Board of Trustees elect new members to the UNC Board of Visitors

For immediate use

 

Board of Trustees elect new members to the UNC Board of Visitors

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.—June 8, 2015) – The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Board of Trustees has appointed 46 people from the U.S. and abroad to serve on the UNC Board of Visitors, one of the most active volunteer groups at Carolina. They will begin their four-year terms July 1, 2015.

 

The new members are part of a board that actively assists the Board of Trustees and Chancellor in several activities that advance UNC-Chapel Hill, including career services, marketing, honor student recruitment, public and government relations and fundraising. Members also serve as ambassadors who inform their communities about issues important to Carolina, and, in turn, share feedback from their communities with the UNC-Chapel Hill administration.

 

The Board of Visitors selection process begins in January and continues through May. Each year, as members rotate off, the Board of Trustees elects a class of new members. N. Thompson Long of Fox Point, Wisconsin, was selected to chair the Board of Visitors.

 

The new members are listed below, alphabetically by North Carolina County and by state.

 

NORTH CAROLINA

 

Catawba

  • Larry T. Williams of Hickory

Cleveland

  • Ralph W. Meekins of Shelby

Forsyth

  • Hada Haulsee of Winston-Salem
  • Danny R. Newcomb of Winston-Salem
  • Pamela Oliver of Clemmons
  • Michael Rogers of Winston-Salem

Guilford

  • Michael H. Godwin of Greensboro
  • Judy White of Greensboro

 

Lenoir

  • W. Robert Bizzell of Kinston

Mecklenburg

  • Peter Keane of Charlotte
  • Frances C. Mangan of Charlotte

New Hanover

  • Louise F. Sloan of Wilmington

Orange

  • Susan B. Anna of Chapel Hill
  • Deniese Chaney of Efland
  • Joseph C. High of Chapel Hill
  • Kristen Smith of Chapel Hill
  • Clayton D. Somers of Chapel Hill

Polk

  • A.L. Lomax of Tryon

Union

  • Frank Moretz of Fairview

Wake

  • Sallie H. Glover of Raleigh
  • Alfred L. Hobgood, IV of Raleigh
  • Hans H. Huang of Raleigh
  • Sandra L. Johnson of Raleigh
  • William W. Lawrence, Jr. of Raleigh
  • Donna Rascoe of Apex
  • Reid S. Saleeby of Raleigh

 

OUT OF STATE

 

Arizona

  • J. Taylor Melvin, III of Scottsdale

California

  • Harris S. Barton of Palo Alto
  • Debashish Chatterjee of Freemont
  • Matthew B. Laycock of Los Angeles

District of Columbia

  • Yewande J. Johnson of Washington

Georgia

  • Katherine Dunlevie of Columbus
  • John C. Hamilton of Atlanta
  • James Kerr of Atlanta
  • Anne Neikirk of Atlanta
  • Ray S. Smith, III of Atlanta

Maine

  • John Walters of Falmouth

Massachusetts

  • Richard Batchelder of Boston

New Jersey

  • Suzanne S. Plambeck of Princeton

New York

  • Paul G. Parker of New York

South Carolina

  • Katina P. Strauch of Charleston

Tennessee

  • Christopher C. Whitson of Nashville

Virginia

  • Renee Grisham of North Garden
  • Sarah D. Robinson of McLean

West Virginia

  • Andrew McMillan of Shepherdstown

 

OUT OF THE COUNTRY

  • Allan B. Heye of London, England

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill: The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 78 bachelor’s, 112 master’s, 68 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in all 100 counties. Carolina’s 304,000-plus alumni live in all 50 states and 150 countries, and more than 159,000 live in North Carolina.

 

Communications and Public Affairs Contact: Helen Buchanan, (919) 445-8555, helenb@unc.edu

 

UNC-Chapel Hill releases NCAA notice of allegations

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UNC-Chapel Hill releases NCAA notice of allegations

(Chapel Hill, N.C.—June 4, 2015) – The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill has released the notice of allegations from the NCAA.

 

The University posted the 59-page notice and hundreds of pages of exhibits – called “factual information” (FI) by the NCAA – on the Carolina Commitment website after review by the Public Records Office to protect privacy rights mandated by federal and state laws. Carolina received the notice of allegations on May 20, 2015, and will respond within the NCAA’s 90-day deadline.

 

In a statement, Chancellor Carol L. Folt and Director of Athletics Bubba Cunningham said:

 

“We take the allegations the NCAA made about past conduct very seriously. This is the next step in a defined process, and we are a long way from reaching a conclusion. We will respond to the notice using facts and evidence to present a full picture of our case. Although we may identify some instances in the NCAA’s notice where we agree and others where we do not, we are committed to continue pursuing a fair and just outcome for Carolina.

 

“We believe the University has done everything possible to address the academic irregularities that ended in 2011 and prevent them from recurring. We have implemented more than 70 reforms and initiatives to ensure and enhance academic integrity. We will continue to monitor the effectiveness of those measures and, wherever needed, put additional safeguards in place.”

 

After the University submits its response to the NCAA about the notice, it also will be posted on the Carolina Commitment website. The University can only comment about NCAA process and policies; it cannot comment on the substance of the case until its completion.

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill: The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 78 bachelor’s, 112 master’s, 68 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in all 100 counties. Carolina’s 304,000-plus alumni live in all 50 states and 150 countries, and more than 159,000 live in North Carolina.

 

Communications and Public Affairs Contact: Joel Curran, Vice Chancellor for Communications and Public Affairs (919) 445-8555, mediarelations@unc.edu

UNC-Chapel Hill launches new Psychology of Popularity MOOC

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UNC-Chapel Hill launches new Psychology of Popularity MOOC

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.—June 3, 2015) – UNC-Chapel Hill’s Friday Center for Continuing Education will launch a new massive open online course (MOOC) on Coursera.org on June 22 called “The Psychology of Popularity.” Taught by psychology professor Mitch Prinstein, the course presents research on the impact of early life experiences with popularity, how those experiences influence adult lives; and how an understanding of popularity can promote increased success at work, better parenting skills, and greater fulfillment in life.

 

Advances in understanding of the human brain have only recently allowed researchers to unlock the effects of popularity and the ways that individuals’ pasts affect them outside of conscious awareness. Dr. Prinstein’s research explores the lasting influence of popularity from childhood through adulthood—its impact on office dynamics, interaction in social circles, and success in personal relationships. Popularity even has the power to change the expression of our DNA.

 

Dr. Prinstein believes that the study of popularity can bring valuable lessons into our everyday life. “I hope this course can help adults see their childhoods in a new light. I hope parents learn how to help their children grow up in a new world where popularity reigns more strongly than ever. And I hope that as adults, we can recognize patterns related to popularity dynamics at home, at work, and in our communities that can be changed so we don’t keep reliving our adolescence all over again.”

 

Dr. Prinstein is the John Van Seters Distinguished Professor of Psychology in UNC-Chapel Hill’s College of Arts and Sciences’ Clinical Program. His research uses a developmental psychopathology framework to understand how adolescents’ interpersonal experiences, particularly among peers, are associated with depression, self-injury, and health risk behaviors. He has received several awards recognizing his contributions to research including American Psychological Association Society of Clinical Psychology Theodore Blau Early Career Award, Columbia University/Brickell Award for research on suicidality, and APA Fellow of the Society of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology. Dr. Prinstein’s work has been featured in many popular media outlets such as The New York Times and National Public Radio, and he has appeared on over two dozen local and national television news programs to discuss his research.

 

-Carolina-

 

William and Ida Friday Center contact: Meredith Gulley, (919) 962-3341, mcgulley@email.unc.edu

 

Communications and Public Affairs contact: Helen Buchanan, (919) 445-8555, helenb@unc.edu

 

Los Angeles’ Critical Mass in residence at PlayMakers through June 6

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Los Angeles’ Critical Mass in residence at PlayMakers through June 6

 

Company will present work from their residency in a free performance on June 6 at 7:30 p.m.

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.—June 2, 2015) – Critical Mass Performance Group, a Los Angeles theater ensemble, is developing a performance piece while in residence through June 6 with PlayMakers Repertory Company at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

 

Led by 2014 Doris Duke Artist Nancy Keystone, the company’s artistic director, Critical Mass comes to PlayMakers as part of an annual residency program providing support for the company’s creative research and development with access to PlayMakers’ professional staff, production shops, rehearsal halls, performance spaces and the intellectual resources of UNC-Chapel Hill.

 

They are working on a new project exploring the idea of surveillance — collaborating with scholars, experts in technology, surveillance culture, constitutional law and religion, and PlayMakers’ creative artists. The project will combine live feed video, music and performance in the unique vocabulary that has made Critical Mass one of the most celebrated ensembles in the country.

 

The group will present a showing of the work created during their two-week residency at 7:30 p.m. on June 6 at the Frey Rehearsal Hall in the Center for Dramatic Art on Country Club Road. The event is free, however space is extremely limited. Seats may be reserved by calling the PlayMakers Box Office at (919) 962-7529.

 

Critical Mass is the latest participant in the PlayMakers residency program, now in its fifth year, which is supported by a $250,000 grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. Previous participants have been Austin’s Rude Mechanicals, Philadelphia’s Pig Iron Theatre Company and New York’s SITI Company and The TEAM.

 

Based in UNC-Chapel Hill’s College of Arts and Sciences, PlayMakers is the Carolinas’ premiere resident professional theater company. Subscription packages are currently available for PlayMakers’ 2015-2016 season. For more information, visit www.playmakersrep.org.

 

-Carolina-

 

Critical Mass Performance Group website: http://www.criticalmassperformancegroup.com

 

PlayMakers contact: Connie Mahan, (919) 962-5359, cmahan@email.unc.edu

 

College of Arts and Sciences contact: Kim Spurr, (919) 962-4093, spurrk@email.unc.edu

 

Communications and Public Affairs contact: Helen Buchanan, (919) 445-8555, helenb@unc.edu

 

Trustees adopt comprehensive approach to curating and teaching campus history

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Trustees adopt comprehensive approach to curating and teaching campus history

 

Carolina Hall will replace name of Saunders Hall;
16-year renaming freeze provides for curation and educational efforts to take hold

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.—May 28, 2015) – The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Board of Trustees today adopted a comprehensive approach to telling the full story of Carolina’s 221-year-old history. In three resolutions, the board voted to develop new curation and education initiatives, rename Saunders Hall to Carolina Hall, and place a 16-year freeze on renaming historic buildings to provide adequate time for the new efforts to take root.

 

“Today’s decisions make an unequivocal statement about Carolina’s values and the importance of continuing to cultivate an inclusive and positive educational atmosphere for our campus,” said Dr. Lowry Caudill, chair of the Board of Trustees. “We want to prepare our students to be effective leaders with an understanding of history, but also with an eye to the future. These efforts to curate the campus and teach the past with greater context will present future generations with a more accurate, complete and accessible understanding of Carolina’s history.”

 

The trustees invested more than a year consulting and engaging in constructive dialogue with student groups, faculty, staff, alumni, historians and national experts on curation regarding the difficult issue of race and place – which continue to confront universities across America – and their inextricable place in UNC-Chapel Hill’s history.

 

In 1920, University trustees named Saunders Hall to recognize William L. Saunders, an alumnus and trustee from 1874 to 1891. They cited his service as North Carolina’s Secretary of State from 1879 to 1891, his record as a compiler and editor of the Colonial records that became the foundation of the current State Archives of North Carolina, and his leadership of the Ku Klux Klan (KKK). The KKK was a violent, terrorist organization that was illegal in the United States during Saunders’ era. He was compelled to appear before a Congressional hearing in 1871 to answer for his reputed involvement in the KKK, but he refused to testify, pleading his Fifth Amendment right to not incriminate himself.

 

Current trustees said they believed the University’s leadership made an error in citing Saunders’ role in the KKK as one qualification for the building name honor.

 

In removing Saunders’ name, trustees followed UNC-Chapel Hill’s existing policy on renaming campus buildings, which allows revoking an honoree’s name if continuing to use it would “compromise the public trust, dishonor the University’s standards, or otherwise be contrary to the best interests of the University.”

 

In selecting the new building name, the trustees concluded the best way to reinforce the larger concept of community was to add “Carolina” to the existing “Hall.” The board’s resolution called for installing a plaque in Carolina Hall that states, “We honor and remember all those who have suffered injustices at the hands of those who would deny them life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.”

 

After evaluating input from hundreds of interviews and a March committee meeting featuring student, faculty and alumni speakers, trustees were guided by seven principles for potential solutions: grounded in evidence and research; focused on teaching and learning; careful not to impose today’s social norms on the past; not hide unpleasant aspects of campus history; practical and implementable; evergreen and sustainable for future students, faculty and staff; and have clear responsibility for execution and ongoing support.

 

“As we plan the curation and educational initiatives, we will be guided by the same care and thoughtful deliberation exemplified by our trustees,” said Chancellor Carol L. Folt, who added that she and her leadership team support the freeze on future name changes because it is the best way to see the educational imperatives flourish.

 

Among the educational enhancements the University will consider are creating a permanent area on campus to tell the rich and diverse history of UNC-Chapel Hill. The new centralized focus would create a more complete, compelling and powerful storytelling center and make it easier to quickly learn about and reflect upon the full measure of Carolina’s history.

 

The University also will explore improving websites such as “The Carolina Story: A Virtual Museum of University History” (http://museum.unc.edu/), as well as supplementing campus tours that place history in context with an evolving America moving from a painful transformation from slavery through the struggle for civil rights. Folt also will evaluate options for creating an online orientation program or non-credit course.

 

Caudill and Folt credited Trustees Alston Gardner and Chuck Duckett, chair and co-chair of the board’s University Affairs Committee, respectively, for their dedication and well-researched approach to such an important issue for the University. They also acknowledged the full board’s thoughtful and deliberate consideration reflected with each member’s votes on the resolutions.

 

“I appreciate all of the efforts Chancellor Folt and her leadership team have made to ensure we fully understood why these issues are so important on campus,” Caudill said. “We also want to thank the hundreds of students, faculty, staff and alumni who shared their strong views at our meetings and via comments sent to our board website. That feedback helped the trustees a great deal.”

 

“Throughout this process, we have learned valuable lessons from our University’s past,” Folt said. “Now it’s time to live in this particular moment by creating an educational program that will honor our traditions of excellence, enlighten our campus community and make Carolina even stronger in the future.”

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill: The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 78 bachelor’s, 112 master’s, 68 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in all 100 counties. Carolina’s 292,500-plus alumni live in all 50 states and 150 countries, and more than 159,000 live in North Carolina.

 

Communications and Public Affairs Contact: Jim Gregory, (919) 962-8431, jim.gregory@unc.edu

 

UNC-Chapel Hill announces receiving NCAA notice of allegations

UNC-Chapel Hill announces receiving NCAA notice of allegations


Pledges prompt public release of document after privacy rights review
 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.—May 22, 2015) – The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill today announced the campus had received a notice of allegations from the NCAA as the next phase in its investigation of academic irregularities and possible bylaw infractions.

 

In a joint statement, Chancellor Carol L. Folt and Director of Athletics Bubba Cunningham said the University had begun reviewing the NCAA’s notice.

 

“We take these allegations very seriously, and we will carefully evaluate them to respond within the NCAA’s 90-day deadline,” the statement said. “The University will publicly release the NCAA’s notice as soon as possible. The notice is lengthy and must be prepared for public dissemination to ensure we protect privacy rights as required by federal and state law. When that review for redactions is complete, the University will post the notice on the Carolina Commitment website and notify the news media. When we respond to the NCAA’s allegations, we will follow this same release process.

 

“Consistent with NCAA protocols, the University cannot comment on details of the investigation until it is completed.”

 

-Carolina-

 
Communications and Public Affairs Contact: Joel Curran, (919) 445-8555, mediarelations@unc.edu
 
 

Board of Trustees Meeting Schedule

Not for publication

 

Board of Trustees Meeting Schedule

 

May 27-28, The Carolina Inn

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.—May 20, 2015) – This site, http://bot.unc.edu/agendas/, posts meeting agendas and related background.

 

Wednesday – May 27

10 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.
Memorial Hall

In a separate event preceding the Board of Trustees meeting, Chancellor Carol L. Folt will make a special announcement concerning University property in downtown Chapel Hill. More information will be available on Tuesday, May 26.

 

Board of Trustees meeting
The Carolina Inn

 

11:30 a.m. – 12:50 p.m.

Lunch

North Parlor

 

1:00 – 2:15 p.m.

*Finance and Infrastructure Committee

Chancellor’s Ballroom West

 

2:30 – 3:45 p.m.

*External Relations Committee

Chancellor’s Ballroom East

 

2:30 – 3:45 p.m.

*Innovation & Impact Committee

Chancellor’s Ballroom West

 

4:00 – 5:15 p.m.

*University Affairs Committee

Chancellor’s Ballroom West

 

6:30 p.m.

Dinner

Gerrard Hall

 

Thursday – May 28    

The Carolina Inn

 

8:00 a.m.

*Board of Trustees Meeting Convenes

Chancellor’s Ballroom

 

12:00 p.m.

Lunch

 

*Some of the business of the Board is authorized by the N.C. Open Meetings Law to be conducted in closed session.

 

-Carolina-

 

Communications and Public Affairs contact: Karen Moon, (919) 445-8555, karen_moon@unc.edu
 

Eight students receive Class of 1938 Awards

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Eight students receive Class of 1938 Awards

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.—May 20, 2015) – Eight University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill students received 2015 Class of 1938 Summer Project Abroad Fellowships for research abroad this summer.

 

The students were chosen for projects outside the United States, with selection based on the quality of applicants’ proposals, financial need and academic purpose. Each will receive $5,000. A committee that included Class of 1938 members and former fellows chose the awardees.

 

The recipients are Martin Bahena, Andrew Royce Bauer, Carrie Bobrowski, Jamilah Dawkins, Carrie Hamilton, Emma Kelly and Jonathan Taylor Wall. Kathryn Bennett received the Charles H. and Margaret M. Witten Travel Award, also $5,000. Class of 1938 members Dr. Charles and Margaret Witten established the award in 1992.

 

Every year since 1975, an endowment created by UNC-Chapel Hill’s Class of 1938 has funded independent projects abroad by UNC-Chapel Hill students. Class members, who lived through and lost friends to World War II, created the endowment to help foster international understanding and promote world peace.

 

“These students truly embody the spirit of the Class of 1938 gift,” said Jane Rosenberg, assistant director for student and exchange visitor services in UNC International Student and Scholar Services office through which the fellowships are awarded. “The projects they are pursuing will be of benefit to them and to the communities they’re serving. They’ll work in nutrition and health, develop sports programs to empower youth and create a positive sense of community, teach in rural schools and more—all while developing long-term friendships and professional networks.”

 

Martin Bahena, son of Pedro Bahena and Agustina Gutierrez of Lexington, is majoring in chemistry. He will go to Fiji to intern with an established nutrition project that works with local communities.

 

Andrew Royce Bauer, son of Kathleen Bauer of Neptune, New Jersey, is majoring in African American studies. He will go to Sint Maarten to work with a basketball program that provides urban youth with a healthy outlet for activity. The program has been designed to reduce youth violence.

 

Kathryn Bennett, daughter of Tim and Julia Bennett of Advance, is majoring in environmental science. She will go to Panama for an internship with Kalu Yala, a company designing a sustainable city approximately 50 miles from Panama City.

 

Carrie Bobrowski, daughter of Thomas and Kelly Brobowski of New Bern, is majoring in dental hygiene. She will teach in multiple schools in Kenya, providing science camp-like lessons designed to help improve student performance in the math section of the Kenyan national exam.

 

Jamilah Dawkins, daughter of Sarah Dawkins of Hamlet, is majoring in global studies and African studies. She will go to the Democratic Republic of Congo to intern with MamAfrica Designs to support a community health initiative and multimedia activities.

 

Carrie Hamilton, daughter of Mary Eubank-Hamilton and Bradley Hamilton of Chapel Hill, is majoring in environmental science and geography. She will go to Ecuador to assess the ecological and cultural impacts of oil drilling and industry on the indigenous Kichwa and Huaorani communities in Yasuni National Park, Orellana, Ecuador.

 

Emma Kelly, daughter of John and Megan Kelly of Lafayette, New Jersey, is majoring in environmental health sciences. She will go to Ghana with research team from the Water Institute at UNC to explore community management in the context of water, sanitation and hygiene (WaSH).

 

Jonathan Taylor Wall, son of Chris and Melinda Wall of Wilson, is a pre-med student majoring in biology. He will go to Peru to work with Hands on Peru, where he will attend lectures and workshops with leading physicians. Following training, he will provide services in a local health clinic and participate in rotations with doctors.

 

Read more about the Class of 1938 Fellowships on the International Student and Scholar Services website.

 

-Carolina-

 

UNC Global contact: Katie Bowler Young, (919) 962-4504, kby@unc.edu

 

Communications and Public Affairs contact: Helen Buchanan, (919) 445-8555, helenb@unc.edu

Firms lack strategy to develop globally competent leaders, according to UNC Kenan-Flagler Business School study

For immediate use

 

Firms lack strategy to develop globally competent leaders,

according to UNC Kenan-Flagler Business School study

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.—May 19, 2015) – The importance of globally competent leaders is recognized by the vast majority of organizations, but few have a strategy to provide the training needed to compete globally, according to a new study by the University of North Carolina Kenan-Flagler Business School and the Human Capital Institute.

 

Their findings are reported in “Compete and Connect: Developing Globally Competent Leaders,” which examines how organizations develop global competence in their workforce. It is based on a survey of more than 300 human resources and training and development professionals.

 

“A globally competent individual has the right attitude, knowledge, skills and functional business expertise to effectively work within and across cultures,” said David Roberts, a UNC Kenan-Flagler professor who teaches about effecting organizational change to achieve strategic goals for UNC Executive Development.

 

When asked about the qualities most important for leaders to work effectively in a global business environment, the top answers are:

 

  • Multicultural sensitivity and awareness (57 percent)
  • Ability to communicate effectively (49 percent)
  • Strategic thinking (47 percent)
  • Leadership and the ability to influence others (45 percent)
  • Respect for differences (44 percent)
  • Ethics and integrity (42 percent)
  • Flexibility and willingness to change (41 percent)
  • Adaptability in new environments (40 percent)
  • Collaborative (37 percent)
  • Decision-making ability (36 percent)

 

Over 60 percent say the need to develop global competence is an urgent and 92 percent say it can be developed through training.

 

Unfortunately, global leadership development at most organizations is in a poor state:

 

  • 38 percent state their organizations are underdeveloped in multicultural sensitivity
  • 43 percent agree that their high-potentials managers are able to meet future business needs.
  • 35 percent say their organizations have a strong leadership pipeline
  • 24 percent say that senior leaders are satisfied with their current bench strength
  • 52 percent of organizations with global operations struggle to recruit talent for global leadership positions

 

The top two most popular ways organizations develop global competence are passive: international travel and encouraging networking outside of the organization.

 

Most organizations aren’t taking a proactive or hands-on approach, Kip Kelly of UNC Executive Development said, but the most effective methods are deliberate and experiential. “They need to do much more than send individuals on business trips – they need a complete top-to-bottom training strategy. That kind of investment gives both organizations and individuals a competitive advantage.”

 

The full report can be downloaded here.

 

About the University of North Carolina Kenan-Flagler Business School

Consistently ranked one of the world’s best business schools, UNC Kenan-Flagler is known for its collaborative culture that stems from its core values: excellence, leadership, integrity, community and teamwork. Professors excel at both teaching and research, and demonstrate unparalleled dedication to students. Graduates are effective, principled leaders who have the technical and managerial skills to deliver results in the global business environment. UNC Kenan-Flagler offers a rich portfolio of programs and extraordinary, real-life learning experiences: Undergraduate Business (BSBA), full-time MBA, Executive MBA Programs (Evening, Weekend and global OneMBA®), online MBA@UNC, UNC-Tsinghua Dual-Degree EMBA, Master of Accounting, PhD, Executive Development, and UNC Business Essentials programs. It is home to the Frank Hawkins Kenan Institute of Private Enterprise.

 

-Carolina-

 

UNC Kenan-Flagler contact: Allison Adams, (919) 962-7235, aadams@unc.edu

 

Communications and Public Affairs contact: Helen Buchanan, (919) 445-8555, helenb@unc.edu

 

Media invited to cover UNC Chapel Hill’s launch of two programs to help the men and women of our nation’s armed forces and veterans

Not for publication

 

Media invited to cover UNC Chapel Hill’s launch of two programs

to help the men and women of our nation’s armed forces and veterans

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.—May 19, 2015) – The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill will announce two new programs that support our active duty military and veterans during a special presentation on Wednesday, May 20, at 11:00 a.m. in the Florence and James Peacock Atrium in the FedEx Global Education Center on campus on Wednesday, May 20.

 

Members of the media are invited to attend this event where Chancellor Carol L. Folt will announce:

 

  • Student Veteran Assistance Program. UNC Chapel Hill has created a new full-time position—Student Veteran Assistance Coordinator—in the Office of the Dean of Students. This position will work collaboratively with other professionals in the Office of the Dean of Students and across the university, state, and local communities to help veterans navigate the higher education process. The position, which will be filled this summer, will also focus on ways to make the university experience a positive experience for military veterans.
  • UNC Core (unccore.org). A new online distance education program offered by UNC Chapel Hill that will help active duty military complete their general education courses so they can apply for follow-on undergraduate degree programs.

 

This event will also be an opportunity to highlight the many other programs Carolina has offered (or is preparing to offer) to support the military and veterans. Chancellor Folt and other Carolina program leaders for service personnel and veterans will speak and be available for questions following the announcements. The announcement will begin promptly at 11:00 a.m. in the Florence and James Peacock Atrium in the FedEx Global Education Center located on the corner of Pittsboro and McCauley Streets.

 

Wednesday, May 20

11:00 a.m. ET

FedEx Global Education Center

301 Pittsboro Street

Chapel Hill, North Carolina

 

Media Check-In: Media must check-in at the media table no earlier than 10:30 a.m. for credentials. Jim Gregory will be the on-site contact.

 

Parking: Parking will be available in The Carolina Inn parking lot on Pittsboro Street adjacent to the FedEx Global Education Center. Please use the contact information below to notify us of your attendance so we can ensure your organization has the opportunity to park in The Carolina Inn parking lot.

 

-Carolina-

 

Communications and Public Affairs contact: Jim Gregory, (919) 962-8431, jim.gregory@unc.edu