Accreditation assessment team invites comment on UNC public safety department

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Accreditation assessment team invites comment on UNC public safety department

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.—July 9, 2015) – The Commission on Accreditation for Law Enforcement Agencies Inc. will examine the policies and procedures, management, operations and support services for the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s department of public safety. The assessment team will arrive July 12.

 

“Verification by the team that the department meets the commission’s state-of-the-art standards is part of a voluntary process to gain reaccreditation—a prized recognition of law enforcement professional excellence,” Chief Jeff B. McCracken said.

 

As a part of the on-site visit, the assessment team will meet with the public at 6 p.m., Monday, July 13 in the Friday Center’s Bellflower Room. UNC employees and community stakeholders may offer comments at this public information session. The team will also accept telephone comments from 1 to 3 p.m. that day (July 13). Call (919) 962-5002 to comment.

 

Both types of comments will be limited to 10 minutes and must address the agency’s ability to comply with applicable commission standards. The standards are available for review at the department. The local contact is Capt. Rahsheem Holland at (919) 962-0563.

 

The team will also accept written comments about the department’s ability to comply with reaccreditation standards. Send written comments to the commission at 13575 Heathcote Blvd., Suite 320, Gainesville, VA, 20155.

 

“The UNC department of public safety must comply with 480 standards in order to gain accredited status,” McCracken said. “Being accredited garners public confidence and is a source of pride for members of this department.”

 

The assessors are law enforcement veterans from out-of-state agencies: team leader and retired Assistant Chief William Buckbee of the Kent State University in Kent, Ohio and Captain Kenneth Rogers of the Mississippi State University Police Department.

 

“They will review written materials, interview individuals, and visit offices and other places where compliance can be witnessed,” Holland said. Once the assessors complete their review of the agency, they report back to the full commission, who will decide on reaccreditation. Accreditation is for three years, during which the agency must submit annual reports attesting continued compliance with its initial accreditation standards.

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill: The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 78 bachelor’s, 112 master’s, 68 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in all 100 counties. Carolina’s 304,000-plus alumni live in all 50 states and 150 countries, and more than 159,000 live in North Carolina.

 

Commission on Accreditation for Law Enforcement Agencies Inc.: (703) 352-4225

 

UNC Public Safety contact: Randy Young, (919) 962-1502

 

UNC-Chapel Hill team wins chance to compete for top brain challenge prize with plan to transform schizophrenia diagnosis and treatment

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UNC-Chapel Hill team wins chance to compete for top brain challenge prize with plan to transform schizophrenia diagnosis and treatment

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.—July 6, 2015) – A team of UNC-Chapel Hill graduate students was among 13 winners of the Neuro Startup Challenge, an open innovation competition designed to bring promising medical inventions to market. Winning teams were selected based on their business plans, financial models and live pitches. The competition was organized by the Heritage Provider Network (HPN) in collaboration with the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the Center for Advancing Innovation (CAI).

 

The UNC-Chapel Hill team’s project, called NeuroNostix, is a sophisticated diagnostic tool for determining personalized treatment plans for patients suffering from schizophrenia. The team will now move forward to phase three of the challenge, which is designed to launch new businesses to commercialize 16 NIH-conceived and developed inventions.  These inventions include therapeutics, diagnostics, prognostics and medical devices designed to improve brain health.

 

“We are very excited to hear that NeuroNostix was selected as a winner of the Neuro Startup Challenge and that they plan to pursue commercialization through the formation of a new startup company,” said Jason Doherty, Ph.D., director of the startup-consulting program at UNC Kenan-Flagler Business School. “The Challenge offered a good platform for teaching the students about the process of technology commercialization and new venture creation. We look forward to continuing to mentor NeuroNostix through its next phases of development.”

 

More than 578 students and entrepreneurs in 70 teams competed in the challenge, which began in August 2014. The UNC-Chapel Hill team members are enrolled in the Graduate Certificate in Technology Commercialization and Entrepreneurship, a program developed by the Frank Hawkins Kenan Institute of Private Enterprise, the Center for Entrepreneurial Studies, and Carolina KickStart. Each team worked on one of the challenge technologies and built a business case for the first semester, producing a short video describing the commercial opportunity of the technology.

 

A subset of students went into the second semester and developed a business plan for the most promising technologies. The teams competed in two phases and were mentored by experts to produce business plans, financial models and live pitches. A team led by Colleen O’Neil, a Ph.D. candidate in analytical chemistry at UNC-Chapel Hill, won for their project titled “Novel Dopamine D2 Receptor Antagonists and Methods of Their Use.”

 

“At this point we are a crossroads in our product development, where we need to decide whether to develop a diagnostic to enable more personalized treatment for patients or to develop a better therapeutic with less side effects“,” said O’Neil. “No matter which road we take, NeuroNostix stands to improve the lives of patients with schizophrenia and reduce costs to the healthcare system at large.”

 

In the final phase of the competition, the winning teams will receive additional mentoring in how to launch their startup, incorporate their business, apply for licensing and execute development and regulatory requirements, all with the hope of bringing their product to market.

 

“Being involved in the competition has been an enlightening experience,” said Anthony Arceci, a Ph.D. candidate in genetics and molecular biology who is also part of the NeuroNostix team. “As part of our normal, day-to-day activities in the lab you are rarely exposed to entrepreneurial activities, although you are aware that a sizable portion of people with the same training end up in business-related professions. This challenge has provided us with a sneak-peak into the world of entrepreneurship and has helped us develop some skills that we wouldn’t have acquired otherwise.”

 

For more information on the challenge, please go to http://www.neurostartupchallenge.org/.

 

About Carolina KickStart:

Carolina KickStart is a part of the North Carolina Translational and Clinical Sciences (NC TraCS) Institute, home to the Clinical and Translational Science Awards (CTSA) program at UNC. The Carolina KickStart Award Program promotes entrepreneurship on the UNC campus by supporting the commercialization of innovations in the life science, biomedical and pharmaceutical fields.

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill: The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 78 bachelor’s, 112 master’s, 68 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in all 100 counties. Carolina’s 304,000-plus alumni live in all 50 states and 150 countries, and more than 159,000 live in North Carolina.

 

Video on NeuroNostix: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5b7MilSn0_w&feature=youtu.be

 

NC TraCS Institute contact: Michele Maclay, (919) 843-5365, maclay@med.unc.edu

 

Communications and Public Affairs Contact: Helen Buchanan, (919) 445-8555, helenb@unc.edu

 

Carolina College Advising Corps expands to Dare County

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Carolina College Advising Corps expands to Dare County

 

A community investment in education will help more than 1,500 students go to college

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.—July 1, 2015) – The Carolina College Advising Corps, based in the Office of Undergraduate Admissions at UNC-Chapel Hill, will expand to Dare County for the 2015-2016 year. The Corps aims to help low-income, first-generation and under-represented students attend college by placing UNC-Chapel Hill graduates in selected high schools across the state.

 

“We are so excited to serve high school students in Dare County,” said Yolanda Keith, Director of the Carolina College Advising Corps. “Now talented students will have the benefit of college advising and support, which will help them plan for a future beyond high school. This expansion would not be possible without the investment made by local leaders. They recognize the vital link between education and long-term prosperity.”

 

Seth Rose, a 2015 graduate of UNC-Chapel Hill, will serve Dare County’s three high schools: Cape Hatteras Secondary School of Coastal Studies, First Flight High and Manteo High School. Advisers such as Seth help students apply for scholarships and need-based aid. Schools served by the Corps experience a 10-11 percent increase in the college-going rate.

 

Nationally, first-generation college students enroll in college at a lower rate—often because of difficulty navigating systems and lack of awareness about opportunities. Less than 50 percent of low-income students admitted to a post-secondary institution end up enrolling, and less than one in 12 graduate. It is expected that nearly 60 percent of North Carolina jobs will require a college degree by 2018.

 

Carolina College advisers foster a college-going culture by placing advisers who are close in age and circumstance to the students they serve. Advisers help students identify and apply to post-secondary programs that will best serve them, both academically and socially, to increase success and retention once they enroll. For 2015-16, 44 advisers will serve 62 high schools in 24 counties. Launched in 2007, the Carolina Corps is a constituent program in the national College Advising Corps.

 

The following organizations contributed funds to support the expansion: Dare County Boat Builders Foundation; Outer Banks Community Foundation; Joe Lamb Jr. & Associates; North Banks Rotary Club; and Midgett Insurance Agency. Numerous individuals, including several members of the Dare County Board of Education, also contributed through personal donations.

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill: The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 78 bachelor’s, 112 master’s, 68 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in all 100 counties. Carolina’s 304,000-plus alumni live in all 50 states and 150 countries, and more than 159,000 live in North Carolina.

 

For an interview with Dare County leaders, please contact: Sharon Perry Sullivan at (252) 480-8888, ext. 1931.

 

UNC Admissions and Carolina College Advising Corps contacts: Ashley Memory (919) 843-2531, or Yolanda Keith (919) 843-7286

 

Communications and Public Affairs Contact: Helen Buchanan, (919) 445-8555, helenb@unc.edu

 

New mosaics discovered in synagogue excavations in Galilee

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New mosaics discovered in synagogue excavations in Galilee

 

A UNC-Chapel Hill archaeologist who leads the project says images in the mosaics — as well as their high level of artistic quality — have never been found in any other ancient synagogue

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.—July 1, 2015) – This summer, excavations directed by UNC-Chapel Hill College of Arts and Sciences professor Jodi Magness revealed stunning new mosaics that decorated the floor of the Late Roman (fifth century) synagogue in the ancient Jewish village of Huqoq.

 

Professor Jodi Magness and UNC Chapel Hill students at the Huqoq

UNC-Chapel Hill archaeology professor Jodi Magness (front row, first on the left) with Carolina students at the Huqoq dig.

The Huqoq excavations, located in Israel’s Lower Galilee, are co-directed by Shua Kisilevitz of the Israel Antiquities Authority. Work has continued each summer since the 2012 excavation when the mosaics were first discovered at the site.

 

A mosaic discovered in the synagogue’s east aisle in 2013 and 2014 depicts three horizontal registers (strips) containing human and animal figures, including elephants. The top register, which is the largest, shows a meeting between two men, who perhaps are intended to represent Alexander the Great and a Jewish high priest according to Magness’s findings. It was the first time a non-biblical story had been found decorating any ancient synagogue.

 

During this summer’s dig, Magness and her colleagues uncovered additional portions of this mosaic, as well as the rest of a mosaic immediately adjacent to it, which is connected with a Hebrew dedicatory inscription that was uncovered in 2012.

 

New digging reveals that the inscription is in the center of a large square panel with human figures, animals and mythological creatures arranged symmetrically around it, Magness said. These include winged putti (cupids) holding roundels (circular discs) with theater masks, muscular male figures wearing trousers who support a garland, a rooster, and male and female faces in a wreath encircling the inscription. Putti and masks are associated with Dionysos (Bacchus), who was the Greco-Roman god of wine and theater performances, she said.

 

This summer’s excavations also brought to light columns inside the synagogue covered with plaster and painted ivy leaf designs.

 

“The images in these mosaics — as well as their high level of artistic quality — and the columns painted with vegetal motifs have never been found in any other ancient synagogue,” Magness said. “These are unique discoveries.”

 

In 2012, a mosaic showing Samson and the foxes, as related in the Bible’s Judges 15:4, was first discovered in the synagogue’s east aisle. The next summer, a second mosaic was found that shows Samson carrying the gate of Gaza on his shoulders, from Judges 16:3.

 

“It is not clear if there is a thematic connection between the Samson scenes and the other mosaics in the east aisle,” Magness added.

 

Sponsors are UNC-Chapel Hill, Brigham Young University in Utah, the University of Toronto in Canada and the University of Wyoming. Students and staff from UNC-Chapel Hill and the consortium schools participated in the dig. Financial support for the 2015 season was also provided by the National Geographic Society Expeditions Council and the National Geographic Society/Waitt Grants Program, and the Loeb Classical Library Foundation.

 

The mosaics have been removed from the site for conservation, and the excavated areas have been backfilled. Excavations are scheduled to continue in summer 2016.

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill: The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 78 bachelor’s, 112 master’s, 68 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in all 100 counties. Carolina’s 304,000-plus alumni live in all 50 states and 150 countries, and more than 159,000 live in North Carolina.

 

Note: Magness can be reached at magness@email.unc.edu or by phone in Israel until July 10.

When dialing from outside Israel: 011-972-52-6611542; from within Israel: 052-6611542.

 

Photos, credit Jim Haberman:

 

College of Arts and Sciences contact: Kim Spurr, (919) 962-4093, spurrk@email.unc.edu

 

Communications and Public Affairs Contact: Helen Buchanan, (919) 445-8555, helenb@unc.edu

 

Southern Folklife Collection receives $986,000 grant from Andrew W. Mellon Foundation

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Southern Folklife Collection receives $986,000 grant from Andrew W. Mellon Foundation

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.—June 29, 2015) – The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill has received a grant of $986,000 from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. This grant will help the Southern Folklife Collection at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Library advance digitization of rare audio, video and motion picture films for preservation and access.

 

Activities for the grant, “Extending the Reach of Southern Audiovisual Sources,” will begin in August.

 

Scholars, musicians and even filmmakers such as Martin Scorcese have found inspiration in the Southern Folklife Collection (SFC) and its quarter-million sound and video recordings and millions of feet of motion picture film.

 

“We’ve become very good at digitizing smaller portions of the collection, but these methods do not scale up,” said Steve Weiss, director of the SFC. “Thanks to the Mellon Foundation, we will be able to solve problems of preservation and access for thousands of valuable items in volume, and deliver them online.”

 

The Library will use grant funds to build an authoritative data repository to support workflow; optimize processes in order to manage the collection and digitize recordings on a large scale; produce preservation-quality master files; and deliver research-quality access copies via online streaming.

 

Among the materials that the SFC will digitize are thousands of hours of field recordings from the collections of folklorists Guy Carawan, William Ferris, Archie Green and Mike Seeger, among many others.

 

The grant also includes funding that will allow the SFC to conduct research and share knowledge about the best methods for large-scale digitization of multimedia collections. A Southern Folklife Audiovisual Research Fellowship will engage visiting scholars with the work of the collection.

 

The grant builds upon a prior planning grant from the Mellon Foundation that developed recommendations for preserving the SFC’s fragile multimedia components before they begin to deteriorate.

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill: The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 78 bachelor’s, 112 master’s, 68 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in all 100 counties. Carolina’s 304,000-plus alumni live in all 50 states and 150 countries, and more than 159,000 live in North Carolina.

 

For more information: http://blogs.lib.unc.edu/news/index.php/2015/06/sfc-mellon-grant/

 

Library contact: Steve Weiss, smweiss@email.unc.edu

 

Communications and Public Affairs Contact: Helen Buchanan, (919) 445-8555, helenb@unc.edu

 

Rare recordings of music greats come to UNC-Chapel Hill’s Southern Folklife Collection

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Rare recordings of music greats come to UNC-Chapel Hill’s Southern Folklife Collection

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.—June 23, 2015) – The Southern Folklife Collection (SFC) at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Library is receiving thousands of hours of recordings from concerts played at McCabe’s Guitar Shop in Santa Monica, California. Venue owner Bob Riskin is making the donation so the SFC can preserve the recordings by creating and archiving digital copies of them.

 

More than 1,600 musical acts have played at McCabe’s Guitar Shop over the last 45 years. The list on the store’s website even comes with a warning: “We lost track of a few names.”

 

Steve Weiss, curator of the SFC, said that McCabe’s is a premiere venue for roots music. “This collection is a national treasure that documents nearly five decades of top performers in an intimate setting,” he said.

 

The audiocassettes and open reel tapes from 1969 onward include performances by the likes of Ramblin’ Jack Elliott, John Fahey, John Hammond, Bill Monroe, Odetta, Jean Ritchie, Dave Van Ronk, Mike Seeger, Ralph Stanley, Merle Travis, Kate Wolf, Townes Van Zandt and North Carolina’s own Elizabeth Cotten and Doc and Merle Watson.

 

“It was important that these taped recordings, which are old and fragile and have significant scholarly value, go to a place where they would be carefully conditioned and conserved,” said Riskin. “We did an inventory and cataloged more than 2,000 tapes. When I began to think of who should receive the gift, several knowledgeable people I respect, including my sound engineers, all said the best choice would be the University of North Carolina.”

 

Weiss said that UNC-Chapel Hill alumnus Robert Burns Clark, class of 1961, now a California-based writer, connected him to Riskin and to John “Kit” Alderson, a music teacher at McCabe’s who wanted to see the collection preserved.

 

Weiss envisions many audiences who are likely to be interested in the recordings, including students, scholars and fans, as well as those doing research for documentaries, film and television. They will be able to start listening to portions of the collection in Wilson Library beginning in September 2016, said Weiss.

 

The McCabe’s store, which first opened its doors in 1958 and specializes in selling folk and acoustic instruments, offers instrument rentals and repairs as well as books, lessons, and help for musicians and music aficionados alike. The iconic venue, which will continue to present legendary musicians and vocal artists in concert on its stage every week, will add new digitized recordings to the SFC over time.

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill: The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 78 bachelor’s, 112 master’s, 68 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in all 100 counties. Carolina’s 304,000-plus alumni live in all 50 states and 150 countries, and more than 159,000 live in North Carolina.

 

For more information: http://blogs.lib.unc.edu/news/index.php/2015/06/mccabes-gift-sfc/

 

Library contact: Steve Weiss, (919) 962-7105, smweiss@email.unc.edu

 

To contact Bob Riskin: Kathy Wyer, (310) 455-9999 wyer.kathy@gmail.com

 

Communications and Public Affairs Contact: Helen Buchanan, (919) 445-8555, helenb@unc.edu

 

PlayMakers’ Summer Youth Conservatory to perform ‘Guys & Dolls’

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PlayMakers’ Summer Youth Conservatory to perform ‘Guys & Dolls’

 

High school thespians train with theater professionals in award-winning program

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.—June 16, 2015) – A cast of high school actors from 14 Triangle-area schools will perform the Tony Award-winning musical “Guys & Dolls” July 15-25 for the PlayMakers Summer Youth Conservatory (SYC) at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. High school actors and technicians began work on the production June 15.

 

PlayMakers Repertory Company, the professional theater in residence in UNC-Chapel Hill’s College of Arts and Sciences, will present the musical as the culmination of its popular SYC program.

 

“Guys & Dolls,” a musical fable of Broadway, is based on a story and characters created by Damon Runyon, with music and lyrics by Frank Loesser, and book by Jo Swerling and Abe Burrows. The New York Times called “Guys & Dolls” the “show that defines Broadway dazzle.”

 

Performances will be at 7:30 p.m. July 15-18, 24, 25 and 2 p.m. July 19 in the Paul Green Theatre inside the Center for Dramatic Art located on Country Club Road. Tickets, $15 for adults and $10 for students and children under 18, may be purchased by calling (919) 962-7529, online at www.playmakersrep.org or at the PlayMakers box office.
With a cast of colorful characters straight off the streets of 1930s New York, “Guys & Dolls” is one of America’s greatest musicals. Searching for the next best place to host his “oldest established permanent floating crap game,” Nathan Detroit makes a bet that high roller Sky Masterson can’t land a date with a straight-edged Salvation Army dame. Not only that, but his fiancée of 14 years is threatening to walk if they don’t tie the knot.

 

PlayMakers’ Associate Artistic Director Jeffrey Meanza directs. He has appeared in numerous PlayMakers productions including “Into the Woods” and “Assassins.” His directing credits include “Crimes of the Heart” (Theatre Raleigh) and “The Mountaintop” (assistant director, PlayMakers and Triad Stage). Meanza has been with PlayMakers since 2007, managing the Summer Youth Conservatory since its inception.

 

Matthew Steffens serves as choreographer and associate director, as he did for last summer’s SYC production of “Hairspray.” He is associate choreographer for immersive theater hit “Queen of the Night” and served as associate choreographer for the recent Broadway production of “Doctor Zhivago.”

 

SYC is a unique, award-winning educational and performance opportunity for young people, which includes working with professional personnel at PlayMakers.

 

Recognized as “a model program for youth theater in North Carolina” by the North Carolina Theatre Conference, the Conservatory features three programs: Theatre Intensive and TheatreTech for high school students and Theatre Quest for middle-schoolers.

 

Beginning this week, high school actors in the Theatre Intensive program train, rehearse and perform in PlayMakers’ professional theater space. At the same time, participants in TheatreTech begin a program in scenic, costume and lighting production. TheatreTech includes technical coursework followed by a month-long apprenticeship with PlayMakers.

 

During Theatre Quest, middle school students participate in a series of week-long classes on a variety of subjects from June 15 to July 24.

 

For more information, visit playmakersrep.org/outreach/syc.

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill: The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 78 bachelor’s, 112 master’s, 68 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in all 100 counties. Carolina’s 304,000-plus alumni live in all 50 states and 150 countries, and more than 159,000 live in North Carolina.

 

PlayMakers contact: For press information, interviews, photos or poster art, contact Connie Mahan, (919) 962-5359, cmahan@email.unc.edu

 

College of Arts and Sciences contact: Kim Spurr, (919) 962-4093, spurrk@email.unc.edu

 

Communications and Public Affairs Contact: Helen Buchanan, (919) 445-8555, helenb@unc.edu

UNC-Chapel Hill and a Top Administrator Recognized by Deshpande Foundation

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UNC-Chapel Hill and a Top Administrator Recognized by Deshpande Foundation

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.—June 11, 2015) – The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and a top administrator each received high honors at the fourth annual Deshpande Symposium for Innovation and Entrepreneurship in Higher Education June 10, in Lowell, Massachusetts.

 

The Deshpande Foundation’s “Deshpande Symposium Awards” recognized Judith Cone with the Outstanding Contributions to Entrepreneurship and Innovation in Higher Education Award and UNC-Chapel Hill with the Entrepreneurial University Award for excellence in student engagement and curriculum innovation.

 

“I would like to thank the many at Carolina who’ve contributed to this recognition for excellence in entrepreneurship,” said Chancellor Carol L. Folt. “As a result of that hard work, UNC-Chapel Hill’s business startups have generated $7 billion in annual revenue to the social and economic benefit of North Carolina and the nation.”

 

Cone serves as the special assistant to the chancellor for innovation and entrepreneurship and interim vice chancellor of commercialization and economic development. The award recognizes Cone’s dedication and commitment to fostering entrepreneurship across higher education, wrote Raj Melville, chair of the awards committee and executive director of the Deshpande Foundation, in a letter notifying UNC-Chapel Hill of the awards.

 

“As a thought leader, she has helped inspire hundreds of institutions worldwide to adopt entrepreneurial activities on their campuses. At UNC, she has helped strengthen the culture of innovation and entrepreneurship across the campus,” wrote Melville. “Beyond that she has helped build coalitions across institutions and geographies to strengthen the economic fabric of local communities.”

 

Cone began her support of UNC-Chapel Hill’s entrepreneurship programming in 2004 when the University was awarded a significant grant to promote entrepreneurship across the university from the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation where she served as then vice president for emerging strategies and entrepreneurship. Since 2009, she has led UNC-Chapel Hill’s Innovation Roadmap strategy for strengthening an ecosystem where innovators launch solutions to the world’s most pressing problems.

 

UNC-Chapel Hill received the university award as an overall leader in entrepreneurial education for “its strong overall commitment to building innovative educational courses and programs as well as student engagement at many levels that foster entrepreneurship across an institution,” wrote Melville.

 

More than 3,000 UNC-Chapel Hill students annually enroll in entrepreneurship courses or participate in workshops, hackathons, startup weekends, and other activities sponsored by one of many entrepreneurship programs on campus. Last year, the University launched and tested nearly 50 student social, commercial and artistic startups in one of the campus’s incubator or venture-creation programs.

 

“UNC-Chapel Hill has worked across the university with curricular, co-curricular and extra-curricular programs that engage faculty and students in innovative and entrepreneurial activities,” Melville wrote. “The results are an example to others of what the 21st century university will look like.”

 

Giving students an opportunity to develop an entrepreneurial skillset and mindset is key for Cone. “If we can give all our students the skills and experience to become central actors in shaping the world around them, with grounding in proven methodologies for taking an idea to impact, we will help transform the social and economic future of our communities and our world,” she said.

 

The Deshpande Foundation encourages the use of entrepreneurship and innovation as catalysts for sustainable change in the United States, India and Canada. Each year more than 300 attendees from nearly a hundred different colleges, universities and institutions come together to network, share and learn from each other.

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill: The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 78 bachelor’s, 112 master’s, 68 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in all 100 counties. Carolina’s 304,000-plus alumni live in all 50 states and 150 countries, and more than 159,000 live in North Carolina.

 

Communications and Public Affairs contact: Helen Buchanan, (919) 445-8555, helenb@unc.edu

 

 

Statement from Dean Karen Gil, College of Arts and Sciences at UNC-Chapel Hill, on the death of Lt. Col. John Collins

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Statement from Dean Karen Gil, College of Arts and Sciences at UNC-Chapel Hill, on the death of Lt. Col. John Collins

 

“We are deeply saddened to learn of the death of Lt. Col. John W. Collins, who was chair of the aerospace studies department in the College of Arts and Sciences and commander of Air Force ROTC Detachment 590. Lt. Col. Collins came to Carolina last July from the 43rd Operations Support Squadron at Pope Field, near Fayetteville, N.C.

 

“As chair of aerospace studies, Lt. Col. Collins was a valued member of the College leadership. As head of UNC-Chapel Hill’s Air Force ROTC, he led a cadre of seven military and civilian personnel, directing academics and activities for 35-40 cadets. He was responsible for the selection, training and leadership development of prospective military officers.

 

“This past spring and fall, he taught courses that included ‘Evolution of United States Air Force Air and Space Power’ and ‘The Military and Contemporary Society.’

 

“He served more than 20 years in active duty and was a Master Navigator, with more than 2,700 flight hours.

 

“He will be deeply missed by his colleagues in the College. Our thoughts go out to his family and friends at this tragic time.”

 

Karen M. Gil, Ph.D.

Dean, College of Arts and Sciences

Lee G. Pedersen Distinguished Professor of Psychology

Seven students selected as 2015 Burch Fellows

For immediate use

 

Seven students selected as 2015 Burch Fellows

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.—June 9, 2015) – Seven students from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill were selected as recipients of the 2015 Burch Fellowship to pursue unique and self-initiated proposed experiences anywhere off UNC-Chapel Hill’s campus.

 

The Burch Fellows Program was established in 1993 by a gift from UNC-Chapel Hill alumnus Lucius E. Burch, III. Its purpose is to recognize undergraduate students at Carolina who possess extraordinary ability, promise, and imagination. The program supports self-designed projects that will make a demonstrable difference in the selected Burch Fellows’ lives and enable them to pursue a passionate interest in a way and to a degree not otherwise possible.

 

To be chosen as a Burch Fellow, an applicant must give convincing evidence of exceptional intellectual, creative, civic, or leadership ability and promise through the application, recommendations, and personal interview. The proposed fellowship experience should be one that will allow the pursuit of an intense interest well beyond the scope of an academic course, a vocational commitment, a summer job, internship, or enrichment program. Financial support of up to $6,000 is available for undergraduate students pursuing unique endeavors anywhere outside of the UNC-Chapel Hill campus.

 

Peter Cooke, class of 2017, is from Baltimore, Maryland, and is pursuing a double major in Asian studies and economics, with a minor in French. He will be spending eight weeks researching the asylum-seeking experience and working with two Syrian refugee aid associations in Paris, France.

 

Sophie Capshaw-Mack, class of 2017, is from Winston-Salem, and is majoring in journalism and mass communication and minoring in both English and religious studies. This summer she will be filming a documentary for the Namibia Chapter of the Forum for African Women Educationalists (FAWENA).

 

Katherine “Max” Gandy, class of 2016, is from Silver Spring, Maryland, and is pursuing a double major in global studies and Hispanic literature & cultures, with a minor in geography. She will be spending both her summer and her fall semester living in Latin America to study cacao and craft chocolate making.

 

Ankita Jain, class of 2017, is from Gaithersburg, Maryland, and is majoring in psychology and minoring in both biology and chemistry. She will travel to Indonesia to study performative customs of traditional medicine and spiritual healing in Bali, such as ceremonies, religious offerings, and healer-client interactions.

 

Izzy Pinheiro, class of 2017, is from Albany, New York, and is pursuing double majors in psychology and English and is minoring in medicine, literature and culture. She will be working with the Triangle Project, a nonprofit human rights organization based in Cape Town, South Africa, and she hopes to elucidate the cultural mechanisms that produce the identities and stereotypes that shape the lived realities of those within the LGBTI population through extracting and analyzing narratives produced by and about black lesbians in Cape Town.

 

Dana Rodriguez, class of 2017, is from St. Louis, Missouri, and is majoring in both psychology and art history with a minor in Hispanic studies. She will travel to Spain and Italy to analyze the artistic nature, principles, and profound symbolism of three types of doorways as essential elements of organizing space: religious doors, doors of personal residences, and doors of burial sites.

 

Alexandra Willcox, class of 2017, is a Chapel Hill native majoring in both environmental health sciences and French. This summer she will spend two months working with MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry to study vectors of infectious disease at the URMITE laboratory in Marseille, France, in collaboration with the public health service of the city.

 

Read more about the Burch Fellowships on the Burch Fellows Program website.

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill: The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 78 bachelor’s, 112 master’s, 68 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in all 100 counties. Carolina’s 304,000-plus alumni live in all 50 states and 150 countries, and more than 159,000 live in North Carolina.

 

Burch Fellows Program contact: Gina Difino, (919) 962-9680, Gina_Difino@unc.edu

 

Communications and Public Affairs Contact: Helen Buchanan, (919) 445-8555, helenb@unc.edu