Carolina welcomes 5,158 new undergraduate students to campus

For immediate use


Carolina welcomes 5,158 new undergraduate students to campus

 

Fall 2017 first-year class includes record number of North Carolinians

 

(Note: The following statistics are preliminary and will not be final until after Aug. 30, 2017, the University’s official enrollment reporting date.)

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— Aug. 18, 2017) –  The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is welcoming 4,373 first-year students – its largest first-year class ever – as well as 785 transfer students as classes begin next week. The first-year class also has the highest-ever number of North Carolina residents at the time of enrollment – 3,670 – representing an increase of 5 percent over the previous year.

 

The record 40,926 first-year applicants represent a 14-percent increase over last year and set a record for total number of applicants for the 12th consecutive year. These students were chosen using a rigorous admissions process that evaluated each candidate comprehensively, individually and holistically.

 

The new first-year class includes 749 students who would be the first in their families to graduate from college, an increase of 6 percent over last year’s class. Carolina Covenant, which guarantees eligible low-income students the opportunity to graduate from Carolina debt-free, welcomes 733 new first-year and transfer students, also an increase of 6 percent.

 

“We are honored to be welcoming these outstanding students to the University, and we’re grateful that they’ve chosen to join us,” said Stephen Farmer, vice provost for enrollment and undergraduate admissions. “We look forward to seeing their contributions to the classroom and community, both while they’re at Carolina and throughout their lives.

 

“As we’ve come to know these students, we’ve been impressed by their achievements, their work ethic, and their willingness to engage with classmates, teachers and the world,” Farmer said. “We’ve also been heartened by the many paths they’ve taken to Carolina. Each of these students has a story, and we believe each one can contribute to the education of the rest.”

 

The following statistics are highlights from the Fall 2017 incoming class:


First-Year Students

 

Demographics

First-year students come from:

  • 93 North Carolina counties, including 35% from rural counties in the state
  • 40 states and the District of Columbia
  • 31 countries

Of the incoming first-year class:

  • 61 percent are female and 39 percent are male
  • 129 students are international students
  • 1,257 North Carolina students are from rural communities
  • 286 students have a military-affiliation
  • 749 students will be the first in their families to graduate from college
  • 34 percent identify themselves as a race or ethnicity other than Caucasian
  • 9 percent identify as African American
  • 8 percent identify themselves as Latino or Latina
  • 16 percent identify themselves as Asian or Asian-American
  • 2 percent identify themselves as American Indian or Alaskan Native

 

Academic credentials

  • 44 percent ranked within top 10 students in their high school class
  • 78 percent ranked within the top 10 percent
  • On the SAT, the middle 50 percent of students scored between 1280-1440
  • On the ACT, the middle 50 percent of students scored between 28-33
  • 78 percent of enrolling students submitted at least one AP score

 

Extracurricular achievements

  • 92 percent participated in community service
  • 70 percent played a sport
  • 66 percent contributed to a cause they believe in
  • 65 percent pursued an independent hobby
  • 50 percent participated in music, drama or other arts
  • 48 percent held a position as president of their class or a club
  • 28 percent conducted research outside the classroom
  • 53 percent traveled outside their home country
  • 58 percent assumed daily family responsibilities
  • 49 percent held a paying job during the school year
  • 47 percent participated in religious or faith-based communities
  • 33 percent participated in student government

 

Admission

For Fall 2017 first-year admission, the University received 40,926 applications – 14 percent more than last year and the second-largest increase in the past 25 years. The overall admit rate fell from 26 percent to 24 percent this year, and the number of North Carolinians** offered admission rose 4 percent to 5,925 compared to 5,696 last year.

 

The incoming class also includes 245 students from one of the 70 partner high schools served by the Carolina College Advising Corps, a public service of the University that seeks to increase college-going rates among low-income, first-generation college and other underrepresented students.

 

Applied / Admitted 

Applied Admitted
North Carolina 12,918 5,925
Out-of-state 28,008 3,785
Total** 40,926 9,710

 

TRANSFER STUDENTS

Approximately 38 percent of the enrolling transfer class is transferring from a North Carolina community college. Incoming transfer students range in age from 17 to 49, and have an average college GPA of 3.7.

 

The transfer class includes 88 students who come to Carolina from partner community colleges served by the Carolina Student Transfer Excellence Program, or C-STEP. The program is designed to enable community college students to transfer to and graduate from UNC-Chapel Hill. C-STEP students represent 11 percent of all enrolling transfer students.

 

Applied / Admitted 

Applied Admitted
North Carolina 1,762 672
Out-of-state 1,761 546
Total** 3,523 1,218

 

AID AND SCHOLARSHIPS

Among all new undergraduates, first-year and transfer students:

  • 46 percent of the incoming class will receive need-based aid, primarily in the form of grants and scholarships.
  • 733 students (14 percent of the incoming first-year and transfer class) are Carolina Covenant Scholars. This year marks the first-time independent students are eligible for the Carolina Covenant.

(Note: All aid statistics are preliminary and subject to revision.)

 

MILITARY

Among all new undergraduates:

  • 286 enrolling first-year students indicated an affiliation with the U.S. Armed Forces, primarily as a dependent with a parent who served or is serving in the military.
  • 101 transfer students indicated an affiliation with the military
  • 25 are currently serving
  • 27 have previously served in the U.S. Armed Forces.
  • 55 are either the dependent or spouse of a current or prior service member.

(Note: Some students qualify for multiple categories, i.e., many who served are also dependents.)

 

(**These numbers reflect residency information at the time of application.)

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 111 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 318,000 alumni live in all 50 states and 157 countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

Communications and Public Affairs contact: Kate Luck, (919) 445-8360 kate.luck@unc.edu

Facts and tips for coverage of new academic year at UNC-Chapel Hill

Not for publication

 

Facts and tips for coverage of new academic year at UNC-Chapel Hill

 

Students will be moving back on campus this weekend

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— Aug. 18, 2017) – Media representatives are invited to cover activities related to the start of the 2017-2018 academic year at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

 

Move-in 

9 a.m. Friday (Aug. 18)-7 p.m. Saturday (Aug. 19)

 

Chancellor Carol L. Folt and Vice Chancellor of Student Affairs Winston Crisp will greet new students at Morrison Residence Hall at 3:30 p.m. on Saturday (Aug. 19).

Morrison is located at 445 Paul Hardin Drive, off Manning Drive.

 

Media planning to cover this portion of move-in should check in with Karen Moon (Cell: 919-218-2467) in front of Morrison Residence Hall.

 

Media planning to cover move-in at alternate times are welcome to film exteriors and conduct interviews outside of residence halls only. Media is not allowed inside residence halls.

 

Visuals: Students and their parents will be unloading boxes, clothes and furnishings from cars. It’s also a time of tears, goodbye hugs and last-minute instructions.

 

Most of the approximately 4,000 first-year and transfer students contracted to live in student housing will be moving in to the residence halls Friday and Saturday. The majority of residence halls that house first-year students are concentrated on South Campus (in the high-rises and nearby buildings). Rising sophomores, juniors and seniors started moving in Wednesday (Aug. 16). In total, Carolina expects more than 8,100 residents to move in by the first day of the semester.  For more move-in information, visit Carolina Housing or contact Allan Blattner, (919) 962-5401, allan_blattner@unc.edu.

 

University Communications on-site contact: Karen Moon, 919-218-2467, Karen_moon@unc.edu

 

 

New Student Convocation and Tar Heel Beginnings

7 p.m. Sunday (Aug. 20)

Carmichael Arena

 

Media should check in with Carly Swain (Cell: 704-305-1838) in front of Carmichael Arena.

 

Visuals: This event starts with thousands of first-year students gathering for a group photo in Carmichael Arena and then being welcomed to Carolina by Chancellor Folt and other distinguished guests. The event segues into a pep rally, complete with marching band, as the students practice Carolina cheers before spilling out of the arena and heading to FallFest. 

 

University Communications on-site contact: Carly Swain, 704-305-1838, carly.swain@unc.edu

 

 

FallFest

8 p.m. Sunday (Aug. 20) – 2 a.m. Monday (Aug. 21)

Hooker Fields

 

Visuals: Students will be grazing on free food and collecting swag. They will play games and student bands and singing groups will perform on outdoor stages. There will be lots of noise, balloons and soap bubbles. University and student leaders will be in attendance.

 

Now in its 21st year, this alcohol-free outdoor celebration welcomes students to campus with free food, performances by student groups and bands, games and more. Student organizations and recreation leagues are on hand to encourage students to get involved at Carolina. For more information visit FallFest.

 

University Communications on-site contact: Carly Swain, 704-305-1838, carly.swain@unc.edu

 

 

Good Neighbor Initiative walk-around

3 p.m. (Aug. 21), rain or shine

Hargraves Center, 216 North Roberson St.

 

Visuals: Volunteers will gather at the Hargraves Center at 3 p.m. and fan out to various neighborhoods (Northside is closest). Volunteers at the center will put on their t-shirts and receive their team assignments and packets of door hangers and other handouts. In the neighborhood, they will knock on doors and talk briefly to the person who answers.

 

Now in its 14th year, the year-round Good Neighbor Initiative encourages students who live off campus to meet their neighbors and work with them to build community and keep neighborhoods clean and safe. Teams of UNC-Chapel Hill students, staff and public safety officers, Chapel Hill police officers and town staff members, community groups and other volunteers will visit students and year-round residents in Northside, Pine Knolls, Cameron-McCauley, and the southern MLK, North St, Columbia St, Dawes-Coolidge and Davie Circle neighborhoods with information about community services, local ordinances and alcohol laws and good neighbor practices. Residents also will be invited to the Good Neighbor Block Party at the Hargraves Center on Sept. 14. For more information, visit Fraternity & Sorority Life and Community Involvement.

 

University Communications on-site contact: MC VanGraafeiland, 646-345-2802, mc.vangraafeiland@unc.edu

 

 

Sunset Serenade

7 p.m. Monday (Aug. 21)

Polk Place

 

Carolina’s best a cappella groups will entertain students on the eve of the new school year. There is no rain date for this outdoor event. In case of inclement weather, this event will be canceled. For more information visit Student Alumni Association.

 

University Communications on-site contact: Jeni Cook, 404-309-3994, jeni.cook@unc.edu

 

 

Bell Tower Relighting

9 p.m. Monday (Aug. 21) – following Sunset Serenade

Morehead-Patterson Bell Tower

 

Order of the Bell Tower (OBT), UNC-Chapel Hill’s official student ambassadors and tradition keepers, invite students to be a part of one of Carolina’s newest traditions and to celebrate the start of a new year. Students, faculty and staff will watch the Bell Tower become illuminated in blue and white, which represents the start of a new academic school year. There is no rain date for this outdoor event. In case of inclement weather, this event will be canceled. For more information visit Order of the Bell Tower.

 

University Communications on-site contact: Jeni Cook, 404-309-3994, jeni.cook@unc.edu

 

 

First Day of Classes

Tuesday (Aug. 22)

Classes officially begin.

 

Visuals: As a first day of classes tradition at Carolina, students line up to drink from the Old Well. Campus legend is that if a student takes a drink of water from the Old Well on this date good grades will follow.

 

Meet some of our incoming students: New Year, New Faces: As UNC-Chapel Hill begins a new fall semester, go to UNC.edu to meet some of the new Tar Heels who will be looking to innovate, educate, serve – and change the world.

 

 

-Carolina-

 

 

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 111 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 318,000 alumni live in all 50 states and 157 countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

University Communications contact: Will Rimer, rimerwp@unc.edu, 919-445-0945

 

UNC-Chapel Hill startups deliver economic boost to North Carolina communities

For immediate use

 

UNC-Chapel Hill startups deliver economic boost to North Carolina communities

 

Carolina startups and social ventures generate $10 billion in annual revenue toward state and global economies; create more than 8,000 jobs in North Carolina and 63,000 worldwide

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— Aug. 15, 2017) – The economic value created by startups connected with the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is on the rise, according to a biannual report on Carolina’s commercial and social ventures.

 

The mid-year analysis shows upward trends in how the University’s startup companies and social ventures are growing across North Carolina, creating new jobs that contribute to the changing workforce and bringing revenue to local and global communities. It includes ventures founded by faculty, staff and students during their time at UNC-Chapel Hill or within three years of graduating from or leaving the University.

 

As of June 2017, data on UNC-affiliated ventures show:

 

  • A 26 percent increase in the total number of ventures (475 compared to 378) since June 2016, with 75 percent of the total ventures launched (358 of 475 ventures) still active.
  • 85 percent of active ventures (306 of 358 ventures) are headquartered across 16 North Carolina counties, an 8 percent increase from the 283 UNC-affiliated ventures based in North Carolina at this time in 2016.
  • 99 percent of the $10 billion in annual revenue earned by the ventures comes from those headquartered in North Carolina.
  • 63,914 people are employed by these ventures, and 8,090 of these employees are located in North Carolina.

 

“Faculty, students and alumni of UNC-Chapel Hill are highly successful at not only incubating novel ideas, discoveries and technologies in classrooms, studios and labs, but also taking their innovations to market as commercial startup companies or social ventures,” said Judith Cone, vice chancellor for innovation, entrepreneurship and economic development. “Because the large majority of these companies establish themselves in North Carolina, they make a significant economic impact for the state by providing jobs and generating revenue in local communities. At the same time, these companies make a human impact that is global in scale through new advances that include bio-medical therapies for serious diseases, technological breakthroughs and social endeavors that improve the lives of many citizens in North Carolina and beyond.”

 

The economic impact analysis is conducted by Innovate Carolina, a meta-group of more than 200 university faculty, staff and student leaders who collaborate to create new connections, identify gaps and strengthen the innovation and entrepreneurial environment on and off campus.

 

A number of Carolina startups made significant advances in 2017, including:

 

G1 Therapeutics, a clinical-stage oncology company in Research Triangle Park with ties to the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, raised approximately $108.6 million in an initial public offering of its stock in May. The company began trading on the NASDAQ Global Market under the ticker symbol “GTHX.”

 

Impulsonic, a 3D audio company that creates true-to-life sounds in virtual reality experiences and games, was acquired by Valve Corporation, a video game and digital distribution company. Impulsonic was founded by students and researchers from Carolina’s computer science department.

 
Falcon Therapeutics is advancing a new approach using tumor-homing cells to treat glioblastoma cancer, the most common form of primary brain cancer and also one of the deadliest. The company recently raised $700,000 in a private equity stock offering, according to a Securities and Exchange Commission filing. It was founded by a professor at the Eshelman School of Pharmacy.

  
410 Medical has developed a novel medical device rapidly infuses life-saving fluids during medical emergencies involving critically-ill patients. It received an investment from the Carolina Angel Network and is the first company to receive funding from Triangle Venture Alliance, a new investment partnership among angel networks from UNC-Chapel Hill, NC State University, Duke University and NC Central University. The company was co-founded by a physician with a clinical faculty appointment in pediatrics at the UNC School of Medicine.

 

Seal the Seasons partners with local farmers and uses technology to flash freeze farm-grown produce at the peak of freshness to sell to consumers 12 months a year. The company, founded by a Carolina student, has raised $750,000 in funding and sells produce at a variety of grocery stores, including Harris Teeter, Lowes Foods, Fresh Market and Whole Foods.

 

Through the support of the Innovate Carolina Network, UNC-Chapel Hill startups are positioned for success as they move through their innovation journey. With a mission to create an environment where innovators thrive, Innovate Carolina provides the right resources and connections that startup companies and ventures need to nurture their ideas.

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 113 master’s, 68 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 318,000 alumni live in all 50 states and 157 countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

About Innovate Carolina

Through the Vice Chancellor’s Office for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Economic Development, Innovate Carolina is UNC-Chapel Hill’s innovation ecosystem that supports the needs of faculty, students, staff, and community members as they translate their unique ideas into practical benefit for the public good. To further cultivate innovation and entrepreneurship within the community, Innovate Carolina provides connections to incubators, accelerators, business services and campus programs, including the 1789 Venture Lab, Launch Chapel Hill, KickStart Venture Services, Technology Commercialization Carolina and CUBE, the social innovation incubator at the UNC Campus Y. Innovate Carolina also partners with the startup investor community through the Carolina Angel Network, Carolina Research Ventures Fund and Blackstone Entrepreneurs Network. Follow Innovate Carolina on Facebook and on Twitter and visit http://innovate.unc.edu/.

 

Office of Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Economic Development contact: Michelle Bolas, (919) 843-6287, michelle.bolas@unc.edu

University Communications contact: MC VanGraafeiland, (919) 962-7090, mc.vangraafeiland@unc.edu

Campus Y selects 2017-2018 Global Gap Year Fellows

For immediate use

  

Campus Y selects 2017-2018 Global Gap Year Fellows

 

Cohort includes two inaugural Bridge Year Fellows sponsored by student-run coffee company

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— July 31, 2017) – The Campus Y at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill has selected ten 2017-2018 Global Gap Year Fellowship (GGYF) recipients. These eight, incoming first-year students and two rising juniors will defer a year of university enrollment to gain informal, global education that combines volunteer service, work, and international travel.

 

Over 70 students applied for the competitive fellowship, which provides up to $7,500 for each recipient to use toward travel, living expenses and other trip costs.

 

While the GGYF is traditionally reserved for incoming first-year students, this year a collaboration with student-run The Meantime Coffee Co., enabled the program to grant two inaugural Bridge Year Fellowships to rising juniors Araseli Valverde and Kaitlin Galindo.

 

The Meantime’s co-founders Keegan McBride and Scott Diekema started the fair-trade coffee company with the intention of providing students with scholarships and professional development opportunities.

 

“We are thrilled to be living out our mission within our first year by funding scholarships for two students. We owe that feat entirely to our customers who gave us a tremendous amount of support this past year,” said Diekema, a rising senior. “As The Meantime grows in the years to come, I am excited to see how we can further our reinvestment into the community.”

 

Gap years are currently in the media limelight as former President Barak Obama’s daughter Malia Obama opted to take one in 2016 before enrolling at Harvard this year. The GGYF program is unique in that it subsidizes self-designed travel and specifically recruits first generation college students, lower income youth and students of color.

 

For the students who become part of the GGYF, their gap year is part of a vibrant, 5-year college career. Post-trip surveys have revealed that the GGY fellows are better equipped to face the social and academic challenges of university life upon their return. GGY alumni have gone on to distinguish themselves at UNC as distinguished scholarship winners, social entrepreneurs and social justice leaders.

 

“The Global Gap Year Fellowship has made me more confident in my personal and professional goals,” said Logan Pratico, a 2016 GGY fellow who traveled to Bolivia and Ecuador. “I have gained so much confidence from my gap year, and the skills I learned and refined abroad – listening, helping, asking for help – are so useful to me in college.”

 

Sarah Smith, GGYF program director, welcomed the new group of fellows to campus in July for pre-departure orientation.

 

“Each year the caliber of our applications increases as more students become aware of the benefits of a gap year,” said Smith. “I’m hopeful that this diverse cohort will continue and expand upon the legacy of public service and global citizenship that previous Fellows have created.”

 

The 2017-2018 cohort’s interests range from English education and environmental sustainability to immigration reform and dance. Recipients are listed below, alphabetically by North Carolina county and then by state.

 

NORTH CAROLINA COUNTIES

 

Caldwell County

Shelby Watson of Collettsville graduated from West Caldwell High School, where she was co-president of Beta Club, a student council representative and played right field on the softball team. She has a passion for the outdoors and enjoys serving others, including a semester long internship at Tuttle Educational State Forest. Watson plans to volunteer in South Africa and Peru.

 

Craven County

Viktoria Alston of Havelock graduated from Havelock High School, where she was involved with JROTC and band and participated in the Spanish Club, Interact Club and National Honor Society. Alston was also vice-chair and co-chair of the Havelock Youth Advisory Committee. She plans to spend time in Latin America.

 

Mecklenburg County

Janis Arrojado of Concord graduated from North Carolina School of Science and Math, where she was involved in numerous sustainability initiatives and ecology research and also danced Tinikling, a form of Filipino dance. She was treasurer of her Interact Club and a finalist for MIT Inspire. Arrojado plans to travel to Southeast Asia to work on environmental sustainability.

 

Stokes County

Araseli Valverde (Bridge Fellow) of Pinnacle is a rising junior and an active member of the Campus Y’s Bonner Leadership Program. She is double majoring in global studies and public policy and plans to spend her time abroad in Italy and Brazil.

 

Wake County

Natalie Barth of Wake Forest graduated from Franklin Academy High School, where she sang in the chorus and played varsity soccer. In addition to being a member of the National Honor Society, National English Honor Society, National History Honor Society and Tri-M Music Honor Society, Barth also served as the vice president of Junior Civitan and participated in numerous local service projects. She plans to visit Ecuador, the Galapagos Islands and sub-Saharan Africa to work on water conservation.

Jennings Dixon of Apex graduated from Holly Springs High School, where he was a member of the band and earned recognition as most outstanding freshman and sophomore musician and as a finalist for the NC All State Honor Band. Dixon is an Eagle Scout and a member of the National Honor Society, National English Honor Society, National Science Honor Society, National Junior Classical League and Tri-M Music Honor Society. He plans to spend time in Sub-Saharan Africa, South Asia and East Asia.

Katie Huge of Carrboro graduated from Chapel Hill High School, where she was a member of the National Honor Society and played varsity volleyball, serving as captain for two years. She also taught volleyball to local youth and volunteered at the Ronald McDonald House. Huge plans to work on sustainability efforts in South America and Thailand.

Georgia Morgan of Cary graduated from Apex High School, where she participated in Nourish International, the Feminism Club, the Environmental Club and was a member of the National Honor Society. She was also a member of the Apex High School Strings program playing in both the classical guitar ensemble and advanced orchestra. Morgan volunteered for TeenCORE of Cary and participated in a weekly tutoring program for youth. She plans to volunteer in Thailand and New Zealand.

 

OUT-OF-STATE

 

Texas

Daniel Almaguer graduated from Mount Carmel Academy in Houston, where he participated in student council, Newman Club and the National Honor Society, was captain of the Houston Urban Debate League and was selected as an EMERGE Scholar. During the summer of 2016, Almaguer was a Summer Scholar at Washington University in St. Louis. He plans to travel and serve in Senegal, India, and Nepal.

 

Virginia

Kaitlin Galindo (Bridge Fellow) of Centreville is an Honors Carolina student and an active member of the Campus Y. She is a public relations and political science double major who plans to travel in Indonesia.

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 113 master’s, 68 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 318,000 alumni live in all 50 states and 157 countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

About the Global Gap Year Fellowship

The GGYF is the only college-sponsored gap year program that allows students to design their own gap-year experience. The fellowship, launched in 2011, was made possible by an anonymous gift of $1.5 million to the Campus Y and supports students who would not otherwise be able to fund their service work. The Campus Y works with UNC-Chapel Hill’s Office of Undergraduate Admissions and Center for Global Initiatives to select a diverse group of students who are encouraged to combine their personal interests, such as artistic endeavors, social justice issues, and environmental issues, with their work while abroad.

 

Campus Y contact: Erin Reitz, (919) 962-2333, ereitz@email.unc.edu

University Communications contact: MC VanGraafeiland, (919) 962-7090, mc.vangraafeiland@unc.edu

 

Cochrane elected to chair Board of Trustees; other officers, new members start

For immediate use

 

Cochrane elected to chair Board of Trustees; other officers, new members start

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— July 27, 2017) – Haywood D. Cochrane Jr. of Elon, has been elected chairman of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Board of Trustees.

 

Trustees today (July 27) also elected two current members as new officers for one-year terms on the 13-member board responsible for governing the University. Charles G. Duckett of Winston-Salem was elected Vice Chair and William A. Keyes IV of Washington, D.C. was elected Secretary.

 

Six trustees were sworn in to begin their four-year terms:

  • Haywood D. Cochrane Jr. of Elon, former chairman of the board of directors of DARA Biosciences Inc. (reappointed)
  • Charles G. Duckett of Winston-Salem, partner with Battle & Associates Inc. (reappointed)
  • Jefferson W. Brown of Charlotte, partner with Moore and Van Allen law firm (reappointed)
  • Kelly Matthews Hopkins of Charlotte, life coach and consultant (reappointed)
  • Dwight D. Stone of Greensboro, president of D. Stone Builders Inc. (reappointed)
  • Richard Y. Stevens of Cary, attorney with the Smith Anderson law firm

 

A seventh new board member is senior Elizabeth M. Adkins of Fayetteville, who was sworn in May 25 and fills the ex officio seat held by Carolina’s student body president.

 

Under Cochrane’s leadership, the Board of Trustees will continue to support Chancellor Carol L. Folt and her team, including the implementation of the University’s strategic framework and its alignment with the UNC System’s strategic plan. It will focus on innovating, translating and supporting economic development and backing institutional efficiencies and cost reductions through shared services and other operational initiatives critical to Carolina’s future. The board will also bolster Carolina’s capital campaign as the University approaches the public launch this October.

 

“I am honored to serve as chair of the Board of Trustees and I accept this responsibility with humility and pride,” said Cochrane. “Following the examples of great leadership set by Dwight Stone and Lowry Caudill, we will continue to have a hard-working board, helping as we can in our delegated authorities, and always with a collaborative focus on the future.”

 

Cochrane began his career in banking and moved into healthcare where he helped rebuild and grow a number of public and private companies with the support of venture capital and private equity partners. He received a bachelor of arts in political science from UNC-Chapel Hill in 1970 where he was a Morehead Scholar, a North Carolina Fellow and secretary of the UNC chapter of Phi Beta Kappa. He has held a number of senior management and executive positions at companies including Allied Clinical Laboratories Inc., Roche Biomedical Laboratories Inc., National Health Laboratories Inc., Laboratory Corporation of America Holdings and CHD Meridian Corporate Healthcare Inc., now a unit of Walgreens. He has served as director of I-trax, Allied Clinical Laboratories Inc., Tripath Imaging Inc., EV3 Inc., American Esoterics Inc., JDN Realty Inc., Sonus Corp., Unilab Inc. and Ameripath Inc., among other companies.

 

Duckett is a partner in Battle & Associates, Inc., a marketing services firm he joined in 1989. He is also a partner in GRINS Enterprises, LLC. He graduated from Carolina in 1982 with a B.A. degree in political science and history. He is married to Beth Brady Duckett who also graduated from UNC. All three of their children have graduated from Carolina. His past service to the university includes work on the National Development Council, the Board of Visitors, the Steering Committee for the Carolina First Campaign and the board of WUNC FM. He established the Bill Guthridge Mathematics Scholarship and helped establish the Bill Guthridge Endowed Professorship in Mathematics along with John Burress. He also serves on the executive board of the Rams Club and has served numerous community boards.

 

Keyes, a native of Washington, North Carolina and Carolina alumnus, has worked in Washington, DC for nearly four decades, both on Capitol Hill and as a White House senior policy advisor. He also established and directs the Institute for Responsible Citizenship, which serves some of America’s best and brightest African American male college students. Keyes has served on the Board of Visitors, the Graduate Education Advancement Board, the Board of Advisors of the School of Media and Journalism and the Board of Directors of the Media and Journalism Foundation. He also created a summer internship program in Washington, D.C. for the university’s journalism students and assisted in the creation of UNC’s Leadership Institute. For his extensive work in education, Keyes earned the Mac A. Stewart Distinguished Award for Service by the Todd A. Bell National Resource Center at Ohio State University and the Dr. Asa G. Hilliard Model of Excellence Award from the College Board.

 

Stevens, an attorney with the Smith Anderson Law Firm and a five-term North Carolina Senator from 2003-2012, previously served on the UNC-Chapel Hill Board of Trustees from 1995-2003, including a term as chair from 1997-1999. He also served on the Board of Visitors from 1991-1995. Stevens earned his bachelor’s, master’s and Juris Doctor degrees from Carolina and has scholarships named for him at the UNC School of Law and the UNC School of Government. Prior to his service in the Senate, he was the County Manager of Wake County and worked as a management consultant. Stevens has chaired the UNC-Chapel Hill Endowment Fund, the UNC-Chapel Hill Foundation, Inc., the UNC General Alumni Association, the Board of Visitors for UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Hospital and The Carolina Club. He has also received numerous awards from Carolina and beyond, among them the UNC General Alumni Association Distinguished Service Medal, the American Society for Public Administration and the National Academy of Public Administration Public Service Award, the Order of the Long Leaf Pine, the William Richardson Davie Award and the North Carolina Chamber of Commerce Award for Distinguished Public Service. Stevens is a member of numerous distinguished societies including the Order of the Golden Fleece, the Order of the Grail-Valkyries and the Order of the Old Well.

 

-Carolina-

 

Photos:

Brown: https://unc.photoshelter.com/galleries/I0000iqxIls0rrg0/Brown-Jeff-jpg

Cochrane: https://unc.photoshelter.com/galleries/I0000pzvDa2MoGi0/Cochrane-Haywood-jpg

Duckett: https://unc.photoshelter.com/galleries/I0000.iy8oIJDrXE/duckett-chuck-13-008-jpg

Hopkins: https://unc.photoshelter.com/galleries/I0000mI7cEENaDqw/Hopkins-Kelly-jpg

Keyes: https://unc.photoshelter.com/galleries/I0000ioGck5h_Jdw/Keyes-IV-William-A-009-JPG

Stevens:https://unc.photoshelter.com/galleries/C00005vwcu89jLJ4/G0000DqmFGdFSytc/I0000J9uA_nsiClE/Stevens-jpeg

Adkins: https://unc.photoshelter.com/galleries/I0000R1K_.SQHTWY/011117-adkins-elizabeth003

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 113 master’s, 68 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 318,000 alumni live in all 50 states and 157 countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

University Communications contact: MC VanGraafeiland, (919) 962-7090, mc.vangraafeiland@unc.edu

Elaine L. Westbrooks named University librarian and vice provost for University Libraries

For immediate use

 

 

Elaine L. Westbrooks named University librarian and vice provost for University Libraries

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C. – July 10, 2017) –  The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill has selected Elaine L. Westbrooks, associate university librarian for research at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, as its new University librarian and vice provost for University Libraries. Approved by the University’s Board of Trustees, the appointment is effective Aug. 15.

 

“Chancellor Carol Folt and I are excited to welcome Elaine to Carolina,” said Executive Vice Chancellor and Provost James W. Dean Jr. “She brings more than 19 years of higher education library experience to her role, where she will oversee one of the top-ranked university library systems in the country, including its services and more than 9 million volumes across 10 libraries.”

 

At the University of Michigan, Westbrooks led the library’s support of the research enterprise, facilitated the management of the operations and budget. Prior to her time in Ann Arbor, Westbrooks worked at research libraries at three other universities. She served as associate dean of libraries at the University of Nebraska at Lincoln, held several positions in technical services at Cornell University Libraries and worked as a digital research and Latin American Cataloger at the University of Pittsburgh.

 

The co-author of three books, along with several book chapters, Westbrooks lectures at numerous conferences. She also serves on the Association for Research Libraries Visioning Taskforce, was recently the chair of the HathiTrust Rights and Access Committee and also served on the HathiTrust Program Steering Committee.

 

“I am honored to be selected as Carolina’s vice provost for University Libraries. The University Libraries have rich collections and talented staff,” said Westbrooks. “I look forward to helping Carolina make its library spaces, collections and services an even more integral part of academic life on campus.”

 

Westbrooks earned a bachelor of arts degree in linguistics and a master’s degree in information and library science from the University of Pittsburgh.

 

She succeeds Sarah Michalak, who retired in December 2016. Carol Hunter, deputy University librarian and associate University librarian for collections and services, has served as interim University librarian since Michalak’s departure. She will retire from Carolina on Oct. 1.

 

-Carolina-

 

Photo: https://unc.photoshelter.com/galleries/C0000L1BiG3Ab08k/G00007jgAb2P2VEM/Westbrooks-Elaine

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 113 master’s, 68 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 318,000 alumni live in all 50 states and 157 countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

University Communications contact: MC VanGraafeiland, (919) 962-7090, mc.vangraafeiland@unc.edu

Excavations by UNC-Chapel Hill archaeologist continue to yield stunning mosaics in ancient Galilean synagogue

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Excavations by UNC-Chapel Hill archaeologist continue to yield stunning mosaics in ancient Galilean synagogue

 

Seventh season of Huqoq excavations brings to light the richest, most diverse collection of mosaics ever discovered in an ancient synagogue

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— July 6, 2017) – A team of specialists and students led by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill professor Jodi Magness has uncovered additional mosaic scenes in the Late Roman synagogue at Huqoq, an ancient Jewish village in Israel’s Lower Galilee. The new finds provide insight about daily life in the fifth century C.E. and expand the rich repertoire of mosaics already discovered decorating the floors of the building.

 

Magness, the Kenan Distinguished Professor of religious studies in Carolina’s College of Arts & Sciences, along with Assistant Director Shua Kisilevitz of the Israel Antiquities Authority, focused this seventh season of Huqoq excavations on the southern part of the nave (main hall), where three panels were exposed.

 

A medallion in the center of the uppermost (northern) panel depicts the Greco-Roman sun god Helios in a quadriga (four-horse chariot) surrounded by personifications of the months and the signs of the zodiac, contained within a square frame with personifications of the four seasons in the corners.

 

The second panel shows the biblical story of Jonah and the whale with a twist: Jonah’s legs are shown dangling from the mouth of a large fish, which is being swallowed by a larger fish, and the larger fish is being swallowed by an even larger fish. This is the first time the story of Jonah has been discovered decorating the mosaic floor of an ancient synagogue in Israel.

 

The third (southernmost) panel contains a detailed scene of men at work constructing a stone tower, apparently the Tower of Babel.

 

“The Huqoq mosaics are unusually rich and diverse,” said Magness. “In addition, they display variations on biblical stories which must represent oral traditions (midrashim) that circulated among the local Jewish population.”

 

Mosaics were first discovered at the site in 2012, and work has continued each summer since then. In 2012, a mosaic depicting Samson and the foxes (as related in the Bible’s Judges 15:4) was found in the synagogue’s east aisle. The next summer, an adjacent mosaic was uncovered that shows Samson carrying the gate of Gaza on his shoulders (Judges 16:3). Another mosaic discovered in the synagogue’s east aisle in 2013 and 2014 depicts the first non-biblical story ever found decorating an ancient synagogue — perhaps the legendary meeting between Alexander the Great and the Jewish high priest.

 

A mosaic panel uncovered in 2015 next to this scene contains a Hebrew inscription surrounded by human figures, animals and mythological creatures including putti (cupids). Mosaics discovered in the northern part of the nave (main hall) in 2016 portray two biblical stories: Noah’s Ark and the parting of the Red Sea, in which Pharaoh’s soldiers are swallowed by large fish similar to the fish swallowing Jonah in the mosaic uncovered this summer.

 

“One of the distinguishing features of the Huqoq mosaics is the incorporation of numerous classical (Greco-Roman) elements such as putti, winged personifications of the seasons, and — in the Jonah scene — harpies (large birds with female heads and torsos representing storm winds),” said Magness. “The mosaics also provide a great deal of information about ancient daily life, such as the construction techniques shown in the Tower of Babel scene uncovered this summer.”

 

Sponsors of the project are UNC-Chapel Hill, Baylor University, Brigham Young University and the University of Toronto. Students and staff from Carolina and the consortium schools participated in the dig. Financial support for the 2017 season was also provided by the National Geographic Society, the Loeb Classical Library Foundation, the International Catacomb Society and the Carolina Center for Jewish Studies at UNC-Chapel Hill.

 

The mosaics have been removed from the site for conservation, and the excavated areas have been backfilled. Excavations are scheduled to continue in summer 2018. For additional information and updates, visit the project’s website: www.huqoq.org.

 

Note: Magness can be reached at magness@email.unc.edu, or by phone in Israel until July 10 and after July 10 in the U.S. When dialing from outside Israel: 011-972-52-6611542; from within Israel: 052-6611542. Phone in the U.S.: 919-967-6888.

 

Photos: (credit: Jim Haberman)

https://unc.photoshelter.com/galleries/C0000.jfK5DRIwnI/G00008qO7cl_AvRE/Huqoq-Mosaics

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 113 master’s, 68 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 318,000 alumni live in all 50 states and 157 countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

College of Arts and Sciences contact: Kim Spurr, (919) 962-4093, spurrk@email.unc.edu

UNC Communications contact: MC VanGraafeiland, (919) 962-7090, mc.vangraafeiland@unc.edu

Paul Hardin, Carolina’s 7th and ‘bicentennial chancellor,’ passes away at age 86

For immediate release

 

 

Paul Hardin, Carolina’s 7th and ‘bicentennial chancellor,’ passes away at age 86

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C. – July 1, 2017) – Chancellor Emeritus Paul Hardin III, who led the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill during its Bicentennial Observance, died at his Chapel Hill home Saturday (July 1) after a courageous battle with ALS. He was 86.

 

“Chancellor Paul Hardin was a visionary leader who is remembered in North Carolina and across our nation for his dedication to promoting the life-changing impact and benefits of higher education,” said Chancellor Carol L. Folt. “In his bicentennial address, alumnus Charles Kuralt spoke of how Carolina was meant to be ‘the University of the people.’ Paul seized upon Carolina’s 200th birthday as an opportunity to light the way to a better future and open Carolina’s doors for all North Carolinians. Paul was warm and gracious and remained very involved with Carolina after his retirement. He will be greatly missed.”

 

Born in Charlotte on June 11, 1931, Hardin was the son of Methodist minister and bishop Paul Hardin Jr. and Dorothy Reel Hardin. He grew up in numerous North Carolina towns as his father moved from church to church.

 

He graduated Phi Beta Kappa from Duke University in 1952 and then first in his class in its law school. He served as editor-in-chief of the Duke Law Journal. After serving in the U.S. Army’s counterintelligence unit, he worked as a lawyer. He taught at Duke Law School for 10 years, eventually becoming a full professor before embarking on a career as a university president.

 

He served as president at Wofford College (1968-1972); Southern Methodist University (1972-1974); and Drew University (1974-1988) before becoming Carolina’s seventh chancellor on July 1, 1988.

 

At his installation, Hardin told the attendees that “the future belongs to those institutions and persons who command it, not to those who wait passively for it to happen.” By the time he stepped down in 1995, “The Bicentennial Chancellor” had presided over some of the most important events in the life of the University and left Carolina poised for its third century.

 

Hardin described the Bicentennial era as a magnificent opportunity that would never come again. “Dare to think big and to dream,” he said, and so they did.

 

The Bicentennial Observance touched all 100 counties and culminated with the celebration in Kenan Stadium on Oct. 13, 1993, when Hardin conferred an honorary degree on President Bill Clinton. The yearlong celebration proved to be a catalyst for the five-year Bicentennial Campaign for Carolina that brought in $440 million in private gifts – $120 million above the goal.

 

A civil rights advocate who pushed for the integration of Durham’s public facilities in the 1960s, Hardin helped double minority representation on Carolina’s faculty. He also played a key role in the naming of the undergraduate admissions office in honor of pioneering black faculty members Blyden and Roberta Jackson.

 

Hardin established the Employee Forum, which gave non-academic University employees a greater voice. He was a staunch advocate for UNC-Chapel Hill and helped campaign successfully for greater fiscal and management flexibility for the state’s public universities.

 

He signed the agreement to build the Southern Observatory for Astrophysical Research with Brazil and the National Optical Astronomy Observatories. He also steered the University community through a controversy that ultimately led to the successful completion of the Sonja Haynes Stone Center for Black Culture and History. After stepping down as chancellor in 1995, Hardin served on the School of Law faculty.

 

Hardin’s awards included the 1995 North Carolina Public Service Award, a General Alumni Association Distinguished Service Medal in 2003 and 2004 William Richardson Davie Award from the UNC trustees, the highest honor bestowed by the board, for service to the University or society. He also received many honorary degrees.

 

Hardin served on the Carolina Performing Arts Society National Advisory Board and attended many performances in Memorial Hall. He was an active lay leader in the United Methodist Church, held numerous community leadership roles and served on several corporate boards. He also was a national leader in higher education; his accomplishments included service as a charter member of the NCAA Presidents’ Commission.

 

In March 2007, Hardin and his wife, Barbara, joined with then-Chancellor James Moeser and Chancellor Emeritus William Aycock and former Interim Chancellor Bill McCoy for the dedication of Hardin Hall, a newly built residence hall on south campus named in his honor.

 

Also on hand was Dick Richardson, a retired provost and political science professor who chaired the Bicentennial Observance while Hardin was chancellor.

 

Richardson said the essential quality of leadership Hardin possessed was his great comfort being himself. There is no veneer to him. No pretense, no façade of personality to hide the real person, Richardson said.

 

“If you scratch deeply beneath the surface of Paul Hardin, you will find exactly what you find on the surface, for this man is solid oak from top to bottom,” Richardson said.

 

Hardin is survived by his wife of 63 years, Barbara Russell Hardin, three children, nine grandchildren and one great-grandchild.

 

A memorial service will be held at 3 p.m. Saturday, July 8, at University United Methodist Church in Chapel Hill. In lieu of flowers, the family suggests gifts may be made to The Robert and Martha Gillikin Library Fund in honor of Paul and Barbara Hardin at the UNC-Chapel Hill Libraries, the Duke University ALS Clinic, the Paul Hardin Scholarship Fund at the Duke Law School or the Hardin-Russell Endowment Fund at Lake Junaluska Assembly.

 

The University plans to ring the South Building bell seven times on the day of Hardin’s memorial service, to honor his role in UNC history as the seventh chancellor. The ringing of the bell is used to mark only the most significant university occasions.

 

-Carolina-

 

Photos (Password: Hardin): https://unc.photoshelter.com/galleries/C0000lFxrRXAnmLE/G00007fjHD7wUL9E/Hardin-Paul

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 113 master’s, 68 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 318,000 alumni live in all 50 states and 157 countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

University Communications contact: (919) 445-8555, mediarelations@unc.edu

UNC-Chapel Hill experts available to discuss hurricane season, which begins today, June 1

For immediate use

 

UNC-Chapel Hill experts available to discuss hurricane season, which begins today, June 1

 

Faculty and researchers can provide insight on storm impact in the US and North Carolina in preparation for new season

 

Hurricane season officially begins today, June 1. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill researchers and faculty are available to provide insight on storm surge and flooding, water quality, beach erosion and other storm-related issues, which can help communities prepare for the upcoming season.

 

Carolina experts are also available to discuss recovery-related research in the wake of Hurricane Matthew, which slammed into 50 counties across North Carolina in 2016. Over the past nine months, 11 different research teams mounted projects on topics from buy-out programs to coastal resilience. This interactive map breaks down how UNC-Chapel Hill researchers are helping develop plans and guide policy for future storms.

 

If you would like to schedule an interview with one of our experts contact our media relations team at mediarelations@unc.edu or call our media line at (919) 445-8555.

 

Rick Luettich is the director for UNC Institute for Marine Sciences in Morehead City, North Carolina and a leading global expert on storm surge. He is on the front lines when it comes to predicting a storm’s potential impact, and is one of the lead developers of ADCIRC, a system of computer programs used to predict storm surge and flooding. These prediction models are updated every few hours – the most recent model can be found here. Agencies including FEMA, NOAA, US Army Corps of Engineers, and NC DEM use Luettich’s model to assess risk, for design protection and to make decisions during storm events. Luettich can discuss coastal risk, protection and forecasting storms.

 

Luettich’s research and ADCIRC model has also been used to design protection systems around New Orleans following Hurricane Katrina and also New York and New Jersey following Hurricane Sandy. He is also the lead investigator of the Department of Homeland Security’s Coastal Resilience Center. In 2017 the National Weather Service will be running ADCIRC during hurricanes.

 

 

Rachel Noble is a distinguished professor at the UNC Institute for Marine Sciences. Her research focuses on public health issues surrounding water quality including stormwater, drinking water and extreme conditions like those following a tropical storm or hurricane event. Her current work highlights the use of rapid tests to protect public health from waterborne diseases. Noble can discuss how to protect human health by better understanding pathogens and the risk they pose to the public, particularly after storm events.

 

 

Noble’s research and rapid method tests have been utilized on both coasts and the Great Lakes to accurately protect public health. She is currently working with US EPA on the implementation of methods to rapidly test E. coli at beaches. She is actively working with municipal wastewater agencies in California, North Carolina, Virginia, and Maryland on improved approaches to protect the public from contamination events in a more timely manner.

 

 

 Carter Smith is a doctoral student at the UNC Institute for Marine Sciences. She studies the benefits of living shorelines, an alternative to seawalls, as a solution to combat erosion and property loss during storms. Living shorelines are both more cost effective than seawalls in the long-term, and are ecologically more sustainable. Smith can discuss how homeowners and property managers can better protect coastal properties from hurricanes.

 

 

 

 

Justin Ridge is a doctoral student at the UNC Institute for Marine Sciences. Working with Institute’s Coastal Geology Lab, in partnership with Duke Marine Lab, he uses drones and other new technologies to monitor coastal environments experiencing changes caused by storms. Ridge can discuss how using drones in coastal environments provides faster, more cost effective information on storm impacts. These data are useful for community planning in light of the increasing number of storms affecting our coasts. 

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 113 master’s, 68 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 318,000 alumni live in all 50 states and 157 countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.