UNC-Chapel Hill releases response to NCAA’s third notice of allegations

For immediate use

 

UNC-Chapel Hill releases response to NCAA’s third notice of allegations

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C. – May 25, 2017) – The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill has released its response to the NCAA’s third notice of allegations resulting from the joint investigation of past academic irregularities.

 

The response, submitted May 16, was posted on the Carolina Commitment website after a review to protect privacy rights. Also posted was a public copy of exhibits accompanying the response and recent correspondence to and from the NCAA in response to public records requests.

 

“We are prepared and look forward to presenting our case to the Committee on Infractions,” said Chancellor Carol L. Folt. “Bringing closure to this process will be an important step for our University. The expansive reforms and initiatives now in place at Carolina reflect the academic values of a community that I am proud to lead.”

 

“We sent the NCAA a full and detailed response,” said Bubba Cunningham, director of athletics. “Our reply to each allegation is based on the NCAA’s constitution and member-adopted bylaws. We expect the Committee on Infractions to consistently apply those bylaws as the case moves forward.”

 

Last October, the University participated in a procedural hearing before the NCAA’s Committee on Infractions. Following the hearing, the panel requested the NCAA’s enforcement staff to revisit the second notice of allegations issued in April 2016. The enforcement staff issued its third notice of allegations in December 2016.

 

The University received the NCAA’s first notice of allegations in May 2015. The NCAA notified the University in June 2014 that it would reopen its original 2011 examination of the past academic irregularities. The case was paused in August 2015 when the University notified the NCAA it had identified new information requiring further review.

 

The next steps in the NCAA’s process for the University include a hearing before the Committee on Infractions scheduled later this summer. The committee typically issues a report several weeks after the hearing.

 

Under the leadership of Folt, who took office in 2013, Carolina has been extraordinarily proactive in accepting all responsibility for its past, working diligently to get to the bottom of these issues, restoring trust, and implementing more than 70 wide-ranging reforms and initiatives. In 2016, the University demonstrated compliance with all academic accreditation principles and standards of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges (SACSCOC) following a yearlong probation.

 

NCAA Bylaw 19.03.01 requires that all infractions-related information remain confidential throughout the infractions process. Consistent with NCAA protocol, University officials will not comment on details about the case until it is completed.

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 110 master’s, 64 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s 318,000-plus alumni live in all 50 states and 157 other countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

Issued by: Joel Curran, vice chancellor for communications
Office of Communications Contact: (919) 445-8555, mediarelations@unc.edu

$18 million gift will transform entrepreneurship at UNC-Chapel Hill

For immediate use

 

$18 million gift will transform entrepreneurship at UNC-Chapel Hill

 

Shuford family gift will add faculty, internship support to help meet demand for popular minor in the College of Arts & Sciences

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— May 23, 2017) – The family of a fifth-generation North Carolina company has made an $18 million gift to the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s College of Arts & Sciences to more than double the size of Carolina’s nationally recognized undergraduate entrepreneurship program.

 

The gift commitment from the Shuford family of Hickory is the largest single one-time gift by a living individual or family to the college. It will help meet the demand of students who want to enroll in entrepreneurship courses or the minor in entrepreneurship through the addition of faculty. It will also support twice the number of student internships at entrepreneurial firms worldwide and will encourage problem-based learning throughout the college and University.

 

The minor in entrepreneurship will be named the Shuford Program in Entrepreneurship in the family’s honor.

 

“This is an extraordinary gift for our University. We are so grateful to the Shuford family for making possible a major expansion of what is a core pillar of Carolina’s strategic vision for the next decade,” said Chancellor Carol L. Folt. “The new Shuford Program in Entrepreneurship expands our efforts in innovation and entrepreneurship across the College and provides many new interdisciplinary, immersive and experiential learning opportunities for Carolina’s bright students.”

 

The Shuford gift will create three additional entrepreneurs-in-residence and up to four faculty fellows, and will create up to 70 student internships and a lecture series on innovation and entrepreneurship. Funds will also endow the program’s executive director and internship director positions. In partnership with the Shuford Program, the college will provide support for at least three additional full-time faculty members, an entrepreneur-in-residence and an administrative staff position.

 

The Shufords are a fifth-generation Carolina family – Abel Alexander Shuford Jr. was a member of the class of 1900. His great-grandchildren, sibilings Jim Shuford and Stephen Shuford, of Charlotte, and Dorothy Shuford Lanier, of Bedford, New York, also Carolina alumni, made the gift to Carolina. Jim, CEO of STM Industries, received his undergraduate degree from Carolina in 1988 followed by his MBA in 1992; Stephen, CEO of Shurtape Technologies, earned his MBA from Kenan-Flagler Business School in 1997; and Dorothy earned her undergraduate degree from Carolina in 1993.

 

“I think entrepreneurship is a big part of the future of work,” said Jim Shuford. “The skills of entrepreneurial thinking and problem-solving are a natural fit for the liberal arts.”

 

Jim was an English major as an undergraduate at Carolina before returning to earn his MBA. He recognizes that many students who want to launch a business or venture may not have the luxury of additional schooling.

 

“An entrepreneurial education will give Carolina undergraduates a leg up — to find a job, start a company, grow a business, or be a productive member of any organization or enterprise,” he said.

 

Created in 2004, Carolina’s minor in entrepreneurship was the signature program of the Carolina Entrepreneurial Initiative, established with a $3.5 million grant from the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation. The minor has grown exponentially and currently has more than 250 students enrolled. More than 800 students have graduated from Carolina with a minor in entrepreneurship.

 

“The Shuford family’s gift for entrepreneurship is a game-changer,” said Kevin Guskiewicz, dean of the College of Arts & Sciences. “The Shuford Program in Entrepreneurship at Carolina is unique to any entrepreneurship program in the country because rather than teaching only business students how to become more entrepreneurial, it also teaches students of music and art, physics, anthropology, exercise and sport science, sociology and many other disciplines how to work collaboratively with an entrepreneurial mindset.”

 

Students pursuing the minor follow one of nine tracks – artistic, commercial, computer science, design, media, scientific, social, sport or public health – and must complete an internship.

 

In March, The Princeton Review ranked Carolina’s undergraduate entrepreneurship programs 14th in the nation (rankings encompass entrepreneurial offerings at both UNC Kenan-Flagler and the college). In 2015, UNC-Chapel Hill received the Entrepreneurial University Award for excellence in student engagement and curriculum innovation from the Deshpande Foundation.

 

Braden Rawls, an early graduate of the program in entrepreneurship, is now CEO of Vital Plan, an herbal supplement company based in Cary, that she founded with her physician father. The company’s 12 employees include six Carolina alumni.

 

“Growing up in a family of doctors and scientists, I had not been exposed to business as a career path. Through the minor in entrepreneurship, I was able to test it out and discovered I had a true knack for creatively solving problems through business, and it complemented the skills I was developing in the journalism school,” said Rawls. “My thinking has changed ever since, and the minor provided me with training and resources that have led me to become a leader in the Triangle’s B Corp network, a business community focused on maximizing a triple bottom line of people, planet and profit.”

 

Charles Merritt, executive director of the minor in entrepreneurship, described the Shuford family gift as “transformative.”

 

“It will accelerate several key initiatives for the program,” said Merritt, “from adding more entrepreneurs-in-residence and instructors to meeting increasing demand for our courses and providing additional support for our internship and career placement efforts.”

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 113 master’s, 68 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 318,000 alumni live in all 50 states and 157 countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

About Shurtape

Shurtape was created in 1955 as a division of Shuford Mills, a textile firm established in 1880. With more than 800 employees in North Carolina and manufacturing and distribution facilities in eight countries, the company produces adhesive tapes under the Shurtape, Duck, FrogTape, T-Rex and Kip brands.

 

University Communications contact: MC VanGraafeiland, (919) 962-7090, mc.vangraafeiland@unc.edu

Innovate Carolina Roadmap report: UNC-Chapel Hill achieves unprecedented growth in impact from innovation and entrepreneurship

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Innovate Carolina Roadmap report: UNC-Chapel Hill achieves unprecedented growth in impact from innovation and entrepreneurship

 

Roadmap strategy transforms research into practical benefit, accelerates the launch of entrepreneurs and new ventures in North Carolina and beyond

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— May 22, 2017) – The number of innovations, entrepreneurs and ventures developed by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill – and the speed of their creation – is showing unprecedented growth, according to a new report by the Office of Vice Chancellor for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Economic Development.

 

The Innovate Carolina Roadmap reports significant societal and economic benefits to the University, the state of North Carolina and the world thanks to a faster pipeline of ideas and the Innovate Carolina ecosystem, which provides a network for all schools and units to work together to advance important outcomes.

 

“Through focused work and pan-university dedication, Carolina is inspiring, developing and mentoring the next generation of innovators and entrepreneurs,” said Chancellor Carol L. Folt. “I have witnessed students, faculty and staff working together like never before to create new jobs and fields that capture imaginations and help improve our state, nation and world. This perfectly aligns with our commitment to ensure our graduates are prepared to face a certain-uncertain future as part of the Innovation Generation.”

 

The report highlights Carolina’s results and next steps in implementing its innovation and entrepreneurship strategy, which includes applying research to real-world problems, preparing students with a translational mindset and skillset to enhance their career success and creating social and commercial startups.

 

Since the initiation of this strategy in 2010, the Innovate Carolina network has collaborated to:

  • Gain stronger outcomes from the commercialization of research-based intellectual property. In comparing the five-year roadmap period to the prior five years, disclosures of ideas by faculty are up 23 percent, patents issued are up 47 percent, the number of new IP-based startups more than doubled and revenue is up 73 percent.
  • Develop KickStart Venture Services, which has provided $1.8 million in awards to 56 intellectual property-based startups since 2009. These companies then raised $20 million in SBIR/STTR grants and $137 million in total funding.
  • Create the $10 million Carolina Research Ventures Fund in 2015. Managed by Hatteras Venture Partners, there have been three investments in startups that have raised more than $115 million in investment capital.
  • Open Launch Chapel Hill in 2013, an accelerator in downtown Chapel Hill. It has worked with 63 companies that have raised $15 million in investment capital and created more than 1,000 jobs, 250 of which are in Orange County, N.C. Three companies have had successful exits.
  • Launch the Carolina Angel Network, which in only six months has 90 members, triple the projected number.
  • Work across boundaries to jumpstart and strengthen convergent disciplines such as applied physical sciences and biomedical engineering. Makerspaces are now available across campus, with a new residence hall-based space opening this fall.

 

The Innovate Carolina Startups Database was created in 2014 to measure the impact of these social and commercial projects. This comprehensive, longitudinal database, which is also used for research purposes by Carolina faculty, houses detailed data on 418 companies started between 1958 and today. Data analysis since 2015 shows that the total revenue of the companies still in operation is in the billions, and the overwhelming majority of these businesses are headquartered in North Carolina. This includes Quintiles, which was started in 1982 by then UNC-Chapel Hill faculty member Dennis Gillings.

 

The roadmap report also details how UNC’s Board of Trustees, administration, deans, chairs, faculty, staff, students, alumni, parents and the community have partnered to ensure the University is well positioned to help solve some of the biggest challenges facing the world today.

 

“The work of the roadmap became a journey of ideas. Engrained in our DNA is the belief we must remain relevant – not only in preparing our students with a translational mindset and skillset for the workforce, but also to serve our society with forward-thinking ideas,” says Judith Cone, Vice Chancellor for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Economic Development. “Working through the roadmap sparked a sweeping re-invention of the University across many fronts, helping us better serve our fast-changing society.”

 

To accomplish the roadmap’s goals and strategies, Innovate Carolina will continue to systematically work to bring together key groups from across the University and community with different perspectives and experiences.

 

“Over the last five years, leaders have stepped forward from every part of the University, region and state to pilot and prove that this collaborative approach to innovation works,” says Cone. “Now, it’s time to build and expand on these successes.”

 

Click on the following links to view the full report and the executive summary.

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 110 master’s, 64 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s 318,000-plus alumni live in all 50 states and 157 other countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

About Innovate Carolina

Through the Vice Chancellor’s Office for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Economic Development, Innovate Carolina is UNC-Chapel Hill’s innovation ecosystem that supports the needs of faculty, students, staff, and community members as they translate their unique ideas into practical benefit for the public good. Follow Innovate Carolina on Facebook and on Twitter and visit http://innovate.unc.edu/.

 

Office of Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Economic Development contact: Michelle Bolas, at 919.843.6287, michelle.bolas@unc.edu

University Communications contact: MC VanGraafeiland, (919) 962-7090, mc.vangraafeiland@unc.edu

Carolina Performing Arts announces 2017-2018 season and the opening of CURRENT ArtSpace + Studio at Carolina Square

For immediate use

 

Carolina Performing Arts announces 2017-2018 season and the opening of

CURRENT ArtSpace + Studio at Carolina Square

 

(Chapel Hill, NC – May 17, 2017) – In addition to presenting 60 performances by 35 internationally renowned and emerging performers, the 13th season of Carolina Performing Arts (CPA) at the University of North Carolina will also feature the opening of CURRENT ArtSpace + Studio, a new, interactive, immersive space in downtown Chapel Hill.

 

Important announcements and themes for the 2017-2018 season include:

 

Opening of CURRENT ArtSpace + Studio – February 2018

CPA’s latest artistic venture, CURRENT ArtSpace + Studio, located in the new Carolina Square development off West Franklin Street, will serve as the physical and intellectual home for CPA’s world-class artists-in-residence to collaborate with faculty, students and the community. Programming at the nearly 7,000 square-foot facility will feature immersive and co-creative arts experiences, including interactive theater and time-based arts installations. More information is available at www.currentunc.org. Performances scheduled for the inaugural season are:

 

Feb. 2-5             “Sound Maze” | Paul Dresher Ensemble

Feb. 19               “We are Gob Squad and So are You” | Gob Squad

Feb. 23 & 24      “Revolution Now!” | Gob Squad

Apr. 7                 Boots Riley and The Coup

Apr. 11-15         “The Fever” | 600 Highwaymen

May 5-6             “Farfalle” | Compagnia TPO

 

“CURRENT ArtSpace + Studio will offer a unique chance for students, faculty and staff to interact with visiting artists and represent Carolina’s commitment to using the arts as a way to further our research and teaching mission and to serve our hometown, our state and the world,” said Chancellor Carol L. Folt.

 

CPA executive and artistic director Emil J. Kang envisions CURRENT ArtSpace + Studio as an incubator for artists and audiences to co-create experiences and to serve as the home for its artists-in-residence.

 

“These shared experiences will be immersive, interactive and intimate, all qualities that resonate with our desire to bring artists and audiences closer together,” said Kang.

 

Reimagining the Artist’s Role on Campus

The new season will also reflect CPA’s growing focus on broadening and deepening its long-term artist relationships and their relationships with the community. Through its first ever Andrew W. Mellon Foundation DisTil Fellowship program and The Nannerl O. Keohane Distinguished Visiting Professorship program, CPA will increase the number and length of its artist residencies, structure formal academic and community partnerships and offer audiences opportunities to engage with artists on multiple platforms.

 

“Our commitment to integrating the work of our world-class artists into the academic lifeblood of the University is rooted in the strong belief that the arts are uniquely qualified to communicate across social and cultural barriers, thus fostering the understanding of and empathy for different points of view and ways of life,” said Kang.

 

The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation DisTil Fellowship (Discovery Through Iterative Learning) invites artists to Carolina’s campus to collaborate with students and faculty in a department outside their own area of expertise, providing them the opportunity to gain new insights into questions they have been asking about their work and the world. DisTil Fellows bring the unique approach of the arts to faculty and students, helping them look at their own work through a new lens and will also share the results of their ideas and discussions with the wider community. The 2017-18 DisTil Fellows are:

 

  • Singer-songwriter Toshi Reagon, whose commitment to social consciousness and supporting communities will see her collaborate with the Department of City & Regional Planning in the College of Arts and Sciences to gain insight into their work studying the impacts of the environment, social policy, government decisions and healthcare on communities.
  • Installation artist and puppeteer Robin Frohardt, whose performance and installation experiences spur audiences to rethink our world. She has already begun work with the Department of Archeology in the College of Arts and Sciences on the emergence of plastic as relic and will continue to explore UNC faculty research on the impact of plastic bags in our environment, new ideas to lessen their impact on our future, and how archeologists study containers and remnants from the past.

 

The Nannerl O. Keohane Visiting Professorship is a joint program of the Provosts at UNC-Chapel Hill and Duke University. This is the first year artists have been included in this program. The Professorship brings scholars to both campuses for a series of residencies, with the mission to advance social engagement and innovation programs and inspire students and faculty to consider how their work can improve our communities. The 2017-18 Keohane Visiting Professors are:

 

  • Musician and writer Jace Clayton, also known for his work as DJ/rupture. Clayton uses an interdisciplinary approach to focus on how sound; memory and public space interact, with an emphasis on low-income communities and the global South. He will participate in the Duke FHI Social Practice Lab and collaborate with Carolina and Duke faculty and students to create new tools and performances that stretch across academic disciplines and cultural traditions.
  • Muralist Nina Chanel Abney, whose work touches on narratives on politics, race, homophobia, celebrity, consumerism and other challenging topics. She will connect with faculty in art, law and social work and with Campus Y students to discuss needs and interests in the community, and collaborate with local organizations to create a public mural in Chapel Hill.

 

 Artists Defying Classification

CPA presents artists who innovative and multidimensional work expands beyond the boundaries of traditional genre labels. The season kicks off Sept. 7 with Ghanaian global fusionist Jojo Abot, who combines Afrobeat, jazz, reggae and electronica with fashion, film, literature and performance art. In November, Big Dance Theater presents 17C, a CPA co-commissioned work, inspired by the exhaustive and eccentric 17th century diary of Samuel Pepys, which mirrors today’s social media obsession through a fascinating and wickedly funny combination of theatre and dance.

 

Chamber Music Redfined

Building on the success of its opening season in the newly renovated Moeser Auditorium, CPA will present artists working at the leading edge of innovation in chamber music. Attacca Quartet and Spektral Quartet are devoted to commissioning and performing new work; cellist Katinka Kleijn, of the Chicago Symphony Orchestras and International Contemporary Ensemble collaborates with Chicago Symphony Orchestra composer-in-residence Samuel Adams in a recital of new music for cello and electronics; and Baroque Orchestration X (B.O.X.) collaborates with Antwerp-based indie rockers Dez Mona to create a shimmering modern song cycle called Saga which explores themes of home and memory against a delicate Baroque soundscape.

 

Additional Season Highlights

Season highlights include a fully staged production of the opera “Cold Mountain,” written by Pulitzer Prize-winner composer Jennifer Higdon, based on the best-selling novel by Carolina alumnus Charles Frazier presented in collaboration with North Carolina Opera, Octavia E. Butler’s “Parable of a Sower,” a new opera based on the epic novel of the same name, with music and lyrics by Toshi Reagon and Bernice Johnson Reagon, which blends science fiction and African American spiritualism; the return of three CPA friends: Academy of St. Martin in the Fields led by music director and violinist Joshua Bell, who will also perform the Beethoven Violin Concerto, two performances by the Chicago Symphony Orchestra with music director Riccardo Muti; and two nights with Broadway superstar Audra McDonald.

 

Other CPA favorites include pianist András Schiff, bluegrass band Steep Canyon Rangers, Galician bagpiper Cristina Pato, Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater, Nederlands Dans Theater, banjo virtuoso Abigail Washburn, singer/songwriter Tift Merritt, Cloud Gate Dance Theater of Taiwan, Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra with Wynton Marsalis and Carolina Ballet’s “The Nutcracker.”

 

Single tickets and subscriptions go on sale to the general public on June 7. More details on the 2017-18 season, including ticket information, digital brochure and artist profiles is available at www.carolinaperformingarts.org. Details on CPA’s CURRENT ArtSpace + Studio is available at www.currentunc.org.

 

COMPELTE 2017-18 SEASON

 

September

Sept. 7                                  Jojo Abot

Sept. 28 & Oct. 1                   “Cold Mountain”

October

Oct. 10                                   Pedja Mužijević, piano

Oct. 25                                   András Schiff, piano

November

Nov. 2                                    China National Centre for the Performing Arts Orchestra, Lu Jia, chief conductor, Ning Feng, violin, Gautier Cupocon, cello

Nov. 3                                    Christina Pato Quartet

Nov. 6                                    Spektral Quartet

Nov. 9 & 10                            “17c” | Big Dance Theater

Nov. 16 & 17                          Octavia E. Butler’s “Parable of the Sower”

December

Dec. 2 & 3                              “The Nutcracker” | Carolina Ballet

Dec. 7                                    Khatia Buniatishvili, piano

Dec. 9                                    Big Band Holidays | Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra with Wynton Marsalis

January

Jan. 12 & 13                            Steep Canyon Rangers

Jan. 18                                   “Saga” | Dez Mona and B.O.X

Jan. 22                                   Isabel Leonard, mezzo-soprano

Jan. 30 & 31                           Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater

February

Feb. 2-5                                 “Sound Maze” | Paul Dresher Ensemble*

Feb. 13                                  Attacca Quartet

Feb. 15                                  Ambrose Akinmusire Quartet

Feb. 16 & 17                          Chicago Symphony Orchestra with Riccardo Muti. music director, Clementine Margaine, mezzo-soprano

Feb. 18                                  Katinka Kleijn, cello and Samuel Adams, electronics

Feb. 19                                  “We are Gob Squad and So are You” | Gob Squad

Feb. 23 & 24                          “Revolution Now!” | Gob Squad

March

Mar. 2 & 3                              Audra McDonald

Mar. 6                                    “Formosa” | Cloud Gate Dance Theatre of Taiwan

Mar. 20                                  Academy of St. Martin in the Fields, Joshua Bell, music director

Mar. 22                                  Abigail Washburn and Wu Fei

Mar. 23                                  “Del and Woody” | Del McCoury Band

Mar. 25                                  Lawrence Brownlee, tenor

Mar. 28 & 29                          Nederlands Dans Theater

April

Apr. 4                                     Daymé Arocena

Apr. 7                                     Boots Riley and The Coup

Apr. 11-15                              “The Fever” | 600 Highwaymen

Apr. 20                                   Tift Merritt

May

May 5-6                                 “Farfalle” | Compagnia TPO

 

*Denotes the opening of CURRENT ArtSpace + Studio

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 113 master’s, 68 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 318,000 alumni live in all 50 states and 157 countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

About Carolina Performing Arts

The mission of Carolina Performing Arts (CPA) is to enrich lives by creating and presenting exceptional arts experiences and connecting them to the UNC community and beyond. Established in 2005 at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, CPA presents the very best from the full spectrum of the performing arts: internationally renowned recitalists and orchestras, chamber ensembles, jazz, folk, and world music artists, dance and theater. CPA strives to nurture artistic innovation and the development of new works on and off campus; to challenge and inspire audiences with powerful and transformative performances; and to integrate the arts into the life of the University, embracing its mission of teaching, research and public service.

 

Carolina Performing Arts contact: Mark Z. Nelson, (919) 966-3834, mark_nelson@unc.edu

Communications and Public Affairs contact: MC VanGraafeiland, (919) 962-7090, mc.vangraafeiland@unc.edu

Media invited to cover College of Arts & Sciences major donation announcement on May 23

Not for publication

 

Media invited to cover College of Arts & Sciences major donation announcement on May 23

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— May 17, 2017) – Media are invited to join the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill for an announcement of the largest single one-time gift by a living individual or family received by the College of Arts & Sciences. Donated by the family of a fifth-generation North Carolina company, the gift will more than double the size of a nationally recognized undergraduate program within the College and provide invaluable support for additional faculty and student internships.

 

Chancellor Carol L. Folt, Dean of the College of Arts & Sciences Kevin Guskiewicz and the donors, who are from Charlotte/Hickory and Bedford, New York, will participate in the presentation and be available for interviews afterward. University leaders, College of Arts & Sciences administrators and staff and important figures in the business community will also attend. The event will begin promptly at 1 p.m.

 

Tuesday, May 23

1 p.m.

Gardner Hall, courtyard (adjacent to Carroll Hall and Hanes Hall on Polk Place)

UNC-Chapel Hill campus

Chapel Hill, North Carolina

 

Media Check-In: Media must check in at the Gardner Hall tent no earlier than 12:30 p.m. MC VanGraafeiland will be the on-site contact (646-345-2802).

 

Parking: A limited number of spaces will be available for media representatives in lots near Gardner Hall. Contact MC VanGraafeiland (mc.vangraafeiland@unc.edu) by 4 p.m. on Monday, May 22, to reserve parking.

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill



The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 110 master’s, 64 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s 318,000-plus alumni live in all 50 states and 157 other countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

Communications and Public Affairs contact: MC VanGraafeiland, (919) 962-7090, mc.vangraafeiland@unc.edu

 

UNC-Chapel Hill alumni association honors three for outstanding service

For immediate use

 

UNC-Chapel Hill alumni association honors three for outstanding service

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— May 16, 2017) – The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill General Alumni Association (GAA) honored Carolina undergraduate admissions director and two alumni who have drawn on their business experience to support the University and the association.

 

Recipients of the 2017 Distinguished Service Medals are Stephen Farmer, vice provost for enrollment and undergraduate admissions; Michael Kennedy, senior client partner with Korn Ferry International, an executive search and development firm; and Sallie Krawcheck, CEO and co-founder of the investment firm Ellevest.

 

The medals were presented on May 13 at the GAA’s Annual Alumni Luncheon during spring reunion weekend. Since 1978, the association has awarded the medals to alumni and others who have provided outstanding service to the GAA or the University.

 

Farmer, of Carrboro, came to UNC-Chapel Hill in 2000 as senior associate director of admissions and was promoted to vice provost in 2004. For more than a decade, Carolina has seen annual increases in the number of applications and has admitted more students who are the first in their families to go to college, more international students and more students of color.

 

Farmer has founded two nationally recognized programs: Carolina College Advising Corps, which sends UNC alumni into underserved high schools to guide eligible students through the college admissions and financial aid process; and the Carolina Student Transfer Excellence Program, which creates a path for community college students to transfer to Carolina. He was also a key figure in launching Thrive@Carolina, which aims to boost graduation rates by coordinating student support services. In 2010, Farmer received the University’s C. Knox Massey Distinguished Service Award.

 

Kennedy, of Atlanta – who graduated from Carolina in 1979, sits on the Federal Retirement Thrift Investment Board and had a previous career in investment and banking — has consulted with the University on high profile hiring. He also held leadership roles in some of the University’s major fundraising efforts, including the Bicentennial and the Carolina First campaigns, and will play a key role in the campaign launching this fall.

 

While expanding minority giving to the University as a member of the National Steering Committee of the Carolina First Campaign, Kennedy established and chaired the Minority Alumni Committee that increased diversity on University advisory boards. The Carolina American Indian Center came out of the committee, and Kennedy has since organized the Alumni Committee on Racial and Ethnic Diversity, which he co-chairs. He received the Harvey Beech Outstanding Alumni Award, given in 2009 by the GAA-sponsored Black Alumni Reunion, and the William Richardson Davie Award in 2014 from UNC’s Board of Trustees.

 

Krawcheck, of New York, a Morehead Scholar who graduated from Carolina in 1987, held top posts at financial firms Smith Barney, Citi and Merrill Lynch before launching Ellevate, a global professional women’s network, and Ellevest, which focuses on investing for women. She recently published a book, “Own It,” on career management for women.

 

Krawcheck has served on the UNC Board of Visitors, the UNC Foundation Investment Board and the Global Leadership Council, and contributed to committees focused on investments, global leadership and development. A member of the Morehead-Cain Central Selection Committee periodically since 2001, she has been the keynote speaker at the foundation’s finalists banquet and its alumni forum. Krawcheck also addresses on-campus events such as the Carolina Women’s Leadership Conference and hosts Carolina alumni events at her home. In 2003, she received the GAA’s Distinguished Young Alumna Award and, in 2014, the William Richardson Davie Award from UNC’s Board of Trustees.

 

The General Alumni Association is a self-governed, nonprofit association serving alumni and friends of Carolina since 1843.

 

GAA Distinguished Service Medal website: https://alumni.unc.edu/awards

 

-Carolina-

Photo Links (photo credit: Ray Black III): https://unc.photoshelter.com/galleries/C00005vwcu89jLJ4/G0000alKcfXEDDoY/GAA-Distinguished-Service-Medals-2017

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 113 master’s, 68 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 318,000 alumni live in all 50 states and 157 countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

GAA contact: Doug Dibbert, GAA president, (919) 962-7050, doug_dibbert@unc.edu

Communications and Public Affairs contact: MC VanGraafeiland, (919) 962-7090, mc.vangraafeiland@unc.edu

UNC Board of Governors selects UNC-Chapel Hill professor Jane F. Thrailkill for 2017 Teaching Excellence Award

For immediate use

 

Associate Professor, Department of English and Comparative Literature, Jane Thrailkill leads a class March 6, 2017. (Jon Gardiner/UNC-Chapel Hill)

 

UNC Board of Governors selects UNC-Chapel Hill professor Jane F. Thrailkill for 2017 Teaching Excellence Award

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— May 3, 2017) – The Board of Governors of the 17-campus University of North Carolina has selected University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill distinguished associate professor Jane F. Thrailkill, department of English and Comparative Literature in the College of Arts and Sciences, for a 2017 Award for Excellence in Teaching. Thrailkill is one of 17 recipients, nominated by special committees on their home campuses and selected by the Board of Governors’ Committee on Personnel and Tenure.

 

Initially on a pre-med track as an undergraduate, Thrailkill changed course and earned her bachelor’s degree in English from Amherst College, followed by master’s and doctorate degrees in English and American literature from Johns Hopkins University. Through her love of literature and interest in medicine she developed a passion for the interdisciplinary field of medical humanities.

 

Thrailkill is being recognized for her commitment to interdisciplinary teaching and scholarship and her leadership in the medical humanities field.

 

“Jane Thrailkill’s exemplary teaching and mentoring skills excite the imaginations of our students,” said Chancellor Carol L. Folt. “The immersive experiences Jane provides students – inside and outside of the classroom – is revolutionizing the delivery of compassionate, people-focused healthcare and clinical training. We congratulate her on this well-deserved recognition and honor.”

 

Shortly after joining the English department in 2000, Thrailkill developed a series of interdisciplinary medical humanities classes, including, “Doctors and Patients,” which examines the nature of the relationship between healers and those who are ill. She also collaborated with Honors Carolina to create an undergraduate minor and a graduate program in literature, medicine, and culture.

 

Thrailkill is the co-founder and co-director of HHIVE lab (Health and Humanities: An Interdisciplinary Venue for Exploration), one of the first research-based health and humanities labs in the country. HHIVE provides undergraduate, graduate and professional students with interest in health humanities the opportunity to participate in research and outreach projects at the intersection of the arts. All Thrailkill’s curricula and programs offer a better understanding of how patients interpret illness, how definitions of disease are shaped through cultural understandings and how professionals can better reflect on their values and communicative practices.

 

Numerous undergraduates note that Thrailkill provided the means within and outside of the classroom for producing excellence in thinking, writing and communicating from a humanist perspective. One future physician testifies to the lasting impact she has had on many students’ academic and professional futures, “She laid the foundation for what I hope to be a lifelong pursuit of the medical humanities and the compassionate, humanistic practice of medicine.”

 

Thrailkill is currently teaching at UNC School of Medicine, as part of an interdisciplinary team of clinicians and scholars leading seminars for medical students during clinical rotations. She will receive her award during Carolina’s spring graduation ceremony.

 

Award citations and photos for all 17 recipients can be found on the University of North Carolina website:

 

-Carolina-

 

Photo:

https://unc.photoshelter.com/galleries/I0000AYvOngTfjhg/005117-threilkill-jane002

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 110 master’s, 64 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pre

 

University Communications contact: MC VanGraafeiland, (919) 962-7090, mc.vangraafeiland@unc.edu