UNC-Chapel Hill’s 2016 Harvey Award funds projects focused on hunger and educational success for children in foster care

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UNC-Chapel Hill’s 2016 Harvey Award funds projects focused on hunger and educational success for children in foster care

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— April 20, 2017) – Faculty members from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Center for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention and schools of medicine, education and social work will tackle the issues of local hunger and academic success for North Carolina foster children with funding provided by the 2016 C. Felix Harvey Award to Advance Institutional Priorities.

 

The Harvey Award reflects a core Carolina value—serving the public good—by recognizing exemplary faculty scholarship that addresses real-world challenges and reflects the University’s commitment to entrepreneurship and innovation.

 

Dr. Alice Ammerman, director of the Center for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention and professor of nutrition, Gillings School of Global Public Health and School of Medicine, will lead a coalition of community partners to increase access to healthy food for low-income consumers.

 

“This venture provides access to healthy food for low-income community members while also providing economic opportunities for local farmers and retailers,” said Ammerman. “The project will develop a sales model with dual price points—full price or slightly higher at an upscale food store, and significantly reduced prices at four small community grocery stores.”

 

The group will use local food production facilities and seasonally available local food to create healthy frozen meals that will be offered for sale at local markets. While inspired by the Mediterranean diet, the recipes will be adapted for the southern palate, featuring southern vegetables and locally produced meats. Local partners include Weaver Street Market, Carolina student start-up Seal the Seasons and Farmer Foodshare among others.

 

This year, through the generosity of the McNairy Foundation and the C. Felix Harvey Award endowment, a second award will fund a team developing a program to meet the academic needs of children in foster care: Dr. Molly Berkoff, associate professor of pediatrics and medical director of the Child Medical Evaluation Program and Child Protection Team, School of Medicine; Dr. Robert Martinez Jr., assistant professor, School of Education; and Laura Phipps, clinical assistant professor at the Family and Children’s Resource Program, Jordan Institute for Families at the School of Social Work.

 

Together, they will develop an online training toolkit to guide child welfare social workers as they assist foster care children and advocate for their academic needs. Some studies show that less than 60 percent of students in foster care finish high school, and among those who do, only 3 percent pursue postsecondary education. Though North Carolina currently has a strong child welfare system, there are no training tools focused on the specific academic needs of foster children. This project will assist with development of resources for both child welfare and the North Carolina school system to use in local districts.

 

“I’m very passionate about this work,” said Berkoff. “Since I arrived at Carolina in 2003, I’ve worked with children who have been victims of abuse and neglect, focusing on their medical needs. Many of them are in foster care and over time I realized that we could work better with our partners in the school system and the child welfare system to meet their educational needs.”

 

The late C. Felix Harvey was chairman of Harvey Enterprises & Affiliates and founder of the Little Bank Inc., both in Kinston, North Carolina. A 1943 Carolina graduate, he joined his family in 2007 to endow the award with a $2 million commitment. Five generations of Harveys have earned UNC-Chapel Hill degrees.

 

-Carolina-

 

Photos:

https://unc.photoshelter.com/galleries/G0000zIeBvX2w5xk/2016-Harvey-Award-Winners

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 110 master’s, 64 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s 317,000-plus alumni live in all 50 states and 156 other countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

Development contact: Kimberly Elenez, (919) 962-1628, kelenez@email.unc.edu

UNC-Chapel Hill Communications contact: MC VanGraafeiland, (919) 962-7090, mc.vangraafeiland@unc.edu

Six earn prestigious Massey Awards for outstanding service at UNC-Chapel Hill

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Six earn prestigious Massey Awards for outstanding service at UNC-Chapel Hill

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— April 19, 2017) – Six employees at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill have been selected by Chancellor Carol L. Folt to receive the 2017 C. Knox Massey Distinguished Service Awards, one of the most coveted distinctions earned by faculty and staff.

 

“The exemplary people recognized with the Massey Award help create the wonderful quality of life we experience at Carolina,” said Folt. “I thank each of the awardees for their extraordinary contributions to the Carolina Community. They put the heart and soul into what it means to serve others.”

 

The late C. Knox Massey of Durham created the awards in 1980 to recognize “unusual, meritorious or superior contributions” by University employees. In 1984, he joined the families of his son, Knox Massey Jr., and daughter, Kay Massey Weatherspoon, to create the Massey-Weatherspoon fund. Income from the fund supports the Massey Awards and Carolina Seminars. Due to endowment growth, the 2017 Massey Award winners will each receive a $10,000 stipend, an increase of $2,500 over previous years.

 

Chosen from campus-wide nominations, the Massey Award recipients will be honored at a luncheon hosted by Folt on April 22, where they will receive their stipend and an award citation. This year’s recipients are:

 

  • Allison Legge, interim registrar and senior associate director for enrollment and undergraduate admissions, Office of Undergraduate Admissions
  • San San Lwin, housekeeper, McIver Residence Hall/Kenan Community
  • Delmazine McAdoo, housekeeper, Connor Residence Hall/Connor Community
  • Sherry Salyer, teaching professor, director of undergraduate studies, Department of Exercise and Sport Science
  • Dave Stevens, senior associate dean of business and operations, Kenan-Flagler Business School
  • Charles Streeter, applications analyst, Student Affairs Information Technology, and Employee Forum chair

 

Allison Legge

Legge helps Carolina build a high-caliber student body from more than 45,000 first-year applicants and 2,500 transfer applicants each year. Known as a “consummate professional” and someone who “sets an unfailingly positive example,” she served the University as a member of a team that oversaw implementing software to link student services, human resources, payroll and finance. She also played a critical role in implementing ConnectCarolina, an online gateway for University administrative systems. “Her primary occupation in life is truly her work for the University and dedication to others,” wrote a nominator.

 

San San Lwin

Lwin’s true passion is looking after students in McIver Residence Hall in the Kenan Community. “She not only loves and cares about her job, but she also loves and cares about us, the residents of Kenan Community,” wrote a nominator. She is valued for her professionalism, dedication and friendliness, with more than 58 residents and colleagues endorsing her nomination in appreciation of her outstanding work ethic and ability to create a “home-away-from-home” in their residence hall. Another nominator describes her as, “a constant force of positivity in our community.”

 

Delmazine McAdoo

McAdoo works to improve the quality of life for students in Connor Residence Hall in the Connor Community. Noted for her outstanding job performance and extraordinary warmth and friendliness, McAdoo is described by her nominators as “always upbeat” and “compassionate and caring.” She was also nominated for performing her duties with the utmost attention to the regulations, standards and procedures necessary to the job. In the words of a student, “It is always a pleasure to see her in the halls, and her outstanding commitment to service is clear.”

 

Sherry Salyer

Salyer is heralded by her nominators as a talented professor, an outstanding leader and an especially generous and skilled mentor in the department of exercise and sport science. “She is a caring person who has gone above and beyond the call of duty to foster student development. … Carolina has been made a better educational institution because of her presence,” praised a colleague. Regularly rated as “excellent” on student course evaluations, she is a seven-time finalist for the department’s Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching Award, and winner in 2001 and 2007.

 

Dave Stevens

Stevens is described as “wise,” “kind” and “entrepreneurial,” and in the words of another nominator, his impact on Kenan-Flagler Business School has been “transformative.” His achievements as head of financial reporting and planning, information technology, human resources and facility planning include playing key roles in the construction of the McColl Building and the Rizzo Conference Center, as well as the expansion of the full-time M.B.A. program and launch of MBA@UNC and Weekend MBA. Colleagues praise his leadership, work ethic and attention to detail.

 

Charles Streeter

Streeter manages more than 30,000 database records that enable Carolina students to stay connected and informed about their student life. In 2013, he was elected chair of the Employee Forum, overseeing its budget, goals, planning and activities. His many contributions to the Employee Forum earned him the inaugural Kay Wijnberg Hovious Outstanding Forum Delegate Award. “One of his strongest talents is creating community among people from very disparate parts of the University, balancing individual and unique needs with the University as a whole,” wrote a nominator.

 

-Carolina-

 

Photos:

https://unc.photoshelter.com/galleries/C00005vwcu89jLJ4/G0000wLg_xVfvlSI/Massey-Award-Winners

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 110 master’s, 64 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s 317,000-plus alumni live in all 50 states and 156 other countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

Development contact: Kimberly Elenez, (919) 962-1628, kelenez@email.unc.edu

UNC-Chapel Hill Communications contact: MC VanGraafeiland, (919) 962-7090, mc.vangraafeiland@unc.edu

UNC Lineberger receives $4 million gift to support promising new cancer treatment

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UNC Lineberger receives $4 million gift to support promising new cancer treatment

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C. – April 10, 2017) – Alice Lehman of Charlotte has donated $4 million to the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill to fund the new cellular immunotherapy research program at UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center.

 

UNC Lineberger is among a select few academic cancer centers in the United States with the staff expertise and technical infrastructure to pursue this promising new cancer research, which involves genetically engineering patients’ immune cells to fight their cancer.

 

We’ve made progress over the years in treating some types of cancer, but many others remain virtually untreatable and have been for decades,” said UNC Lineberger Director Norman E. Sharpless, M.D. “Cellular immunotherapies hold tremendous promise to change the landscape of cancer care and the trajectory of people’s lives. We’re very grateful to Alice for helping us fulfill that promise.”

 

Lehman, a retired executive vice president and director of investor relations at Wachovia Corp., lost her husband Frank to colon cancer.

 

Over the past 10 years, I have lost three close family members to cancer. My journey to try to find a cure for my husband, my sister and my father convinced me that the emerging use of cellular immunotherapy was the only hope for those with metastatic cancer,” said Lehman. “I was so excited when I learned that UNC Lineberger was on the cutting edge of this emerging technology and that they were planning clinical trials to combat many types of cancers. The minute I found out, I knew that I wanted to be part of the solution both as a member of the Board of Visitor’s, and more importantly, as a financial supporter of the immunotherapy program.“

 

UNC Lineberger recently launched clinical trials to gauge the effectiveness of cellular immunotherapy, and initial results have shown success. Ian Dale, 60, of Cary, was diagnosed in January 2016 with anaplastic large cell lymphoma and told he would live just four to six months without treatment. He underwent chemotherapy and radiation, but the cancer spread to his liver and spleen. With cellular immunotherapy treatment, it went into remission.

 

“I have a whole new lease on life,” Dale said. “I’m here when I probably wouldn’t be.”

 

Cellular immunotherapy involves extracting disease-fighting immune cells – called T-cells – from the patient’s blood, and genetically engineering them to recognize the patient’s cancer. The researchers use a modified virus to insert DNA into the T-cells, which enables them to recognize and destroy cancer cells. The hybrid T-cells are then multiplied by the tens of thousands and infused back into the patient. Since the cells originate in the patient, they are less likely to be rejected, which is the treatment’s major advantage.

 

Current clinical trials at UNC Lineberger target Hodgkin lymphoma and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Plans for additional trials include treating patients with acute leukemia, multiple myeloma and certain brain cancers.

 

Along with Lehman’s gift, the UNC Lineberger cellular immunology program is supported by the state’s University Cancer Research Fund, the McMichael Family Foundation and the Barnhill Family Foundation.

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill



The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 110 master’s, 64 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s 317,000-plus alumni live in all 50 states and 156 other countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

UNC Lineberger contact: Bill Schaller, (919) 962-3405, bill_schaller@med.unc.edu

University Communications contact: MC VanGraafeiland, (919) 962-7090, mc.vangraafeiland@unc.edu

 

UNC-Chapel Hill launches University-wide initiative to integrate the arts, learning and public service with Arts Everywhere Day, on April 7

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IMG_3096 copy

 

UNC-Chapel Hill launches University-wide initiative to integrate the arts, learning and public service with Arts Everywhere Day, on April 7

 

First annual campus arts celebration to feature more than 50 performances and installations by 40 partners across 20 campus sites

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.—April 4, 2017) – Media are invited to join University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Chancellor Carol L. Folt and Special Assistant to the Chancellor for the Arts Emil Kang at 1 p.m. on April 7 on a tour of diverse student and professional arts experiences during Arts Everywhere Day, the official launch of Carolina’s groundbreaking Arts Everywhere initiative.

 

Converting the campus into a creative hub, Arts Everywhere Day will engage the University community with diverse arts experiences and opportunities for creative expression. Along with professional installations, student and departmental work will be on view and more than 50 pop-up performances by student arts groups are scheduled. Creative, hands-on activities will also take place at The Pit, Polk Place and Rams Head Plaza.

 

With the belief that the arts are an essential tool for learning and engaging communities, Folt created Arts Everywhere to revolutionize academics and enhance public service at Carolina. Kang will drive this long-term strategic initiative to invest in sustained creative practice, live arts experiences and arts learning, with the goal of making Carolina a leader in transforming the 21st century liberal arts education.

 

Chancellor Folt and Emil Kang will join students at 1 p.m. to paint the Arts Everywhere mural wall. Media are invited to cover and are encouraged to join them as they tour a variety of installations, exhibits and performances across campus. Both will be available for questions at the completion of the tour.

 

Friday, April 7

1 p.m. ET

Mural Wall, The Pit (in front of UNC Student Stores)

207 South Rd.

UNC-Chapel Hill campus

 

Media unable to complete the full tour are encouraged to cover campus activities on their own. The program of events kicks off at 12 p.m. and includes:

 

  • Arts Everywhere Mural Wall – Designed by the UNC Arts Ambassadors, in collaboration with the Undergraduate Art Association, the wall will feature outlines of figures representing Carolina students and community members. The campus community is invited to fill in portions of the outlined design with paints that will be provided.
  • Campus Keys – Ten pianos (nine painted by students), installed at outdoor locations across campus, will be played by student art groups and music students during class changes (12:05 p.m., 1:10 p.m., 2:15 p.m. and 3:20 p.m.). The pianos will remain on campus though April 12 and will be open for anyone to play.
  • Capstone event for Maker-in-Residence – Carolina Maker-in-Residence Donovan Zimmerman, of Paperhand Puppet Intervention, will showcase his mask work with Carolina students at the Murray Hall Makerspace. The event will culmintate with a presentation of these larger-than-life pieces at 3:30 p.m. at Historic Playmakers Theater.
  • Dumpster Monster – This unique installation by Carolina Performing Arts DisTIL Fellow Robin Frohardt on Polk Place sends a poignant message about the inordinate amount of waste that humanity contributes to the earth.
  • Los Trompos – A large-scale interactive outdoor installation by Mexican designers Héctor Esrawe and Ignacio Cadena. “Los Trompos” is inspired by spinning tops and will be on view at the Ackland Art Museum, Rams Head Plaza and the Campus Y courtyard through Sept. 17.
  • Snake Pendulum demonstrations – Designed and built by students and faculty of the physics and math departments, this kinetic sculpture, on view in front of Phillips Hall, will demonstrate tension, phase and simple harmonic motion, as well as the creativity inherent in both disciplines.
  • Evening lectures and performances – The day will close with a keynote speech by Nigerian novelist Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s at the Fifth Annual Global Africana Conference and evening performances by Kenan Theater Company, UNC Opera and UNC Baroque Ensemble and PlayMakers Repertory Company.

 

Media Check-In: Media must check-in at The Pit no earlier than 12:40 p.m. MC VanGraafeiland (Cell: 646-345-2802) will be the on-site contact.

 

Media Parking: A limited number of spaces will be available for press in lots near the Frank Porter Graham Student Union. Contact MC VanGraafeiland (mc.vangraafeiland@unc.edu) by 3 p.m. on Thursday, April 6 to reserve parking.

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill



The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 110 master’s, 64 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s 317,000-plus alumni live in all 50 states and 156 other countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

Arts Everywhere contact: Rachel Ash, (919) 843-9088, rachel_ash@unc.edu

Communications and Public Affairs contact: MC VanGraafeiland, (919) 962-7090, mc.vangraafeiland@unc.edu

Welcome home the 2017 NCAA Championship men’s basketball team, April 4

For immediate use

 

Welcome home the 2017 NCAA Championship men’s basketball team, April 4

 

Coach Roy Williams and team to celebrate program’s 6th NCAA title at Dean E. Smith Center with students, faculty, staff and community

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— April 4, 2017) – The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill will hold a welcome reception for the 2017 NCAA Championship men’s basketball team at 6:30 p.m. on Tuesday, April 4 in the Dean E. Smith Center. Media may check in at the Smith Center after 2 p.m. Doors open to the public at 5 p.m.

 

RSVP: Media intending to cover are asked to RSVP by 12 p.m. on April 4, by emailing mediarelations@unc.edu or calling the media line at (919) 445-8555.

 

Arrival: Bring media credentials; enter through gate D entrance beginning at 2 p.m.

 

Media Section: There will be a section reserved for media inside the Smith Center. Cameras can set up at the bottom of Section 100. See staff at media check-in upon arrival and you will be directed accordingly.

 

Assistance on-site: Call Joanne Peters (919) 593-2344 or the media line at (919) 445-8555.

 

Media parking: Satellite trucks may park behind the Smith Center. Media are asked to send only one truck per station. Set-up may begin after 2 p.m. Limited public parking is available in the following lots beginning at 5 p.m: Manning Lot, Bowles Lot, Business School Deck, Craige Deck, Jackson Deck, Cardinal Deck. Road closure and parking restriction information is available online.

 

Cable: If using cable, approximately 1,000 feet is needed to reach from trucks in the back lot to filming areas inside the Smith Center.

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 110 master’s, 64 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s 317,000-plus alumni live in all 50 states and 156 other countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

UNC-Chapel Hill Communications contact: MC VanGraafeiland, (919) 962-7090, mc.vangraafeiland@unc.edu

150 at UNC-Chapel Hill inducted into Phi Beta Kappa

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150 at UNC-Chapel Hill inducted into Phi Beta Kappa

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C. – March 28, 2017) – Phi Beta Kappa, the nation’s oldest and most honored college honorary society, has inducted 150 University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill students as new members.

 

The recent induction ceremony featured remarks by Chancellor Carol L. Folt and a keynote address by Carol A. Hee, clinical associate professor of strategy and entrepreneurship. New members received certificates and Phi Beta Kappa keys, the organization’s symbol.

 

Phi Beta Kappa membership is open to undergraduates in the college and professional degree programs who meet stringent eligibility requirements.

 

A student who has completed 75 hours of course work in the liberal arts and sciences with a GPA of 3.85 or better (on a 4-point scale) is eligible for membership. Also eligible is any student who has completed 105 hours of course work in the liberal arts and sciences with a 3.75 GPA. Grades earned at other universities are not considered. Less than 1 percent of all college students qualify.

 

Past and present Phi Beta Kappa members from across the country have included 17 American presidents and numerous artistic, intellectual and political leaders. Seven of the current U.S. Supreme Court Justices are members.

 

Phi Beta Kappa has 286 chapters nationwide. UNC’s chapter, Alpha of North Carolina, was founded in 1904 and is the oldest of seven chapters in the state. Each year, Phi Beta Kappa chapters and alumni associations across the country raise and distribute more than $1 million in awards, scholarships and prizes benefiting high schools and college students.

 

Phi Beta Kappa officers at Carolina for 2016-2017 are students Aaron Homburger, president; Kylie Nowicki, vice president; and Guilia Curcelli, recording secretary. James L. Leloudis, professor of history, associate dean for Honors Carolina and director of the James M. Johnston Center for Undergraduate Excellence, is chapter executive secretary and faculty advisor.

 

Listed below are 149 inductees, 93 of whom are from North Carolina. The names appear below in alphabetical order by North Carolina county, then by state and country. All study in the College of Arts and Sciences except where otherwise noted. One student chose not to be listed.

 

Alamance County

  • Andrew Carden, a senior with an exercise and sport science major, son of Eric Carden and Dana Carden of Burlington.

 

Brunswick County

  • Amber Nicole Fulford, a junior with biology and anthropology majors and a chemistry minor, daughter of Adam Fulford Sr. and Crystal Fulford of Supply.

 

Buncombe County

  • Catherine McCann Blalock, a senior with a political science major and a public policy minor, daughter of Richard Blalock and Jennifer McCann of Asheville.
  • Michael William Thomas, a senior with a history major, son of Michael Thomas and Cathy Thomas of Asheville
  • Evelyn Scott Yarborough, a senior with peace, war, and defense and English majors and a history minor, daughter of William Yarborough, III of Greenville, South Carolina and Denise Yarborough of Asheville.

 

Cabarrus County

  • Alexander Warren Griffin, a senior with a classical archaeology major and a history minor, son of Dr. Keith Griffin and Stacey Griffin of Concord.
  • Robert Thomas Short III, a senior with a psychology major and a chemistry minor, son of Robert Short, Jr. and Linda Short of Concord.
  • Elizabeth Marie Thompson, a senior with an exercise and sport science major, of Harrisburg.

 

Chatham County

  • Philip Bray Straughn, a senior with a chemistry major and a computer science minor, son of Charles Straughn and Linda Straughn of Chapel Hill.

 

Craven County

  • Jacob Fisher, a senior with a computer science major, of New Bern.

 

Cumberland County

  • Srihita Bongu, a senior with economics and chemistry majors, daughter of Ram Mohan Bongu and Deepika Bongu of Fayetteville.
  • Brian Michael Fields, a junior with a political science major and urban and regional planning and history minors, son of Michael Fields and Becky Fields of Fayetteville.
  • Gillian Elizabeth Manning, a senior with an art history major and a Latin minor, daughter of MD Kenneth Manning and Brynn Manning of Fayetteville.

 

Dare County

  • Kathrin Morgan Hennigan, a junior with a psychology major and a neuroscience minor, of Kitty Hawk.

 

Durham County

  • Emma Marina Bogerd, a junior with biology and environmental sciences majors and a chemistry minor, of Durham.
  • Eliza McClellan Pentecost Farren, a senior with a global studies major and a Chinese minor, daughter of David Farren of Chicago, Illinois and Martha Pentecost Jr. of Durham.
  • Andrew Charles Kelly, a junior with a computer science major and astronomy and mathematics minors, son of Charles Kelly and Barbara Kelly of Durham.

 

Forsyth County

  • Katherine Butler Elliott, a senior with a business administration major and a coaching education minor, daughter of Dr. J. Grady Elliott Jr. and Kristine Elliott of Winston-Salem.
  • Lily Jewel Jones, a junior with a nutrition major and Chinese and chemistry minors, daughter of Dr. Beverly Jones III and Janet Jones of Winston-Salem.
  • Christina Margaret Korzen, a junior with environmental studies and public policy majors, daughter of John Korzen and Catherine Korzen of Kernersville.
  • Elizabeth Salisbury Neill, a senior with psychology and political science majors, of Winston-Salem.
  • Samuel Leo Pranikoff, a senior with a political science major and a sustainability studies minor, son of Dr. Thomas Pranikoff and Karen Pranikoff of Winston-Salem.
  • Dustin P Sneed, a junior with an economics major and a chemistry minor, son of Steve Sneed and Kathy Sneed of Winston-Salem.

 

Gaston County

  • Mitchell Coles Hanks, a senior with an exercise and sport science major, of Belmont.

 

Guilford County

  • Erin Kennedy Allred, a senior with a communication studies major and a dramatic art minor, of Oak Ridge.
  • Suejette Davidson Black, a senior with an economics major and a chemistry minor, daughter of Richard Black of Wilmington and Sydney Cardone of Greensboro.
  • Katherine Marie Corum, a senior with a geography major and history and women’s and gender studies minors, daughter of Daniel Corum and Megan Corum of Pleasant Garden.
  • Jordan Robert Elliott, a senior with a computer science major and a history minor, son of Dennis Elliott and Inez Elliott of Brown Summit.
  • Anne Bennett Osteen, a senior with business administration and English majors, daughter of Bill Osteen Jr. and Elizabeth Osteen of Greensboro.
  • Shannon Elise Paylor, a senior with a mathematical decision sciences major and a French minor, daughter of Flynn Paylor and Deb Paylor.
  • Catherine Marie Phipps, a senior with a sociology major and a Spanish for the professions minor, daughter of David Phipps and Lynn Phipps of High Point.

 

Johnston County

  • Lewis Carpenter Flowers III, a senior with economics and history majors and a philosophy, politics and economics minor, son of Lewis Flowers Jr. and Kimberly Flowers of Manila, Philippines.

 

Mecklenburg County

  • Brooke Alexandria Davies, a senior with a peace, war and defense major, daughter of David Davies and Michele Fasciana of Charlotte.
  • Morgan Elizabeth Ferone, a junior with a biology major and religious studies and chemistry minors, daughter of Michael Ferone and Susan Ferone of Charlotte.
  • Laura Wells Gill, a senior with a computer science major and a business administration minor, daughter of Thold Gill and Ellen Gill of Charlotte.
  • Daniel Aryon Khordehforosh, a senior with a chemistry major and biology and business administration minors, son of Parvaneh Taheri of Charlotte.
  • Kayla Grace Kopczynski, a senior with a biology major, daughter of Todd Kopczynski and Michelle Moore of Charlotte.
  • Lee Powell Landess, a senior with a music major and chemistry and biology minors, son of Bart Landess and Fran Landess of Charlotte.
  • Lewis McAden Malone, a junior with computer science and philosophy majors and a writing for the screen and stage minor, son of James Malone and Mary Malone of Chapel Hill.
  • Allison Marvin, a junior with a biology major and a chemistry minor, of Charlotte.
  • Bharath Rama, a junior with biochemistry and mathematics majors, son of Ganapathy Rama and Savithri Konamme of Matthews.
  • Sharath Rama, a junior with a biostatistics major and a chemistry minor, son of Ganapathy Rama and Savithri Konamme of Matthews.
  • Emily Anne Reckard, a senior with anthropology and environmental studies majors and a geography minor, daughter of Heidi Reckard and Stan Reckard of Charlotte.
  • Roman John Rogowski, a senior with a computer science major and a mathematics minor, of Huntersville.
  • Anne Rutledge, a senior with history and global studies majors and an education minor, of Davidson.
  • Rachel Carolyn Cheng Uri, a senior with a psychology major and a neuroscience minor, of Charlotte.
  • Michelle Zixin Yu, a junior with biology and communication studies majors and a studio art minor, daughter of Jennifer Yu of Charlotte.
  • Huanyu Zhu, a junior with a biochemistry major and a computer science minor, son of Xiuli Lin and Chenfu Zhu of Charlotte.

 

Moore County

  • Elaine Kaye Kearney, a junior with biostatistics and computer science majors, daughter of Wayne Kearney Jr. and Jennifer Kearney of Pinehurst.
  • Grant Alexander King, a senior with economics and linguistics majors and a Japanese minor, of Pinehurst.

 

New Hanover County

  • Katharine Chase Frazier, a senior with an English major, of Wilmington.
  • Justine Taylor Orlovsky-Schnitzler, a senior with history and women’s and gender studies majors and a social and economic justice minor, daughter of Steven Schnitzler and Lisa Schnitzler of Wilmington.
  • Ellie Scialabba, a senior with a psychology major and geography and religious studies minors, daughter of Dr. Fred Scialabba and Dr. Annette Scialabba of Wilmington.

 

Onslow County

  • Erika Lynn Booth, a senior with biology and psychology majors and a chemistry minor, daughter of Ginger Booth and Scott Booth of Jacksonville.

 

Orange County

  • Emily Belding, a senior with political science and global studies majors and an environmental studies minor, of Hillsborough.
  • Susan K Leichliter, a senior with a women’s and gender studies major and a social and economic justice minor, of Chapel Hill.
  • Nathaniel Pritchard, a senior with mathematical decision sciences and economics majors and a Spanish for the professions minor, son of William Pritchard and Michelle Pritchard of Chapel Hill.
  • Kevin Su, a senior with a psychology major and cognitive science and chemistry minors, of Chapel Hill.
  • Teddy Wong, Jr., a junior with chemistry and mathematics majors, of Chapel Hill.

 

Pitt County

  • Patrick John Moloney, a senior with economics and business administration majors, son of Rob Moloney and Maria Moloney of Greenville.
  • Brendon Connor Murray, a junior with archaeology and history majors, son of Dr. Kevin Murray and Dr. Maria Murray of Greenville.

 

Rockingham County

  • Nathan Ray Hayes, a senior with political science and history majors, son of Kenneth Hayes and Teresa Hayes of Reidsville.

 

Union County

  • Megan Nicole Brown, a senior with a Hispanic linguistics major and a speech and hearing sciences minor, daughter of Mark Brown and Elaine Brown of Weddington.
  • Jessica Reggan Hoffman, a junior with environmental sciences and mathematics majors and a chemistry minor, daughter of Greg Hoffman and Chandra Hoffman of Indian Trail.
  • Jeet H Patel, a senior with a quantitative biology major, son of Hitesh Patel and Tejal Patel of Monroe.

 

Wake County

  • Jacqueline Ivy Battaile, a senior with a history major, daughter of Lawrence Battaile and Dr. Melinda Battaile of Raleigh.
  • Abigail Elizabeth Bell, a senior with a global studies major and Spanish and geography minors, daughter of Thomas Bell and Julia Bell and of Cary.
  • William Michael Buddendeck, a junior with economics and music majors and a Spanish for the professions minor, son of Michael Buddendeck and Karen Buddendeck of Cary.
  • Lin Cao, a junior with biology and anthropology majors and a chemistry minor, daughter of Lianyong Cao and Wei Wang of Cary.
  • Bailey Reed DeSimone, a senior with history and global studies majors and a German minor, daughter of Doug DeSimone of Raleigh and Patty Sandberg of Cary.
  • Eileen May Harvey, a senior with a global studies major and Chinese and urban studies and planning minors, daughter of David Harvey and Grace Harvey of Cary.
  • Wendy Kally Ji, a senior with a public policy major and a business administration minor, daughter of Dr. Wan Ji and Dr. Li Cai of Cary.
  • Kaitlyn Rose Johnson, a senior with a biology major and chemistry and women’s and gender studies minors, daughter of David Johnson and Kristyn Johnson of Raleigh.
  • Nina Rachel Joseph, a junior with mathematical decision sciences and computer science majors and a Jewish studies minor, of Cary.
  • Stephanie Kim, a junior with a chemistry major and a Spanish for the professions minor, daughter of Dr. Kalhee Kim and Jenny Kim of Cary.
  • Sarah Gray Lesley, a junior with English and music majors and a creative writing minor, daughter of Robert Lesley and Lu-Ann Lesley of Raleigh.
  • Dana Michelle Lingenfelser, a senior with an environmental studies major and a public policy minor, daughter of Charles Lingenfelser and Denise Lingenfelser of Fuquay-Varina.
  • Charles Bracken Lumsden, a senior with history and anthropology majors and a Spanish minor, son of William Lumsden and Margaret Lumsden of Raleigh.
  • Ryan K. McCord, a junior with public policy and global studies majors and an African studies minor, of Raleigh.
  • Aakash Mehta, a junior with environmental health sciences and biology majors and a chemistry minor, of Holly Springs.
  • Alexander Scot O’Hara, a senior with a biology major and chemistry and neuroscience minors, son of Jeffrey O’Hara and Brenda O’Hara of Cary.
  • William Robert Ostrom, a senior with a nutrition major and a chemistry minor, son of Bob Ostrom and Melissa Ostrom of Cary.
  • Timothy Michael Preston, a senior with an exercise and sport science major and a chemistry minor, of Raleigh.
  • Laura Elizabeth Roberson, a junior with biology and geography majors, daughter of Mark Roberson and Muriel Roberson of Cary.
  • Halle Marie Ronk, a junior with biology and chemistry majors, daughter of Kevin Ronk and Lorraine Ronk of Raleigh.
  • Rohanit Singh, a junior with environmental health sciences and biology majors and a Spanish for the medical professions minor, son of Dr. Manmohan Singh and Ritu Singh of Cary.
  • Priyanka Srinivas, a junior with a biology major and neuroscience and chemistry minors, daughter of Srinivasa Boregowda and Bharati Srinivasa of Cary.
  • Olivia Terrell, a senior with a communication studies major and an English minor, of Cary.
  • Paige Emily Trexler, a junior with a biology major and chemistry and Spanish for the professions minors, daughter of Mark Trexler and Suzanne Trexler of Cary.
  • Audrey Elizabeth Woolard, a senior with English and history majors and a creative writing minor, daughter of James Woolard Jr. and Michelle Woolard of Raleigh.
  • Andrew Joseph Notz Zalesak, a sophomore with chemistry and music majors, of Cary.

 

Watauga County

  • Lynde Marie Wangler, a junior with a psychology major and neuroscience and biology minors, of Boone.

 

Wilkes County

  • Erin Kolstad, a senior with media and journalism and psychology majors, daughter of Charles Kolstad and Catherine Kolstad of Wilkesboro.

 

Connecticut

  • Nikaya Smith, a senior with a mathematics major and a mathematical decision sciences minor, daughter of Clarence Smith and Penny Smith of West Hartford.

 

Delaware

  • Benjamin Clyde Creekmore, a junior with biochemistry and biophysics majors and a biology minor, son of Dr. J. Richard Creekmore and Lisa Creekmore of Wilmington.

 

Florida

  • Jonathan Tyler Alvarez, a junior with a biomedical and health sciences engineering major, son of Jose Alvarez of Miami.
  • Martina Knechel, a junior with biochemistry and biology majors, of Gainesville.
  • Diana Cristina Lopez, a junior with biology and Hispanic literature and cultures majors and a neuroscience minor, daughter of Jaime Lopez and Diana B. Lopez of Miami.
  • Shelby L. Waldron, a junior with psychology and exercise and sport science majors, daughter of R. Larry Waldron and Dolores Waldron of Brandon.

 

Georgia

  • Sarah Ellyn Boland, a senior with health behavior and physics majors and a chemistry minor, daughter of Dr. Ryan Boland and Dr. Pam Boland of Savannah.
  • Prasanna Kumar, a junior with psychology and economics majors and a chemistry minor, son of Dr. Sri Kumar and Ganga Kumar of Buford.
  • Alexandra Marie Paré, a senior with a broadcast and electronic journalism major and an entrepreneurship minor, daughter of Richard Paré and Anna Paré of Atlanta.
  • Amy Elizabeth Shehan, a senior with a political science major and Spanish for the professions and social and economic justice minors, daughter of Wayne Shehan and Mary Shehan of Alpharetta.
  • Mary Caroline Tarallo, a junior with biology and chemistry majors, daughter of Frank Tarallo of Atlanta and Cathy Roush of Hilton Head, South Carolina.

 

Maryland

  • Emily Claire Crockett, a senior with information science and art history majors and an Italian minor, daughter of David Crockett Jr. of Zimmerman, Minnesota and Susan Crockett of Raleigh, North Carolina.
  • Martha Isaacs, a senior with a geography major and city and regional planning and philosophy minors, daughter of William Isaacs and Louise Isaacs of Baltimore.
  • Emma Johnson, a senior with political science and history majors and a women’s and gender studies minor, daughter of Mark Johnson and Donna Tasso-Johnson of Potomac.
  • Christina Marie Kochanski, a senior with an economics major and a philosophy, politics, and economics minor, daughter of Matthew Kochanski and Margaret Kochanski of Columbia.
  • Spencer Kyle Lichtenberg, a senior with computer science and Asian studies majors, son of Marc Lichtenberg and Leslie Lichtenberg of Baltimore.
  • Carolyn Jennifer Reuland, a junior with biology and Spanish majors and a chemistry minor, daughter of Dr. Charles Reuland and Melissa Reuland of Baltimore.

 

Massachusetts

  • Andrea Joyce McSweeney, a senior with a biology major and a Spanish for the professions minor, daughter of Gregory McSweeney and Joyce McSweeney of Needham.
  • Benjamin Edward Shirley, a senior with a health policy and management major and a Spanish for the professions minor, of Beverly.

 

Missouri

  • Michael Gu, a junior with computer science and mathematics majors, of St. Louis.

 

New Jersey

  • William Matthew Townley Christoffersen, a junior with English and American studies majors and a music minor, of Lawrenceville.
  • Kimberly Mae Hoover, a junior with a psychology major and chemistry and biology minors, of Medford.

 

New Mexico

  • Ana Cutts Dougherty, a senior with economics and global studies majors and a philosophy, politics and economics minor, daughter of Tim Dougherty and Dr. Katharine Dougherty of Interlochen, Michigan.

 

New York

  • David Cortese DeGenova, a senior with a philosophy major and mathematical decision sciences and entrepreneurship minors, of Croton on Hudson.
  • Kelly Lynn Jasiura, a senior with public relations and public policy majors, daughter of Richard Jasiura and Joyce Jasiura of Buffalo.
  • Diane G Li, a senior with a public policy major, daughter of Minbin Li and Zhuobin Chen of New Hyde Park.
  • Isabel Maria Pinheiro, a senior with an interdisciplinary studies major and a composition, rhetoric and digital literacy minor, of Menands.
  • Matthew Ragusa, a junior with business administration and computer science majors, son of Gerard Ragusa and Jamie Ragusa of Staten Island.
  • Kathryn Nell Ryan, a senior with a psychology major and a Spanish for the professions minor, daughter of Greg Ryan and Eileen Ryan of Rockville Centre.
  • Danielle Christina Spitzer, a senior with biology and women’s and gender studies majors and a chemistry minor, daughter of Peter Spitzer and Doris Spitzer of Albany.

 

Ohio

  • Michael Louis Palumbo III, a junior with astrophysics and Latin majors, son of Michael Palumbo Jr. and Christina Palumbo of Concord.

 

Oregon

  • Ashley Han, a junior with a biology major and music and chemistry minors, daughter of Dr. Dong-ho Han and Mi-young Han of Beaverton.

 

Pennsylvania

  • Brian Charles Shields, a senior with philosophy and economics majors, son of Joseph Shields and Valerie Shields of Pittsburgh.

 

South Carolina

  • Aaron Paul Lovett, a senior with communication studies and documentary studies majors and a creative writing minor, son of the late James Lovett of Charleston and Iris Lovett of Charlotte, North Carolina.
  • Madeline Norris, a senior with English and psychology majors and a creative writing minor, daughter of Terry Melloh of Columbia.
  • Sarah Suzanne Renfro, a junior with an environmental health sciences major and a computer science minor, daughter of Dr. John Renfro and Dr. Suzanne Renfro of Greenville.

 

Texas

  • Gefen Kusin-Kline, a senior with an English major, of Dallas.
  • Katherine Anne Stotesbery, a senior with public policy and political science majors and an entrepreneurship minor, daughter of William Stotesbery and Susan Stotesbery of Austin.

 

Vermont

  • Anne Sutton, a junior with music and geography majors, daughter of Edward Sutton and Lynn Sutton of Burlington.

 

Virginia

  • Grant Scott Broussard, a junior with biology and chemistry majors, of Glen Allen.
  • Julia Whipple Gallini, a senior with biostatistics and mathematics majors and a music minor, daughter of Peter Gallini and Alisha Gallini of Richmond.
  • Michael Joseph Sanders, a junior with history and English majors and a philosophy, politics and economics minor, son of David Sanders and Jane Kotlarski of McLean.
  • Kara Louise Walker, a junior with information science and Latin majors, daughter of Dr. Richard Walker and Ellen Walker of Blacksburg.

 

West Virginia

  • Jasmine Shishir Shah, a senior with biology and psychology majors and a chemistry minor, daughter of Dr. Shishir Shah and Bindiya Shah of Wheeling.

 

Canada

  • Ariana B. Vaisey, a senior with an economics major and a geography minor, of Vancouver.

 

China

  • Xuewen Chen, a junior with biology and chemistry majors, of Hangzhou.
  • Zhengyang Fang, a junior with computer science and mathematical decision sciences majors, son of Lei Fang and Shuxian Wu of Jinan.
  • Jialing Jiang, a senior with economics and philosophy majors, of Beijing.
  • Ao Joseph Qiao, a junior with public policy and economics majors and a mathematical decision science minor, of Anhui.
  • Shengding Sun, a junior with a mathematics major and a computer science minor, of Beijing.
  • Zijun Tian, a junior with mathematical decision sciences and economics majors and a mathematics minor, of Jinan.
  • Xingzhi Wang, a junior with chemistry and mathematics majors and a geography minor, of Guangzhou.
  • Zicheng Ye, a junior with mathematics and economics majors, son of Boyu Ye and Wei Sun.
  • Wei Zhou, a senior with business journalism and political science majors, daughter of Qingsong Zhou and Qiuling Hu of Zhengzhou.

 

England

  • James Patrick Ellsmoor, a May 2016 graduate with geography and economics majors and a sustainability studies minor, son of Stephen Ellsmoor and Jane Ellsmoor of Market Drayton.

 

Peru

  • Gerardo Manuel Perez Goncalves, a junior with a biochemistry major and mathematics and biology minors, son of Leopoldo Perez Padilla and Yracy Goncalves Pereira of Morrisville, North Carolina.

 

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill



The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 110 master’s, 64 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s 317,000-plus alumni live in all 50 states and 156 other countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

Phi Beta Kappa contact: Jason Clemmons, (919) 843-7756, jclem@email.unc.edu

University Communications contact: MC VanGraafeiland, (919) 962-7090, mc.vangraafeiland@unc.edu

UNC-Chapel Hill student named 2017 Gates Cambridge Scholar

For immediate use

 

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UNC-Chapel Hill student named 2017 Gates Cambridge Scholar

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C. – Feb. 21, 2017) – Adriano Bellotti, a current student in the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s School of Medicine, has been awarded the prestigious Gates Cambridge Scholarship, which provides full support for graduate study at the University of Cambridge in England.

 

Bellotti, 24, a Charlotte native, is among 36 Americans selected for the award from 800 U.S. applicants. He is Carolina’s sixth Gates Cambridge Scholar and its fourth consecutive recipient since 2013.

 

The Gates Cambridge enables academically outstanding students from outside the United Kingdom, with a strong interest in social leadership and responsibility, to pursue graduate study at the storied university.

 

“It is wonderful to see Adriano selected for this outstanding award that will help him advance his studies in the development and application of mathematical models to create new biomedical engineering solutions leading to breakthrough clinical treatments and technologies,” said Chancellor Carol L. Folt. “I am very excited for Adriano and know his studies at Cambridge will provide an excellent opportunity for him to continue his studies.”

 

As an undergraduate, Bellotti began to appreciate the pragmatic perspective and mathematical methods of research in biomedical engineering. He sought to apply this empirical approach to medicine, which led him to pursue a combined master’s and doctoral degree program at Carolina.

 

At Cambridge, Bellotti plans to complete a 3-year doctoral degree, studying neurophysiology through computational modeling, specifically neuroplasticity in both single neurons and neuronal circuits. Using this research, coupled with his engineering background and clinical experience, he aspires to lead medical researchers in facilitating the translation of new treatments and technologies into the clinic.

 

“The Gates Cambridge enables academically outstanding students from outside the United Kingdom, with a strong interest in social leadership and responsibility, to pursue graduate study,” said professor Inger Brodey, director of Carolina’s Office of Distinguished Scholarships. “Adriano’s selection is quite an honor for him as well as for Carolina.”

 

Established in 2000, the Gates Cambridge Scholarship is funded by a $210 million donation to the University of Cambridge by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.

 

-Carolina-

Photo: http://unc.photoshelter.com/galleries/C00005plBUJIuM28/G0000mfpZgv1j.1w/I0000QsncAC6plrE/Adriano-Bellotti-jpg-jpeg

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill



The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 110 master’s, 64 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s 317,000-plus alumni live in all 50 states and 156 other countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

Office of Distinguished Scholarships contacts: Inger Brodey, (919) 923-1414, brodey@email.unc.edu; and Malindi Robinson (919) 843-7757, malindi@email.unc.edu; Twitter @ODS_UNCCH

Communications and Public Affairs contact: MC VanGraafeiland, (919) 962-7090, mc.vangraafeiland@unc.edu

Maen Rashid Ariekat of the PLO Delegation to the US to speak at Carolina March 6

For immediate use

 

Maen Rashid Ariekat of the PLO Delegation to the US to speak at Carolina March 6

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C. – Feb. 20, 2017) – Maen Rashid Areikat, a diplomat and chief of the Palestinian Liberation Organization (PLO) Delegation to the United States, will visit the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill on March 6. During his visit, Areikat will deliver a talk titled “The Palestinian-Israeli Conflict and the New U.S. Administration” at 5:30 p.m. in the Nelson Mandela Auditorium in the FedEx Global Education Center.

 

Areikat’s visit to Carolina is held in conjunction with the Ambassadors Forum, which brings to campus prominent diplomats, politicians and business leaders to deliver public lectures and conduct seminars for graduate students. Visit the UNC Global website for more information.

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill



The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 110 master’s, 64 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s 317,000-plus alumni live in all 50 states and 156 other countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

University Communications contact: MC VanGraafeiland, (919) 962-7090, mc.vangraafeiland@unc.edu

PlayMakers Repertory Company announces 2017-2018 season

For immediate use

 

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PlayMakers Repertory Company announces 2017-2018 season

 

New season features two regional premieres by Carolina alumni, the return of rotating repertory and a holiday treat for the whole family

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C. – Feb. 17, 2017) – A playful, irreverent take on Jane Austen; a dizzy, dysfunctional family reunion; two topically charged premieres by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill alumni; and the return of the popular rotating repertory with works about faith and following will comprise the Main-stage lineup of PlayMakers Repertory Company’s 2017-2018 Season: A Season on the Edge.

 

The 2017-2018 Main-stage season from UNC-Chapel Hill’s professional theater in residence leaps into multiple perspectives on questions of morality, family, history’s edges and the complexities of human connection.

 

The new season is the second selected by PlayMakers’ Producing Artistic Director Vivienne Benesch.

 

“I am eager to continue creating a path for theatre to make a transformational impact on our communities,” said Benesch. “With several regional premieres, including our first fully commissioned work, the 2017-18 season leaves me breathless with the promise of bringing new points of view and new voices that engage while they entertain. PlayMakers is about providing a first-class theatre experience right here at UNC-Chapel Hill, and being a forum for extraordinary, courageous work that invites us to tackle big questions. Our new lineup, along with a host of exceptional artists from our resident company and around the nation, will do just that.”

 

PlayMakers will also present two groundbreaking, topical works in its 2017-18 PRC2 second- stage season and a holiday special event for the whole family.

 

Subscription packages are available for purchase now, and renewing subscribers can secure their current seats for the new season through May 1. Call (919) 962-7529 or visit PlayMakers’ website for more information.

 

Main-stage productions:

 

“The Cake” by Bekah Brunstetter, Sept. 13 – Oct. 1

The season opens with a regional premiere and the first of three North Carolina stories this season. Della makes cakes, not judgment calls. But when the woman she helped raise comes back home to Winston-Salem to get married and her fiancé is actually another woman, Della is forced to examine some of her deeply held beliefs for the first time in her life. “The Cake” was written by critically acclaimed UNC-Chapel Hill alumnus Bekah Brunstetter, who currently writes for NBC’s “This is Us.”

 

“Sense and Sensibility” adapted by Kate Hamill, Oct. 19 – Nov. 6

Based on the novel by Jane Austen

Playwright Kate Hamill gives a fresh, comic take on Jane Austen’s beloved novel. Set in gossipy late 18th-century England, this eminently theatrical adaptation follows the fortunes (and misfortunes) of the Dashwood sisters—sensible Elinor and hypersensitive Marianne—after their father’s sudden death leaves them financially destitute and socially vulnerable. Hamill’s adaptation has been called “an unconditional delight” by The New York Times and “full of galloping comic vitality” by The Wall Street Journal.

 

“Dot” by Colman Domingo, Nov. 21 – Dec. 16

In another regional premiere, Dotty and her three grown children gather for the holidays with more than exchanging presents on their minds. This compassionate and often hilarious look at dementia’s effects on a family grapples unflinchingly with aging parents and midlife crises in the heart of a West Philly neighborhood. Theater Mania called “Dot” is “a magnificent play full of laughter and heartbreak.”

 

The rotating repertory presents two shows that explore different aspects of a theme, encouraging discovery and conversation.

 

Molière’s “Tartuffe”, Feb. 3 – March 11, 2018

Adapted by David Ball

In rotating repertory with “The Christians”

The man of the house has lost his mind. He has been blinded by the counterfeit zeal of a penniless scoundrel who fully intends to make off with his wife, his livelihood and probably the kitchen sink. The New York Times calls David Ball’s new adaptation of this classic French satire of religious hypocrisy “glorious from the first scene.”

 

“The Christians” by Lucas Hnath, Feb. 3 – March 11, 2018

In rotating repertory with Molière’s “Tartuffe”

Twenty years ago, Pastor Paul’s church was nothing more than a modest storefront. Now he presides over a megachurch of thousands, with a coffee shop in the lobby and a baptismal font as big as a swimming pool. But Pastor Paul is about to preach a sermon that will shake the very foundations of his church’s beliefs. The Chicago Tribune heralded this big-little play about faith in America as “truly gripping and wholly unexpected.”

 

“Leaving Eden” by Mike Wiley with music & lyrics by Laurelyn Dossett, April 4 – 22, 2018

World Premiere of a PlayMakers Repertory Company commission

Mike Wiley, UNC-Chapel Hill alumnus and acclaimed playwright of “The Parchman Hour,” returns to PlayMakers with singer-songwriter Laurelyn Dossett to explore, through words and music, the cyclical nature of humanity. This unearthing of yesterday yields a hymn for our future, with its glimpse into identity, immigration and economic struggle—all told through the lens of a small town in North Carolina. American Theater has called Wiley’s plays “sophisticated blends of narrative and wit.”

 

PRC2 second- stage productions:

 

“Count” by Lynden Harris (a co-production with Hidden Voices), Aug. 23 – 27, 2018

PlayMakers’ own resident company member Kathryn Hunter-Williams directs this searing portrayal of a single day on death row, where six men unpack their personal inheritances of violence, racism, mental illness, poverty and unexpected love. Who is disposable, who counts, and what does justice mean when the scales are broken and the blindfold is our own?

 

TBA: April 25 – 29, 2018

 

A PlayMakers special holiday event for the whole family:

 

“Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol,” Dec. 13 – 23, adapted by William Leach

An intimate evening with PlayMakers legend Ray Dooley as he shares the classic tale of Ebeneezer Scrooge’s journey through Christmases past, present and future to find redemption, charity and love.

 

All performances will be presented in UNC-Chapel Hill’s Center for Dramatic Art on Country Club Road. Main-stage productions will be in the Paul Green Theatre; PRC2 shows and “A Christmas Carol” will be in the Elizabeth Price Kenan Theatre.

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill



The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 110 master’s, 64 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s 317,000-plus alumni live in all 50 states and 156 other countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

About PlayMakers

PlayMakers is the professional theater in residence at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s College of Arts and Sciences, and North Carolina’s premier resident theater company for more than 40 years. PlayMakers has been named one of the “best regional theatres in America”.

 

PlayMakers contact: Diana Pineda, (919) 962-7114, dmpineda@email.unc.edu

University Communications contact: MC VanGraafeiland, (919) 962-7090, mc.vangraafeiland@unc.edu

More than 7,000 UNC-Chapel Hill students make Fall 2016 Dean’s List

For immediate use

 

More than 7,000 UNC-Chapel Hill students make Fall 2016 Dean’s List

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C. – Feb. 7, 2017) – The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill recognized 7,237 students for outstanding academic achievement through their selection for the Fall 2016 Dean’s List.

 

Dean’s list recognition requires full-time students who enter the University as new first-year students starting in fall 2010 or thereafter to earn at least a 3.5 grade-point average on a 4.0 scale with no grade lower than a “C” for 12 hours of letter-grade credit, exclusive of physical education activities (PHYA) courses. Students who enrolled before fall 2010 must post a 3.2 grade-point average for 15 hours of letter-grade credit or a 3.5 for 12 hours of credit. No grade can be lower than a “C. Additional details can be found here.

 

The complete Fall 2016 Dean’s List can be found here.

The complete list of Fall 2016 degree recipients can be found here.

 

Note to editors: To identify students in your circulation area:

  • For students in your county, click on the arrow in the “NC County” column to the far right. Select “Filter” and “Equals.”
  • Select the county name from the drop down list displayed in the pop-up window. (You can only choose one county at a time.)
  • Close the pop-up window and click on the “Filter” tab to see the results.
  • Follow the same procedure to filter by city or state.
  • To print the filtered results, click on the arrow at the top of any of the columns. Select “Print” and “Filtered only.”
  • The filtered results can also be exported into Excel. This function works best using the Internet Explorer browser. (Depending on your computer, you may have to temporarily disable some security settings.) While on the filtered results screen, click on the arrow at the top of any of the columns. Select “Export” and “CSV” and “Filtered only.” Save the filtered results as a text file to your computer. Open the file in Excel. When importing the file, make sure that the Delimited and Comma settings are checked.
  • Another option is to download the unfiltered list to your computer then open and filter the file using Excel.

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill



The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 110 master’s, 64 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s 317,000-plus alumni live in all 50 states and 156 other countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

University Communications contact: MC VanGraafeiland, (919) 962-7090, mc.vangraafeiland@unc.edu