150 at UNC-Chapel Hill inducted into Phi Beta Kappa

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150 at UNC-Chapel Hill inducted into Phi Beta Kappa

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C. – March 28, 2017) – Phi Beta Kappa, the nation’s oldest and most honored college honorary society, has inducted 150 University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill students as new members.

 

The recent induction ceremony featured remarks by Chancellor Carol L. Folt and a keynote address by Carol A. Hee, clinical associate professor of strategy and entrepreneurship. New members received certificates and Phi Beta Kappa keys, the organization’s symbol.

 

Phi Beta Kappa membership is open to undergraduates in the college and professional degree programs who meet stringent eligibility requirements.

 

A student who has completed 75 hours of course work in the liberal arts and sciences with a GPA of 3.85 or better (on a 4-point scale) is eligible for membership. Also eligible is any student who has completed 105 hours of course work in the liberal arts and sciences with a 3.75 GPA. Grades earned at other universities are not considered. Less than 1 percent of all college students qualify.

 

Past and present Phi Beta Kappa members from across the country have included 17 American presidents and numerous artistic, intellectual and political leaders. Seven of the current U.S. Supreme Court Justices are members.

 

Phi Beta Kappa has 286 chapters nationwide. UNC’s chapter, Alpha of North Carolina, was founded in 1904 and is the oldest of seven chapters in the state. Each year, Phi Beta Kappa chapters and alumni associations across the country raise and distribute more than $1 million in awards, scholarships and prizes benefiting high schools and college students.

 

Phi Beta Kappa officers at Carolina for 2016-2017 are students Aaron Homburger, president; Kylie Nowicki, vice president; and Guilia Curcelli, recording secretary. James L. Leloudis, professor of history, associate dean for Honors Carolina and director of the James M. Johnston Center for Undergraduate Excellence, is chapter executive secretary and faculty advisor.

 

Listed below are 149 inductees, 93 of whom are from North Carolina. The names appear below in alphabetical order by North Carolina county, then by state and country. All study in the College of Arts and Sciences except where otherwise noted. One student chose not to be listed.

 

Alamance County

  • Andrew Carden, a senior with an exercise and sport science major, son of Eric Carden and Dana Carden of Burlington.

 

Brunswick County

  • Amber Nicole Fulford, a junior with biology and anthropology majors and a chemistry minor, daughter of Adam Fulford Sr. and Crystal Fulford of Supply.

 

Buncombe County

  • Catherine McCann Blalock, a senior with a political science major and a public policy minor, daughter of Richard Blalock and Jennifer McCann of Asheville.
  • Michael William Thomas, a senior with a history major, son of Michael Thomas and Cathy Thomas of Asheville
  • Evelyn Scott Yarborough, a senior with peace, war, and defense and English majors and a history minor, daughter of William Yarborough, III of Greenville, South Carolina and Denise Yarborough of Asheville.

 

Cabarrus County

  • Alexander Warren Griffin, a senior with a classical archaeology major and a history minor, son of Dr. Keith Griffin and Stacey Griffin of Concord.
  • Robert Thomas Short III, a senior with a psychology major and a chemistry minor, son of Robert Short, Jr. and Linda Short of Concord.
  • Elizabeth Marie Thompson, a senior with an exercise and sport science major, of Harrisburg.

 

Chatham County

  • Philip Bray Straughn, a senior with a chemistry major and a computer science minor, son of Charles Straughn and Linda Straughn of Chapel Hill.

 

Craven County

  • Jacob Fisher, a senior with a computer science major, of New Bern.

 

Cumberland County

  • Srihita Bongu, a senior with economics and chemistry majors, daughter of Ram Mohan Bongu and Deepika Bongu of Fayetteville.
  • Brian Michael Fields, a junior with a political science major and urban and regional planning and history minors, son of Michael Fields and Becky Fields of Fayetteville.
  • Gillian Elizabeth Manning, a senior with an art history major and a Latin minor, daughter of MD Kenneth Manning and Brynn Manning of Fayetteville.

 

Dare County

  • Kathrin Morgan Hennigan, a junior with a psychology major and a neuroscience minor, of Kitty Hawk.

 

Durham County

  • Emma Marina Bogerd, a junior with biology and environmental sciences majors and a chemistry minor, of Durham.
  • Eliza McClellan Pentecost Farren, a senior with a global studies major and a Chinese minor, daughter of David Farren of Chicago, Illinois and Martha Pentecost Jr. of Durham.
  • Andrew Charles Kelly, a junior with a computer science major and astronomy and mathematics minors, son of Charles Kelly and Barbara Kelly of Durham.

 

Forsyth County

  • Katherine Butler Elliott, a senior with a business administration major and a coaching education minor, daughter of Dr. J. Grady Elliott Jr. and Kristine Elliott of Winston-Salem.
  • Lily Jewel Jones, a junior with a nutrition major and Chinese and chemistry minors, daughter of Dr. Beverly Jones III and Janet Jones of Winston-Salem.
  • Christina Margaret Korzen, a junior with environmental studies and public policy majors, daughter of John Korzen and Catherine Korzen of Kernersville.
  • Elizabeth Salisbury Neill, a senior with psychology and political science majors, of Winston-Salem.
  • Samuel Leo Pranikoff, a senior with a political science major and a sustainability studies minor, son of Dr. Thomas Pranikoff and Karen Pranikoff of Winston-Salem.
  • Dustin P Sneed, a junior with an economics major and a chemistry minor, son of Steve Sneed and Kathy Sneed of Winston-Salem.

 

Gaston County

  • Mitchell Coles Hanks, a senior with an exercise and sport science major, of Belmont.

 

Guilford County

  • Erin Kennedy Allred, a senior with a communication studies major and a dramatic art minor, of Oak Ridge.
  • Suejette Davidson Black, a senior with an economics major and a chemistry minor, daughter of Richard Black of Wilmington and Sydney Cardone of Greensboro.
  • Katherine Marie Corum, a senior with a geography major and history and women’s and gender studies minors, daughter of Daniel Corum and Megan Corum of Pleasant Garden.
  • Jordan Robert Elliott, a senior with a computer science major and a history minor, son of Dennis Elliott and Inez Elliott of Brown Summit.
  • Anne Bennett Osteen, a senior with business administration and English majors, daughter of Bill Osteen Jr. and Elizabeth Osteen of Greensboro.
  • Shannon Elise Paylor, a senior with a mathematical decision sciences major and a French minor, daughter of Flynn Paylor and Deb Paylor.
  • Catherine Marie Phipps, a senior with a sociology major and a Spanish for the professions minor, daughter of David Phipps and Lynn Phipps of High Point.

 

Johnston County

  • Lewis Carpenter Flowers III, a senior with economics and history majors and a philosophy, politics and economics minor, son of Lewis Flowers Jr. and Kimberly Flowers of Manila, Philippines.

 

Mecklenburg County

  • Brooke Alexandria Davies, a senior with a peace, war and defense major, daughter of David Davies and Michele Fasciana of Charlotte.
  • Morgan Elizabeth Ferone, a junior with a biology major and religious studies and chemistry minors, daughter of Michael Ferone and Susan Ferone of Charlotte.
  • Laura Wells Gill, a senior with a computer science major and a business administration minor, daughter of Thold Gill and Ellen Gill of Charlotte.
  • Daniel Aryon Khordehforosh, a senior with a chemistry major and biology and business administration minors, son of Parvaneh Taheri of Charlotte.
  • Kayla Grace Kopczynski, a senior with a biology major, daughter of Todd Kopczynski and Michelle Moore of Charlotte.
  • Lee Powell Landess, a senior with a music major and chemistry and biology minors, son of Bart Landess and Fran Landess of Charlotte.
  • Lewis McAden Malone, a junior with computer science and philosophy majors and a writing for the screen and stage minor, son of James Malone and Mary Malone of Chapel Hill.
  • Allison Marvin, a junior with a biology major and a chemistry minor, of Charlotte.
  • Bharath Rama, a junior with biochemistry and mathematics majors, son of Ganapathy Rama and Savithri Konamme of Matthews.
  • Sharath Rama, a junior with a biostatistics major and a chemistry minor, son of Ganapathy Rama and Savithri Konamme of Matthews.
  • Emily Anne Reckard, a senior with anthropology and environmental studies majors and a geography minor, daughter of Heidi Reckard and Stan Reckard of Charlotte.
  • Roman John Rogowski, a senior with a computer science major and a mathematics minor, of Huntersville.
  • Anne Rutledge, a senior with history and global studies majors and an education minor, of Davidson.
  • Rachel Carolyn Cheng Uri, a senior with a psychology major and a neuroscience minor, of Charlotte.
  • Michelle Zixin Yu, a junior with biology and communication studies majors and a studio art minor, daughter of Jennifer Yu of Charlotte.
  • Huanyu Zhu, a junior with a biochemistry major and a computer science minor, son of Xiuli Lin and Chenfu Zhu of Charlotte.

 

Moore County

  • Elaine Kaye Kearney, a junior with biostatistics and computer science majors, daughter of Wayne Kearney Jr. and Jennifer Kearney of Pinehurst.
  • Grant Alexander King, a senior with economics and linguistics majors and a Japanese minor, of Pinehurst.

 

New Hanover County

  • Katharine Chase Frazier, a senior with an English major, of Wilmington.
  • Justine Taylor Orlovsky-Schnitzler, a senior with history and women’s and gender studies majors and a social and economic justice minor, daughter of Steven Schnitzler and Lisa Schnitzler of Wilmington.
  • Ellie Scialabba, a senior with a psychology major and geography and religious studies minors, daughter of Dr. Fred Scialabba and Dr. Annette Scialabba of Wilmington.

 

Onslow County

  • Erika Lynn Booth, a senior with biology and psychology majors and a chemistry minor, daughter of Ginger Booth and Scott Booth of Jacksonville.

 

Orange County

  • Emily Belding, a senior with political science and global studies majors and an environmental studies minor, of Hillsborough.
  • Susan K Leichliter, a senior with a women’s and gender studies major and a social and economic justice minor, of Chapel Hill.
  • Nathaniel Pritchard, a senior with mathematical decision sciences and economics majors and a Spanish for the professions minor, son of William Pritchard and Michelle Pritchard of Chapel Hill.
  • Kevin Su, a senior with a psychology major and cognitive science and chemistry minors, of Chapel Hill.
  • Teddy Wong, Jr., a junior with chemistry and mathematics majors, of Chapel Hill.

 

Pitt County

  • Patrick John Moloney, a senior with economics and business administration majors, son of Rob Moloney and Maria Moloney of Greenville.
  • Brendon Connor Murray, a junior with archaeology and history majors, son of Dr. Kevin Murray and Dr. Maria Murray of Greenville.

 

Rockingham County

  • Nathan Ray Hayes, a senior with political science and history majors, son of Kenneth Hayes and Teresa Hayes of Reidsville.

 

Union County

  • Megan Nicole Brown, a senior with a Hispanic linguistics major and a speech and hearing sciences minor, daughter of Mark Brown and Elaine Brown of Weddington.
  • Jessica Reggan Hoffman, a junior with environmental sciences and mathematics majors and a chemistry minor, daughter of Greg Hoffman and Chandra Hoffman of Indian Trail.
  • Jeet H Patel, a senior with a quantitative biology major, son of Hitesh Patel and Tejal Patel of Monroe.

 

Wake County

  • Jacqueline Ivy Battaile, a senior with a history major, daughter of Lawrence Battaile and Dr. Melinda Battaile of Raleigh.
  • Abigail Elizabeth Bell, a senior with a global studies major and Spanish and geography minors, daughter of Thomas Bell and Julia Bell and of Cary.
  • William Michael Buddendeck, a junior with economics and music majors and a Spanish for the professions minor, son of Michael Buddendeck and Karen Buddendeck of Cary.
  • Lin Cao, a junior with biology and anthropology majors and a chemistry minor, daughter of Lianyong Cao and Wei Wang of Cary.
  • Bailey Reed DeSimone, a senior with history and global studies majors and a German minor, daughter of Doug DeSimone of Raleigh and Patty Sandberg of Cary.
  • Eileen May Harvey, a senior with a global studies major and Chinese and urban studies and planning minors, daughter of David Harvey and Grace Harvey of Cary.
  • Wendy Kally Ji, a senior with a public policy major and a business administration minor, daughter of Dr. Wan Ji and Dr. Li Cai of Cary.
  • Kaitlyn Rose Johnson, a senior with a biology major and chemistry and women’s and gender studies minors, daughter of David Johnson and Kristyn Johnson of Raleigh.
  • Nina Rachel Joseph, a junior with mathematical decision sciences and computer science majors and a Jewish studies minor, of Cary.
  • Stephanie Kim, a junior with a chemistry major and a Spanish for the professions minor, daughter of Dr. Kalhee Kim and Jenny Kim of Cary.
  • Sarah Gray Lesley, a junior with English and music majors and a creative writing minor, daughter of Robert Lesley and Lu-Ann Lesley of Raleigh.
  • Dana Michelle Lingenfelser, a senior with an environmental studies major and a public policy minor, daughter of Charles Lingenfelser and Denise Lingenfelser of Fuquay-Varina.
  • Charles Bracken Lumsden, a senior with history and anthropology majors and a Spanish minor, son of William Lumsden and Margaret Lumsden of Raleigh.
  • Ryan K. McCord, a junior with public policy and global studies majors and an African studies minor, of Raleigh.
  • Aakash Mehta, a junior with environmental health sciences and biology majors and a chemistry minor, of Holly Springs.
  • Alexander Scot O’Hara, a senior with a biology major and chemistry and neuroscience minors, son of Jeffrey O’Hara and Brenda O’Hara of Cary.
  • William Robert Ostrom, a senior with a nutrition major and a chemistry minor, son of Bob Ostrom and Melissa Ostrom of Cary.
  • Timothy Michael Preston, a senior with an exercise and sport science major and a chemistry minor, of Raleigh.
  • Laura Elizabeth Roberson, a junior with biology and geography majors, daughter of Mark Roberson and Muriel Roberson of Cary.
  • Halle Marie Ronk, a junior with biology and chemistry majors, daughter of Kevin Ronk and Lorraine Ronk of Raleigh.
  • Rohanit Singh, a junior with environmental health sciences and biology majors and a Spanish for the medical professions minor, son of Dr. Manmohan Singh and Ritu Singh of Cary.
  • Priyanka Srinivas, a junior with a biology major and neuroscience and chemistry minors, daughter of Srinivasa Boregowda and Bharati Srinivasa of Cary.
  • Olivia Terrell, a senior with a communication studies major and an English minor, of Cary.
  • Paige Emily Trexler, a junior with a biology major and chemistry and Spanish for the professions minors, daughter of Mark Trexler and Suzanne Trexler of Cary.
  • Audrey Elizabeth Woolard, a senior with English and history majors and a creative writing minor, daughter of James Woolard Jr. and Michelle Woolard of Raleigh.
  • Andrew Joseph Notz Zalesak, a sophomore with chemistry and music majors, of Cary.

 

Watauga County

  • Lynde Marie Wangler, a junior with a psychology major and neuroscience and biology minors, of Boone.

 

Wilkes County

  • Erin Kolstad, a senior with media and journalism and psychology majors, daughter of Charles Kolstad and Catherine Kolstad of Wilkesboro.

 

Connecticut

  • Nikaya Smith, a senior with a mathematics major and a mathematical decision sciences minor, daughter of Clarence Smith and Penny Smith of West Hartford.

 

Delaware

  • Benjamin Clyde Creekmore, a junior with biochemistry and biophysics majors and a biology minor, son of Dr. J. Richard Creekmore and Lisa Creekmore of Wilmington.

 

Florida

  • Jonathan Tyler Alvarez, a junior with a biomedical and health sciences engineering major, son of Jose Alvarez of Miami.
  • Martina Knechel, a junior with biochemistry and biology majors, of Gainesville.
  • Diana Cristina Lopez, a junior with biology and Hispanic literature and cultures majors and a neuroscience minor, daughter of Jaime Lopez and Diana B. Lopez of Miami.
  • Shelby L. Waldron, a junior with psychology and exercise and sport science majors, daughter of R. Larry Waldron and Dolores Waldron of Brandon.

 

Georgia

  • Sarah Ellyn Boland, a senior with health behavior and physics majors and a chemistry minor, daughter of Dr. Ryan Boland and Dr. Pam Boland of Savannah.
  • Prasanna Kumar, a junior with psychology and economics majors and a chemistry minor, son of Dr. Sri Kumar and Ganga Kumar of Buford.
  • Alexandra Marie Paré, a senior with a broadcast and electronic journalism major and an entrepreneurship minor, daughter of Richard Paré and Anna Paré of Atlanta.
  • Amy Elizabeth Shehan, a senior with a political science major and Spanish for the professions and social and economic justice minors, daughter of Wayne Shehan and Mary Shehan of Alpharetta.
  • Mary Caroline Tarallo, a junior with biology and chemistry majors, daughter of Frank Tarallo of Atlanta and Cathy Roush of Hilton Head, South Carolina.

 

Maryland

  • Emily Claire Crockett, a senior with information science and art history majors and an Italian minor, daughter of David Crockett Jr. of Zimmerman, Minnesota and Susan Crockett of Raleigh, North Carolina.
  • Martha Isaacs, a senior with a geography major and city and regional planning and philosophy minors, daughter of William Isaacs and Louise Isaacs of Baltimore.
  • Emma Johnson, a senior with political science and history majors and a women’s and gender studies minor, daughter of Mark Johnson and Donna Tasso-Johnson of Potomac.
  • Christina Marie Kochanski, a senior with an economics major and a philosophy, politics, and economics minor, daughter of Matthew Kochanski and Margaret Kochanski of Columbia.
  • Spencer Kyle Lichtenberg, a senior with computer science and Asian studies majors, son of Marc Lichtenberg and Leslie Lichtenberg of Baltimore.
  • Carolyn Jennifer Reuland, a junior with biology and Spanish majors and a chemistry minor, daughter of Dr. Charles Reuland and Melissa Reuland of Baltimore.

 

Massachusetts

  • Andrea Joyce McSweeney, a senior with a biology major and a Spanish for the professions minor, daughter of Gregory McSweeney and Joyce McSweeney of Needham.
  • Benjamin Edward Shirley, a senior with a health policy and management major and a Spanish for the professions minor, of Beverly.

 

Missouri

  • Michael Gu, a junior with computer science and mathematics majors, of St. Louis.

 

New Jersey

  • William Matthew Townley Christoffersen, a junior with English and American studies majors and a music minor, of Lawrenceville.
  • Kimberly Mae Hoover, a junior with a psychology major and chemistry and biology minors, of Medford.

 

New Mexico

  • Ana Cutts Dougherty, a senior with economics and global studies majors and a philosophy, politics and economics minor, daughter of Tim Dougherty and Dr. Katharine Dougherty of Interlochen, Michigan.

 

New York

  • David Cortese DeGenova, a senior with a philosophy major and mathematical decision sciences and entrepreneurship minors, of Croton on Hudson.
  • Kelly Lynn Jasiura, a senior with public relations and public policy majors, daughter of Richard Jasiura and Joyce Jasiura of Buffalo.
  • Diane G Li, a senior with a public policy major, daughter of Minbin Li and Zhuobin Chen of New Hyde Park.
  • Isabel Maria Pinheiro, a senior with an interdisciplinary studies major and a composition, rhetoric and digital literacy minor, of Menands.
  • Matthew Ragusa, a junior with business administration and computer science majors, son of Gerard Ragusa and Jamie Ragusa of Staten Island.
  • Kathryn Nell Ryan, a senior with a psychology major and a Spanish for the professions minor, daughter of Greg Ryan and Eileen Ryan of Rockville Centre.
  • Danielle Christina Spitzer, a senior with biology and women’s and gender studies majors and a chemistry minor, daughter of Peter Spitzer and Doris Spitzer of Albany.

 

Ohio

  • Michael Louis Palumbo III, a junior with astrophysics and Latin majors, son of Michael Palumbo Jr. and Christina Palumbo of Concord.

 

Oregon

  • Ashley Han, a junior with a biology major and music and chemistry minors, daughter of Dr. Dong-ho Han and Mi-young Han of Beaverton.

 

Pennsylvania

  • Brian Charles Shields, a senior with philosophy and economics majors, son of Joseph Shields and Valerie Shields of Pittsburgh.

 

South Carolina

  • Aaron Paul Lovett, a senior with communication studies and documentary studies majors and a creative writing minor, son of the late James Lovett of Charleston and Iris Lovett of Charlotte, North Carolina.
  • Madeline Norris, a senior with English and psychology majors and a creative writing minor, daughter of Terry Melloh of Columbia.
  • Sarah Suzanne Renfro, a junior with an environmental health sciences major and a computer science minor, daughter of Dr. John Renfro and Dr. Suzanne Renfro of Greenville.

 

Texas

  • Gefen Kusin-Kline, a senior with an English major, of Dallas.
  • Katherine Anne Stotesbery, a senior with public policy and political science majors and an entrepreneurship minor, daughter of William Stotesbery and Susan Stotesbery of Austin.

 

Vermont

  • Anne Sutton, a junior with music and geography majors, daughter of Edward Sutton and Lynn Sutton of Burlington.

 

Virginia

  • Grant Scott Broussard, a junior with biology and chemistry majors, of Glen Allen.
  • Julia Whipple Gallini, a senior with biostatistics and mathematics majors and a music minor, daughter of Peter Gallini and Alisha Gallini of Richmond.
  • Michael Joseph Sanders, a junior with history and English majors and a philosophy, politics and economics minor, son of David Sanders and Jane Kotlarski of McLean.
  • Kara Louise Walker, a junior with information science and Latin majors, daughter of Dr. Richard Walker and Ellen Walker of Blacksburg.

 

West Virginia

  • Jasmine Shishir Shah, a senior with biology and psychology majors and a chemistry minor, daughter of Dr. Shishir Shah and Bindiya Shah of Wheeling.

 

Canada

  • Ariana B. Vaisey, a senior with an economics major and a geography minor, of Vancouver.

 

China

  • Xuewen Chen, a junior with biology and chemistry majors, of Hangzhou.
  • Zhengyang Fang, a junior with computer science and mathematical decision sciences majors, son of Lei Fang and Shuxian Wu of Jinan.
  • Jialing Jiang, a senior with economics and philosophy majors, of Beijing.
  • Ao Joseph Qiao, a junior with public policy and economics majors and a mathematical decision science minor, of Anhui.
  • Shengding Sun, a junior with a mathematics major and a computer science minor, of Beijing.
  • Zijun Tian, a junior with mathematical decision sciences and economics majors and a mathematics minor, of Jinan.
  • Xingzhi Wang, a junior with chemistry and mathematics majors and a geography minor, of Guangzhou.
  • Zicheng Ye, a junior with mathematics and economics majors, son of Boyu Ye and Wei Sun.
  • Wei Zhou, a senior with business journalism and political science majors, daughter of Qingsong Zhou and Qiuling Hu of Zhengzhou.

 

England

  • James Patrick Ellsmoor, a May 2016 graduate with geography and economics majors and a sustainability studies minor, son of Stephen Ellsmoor and Jane Ellsmoor of Market Drayton.

 

Peru

  • Gerardo Manuel Perez Goncalves, a junior with a biochemistry major and mathematics and biology minors, son of Leopoldo Perez Padilla and Yracy Goncalves Pereira of Morrisville, North Carolina.

 

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill



The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 110 master’s, 64 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s 317,000-plus alumni live in all 50 states and 156 other countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

Phi Beta Kappa contact: Jason Clemmons, (919) 843-7756, jclem@email.unc.edu

University Communications contact: MC VanGraafeiland, (919) 962-7090, mc.vangraafeiland@unc.edu

UNC-Chapel Hill student named 2017 Gates Cambridge Scholar

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UNC-Chapel Hill student named 2017 Gates Cambridge Scholar

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C. – Feb. 21, 2017) – Adriano Bellotti, a current student in the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s School of Medicine, has been awarded the prestigious Gates Cambridge Scholarship, which provides full support for graduate study at the University of Cambridge in England.

 

Bellotti, 24, a Charlotte native, is among 36 Americans selected for the award from 800 U.S. applicants. He is Carolina’s sixth Gates Cambridge Scholar and its fourth consecutive recipient since 2013.

 

The Gates Cambridge enables academically outstanding students from outside the United Kingdom, with a strong interest in social leadership and responsibility, to pursue graduate study at the storied university.

 

“It is wonderful to see Adriano selected for this outstanding award that will help him advance his studies in the development and application of mathematical models to create new biomedical engineering solutions leading to breakthrough clinical treatments and technologies,” said Chancellor Carol L. Folt. “I am very excited for Adriano and know his studies at Cambridge will provide an excellent opportunity for him to continue his studies.”

 

As an undergraduate, Bellotti began to appreciate the pragmatic perspective and mathematical methods of research in biomedical engineering. He sought to apply this empirical approach to medicine, which led him to pursue a combined master’s and doctoral degree program at Carolina.

 

At Cambridge, Bellotti plans to complete a 3-year doctoral degree, studying neurophysiology through computational modeling, specifically neuroplasticity in both single neurons and neuronal circuits. Using this research, coupled with his engineering background and clinical experience, he aspires to lead medical researchers in facilitating the translation of new treatments and technologies into the clinic.

 

“The Gates Cambridge enables academically outstanding students from outside the United Kingdom, with a strong interest in social leadership and responsibility, to pursue graduate study,” said professor Inger Brodey, director of Carolina’s Office of Distinguished Scholarships. “Adriano’s selection is quite an honor for him as well as for Carolina.”

 

Established in 2000, the Gates Cambridge Scholarship is funded by a $210 million donation to the University of Cambridge by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.

 

-Carolina-

Photo: http://unc.photoshelter.com/galleries/C00005plBUJIuM28/G0000mfpZgv1j.1w/I0000QsncAC6plrE/Adriano-Bellotti-jpg-jpeg

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill



The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 110 master’s, 64 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s 317,000-plus alumni live in all 50 states and 156 other countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

Office of Distinguished Scholarships contacts: Inger Brodey, (919) 923-1414, brodey@email.unc.edu; and Malindi Robinson (919) 843-7757, malindi@email.unc.edu; Twitter @ODS_UNCCH

Communications and Public Affairs contact: MC VanGraafeiland, (919) 962-7090, mc.vangraafeiland@unc.edu

Maen Rashid Ariekat of the PLO Delegation to the US to speak at Carolina March 6

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Maen Rashid Ariekat of the PLO Delegation to the US to speak at Carolina March 6

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C. – Feb. 20, 2017) – Maen Rashid Areikat, a diplomat and chief of the Palestinian Liberation Organization (PLO) Delegation to the United States, will visit the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill on March 6. During his visit, Areikat will deliver a talk titled “The Palestinian-Israeli Conflict and the New U.S. Administration” at 5:30 p.m. in the Nelson Mandela Auditorium in the FedEx Global Education Center.

 

Areikat’s visit to Carolina is held in conjunction with the Ambassadors Forum, which brings to campus prominent diplomats, politicians and business leaders to deliver public lectures and conduct seminars for graduate students. Visit the UNC Global website for more information.

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill



The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 110 master’s, 64 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s 317,000-plus alumni live in all 50 states and 156 other countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

University Communications contact: MC VanGraafeiland, (919) 962-7090, mc.vangraafeiland@unc.edu

PlayMakers Repertory Company announces 2017-2018 season

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PlayMakers Repertory Company announces 2017-2018 season

 

New season features two regional premieres by Carolina alumni, the return of rotating repertory and a holiday treat for the whole family

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C. – Feb. 17, 2017) – A playful, irreverent take on Jane Austen; a dizzy, dysfunctional family reunion; two topically charged premieres by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill alumni; and the return of the popular rotating repertory with works about faith and following will comprise the Main-stage lineup of PlayMakers Repertory Company’s 2017-2018 Season: A Season on the Edge.

 

The 2017-2018 Main-stage season from UNC-Chapel Hill’s professional theater in residence leaps into multiple perspectives on questions of morality, family, history’s edges and the complexities of human connection.

 

The new season is the second selected by PlayMakers’ Producing Artistic Director Vivienne Benesch.

 

“I am eager to continue creating a path for theatre to make a transformational impact on our communities,” said Benesch. “With several regional premieres, including our first fully commissioned work, the 2017-18 season leaves me breathless with the promise of bringing new points of view and new voices that engage while they entertain. PlayMakers is about providing a first-class theatre experience right here at UNC-Chapel Hill, and being a forum for extraordinary, courageous work that invites us to tackle big questions. Our new lineup, along with a host of exceptional artists from our resident company and around the nation, will do just that.”

 

PlayMakers will also present two groundbreaking, topical works in its 2017-18 PRC2 second- stage season and a holiday special event for the whole family.

 

Subscription packages are available for purchase now, and renewing subscribers can secure their current seats for the new season through May 1. Call (919) 962-7529 or visit PlayMakers’ website for more information.

 

Main-stage productions:

 

“The Cake” by Bekah Brunstetter, Sept. 13 – Oct. 1

The season opens with a regional premiere and the first of three North Carolina stories this season. Della makes cakes, not judgment calls. But when the woman she helped raise comes back home to Winston-Salem to get married and her fiancé is actually another woman, Della is forced to examine some of her deeply held beliefs for the first time in her life. “The Cake” was written by critically acclaimed UNC-Chapel Hill alumnus Bekah Brunstetter, who currently writes for NBC’s “This is Us.”

 

“Sense and Sensibility” adapted by Kate Hamill, Oct. 19 – Nov. 6

Based on the novel by Jane Austen

Playwright Kate Hamill gives a fresh, comic take on Jane Austen’s beloved novel. Set in gossipy late 18th-century England, this eminently theatrical adaptation follows the fortunes (and misfortunes) of the Dashwood sisters—sensible Elinor and hypersensitive Marianne—after their father’s sudden death leaves them financially destitute and socially vulnerable. Hamill’s adaptation has been called “an unconditional delight” by The New York Times and “full of galloping comic vitality” by The Wall Street Journal.

 

“Dot” by Colman Domingo, Nov. 21 – Dec. 16

In another regional premiere, Dotty and her three grown children gather for the holidays with more than exchanging presents on their minds. This compassionate and often hilarious look at dementia’s effects on a family grapples unflinchingly with aging parents and midlife crises in the heart of a West Philly neighborhood. Theater Mania called “Dot” is “a magnificent play full of laughter and heartbreak.”

 

The rotating repertory presents two shows that explore different aspects of a theme, encouraging discovery and conversation.

 

Molière’s “Tartuffe”, Feb. 3 – March 11, 2018

Adapted by David Ball

In rotating repertory with “The Christians”

The man of the house has lost his mind. He has been blinded by the counterfeit zeal of a penniless scoundrel who fully intends to make off with his wife, his livelihood and probably the kitchen sink. The New York Times calls David Ball’s new adaptation of this classic French satire of religious hypocrisy “glorious from the first scene.”

 

“The Christians” by Lucas Hnath, Feb. 3 – March 11, 2018

In rotating repertory with Molière’s “Tartuffe”

Twenty years ago, Pastor Paul’s church was nothing more than a modest storefront. Now he presides over a megachurch of thousands, with a coffee shop in the lobby and a baptismal font as big as a swimming pool. But Pastor Paul is about to preach a sermon that will shake the very foundations of his church’s beliefs. The Chicago Tribune heralded this big-little play about faith in America as “truly gripping and wholly unexpected.”

 

“Leaving Eden” by Mike Wiley with music & lyrics by Laurelyn Dossett, April 4 – 22, 2018

World Premiere of a PlayMakers Repertory Company commission

Mike Wiley, UNC-Chapel Hill alumnus and acclaimed playwright of “The Parchman Hour,” returns to PlayMakers with singer-songwriter Laurelyn Dossett to explore, through words and music, the cyclical nature of humanity. This unearthing of yesterday yields a hymn for our future, with its glimpse into identity, immigration and economic struggle—all told through the lens of a small town in North Carolina. American Theater has called Wiley’s plays “sophisticated blends of narrative and wit.”

 

PRC2 second- stage productions:

 

“Count” by Lynden Harris (a co-production with Hidden Voices), Aug. 23 – 27, 2018

PlayMakers’ own resident company member Kathryn Hunter-Williams directs this searing portrayal of a single day on death row, where six men unpack their personal inheritances of violence, racism, mental illness, poverty and unexpected love. Who is disposable, who counts, and what does justice mean when the scales are broken and the blindfold is our own?

 

TBA: April 25 – 29, 2018

 

A PlayMakers special holiday event for the whole family:

 

“Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol,” Dec. 13 – 23, adapted by William Leach

An intimate evening with PlayMakers legend Ray Dooley as he shares the classic tale of Ebeneezer Scrooge’s journey through Christmases past, present and future to find redemption, charity and love.

 

All performances will be presented in UNC-Chapel Hill’s Center for Dramatic Art on Country Club Road. Main-stage productions will be in the Paul Green Theatre; PRC2 shows and “A Christmas Carol” will be in the Elizabeth Price Kenan Theatre.

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill



The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 110 master’s, 64 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s 317,000-plus alumni live in all 50 states and 156 other countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

About PlayMakers

PlayMakers is the professional theater in residence at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s College of Arts and Sciences, and North Carolina’s premier resident theater company for more than 40 years. PlayMakers has been named one of the “best regional theatres in America”.

 

PlayMakers contact: Diana Pineda, (919) 962-7114, dmpineda@email.unc.edu

University Communications contact: MC VanGraafeiland, (919) 962-7090, mc.vangraafeiland@unc.edu

More than 7,000 UNC-Chapel Hill students make Fall 2016 Dean’s List

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More than 7,000 UNC-Chapel Hill students make Fall 2016 Dean’s List

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C. – Feb. 7, 2017) – The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill recognized 7,237 students for outstanding academic achievement through their selection for the Fall 2016 Dean’s List.

 

Dean’s list recognition requires full-time students who enter the University as new first-year students starting in fall 2010 or thereafter to earn at least a 3.5 grade-point average on a 4.0 scale with no grade lower than a “C” for 12 hours of letter-grade credit, exclusive of physical education activities (PHYA) courses. Students who enrolled before fall 2010 must post a 3.2 grade-point average for 15 hours of letter-grade credit or a 3.5 for 12 hours of credit. No grade can be lower than a “C. Additional details can be found here.

 

The complete Fall 2016 Dean’s List can be found here.

The complete list of Fall 2016 degree recipients can be found here.

 

Note to editors: To identify students in your circulation area:

  • For students in your county, click on the arrow in the “NC County” column to the far right. Select “Filter” and “Equals.”
  • Select the county name from the drop down list displayed in the pop-up window. (You can only choose one county at a time.)
  • Close the pop-up window and click on the “Filter” tab to see the results.
  • Follow the same procedure to filter by city or state.
  • To print the filtered results, click on the arrow at the top of any of the columns. Select “Print” and “Filtered only.”
  • The filtered results can also be exported into Excel. This function works best using the Internet Explorer browser. (Depending on your computer, you may have to temporarily disable some security settings.) While on the filtered results screen, click on the arrow at the top of any of the columns. Select “Export” and “CSV” and “Filtered only.” Save the filtered results as a text file to your computer. Open the file in Excel. When importing the file, make sure that the Delimited and Comma settings are checked.
  • Another option is to download the unfiltered list to your computer then open and filter the file using Excel.

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill



The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 110 master’s, 64 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s 317,000-plus alumni live in all 50 states and 156 other countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

University Communications contact: MC VanGraafeiland, (919) 962-7090, mc.vangraafeiland@unc.edu

Award-winning historian Brenda Stevenson to speak on Black Lives Matter, gender and justice

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Award-winning historian Brenda Stevenson to speak on Black Lives Matter, gender and justice

 

Event is Carolina’s 13th annual African American History Month keynote lecture

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C. – Feb. 2, 2017) – Award-winning historian Brenda Stevenson, who has been praised for “bravery in journalism,” will deliver the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s 13th annual African American History Month lecture at 7 p.m. on Feb. 8, in the Sonja Haynes Stone Center for Black Culture and History.

 

Stevenson, the Nickoll Family Distinguished Professor of History at U.C.L.A. and a fellow at Stanford University’s Center for Advanced Studies in Behavioral Sciences, is an acclaimed author and frequent commentator on National Public Radio. An expert on African American history, black women and families and race relations, her lecture “When Do Black Female Lives Matter? Contested Assaults, Murders, and American Race Riots” will discuss the connections among slavery, violence against black women, African American resistance and modern-day brutality.

 

Her book “The Contested Murder of Latasha Harlins: Justice, Gender, and the Origins of the Los Angeles Riots,” reframed the narrative of the Los Angeles race riots as a response to the first verdict in the Rodney King trial.

 

A former Guggenheim Fellow and National Humanities Center John Hope Franklin Fellow, Stevenson is also the recipient of the Ida B. Wells Award for Courage in Journalism and the Southern Historical Association’s John W. Blassingame Award, given for distinguished scholarship and mentorship in African American history. She earned her bachelor’s degree from the University of Virginia and her master’s degree and doctorate from Yale.

 

Stevenson joins a long list of distinguished scholars the University has featured for this centerpiece Black History Month event. Previous speakers include Lonnie Bunch, director of the National African American Museum; Mary Frances Berry, professor and former chair of the Civil Rights Commission; Bernice Johnson Reagon, MacArthur Genius Award recipient and Civil Rights Movement icon; and the activist and prolific author, Robin D.G. Kelley.

 

The lecture, which is free and open to the public, will be followed by a question and answer session. Stevenson then will also be available afterward to autograph copies of “Contested Murder” and her most recent book, “What Is Slavery?”

 

The event is sponsored by the Offices of the Chancellor and Provost, the College of Arts and Sciences and its departments of communications, music, history and African and African American diaspora studies, the Carolina Women’s Center, the Center for the Study of the American South, Diversity and Multi-Cultural Affairs, Delta Sigma Theta and the Stone Center, among others.

 

Parking is available in the Bell Tower parking deck by the Stone Center. A reception will follow.

 

-Carolina-

  

 

Photo Link:

http://unc.photoshelter.com/gallery-image/Miscellaneous/G0000_YPXmPhWYxM/I0000jVxAatmCBK4/C00005plBUJIuM28

 

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill



The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 110 master’s, 64 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s 317,000-plus alumni live in all 50 states and 156 other countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

Stone Center contact: Clarissa Goodlett, (919) 962-0395, cgoodlet@email.unc.edu

University Communications contact: MC VanGraafeiland, (919) 962-7090, mc.vangraafeiland@unc.edu

Marcus Roberts and Modern Jazz Generation to headline Carolina Jazz Festival

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Marcus Roberts and Modern Jazz Generation to headline Carolina Jazz Festival

 

Celebration of jazz on Carolina’s campus Feb. 15-18 marks 40th festival for founder, music professor and director of jazz studies Jim Ketch

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C. – Feb. 1, 2017) – Marcus Roberts and the Modern Jazz Generation will headline the 40th annual Carolina Jazz Festival at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Feb. 15-18. The festival promotes a broad range of programming spanning performance, education and scholarship.

 

Roberts and the Modern Jazz Generation will perform Feb. 17 at 8 p.m. in Memorial Hall. A jazz pianist/composer, Roberts rose to prominence with the Wynton Marsalis and Jazz at Lincoln Center bands, then with his own trio and as a classical soloist. Best known for his entirely new approach to jazz trio performance, his critically acclaimed legacy of recorded music reflects his tremendous versatility as an artist.

 

In 2014, Jazziz Magazine wrote: “In the course of a single piece, [Roberts] constantly modulates grooves, tempos and keys, plays separate time signatures with the right hand and the left, and, as he puts it, ‘flips around the roles of the piano, bass and drums …’”

 

For 40 years, festival founder and director Jim Ketch, a music professor and director of jazz studies, has brought his passion and love for jazz to the Carolina campus and community.

 

“What has happened over the years is that the festival has evolved from a department of music event to a university event,” Ketch said. “In 40 years, many of the world’s most talented jazz artists have graced our stage. We also created an artist-in-residence program that brings talent jazz artists and educators to work very closely with jazz students. Our students have been inspired by these generous and gifted artists, but so, too, has the jazz faculty.”

 

The festival will feature additional performances and workshops by the UNC Jazz Band, UNC Faculty Jazz Ensemble, UNC Jazz combos, Charanga Carolina and Dayna Stephens, a tenor saxophonist and composer who is the artist-in-residence. Many of the events are free.

 

The Carolina Jazz Festival also links UNC-Chapel Hill to the educational wing of Jazz at Lincoln Center. For 12 years, the festival has featured the North Carolina Regional Essentially Ellington High School Jazz Festival, which has engaged student participation from high school bands from North Carolina, Virginia, Washington D.C., and New Jersey in performances and clinics. This year’s high school jazz festival is Feb. 18 from 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. in Hill Hall and the Kenan Music Building.

 

Full details about Carolina Jazz Festival are available here or call the music department in the College of Arts and Sciences at (919) 962-1039.

 

For tickets, contact the Memorial Hall box office at (919) 843-3333 or visit the Carolina Performing Arts website.

 

-Carolina-

 

Photos: http://unc.photoshelter.com/gallery/Carolina-Jazz-Festival/G0000xiFg_6feALk/C000066lthct_RD0

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill



The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 110 master’s, 64 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s 317,000-plus alumni live in all 50 states and 156 other countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

College of Arts and Sciences contact: Kim Spurr, (919) 962-4093, spurrk@email.unc.edu

University Communications contact: MC VanGraafeiland, (919) 962-7090, mc.vangraafeiland@unc.edu

UNC-Chapel Hill student Benjamin Kompa named Churchill Scholar

For immediate use

 

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UNC-Chapel Hill student Benjamin Kompa named Churchill Scholar

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C. – Jan. 26, 2017) – Benjamin Kompa, a fourth-year student at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, has been named a recipient of the prestigious Churchill Scholarship, a research-focused award that provides funding to outstanding American students for a year of master’s study in science, mathematics and engineering at Churchill College, based at the University of Cambridge in England.

 

Kompa is one of only 15 selected for the award, which not only requires exemplary academic achievement but also seeks those with proven talent in research, extensive laboratory experience and personal activities outside of academic pursuits, especially in music, athletics and social service. He is Carolina’s 17th Churchill Scholar.

 

“Receiving a Churchill Scholarship is an incredible opportunity for a young scholar and Benjamin is so deserving of this prestigious award,” said Chancellor Carol L. Folt. “He is focused on applying his significant skills in computer science and statistics to solve challenging, global biomedical problems. We are very pleased for Benjamin and know his studies at Cambridge will help pave the way for him to make life-changing impacts in the fields of computational biology and bioinformatics.”

 

Kompa, 22, is a native of Columbus, Ohio and plans to graduate from Carolina this May with a double major in mathematics and computational science and a minor in biology from the College of Arts & Sciences. He is a Colonel Robinson Scholar, a Phi Beta Kappa member and an Honors Carolina student and has worked in biology labs since high school. Kompa is also a two-time national champion Bridge player, who upon request from the World Bridge Federation, successfully investigated cheating in Bridge using computer methods.

 

He has worked in the same lab since his first year at UNC-Chapel Hill, where he learned biology lab techniques and conducted computational research to model chromosomes. His research has been pioneering in its exploration of new models and approaches, emphasizing lasting impacts over quickly publishing papers. Kompa also spent a summer at Harvard Medical School studying methods of artificial intelligence neural networks and applied them to analyzing MRIs.

 

Deeply interested in applying the techniques of computer science and statistics to biomedical problems, Kompa plans to use the Churchill Scholarship to pursue an M. Phil. in computational biology in the department of applied math and theoretical physics and conduct research on disease comorbidities with Dr. Pietro Lio. He then hopes to pursue Ph.D. and career in research in bioinformatics.

 

“We are thrilled to see the Churchill go to such an exceptional and worthy student, “ said Inger Brodey, director of Carolina’s Office of Distinguished Scholarships.

 

The Churchill started in 1963 with three awards and since grown to an average of 14 awards. The Scholarship was set up at the request of Sir Winston Churchill in order to fulfill his vision of U.S.-U.K. scientific exchange with the goal of advancing science and technology on both sides of the Atlantic, helping to ensure our future prosperity and security. There have now been approximately 500 Churchill Scholars.

 

-Carolina-

 

Photo Link: http://unc.photoshelter.com/gallery-image/Students/G0000mfpZgv1j.1w/I0000bmB3LYUEiz4/C00005plBUJIuM28

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill



The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 110 master’s, 64 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s 317,000-plus alumni live in all 50 states and 156 other countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

Office of Distinguished Scholarships contacts: Inger Brodey, (919) 923-1414, brodey@email.unc.edu; and Malindi Robinson (919) 843-7757, malindi@email.unc.edu; Twitter @ODS_UNCCH

Communications and Public Affairs contact: MC VanGraafeiland, (919) 962-7090, mc.vangraafeiland@unc.edu

Ackland Art Museum receives largest gift ever – valued at $25 million, including 7 Rembrandt drawings

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Ackland Art Museum receives largest gift ever – valued at $25 million, including 7 Rembrandt drawings

 

Sheldon and Leena Peck gift includes masterworks, endowment funds providing long-term support for the museum

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C. – Jan. 25, 2017) – The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s Ackland Art Museum has received its largest gift ever, donated from alumnus Sheldon Peck and his wife Leena – valued at $25 million. The unprecedented commitment includes an $8 million endowment to support a new curator and future acquisitions and an art gift of 134 primarily 17th-century European masterworks, valued at $17 million, including seven works by Rembrandt van Rijn.

 

With the Peck Collection gift, the Ackland becomes the first public university art museum in the United States to own a collection of drawings by Rembrandt and only the second university art museum in the nation to do so.

 

The masterworks are a major collection of Dutch and Flemish drawings built by the Pecks over the last four decades. Along with the Rembrandts, the collection includes nearly 100 17th-century Dutch landscape, genre and figural compositions by artists such as Aelbert Cuyp, Jan van Goyen and Jacob van Ruisdael, as well as a dozen 17th-century Flemish drawings by masters like Peter Paul Rubens, Jacob Jordaens and Paul Bril. A group of 15 18th- and 19th-century Dutch drawings is also part of the collection.

 

One of the Rembrandt drawings in the collection bears an inscription in the artist’s own handwriting, which until this donation was the last known drawing with such an inscription remaining in private hands.

 

“This amazing gift of European Golden Age art treasures – preserved for nearly 400 years and lovingly collected by the Pecks over the past 40 years – delights us today with its timeless beauty and will forever inspire future generations of students, scholars and visitors that come to our historic campus,” said Chancellor Carol L. Folt. “These drawings are a remarkable window through which we glimpse past cultures and times through the eyes of masters. We are honored by the inestimable value of the Pecks’ gift because it advances Carolina’s public mission to serve the people of North Carolina and makes the university a destination for people of all ages from around the world for all time.”

 

The Pecks’ gift includes the Peck Collection Endowment Fund and the Sheldon Peck Curatorship Fund, dedicated to the care and enhancement of the Peck Collection, including conservation, digitization and cataloging, as well as funds for the acquisition of other European and American masterworks created before 1950.

 

The endowment will also enable the Ackland to create and support a new position at the museum: the Sheldon Peck curator of European and American art and curator of the Peck Collection. This is the Ackland’s first full-time endowed position.

 

“We are overjoyed with the Pecks’ exceptionally generous gift of art, funds for its stewardship and support for future acquisitions,” said Ackland Art Museum Director Katie Ziglar. “Thanks to the new curatorial position their endowment also provides, we look forward to organizing a series of special exhibitions focusing on masterworks from the Peck Collection. Works of such high achievement and quality will fascinate and delight Ackland visitors for decades to come.”

 

With their gift, the Pecks aspire to offer the public a deeper appreciation for the Dutch masters’ celebration of beauty in the everyday.

 

“The exceptional vision and profound humanity of the Dutch masters’ drawings still have the power to surprise and delight 400 years after their creation. I hope many will experience the pleasure and awe these works still elicit in me every time I study one,” said Sheldon Peck. “I am thrilled the Ackland, with its distinguished tradition of commitment to the research and exhibition of drawings, will now be the steward of what Leena and I have brought together.”

 

Peck, originally from Durham, is a prominent orthodontic specialist, educator and art collector. After receiving his undergraduate degree from Carolina in 1963 and his doctorate from the UNC School of Dentistry in 1966, he moved to Boston for a residency in orthodontics and then entered private practice and academics. Peck was a clinical professor of developmental biology at the Harvard University School of Dental Medicine for 20 years, and served as an adjunct professor of orthodontics at Carolina’s School of Dentistry.

 

He has generously donated art to the Ackland since 1988, when he gave a drawing by Allart van Everdingen to the museum in honor of his much-admired older brother and Carolina alumnus, Harvey Peck. Works of art from the Pecks’ collection, many of them exhibited for the first time, were on view in the 1999 Ackland travelling exhibition “Fresh Woods and Pastures New.”

 

Peck has been a member of the Ackland’s national advisory board since 1987, and he and his wife are longtime supporters of the museum’s “Art For Lunch” lecture series.

 

“We are thrilled that a longtime board member has made such an unparalleled gift to the Ackland, which brings the museum to a new level of importance in the region and in our country,” said Kate Nevin, Ackland advisory board chair.

 

-Carolina-

 

Photo Links:

The Pecks: http://unc.photoshelter.com/gallery-image/Miscellaneous/G0000_YPXmPhWYxM/I0000WxA_2CTe3Fw/C00005plBUJIuM28

 

Key Peck Collection pieces: http://unc.photoshelter.com/gallery/Peck-Ackland-Art-Museum/G0000aXECXgIE_5E/C00005vwcu89jLJ4 Password: Peck.

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill



The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 110 master’s, 64 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s 317,000-plus alumni live in all 50 states and 156 other countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

About the Ackland Art Museum

Featuring a year-round calendar of special exhibitions and dynamic public programs, the Ackland Art Museum – located on the historic campus of UNC-Chapel Hill – encourages visitors to engage with the rich legacy of the artistic past as well as with living artists from around the world. The Ackland’s holdings consist of more than 18,000 works of art, featuring significant collections of European masterworks, 20th-century and contemporary art, African art, North Carolina pottery and folk art. Additionally, the Ackland holds North Carolina’s premiere collections of Asian art and works on paper (drawings, prints and photographs). This universal collection of artworks from antiquity to the present makes the Ackland uniquely able to advance the teaching and research missions of the University.

 

Ackland contact: Emily Bowles, (919) 843-3675, emily.bowles@unc.edu

Development contact: Kim Elenez, (919) 962-1628, kelenez@email.unc.edu

Communications and Public Affairs contact: MC VanGraafeiland, 919) 962-7090, mc.vangraafeiland@unc.edu

Southern Folklife Collection partners with Yep Roc Records to release rare music recordings from its vast archives

For immediate use

 

Southern Folklife Collection partners with Yep Roc Records to release rare music recordings from its vast archives

 

Titles from Dolly Parton, Doc Watson and a Cajun compilation to launch partnership

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C. – Jan. 24, 2017) – Music lovers will soon be able to own rare audio history, thanks to a partnership between the Southern Folklife Collection (SFC) at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and Yep Roc Records, based in Hillsborough.

 

The SFC, part of the Wilson Special Collections Library, will create digital masters of rare archival recordings from its collections, which Yep Roc Records will produce, package and distribute.

 

“Music lovers and researchers have long come to Chapel Hill to hear the unique recordings that are in the Southern Folklife Collection. Through this partnership, we are able to bring historic roots music to audiences around the world,” said Steve Weiss, director of the SFC.

 

The inaugural release— Dolly Parton’s first single, “Puppy Love”—is a 45-RPM with a B-side of “Girl Left Alone.” The limited edition run will be available exclusively in participating stores on April 22, Record Store Day. Subsequent releases will be available on compact disc, vinyl and from digital providers.

 

“Like a first love, a first record for a singer will always be remembered above all others,” said Parton. “Hopefully I’ve improved since I recorded ‘Puppy Love,’ so don’t laugh…just enjoy.”

 

The first three releases from the SFC/Yep Roc partnership are:

 

Dolly Parton: “Puppy Love” and “Girl Left Alone” (April 22)

Dolly Parton recorded “Puppy Love” for Goldband Records in 1959, when she was just 13. This edition is re-mastered from the original mono master tape. Packaging will include reproductions of the original Goldband record labels, housed in a picture sleeve featuring an early promotional photograph of Parton.

 

“Swampland Jewels” (Sept. 22)

A compilation of classic Cajun music from Goldband Records,“Swampland Jewels” features recordings by Jo-El Sonnier, Boozoo Chavis, Iry LeJune Jr. and Cleveland Crochet. Packaging features the original album art of a bikini-clad girl riding a giant crawfish, and includes the booklet “From the Bayou,” a history of Goldband Records by music writer Mike Leadbitter and Goldband Records founder Eddie Shuler.

 

Doc Watson: “Live at the Club 47” (Date TBA)

A newly discovered performance by Doc Watson, “Live at the Club 47” was recorded in Cambridge, Massachusetts in 1963. This recording features unreleased songs from Watson’s early repertoire.

 

“This is an amazing opportunity for Yep Roc to work with Steve Weiss and the Southern Folklife Collection to help bring some incredible music to a worldwide audience of music fans,” said Glenn Dicker, co-owner and A&R for Yep Roc Records. “Walking through the vast archives for the first time to see, touch and, of course, hear what kinds of treasures are in the collection was a mind-blowing experience. Steve is doing a terrific job curating the collection and we’re honored to be part of the team.”

 

More information on the Southern Folklife Collection is available here. For purchase and online ordering details, visit www.yeproc.com.

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill



The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 110 master’s, 64 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s 317,000-plus alumni live in all 50 states and 156 other countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

About the Southern Folklife Collection

The Southern Folklife Collection is one of the nation’s foremost archival resources for the study of American folk music and popular culture. SFC holdings extensively document all forms of southern musical and oral traditions across the entire spectrum of individual and community expressive arts, as well as mainstream media production. Centered around the John Edwards Memorial Collection, the SFC is especially rich in materials documenting the emergence of old-time, country-western, hillbilly, bluegrass, blues, folk, gospel, rock and roll, Cajun and zydeco musics.

 

About Yep Roc Records

Founded by Glenn Dicker and Tor Hansen in 1997, Yep Roc Records is based in Hillsborough and calls itself “the artist-driven label that refuses to be labeled.” With a strong belief in the vision of each of its artists, Yep Roc Records strives to serve each project based on its unique characteristics. Over 20 years, the label has released albums from North Carolina and international artists, including Aoife O’Donovan, Chatham County Line, Dave Alvin, Los Straitjackets, Nick Lowe, Robyn Hitchcock and Tift Merritt. The label is exclusively distributed by Redeye.

 

Southern Folklife Collection contact: Steve Weiss, (919) 962-7105, smweiss@email.unc.edu

Yep Roc Records contact: Lellie Capwell, (818) 384-1189, Lellie@yeprocmusicgroup.com

University Communications contact: MC VanGraafeiland, (919) 962-7090, mc.vangraafeiland@unc.edu