, earning a doctorate in science education from Oregon State University in 1998.

 

Nationally recognized for his scholarship in science education research and innovation in education, Abd-El-Khalick is an award-winning teacher and serves as co-editor of the Journal of Research in Science Teaching and on the executive board of the National Association for Research in Science Teaching.

 

Tuesday, April 26

1:00 p.m.

The Carolina Inn

Hill Ballroom South

211 Pittsboro St.

Chapel Hill, North Carolina

 

Media Check-In: Media must check in no earlier than 12:30 p.m. at The Carolina Inn.  Jim Gregory (703-300-3350, jim.gregory@unc.edu) and Michael John (571-439-9317, michael.john@unc.edu) will be the on-site contacts.

 

Media Parking: A limited number of spaces will be available for media at The Carolina Inn. Contact Michael John (contact information below) by 11 a.m. on Tuesday, April 26, to reserve parking.

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 113 master’s, 68 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty – including two Nobel laureates – staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 308,000 alumni live in all 50 states and 150 countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

Communications and Public Affairs contact: Michael John, (919) 445-8360, michael.john@unc.edu

 

 

UNC-Chapel Hill Selects Barnes & Noble College to Manage UNC Student Stores

For immediate use

 

UNC-Chapel Hill Selects Barnes & Noble College to Manage UNC Student Stores

10-year, $30 million deal to quadruple contribution to need-based scholarships;
Deal retains all full-time employees; Expands Bull’s Head Bookshop

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C. – April 21, 2016) The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill has selected Barnes & Noble College Booksellers, a Barnes & Noble Education company (NYSE:BNED), to operate its UNC Student Stores. As part of a 10-year, $30 million agreement, all operations will transition on July 1, 2016, with the exception of the print shop and pharmacy, which the University will continue to operate. All 48 full-time staff members will maintain employment at their current salary either under Barnes & Noble College management or by remaining with UNC-Chapel Hill.

 

“Guaranteeing continued employment for existing staff, preserving the beloved qualities of Student Stores and significantly increasing the funds toward need-based scholarships are key elements of this partnership with Barnes & Noble College,” said Brad Ives, associate vice chancellor for campus enterprises. “We thank everyone at Student Stores for their service and commitment to the campus community and for their patience during our diligence process.”

 

Employees transitioning under Barnes & Noble College management are guaranteed employment for three years. Full-time staff who transition to new management and are within 18 months of their five-year state service mark or three years of their 30-year state service mark will remain on the UNC-Chapel Hill payroll until they meet those milestones. Staff members retained by UNC-Chapel Hill will be offered positions with comparable duties in other areas of the University.

 

Net proceeds from UNC Student Stores sales will continue to support need-based scholarships. Barnes & Noble College forecasts an annual payment to the university of more than $3 million, with a guaranteed minimum payment of $3 million annually for the first two years. After the university covers operating expenses, existing debt service of $800,000 annually and other support costs, the Student Stores expects to net out between $1.75 and $2 million, which will be contributed to need-based scholarships annually, quadrupling its recent contribution.

 

“Ensuring an affordable education for our students is a proud part of Carolina’s past and a cornerstone of our future,” said Shirley A. Ort, associate provost and director of scholarships and student aid and a member of the Student Stores Request for Proposals (RFP) Advisory Committee. “For decades, Student Stores has been a great partner in that effort by providing a vital source of scholarships for both undergraduate and graduate students, getting us to where we are today. For that we are enormously grateful, and to the staff who have also hired our students. But this plan for Student Stores will create millions of additional dollars in need-based scholarship funds for talented and deserving students – supplemental sources that we greatly need.”

 

The new design plans for UNC Student Stores include greater visibility for the Bull’s Head Bookshop, which will retain its name and move to larger space on the top floor. The new Bull’s Head Bookshop will stock 70,000 titles, more than double the current offerings, and continue to feature books by university faculty. The renovations will also include a gathering area for book talks and signings.

 

“The ideas for the Bull’s Head are remarkable and very consistent with what we heard people say they wanted,” said Ives. “Barnes & Noble agreed that the bookshop was underutilized, and they have plans to re-imagine it while preserving its local vibe that this campus has come to know and love.”

 

Financial terms of the agreement include:

  • $3.8 million to update and expand existing retail space and another $200,000 for technology.
  • $1 million signing bonus, which will go to need-based student scholarships.
  • $25,000 for annual textbook scholarships.

Other key terms include:

  • Maintaining the UNC Student Stores name without Barnes & Noble branding.
  • Offering a 10-percent discount on new and used textbooks for UNC-Chapel Hill students plus a price-match guarantee against national vendors.
  • Hiring a similar number of student employees at salaries comparable to their current pay.
  • Managing the UNC Student Stores website to deliver an innovative online shopping experience.
  • Establishing a UNC Student Stores advisory board, consisting of students, faculty and staff, to provide input on store programs, merchandise and services.
  • Expanding the coffee shop to include a large seating area on the main floor.

 

In January, the university issued an RFP to examine the possibility of third-party management of UNC Student Stores to address declining sales and increase the financial contribution to scholarships. Revenue has declined by more than 15 percent since 2007 and remained flat for the last five years.

 

“As a result of the overall declining sales and margins, contributions to scholarships have been inconsistent from year to year,” said Ives. “This inconsistency, combined with the rising cost of tuition, means we have not been able to keep pace with the growing need for scholarship funds, and we needed to explore other avenues.”

 

The university received and reviewed proposals in response to the RFP. Six firms and the management of the UNC Student Stores presented their proposals to a 13-member advisory committee, representing faculty, staff and students. The proposal from Barnes & Noble College received the committee’s unanimous endorsement.

 

“We are grateful to the advisory committee, which represented a cross section of the campus community and brought diverse perspectives about the Student Stores,” added Ives. “They really cared about making the right decision for Carolina.”

 

“We’re thrilled to partner with UNC-Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university,” said Max J. Roberts, Chief Executive Officer of Barnes & Noble College. “We’re looking forward to delivering an innovative retail experience and dynamic digital learning environment that supports the university’s superior quality and affordable academic programs. This complete support system will help nurture student success and serve the entire Carolina community.”

 

Barnes & Noble College operates bookstores at nearly 750 U.S. colleges and universities; 25 of those are in North Carolina, including four at other UNC system schools.

 

-Carolina-

 

Media/Video link: https://youtu.be/oqJCkUAPWBs

Fact sheet link: https://www.unc.edu/files/2016/04/UNC-Student-Stores-fact-sheet.pdf

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 113 master’s, 68 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty – including two Nobel laureates – staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 308,000 alumni live in all 50 states and 150 countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

About Barnes & Noble College

Barnes & Noble College, a Barnes & Noble Education company (NYSE:BNED), is a leading operator of college bookstores in the United States. Barnes & Noble College currently operates 748 campus bookstores and the school-branded e-commerce sites for each store, serving more than 5 million college students and faculty nationwide. As a strategic partner, Barnes & Noble College is committed to offering a complete support system and an unmatched retail and digital learning experience to foster student success in higher education.

 

General information on Barnes & Noble College can be obtained on the company’s website: www.bncollege.com.

 

UNC-Chapel Hill Division of Finance and Administration contact: Allison Reid, (919) 962-6288, allison_reid@unc.edu

Communications and Public Affairs contact: Jim Gregory, (919) 445-8555, jim.gregory@unc.edu

Fouad Abd-El-Khalick named new dean of UNC-CH School of Education

For immediate use

 

Fouad Abd-El-Khalick named new dean of UNC-CH School of Education

 

Researcher in state-of-the-art science content, nature of science and instructional approaches at K-12 level to lead one of Carolina’s oldest professional schools

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— April 18, 2016) – The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill today announced that Fouad Abd-El-Khalick has been selected as the new dean for the School of Education, one of the oldest professional schools at Carolina. He is currently the associate dean for research and research education in the College of Education at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC).

 

 

“We are pleased to welcome Fouad Abd-El-Khalick as the dean of the School of Education,” said Executive Vice Chancellor and Provost James W. Dean Jr. “He brings outstanding global experience as a science education scholar, award-winning teacher and leader of diversified partnerships tackling complex educational issues. We are certain his contributions at UNC-Chapel Hill will greatly enrich the lives of the students, faculty and staff in our School of Education and across campus.”

 

 

Abd-El-Khalick has been at UIUC since 2000, where he is the Grayce Wicall Gauthier Professor of Education. He has published extensively in science education and is an award-winning teacher. His research focuses on the teaching and learning about the nature of science in grades K-12, and in preservice and in-service science teacher education settings. He has helped develop and lead partnerships involving UIUC and other universities, local school districts and others to improve the practice of science teaching.

 

 

The University appointment, effective July 1, was approved by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s Board of Trustees. He succeeds Bill McDiarmid, who served as dean from 2009 to the end of 2015, leading the school as it built new academic programs, increased diversity among its faculty and prepared for a capital campaign. Deborah Eaker-Rich, senior associate dean and chief academic officer for the School of Education, has served as interim dean since January.

 

 

“Serving as dean provides a unique opportunity to work alongside a large group of talented and committed faculty, staff, students, alumni and leaders both within the School of Education and across the UNC-Chapel Hill campus and beyond to address issues that are of critical importance to the wellbeing of the state, nation and the globe,” Abd-El-Khalick said.

 

 

Abd-El-Khalick grew up in Lebanon, earning a bachelor of science degree in biology, a diploma in teaching secondary science and a Master of Arts in science education from the American University of Beirut. He came to the United States for graduate school, earning a doctorate in science education from Oregon State University in 1998.

 

 

After earning his doctorate, Abd-El-Khalick spent two years on the faculty at the American University of Beirut in the Department of Education before joining UIUC. Abd-El-Khalick serves as co-editor of the Journal of Research in Science Teaching and serves on the executive board of the National Association for Research in Science Teaching (NARST).

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 113 master’s, 68 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty – including two Nobel laureates – staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 308,000 alumni live in all 50 states and 150 countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

School of Education contact: Mike Hobbs, (919) 962-8687, michael_hobbs@unc.edu

Communications and Public Affairs contact: Michael John, (919) 445-8360, michael.john@unc.edu

 

 

 

UNC-Chapel Hill rated among top 10 national public universities for African Americans

For immediate use

 

 

UNC-Chapel Hill rated among top 10 national public universities for African Americans

MONEY and Essence magazines’ analyzed more than 1,500 schools to single out the 50 best

 

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— April 14, 2016) – The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill – a top public research university with a strong focus on access and affordability and high graduation rates – ranks ninth among the nation’s best public universities for African Americans, according to MONEY and Essence magazines. The publications collaborated to analyze more than 1,500 four-year colleges and universities to single out the ones that offer the best value for African-American students.

 

 

To determine the 50 Best Schools for African Americans, the methodology focused on colleges and universities that offer both high value and a supportive environment measuring factors including graduation rates, affordability, earnings potential and representation. Among both national public and private institutions of higher education, Carolina ranked 22nd overall.

 

 

We are pleased to be acknowledged as one of the top institutions of higher education for African American students,” said Taffye Benson Clayton, associate vice chancellor for Diversity and Multicultural Affairs and chief diversity officer. “As the nation’s first public university, with a distinct southern history and a global footprint, we are gratified by the growth and important milestones achieved in matters of race, diversity and inclusion at Carolina. We are encouraged by this recognition and aspire to accomplish even greater successes for African American students and all students on our campus.”

 

 

U.S. News and World Report has ranked Carolina in the top five of national public universities for 15 consecutive years and Kiplinger’s Personal Finance has ranked the university first among the 100 best U.S. public colleges and universities that offer high-quality academics at an affordable price 15 times. The University also features 325 study abroad programs in 70 countries and it ranks among the nation’s most successful public universities in attracting research funding from federal agencies.

 

 

Additionally, Carolina provides outstanding access and affordability through signature programs like Carolina Covenant, UNC-Chapel Hill’s over a decade-long promise to low-income youth who earn admission that they can graduate debt-free with help from grants, scholarships and work-study jobs.

 

 

The university’s Carolina Firsts program has also created a pathway of opportunity for the almost 20 percent of UNC-Chapel Hill undergraduates who are the first in their family to attend college.

 

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 113 master’s, 68 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty – including two Nobel laureates – staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 308,000 alumni live in all 50 states and 150 countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

Communications and Public Affairs contact: Michael John, (919) 445-8360, michael.john@unc.edu

MONEY contact: Kelsey Rohwer, (212) 522-2401, kelsey.rohwer@timeinc.com