PlayMakers to host 2015-2016 season preview June 11

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PlayMakers to host 2015-2016 season preview June 11

 

Event includes Q&A with producing artistic director Joseph Haj

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.—May 18, 2015) – PlayMakers Repertory Company will hold a special event to celebrate its upcoming 40th anniversary season, hosting a 2015-2016 season preview with producing artistic director Joseph Haj on June 11 from 6:30 to 9 p.m. at the Center for Dramatic Art at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

 

Haj will reveal new information about the season, share his inspiration for the lineup of plays and take audience questions in an onstage conversation moderated by Frank Stasio, host of WUNC-FM’s “The State of Things.” A reception with food and drink will begin the evening, followed by the presentation in the Paul Green Theatre at 7:30 p.m., and will end with dessert in the lobby.

 

The theater promises a special look at what’s ahead for PlayMakers, and for Haj as he takes up his next position on the national theater scene. After nine seasons with PlayMakers, Haj will become artistic director of the Guthrie Theater in Minneapolis, Minnesota, in July.

 

The event is free, but reservations are required, as space is limited. To RSVP, call the PlayMakers Box Office at (919) 962-7529.

 

Subscription packages for PlayMakers’ 2015-2016 season may be purchased by calling the box office. For more on the new season, visit www.playmakersrep.org.

 

Based in UNC-Chapel Hill’s College of Arts and Sciences, PlayMakers is the Carolinas’ premiere resident professional theater company. New York’s Drama League has named PlayMakers one of the “best regional theatres in America.”

 

-Carolina-

 

Photo of Haj: http://uncnews.unc.edu/files/2015/05/Joseph-Haj_prc_2015.jpeg

 

PlayMakers contact: Connie Mahan, (919) 962-5359, cmahan@email.unc.edu

 

College of Arts and Sciences contact: Kim Spurr, (919) 962-4093, spurrk@email.unc.edu


Communications and Public Affairs contact:
Helen Buchanan, (919) 445-8555, helenb@unc.edu

Financial Times ranks custom executive programs at UNC Kenan-Flagler No. 9 globally

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Financial Times ranks custom executive programs at UNC Kenan-Flagler No. 9 globally

 

UNC-Chapel Hill ranks No. 3 in the U.S. for customized leadership development and business education programs

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.—May 18, 2015) – Custom executive education programs at the University of North Carolina Kenan-Flagler Business School are among the very best in the world, according to a new Financial Times ranking.

 

The Financial Times ranked UNC Kenan-Flagler No. 9 in the world and No. 3 in the United States for its customized leadership development and business education programs.

 

“We are dedicated to the partnerships we develop with companies to help them solve business challenges and develop the knowledge, skills and experience they need,” said Susan Cates, president of UNC Executive Development. “To receive this positive feedback from the clients we serve is truly gratifying and inspires us as we continue to collaborate with them to develop their future business leaders.”

 

UNC Kenan-Flagler also ranked highly in several individual categories, including:

  • No. 1 for value for money
  • No. 2 for faculty
  • No. 3 for aims achieved
  • No. 3 for new skills and learning
  • No. 4 for program design

 

“We are especially proud to be recognized as No. 1 for the value that we bring to our partners all around the world,” said David Leonard, executive director. “We work hard to help our clients address real business challenges, ensuring that the programs we design deliver real value.”

 

UNC Kenan-Flagler also was ranked No. 4 for facilities. For the last 15 years its home has been the Paul J. Rizzo Conference Center at Meadowmont, which was designed specifically to serve the needs of executive programs. An expansion of the Rizzo Center to accommodate the growing demand for UNC Executive Development programs will be complete this summer.

 

For more than 60 years, UNC Kenan-Flagler has been a leader in the field of executive education. Today, UNC Executive Development designs programs for Fortune 500 companies and government organizations that have a significant impact on their businesses.

 

-Carolina-

 

UNC Kenan-Flagler contact: Allison Adams, (919) 962-7235, aadams@unc.edu

 

Communications and Public Affairs contact: Helen Buchanan, (919) 445-8555, helenb@unc.edu

 

Kenan Creative Collaboratory funds projects that connect work across Kenan Institutes and host N.C. universities

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Kenan Creative Collaboratory funds projects that connect work across Kenan Institutes and host N.C. universities

 

Kenan Institutes at UNC-Chapel Hill, Duke, NC State, and UNC School of the Arts make the Kenan Creative Collaboratory

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.—May 15, 2015) – The Kenan Creative Collaboratory has announced selections for its first grants to incubate and advance partnerships among researchers, teachers, practitioners, performers and artists to find connections in the collective work of the four Kenan Institutes and their host institutions: the Kenan Institute of Private Enterprise at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the William R. Kenan Jr. Institute for Engineering, Technology and Science at North Carolina State University, the Thomas S. Kenan Institute for the Arts at the University of North Carolina School of the Arts and the Kenan Institute for Ethics at Duke University.

 

The Kenan Creative Collaboratory provides funding for innovative research, teaching and problem solving at the intersection of private enterprise, engineering, technology and science, arts and ethics. Awards ranged from $7,500 to $93,000 per project. To be eligible for funding, project proposals drew participants from two or more of the four universities that house Kenan Institutes.

 

“The grants provide a platform for creative teams of problem-solvers from across science, business, the arts and humanities to make a lasting impact,” said Dan Drake, President of the William R. Kenan, Jr. Funds. “By encouraging collaboration between the four Kenan Institutes and their four host universities, we are advancing new knowledge, inventing new pedagogies, enhancing economic development, and proposing new solutions based on creative synergies.”

 

Eight projects were funded:

 

  • The “Science, Ethics, Identity and Human Rights” project by Duke and NC State will identify key challenges for applying scientific technologies in human rights contexts, with an initial focus on identifying human remains and reunifying migrant children with families on the U.S.-Mexico border. Leading the project are Sara Katsanis of Duke and Seth Faith of NC State.

 

  • The “Smart Economics for the Environment and Human Development” project by Duke, UNC-Chapel Hill, NC State and UNCSA will establish a diverse working group that brings together cross-disciplinary expertise and perspectives from all walks of life to create more comprehensive indicators to measure smart development and progress. Leading the project is Dirk Philipsen of Duke in collaboration with Brent Lane of UNC-Chapel Hill, Roby Sawyers of NC State and Corey Madden of UNCSA.

 

  • The “Ancient North Carolinians: A Virtual Museum of Cultural Heritage and Archaeology” project by UNC-Chapel Hill and NC State will create an interactive, state-of-the-art resource which will be publicly available online. Leading the project is Vincas Steponaitis of UNC-Chapel Hill in collaboration with Brent Lane of UNC-Chapel Hill and Elaine Franklin of NC State.

 

  • The “Innovate NC: A Cross City Learning Collaborative” project by NC State and UNC-Chapel Hill will create a multi-city innovation learning collaborative to help five North Carolina communities make major gains in building and sustaining a new innovation model. Leading the project are Anita Brown-Graham and Sarah Langer of NC State and Jim Johnson of UNC-Chapel Hill.

 

  • The “Community Environmental Empowerment” project by Duke, NC State and UNC-Chapel Hill will develop community capacity to address environmental injustices and identify best practices for incorporating environmental equity into local environmental decision-making. Leading the project is Kay Jowers of UNC-Chapel Hill in collaboration with Kofi Boone of NC State and Deborah Gallagher of Duke.

 

  • The “North Carolina Venture Lab” by NC State and UNC-Chapel Hill will blend three elements of entrepreneurial education into a model: Pedagogy, experiential education, and a research clinic. Leading the project are Ted Zoller of UNC-Chapel Hill and Steve Markham of NC State.

 

  • The “ARDEO” project by the UNCS A and the North Carolina Jaycee Burn Center at UNC Health Care will work with theater faculty and students, doctors and patients to support the research, writing, development and presentation of a play based on personal narratives from doctors and patients that highlight the power, impact and significance of narrative medicine. Leading the project is Jacqueline E. Lawton of UNC-Chapel Hill in collaboration with Bruce Cairns of UNC-Chapel Hill and Carl Forsman of UNCSA.

 

  • The “Developing Frameworks for IP Commercialization in Entertainment Technologies” project by UNCSA and NC State will help faculty to work with industry and develop policies, guidelines and frameworks that address legal, ethical, entrepreneurial, and financial dimensions of the digital gaming technologies. Leading the project are Michael Young of NC State and Susan Ruskin of UNCSA.

 

-Carolina-

 

Frank Hawkins Kenan Institute of Private Enterprise, UNC-Chapel Hill contact: Mark Little, (919) 962-8201, mark_little@kenan-flagler.unc.edu

 

Kenan Institute for Ethics, Duke University: Suzanne Shanahan, (919) 660-3033, suzanne.shanahan@duke.edu

 

Thomas S. Kenan Institute for the Arts, UNC School of the Arts contact: Lynda Lotich, (336) 770-1432, lotichl@uncsa.edu

 

William R. Kenan, Jr. Institute for Engineering, Technology & Science, NC State: Raj Narayan, (919) 515-5118, rnaraya@ncsu.edu

 

UNC Kenan-Flagler contact: Allison Adams, (919) 962-7235, aadams@unc.edu

 

Communications and Public Affairs contact: Helen Buchanan, (919) 445-8555, helenb@unc.edu

 

Statement from Chancellor Carol L. Folt on the passing of Coach Bill Guthridge:

(Chapel Hill, N.C. – May 13, 2015) – Former University of North Carolina men’s basketball coach Bill Guthridge passed away last evening (May 12). He was 77 years old. UNC-Chapel Hill Chancellor Carol L. Folt released the following statement:

 

Statement from Chancellor Carol L. Folt on the passing of Coach Bill Guthridge:

“The Carolina community mourns the passing of Bill Guthridge, a great coach, devoted friend and loyal Tar Heel. For more than three decades, Coach Guthridge served this University he loved so much with a deep commitment to academic and athletic excellence. Like his lifelong friend and mentor, Coach Dean Smith, he led by example instilling values of kindness, discipline and a strong work ethic. His legacy lives on in each of the players who were privileged to call him Coach and countless Tar Heels and people across the nation who admired him. We offer our deepest condolences to the Guthridge family as they grieve the loss of a wonderful husband and father.”

 
 

UNC-Chapel Hill invites community to support annual American Red Cross blood drive

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UNC-Chapel Hill invites community to support annual American Red Cross blood drive

 

The annual Carolina Blood Drive will be held June 2, 7 a.m. to 6 p.m.

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.—May 13, 2015) – Nearly five million people need blood transfusions each year, and with just one blood donation, up to three lives can be saved. UNC-Chapel Hill will host its annual Carolina Blood Drive 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. on June 2 at the Dean E. Smith Center with a goal of collecting 900 pints of blood. Campus and community members are invited to attend and help support the American Red Cross in its lifesaving mission.

 

To thank donors for their participation, various prizes, such as tickets to athletic events, autographed memorabilia and gift certificates, will be given away throughout the day. Those who donate blood will receive a Carolina Blood Drive T-shirt courtesy of the American Red Cross. Eligible double red cell donors also will receive an American Red Cross travel mug. After giving, donors may choose from refreshments provided by local businesses.

 

“This summer, the Red Cross encourages eligible donors to help patients in need by donating blood or platelets,” said Marci Allen of the Carolinas Region of the American Red Cross. “We appreciate Carolina’s 27-year commitment to helping us fulfill this lifesaving mission by providing blood donations, especially during the summer months when donations are typically down.”

 

Now in its 27th year, the Carolina Blood Drive has collected 23,580 pints of blood helping to save up to 70,670 lives. Last year’s drive collected 990 units of blood. This year the Carolina Blood Drive is hoping to surpass this goal in order to help save lives and promote healing in hospitals across the Carolinas Region of the American Red Cross.

 

For details and to register to donate blood, or volunteer at the drive, visit unc.edu/blood or call 1-800-RED-CROSS. To find out whether you are eligible to donate, visit blooddrive.web.unc.edu/donor.

 

-Carolina-

 

Carolina Center for Public Service contact: Rhonda Beatty, (919) 843-6993, rbeatty@unc.edu

 

Communications and Public Affairs contact: Helen Buchanan, (919) 445-8555, helenb@unc.edu
 

UNC Kenan-Flagler Business School’s MBA@UNC ranks No. 1 online by Princeton Review

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UNC Kenan-Flagler Business School’s MBA@UNC ranks No. 1 online by Princeton Review

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.—May 12, 2015) – The Princeton Review ranks UNC Kenan-Flagler Business School’s MBA@UNC program No. 1 in its first ranking of online MBA programs.

 

UNC Kenan-Flagler launched MBA@UNC on July 4, 2011. Today, more than 630 students are enrolled. They represent 43 states and 40 countries, including Australia, Azerbaijan, Columbia, India, Italy, Mexico, Nigeria, Poland, Russia, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom and across the United States.

 

“With MBA@UNC I am able to take advantage of their top-rated program, reputation and extensive alumni network without uprooting my family and career,” according to one student surveyed.

 

MBA@UNC blends the flexibility of an online program with intensively interactive experiences and the rigor and quality of an on-campus program, said Susan Cates, MBA@UNC executive director. “Our students are high-potential working professionals who make deep connections while they learn together, advance their careers and join a global community of Carolina alumni.”

 

The Princeton Review chose the top 25 schools for its ranking based on surveys conducted in the 2014 academic year of students and administrators at MBA programs offering at least 75 percent of their programs of study online.

 

The school survey covers admissions selectivity, graduation and retention rates, faculty training and credentials, technological infrastructure, student indebtedness and career outcomes among other items. The student survey covers faculty, classmates, career preparation, academics, the technology platform and overall satisfaction.

 

MBA@UNC students praised the high caliber of the faculty, classmates, curriculum and career support. Student survey comments included:

 

  • “The professors are excellent and engaging, and are consistently accessible.”
  • About the face-to-face Global Immersions courses: “I have traveled the world through this program – Singapore, Istanbul, South Africa, New York City – all while building personal connections with people I interact with on a daily basis online.”
  • “I was surprised by the breadth and depth of the connections I was able to establish with my peers.”
  • Classmates are “some the most intelligent and successful individuals I have ever met—hands down” while another counts among his peers “an F18 pilot who’s participating in group study from an aircraft carrier, a scientist working some genetic engineering (PhD), a doctor and emergency medicine chairman, a Lockheed Martin’s aeronautical engineer taking a class from Afghanistan.”

 

To deliver MBA@UNC, UNC Kenan-Flagler collaborates with 2U Inc., which provides an advanced online learning platform of cloud-based software-as-a-service technology and technology-enabled services to support faculty and students.

 

U.S. News & World Report ranked MBA@UNC No. 1 in a tie with Indiana University and Temple University in January. It ranked programs on five categories: Student engagement, admissions selectivity, peer reputation, faculty credentials and training how to teach distance learners, and student services and technology.

 

-Carolina-

 

UNC Kenan-Flagler contact: Allison Adams, (919) 962-7235, aadams@unc.edu

 

Communications and Public Affairs contact: Helen Buchanan, (919) 445-8555, helenb@unc.edu

 

Next eGranary from WiderNet Project will include TED Talks

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Next eGranary from WiderNet Project will include TED Talks

 

All 1,900 TED Talks will be included in the next release of the “Internet in a Box”

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.—May 12, 2015) – TED Talks are about to spread even further thanks to a collaboration with the WiderNet Project, a non-profit founded and directed by UNC-Chapel Hill School of Information and Library Science (SILS) associate professor Cliff Missen. All 1,900 TED Talks will be included in the next release of the eGranary Digital Library, the off-line “Internet in a Box” that is used at over 1,000 locations that lack adequate Internet access in places such as Africa and India.

 

“As TED extends its mission to hard-to-reach parts of the world, particularly where Internet connectivity is constrained or costly, we’re keen to partner with the right platforms to reach these underserved regions,” said Deron Triff, TED’s Director of Global Distribution and Licensing.  “eGranary’s solution is an important part of our strategy and we’re excited to support their efforts.”

 

TED is an internationally known nonprofit devoted to spreading ideas, usually in the form of short, powerful talks in 18 minutes or less. TED began in 1984 as a conference where Technology, Entertainment and Design converged, and today covers almost all topics–from science to business to global issues–in more than 100 languages. Both TED and WiderNet are committed to the power of education and ideas to change lives.

 

“Everybody needs a new idea a day,” said Missen, who was a TED Fellow in 2007 and has organized TEDx events.  “The addition of the TED Talks to the next eGranary will spread important and exciting ideas to people who have been left out of the conversation.”

 

The eGranary, WiderNet’s centerpiece program, was created to provide educational resources to the two-thirds of the world’s population that does not have Internet access. The eGranary is an off-line collection of over 32 million resources, including videos, articles, books and images, accessible over local area networks.

 

WiderNet, a tax-exempt 501(c)(3) nonprofit, and its research and development component, WiderNet@UNC, are dedicated to providing digital educational resources to clinics, schools, libraries, prisons and homes lacking adequate Internet access. For more information, visit http://www.widernet.org/.

 

-Carolina-

 

School of Information and Library Science contact: Contact: Katherine Perales, (919) 843-8337, kpearl@email.unc.edu

 

WiderNet contact: Lisa Many, (919) 240-4622, publicity@widernet.org

 

Communications and Public Affairs contact: Helen Buchanan, (919) 445-8555, helenb@unc.edu
 

UNC-Chapel Hill Alumni Association honors three for outstanding service

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UNC-Chapel Hill Alumni Association honors three for outstanding service

 

Dr. H. Shelton “Shelley” Earp III, Robyn S. Hadley, and Thomas W. Ross Sr. are recipients

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.—May 12, 2015) – The General Alumni Association at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill honored three alumni on Saturday, May 9, for their outstanding service to the University and to the association.

 

Recipients of the 2015 Distinguished Service Medals are Dr. H. Shelton “Shelley” Earp III, director of UNC Cancer Care and former director of the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center; Robyn S. Hadley, former alumni association chair; and Thomas W. Ross Sr., UNC system president.

 

The medals were presented at the alumni association’s Annual Alumni Luncheon during spring reunion weekend. The association has awarded the medals since 1978 to alumni and others who have provided outstanding service to the association or the University.

 

Earp, of Chapel Hill, is a professor of pharmacology and medicine and a Lineberger Professor of Cancer Research. Earp received his medical degree in 1970 and his master’s degree in biochemistry in 1971, both from UNC-Chapel Hill, and joined the faculty in 1977.

 

Earp was director of the cancer center from 1997 to 2013. As director of UNC Cancer Care, he coordinates cancer care and research across UNC-Chapel Hill’s School of Medicine, the University and the UNC Health Care System. Earp’s also has chaired search committees for a provost and medical school dean and has served on the search committee for the chancellor. He has served on the Faculty Council and the steering committee for the self-study of the University’s research mission. He has chaired the Chancellor’s Advisory Committee on Naming of Facilities.

 

Earp’s teaching awards include the Medical School Basic Science Teaching Award and the Kaiser-Permanente Medical School Excellence in Teaching Award. In 2008, he received the annual Thomas Jefferson Award, recognizing a UNC-Chapel Hill faculty member who, through personal influence and performance of duty in teaching, writing and scholarship, has best exemplified the ideals of Thomas Jefferson. He was the faculty representative to the GAA Board of Directors in 2001-2002 and received the alumni association’s Faculty Service Award in 2010.

 

Hadley, of St. Louis, is a native of Graham and attended UNC-Chapel Hill as a Morehead Scholar, graduating in 1985 with a degree in public policy and analysis. She played on the women’s basketball team and was named a Rhodes Scholar.

 

Last year, she became associate vice chancellor and director of the John B. Ervin Scholars Program at Washington University in St. Louis. After a career in business, Hadley was the founding executive director of the “What’s After High School?” program for the Burlington-Alamance school system and founder of the YESICAN nonprofit to help students there prepare for college. In 2012, the White House recognized Hadley as a “Champion of Change” for her work.

 

She has been active with the alumni association’s Black Alumni Reunion and is a recipient of its Harvey E. Beech Outstanding Alumni Award. She also is a founding member of BAR’s Light on the Hill Society, chairs the selection committee for the Light on the Hill Society Scholarship and served on the UNC-Chapel Hill Board of Visitors from 1989 to 1993. Hadley served on the alumni association board as an at-large member before assuming office as chair for 2013-2014.

 

Ross, of Chapel Hill, has devoted nearly all of the past 40 years to public service. Immediately after law school, he taught public law and government at UNC-Chapel Hill’s Institute of Government before returning to his hometown of Greensboro to practice law. Former U.S. Rep. Robin Britt brought him to Washington, D.C., to be the congressman’s chief of staff. Then, at age 33, Ross became one of the youngest judges appointed to the N.C. Superior Court.

 

Ross went on to direct the state’s Administrative Office of the Courts and then served as executive director of the Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation, distributing $20 million annually to nonprofits working toward social justice, economic development and pre-college education. He accepted the presidency of Davidson College in 2007.

 

During his four years as president of the UNC system, he has appointed 12 of the system’s 17 chancellors, including UNC-Chapel Hill Chancellor Carol L. Folt. Ross will step down from the UNC presidency in January 2016.

 

-Carolina-

 

Website: www.alumni.unc.edu

 

Photos of recipients, please credit Ray Black III:

 

General Alumni Association contact: President Doug Dibbert, (919) 962-7050

 

Communications and Public Affairs contact: Helen Buchanan, (919) 445-8555, helenb@unc.edu
 

Gone Home: Race and Roots through Appalachia,” exhibition about black coal miners in Appalachia on display at UNC-Chapel Hill’s Wilson Library

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“Gone Home: Race and Roots through Appalachia,” exhibition about black coal miners in Appalachia on display at UNC-Chapel Hill’s Wilson Library

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.—May 12, 2015) – An exhibition of the little-known stories of African Americans who left the rural South during the first part of the 20th century and settled in the coal fields of West Virginia, Tennessee, and Eastern Kentucky is on display at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. “Gone Home: Race and Roots through Appalachia” is currently housed in the Melba Remig Saltarelli Exhibit Room in Wilson Library on the UNC-Chapel Hill campus through Aug. 20.

 

“Gone Home” grew out of the Eastern Kentucky African American Migration Project (EKAAMP), a novel partnership among the Southern Historical Collection in Wilson Library; Karida Brown, a doctoral student in sociology at Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island; and Appalachian communities.

 

Brown, a descendent of coal miners, has recorded more than 200 oral history interviews with individuals who live in or grew up in the region. The Southern Historical Collection archives these recordings, along with photographs, organizational records, and family papers that community members have offered to Brown.

 

Through exhibit themes such as school, home, and coal, visitors come to know the close-knit African American community of Harlan County, Kentucky, one story at a time. Panels display excerpts from the oral history interviews, which visitors with smart phones can also listen to. On view are photographs and memorabilia from community social events, publications by schools and churches, news reports, and even a brick of coal. A television in a reconstructed living room plays a video about the project. “When I got that audio recorder and hit the road, people told their stories and they made history, and together we made history,” Brown says in the video.

 

“Gone Home” is free and open to the public. For hours, visit http://library.unc.edu/wilson/ or call (919) 962-3765. To learn more about the Eastern Kentucky African American Migration Project, visit the project website at http://ekaamp.web.unc.edu/.

 

-Carolina-

 

Library Contact: Bryan Giemza, (919) 962-434, bryan@unc.edu

 

Communications and Public Affairs contact: Helen Buchanan, (919) 445-8555, helenb@unc.edu

 

Rocky Mount native awarded Thomas Wolfe Scholarship

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Rocky Mount native awarded Thomas Wolfe Scholarship

 

Incoming first-year student Hayley Sigmon wins full four-year merit scholarship

in creative writing to UNC-Chapel Hill

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.—May 12, 2015) – Incoming first-year student Hayley Sigmon of Rocky Mount has been awarded a 2015 Thomas Wolfe Scholarship, a full four-year merit scholarship to the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

 

The scholarship program was established in 2001 with a gift to UNC-Chapel Hill’s College of Arts and Sciences from alumnus Frank Borden Hanes Sr. of Winston-Salem. It honors Carolina graduate Thomas Wolfe, best known for his 1929 novel, “Look Homeward, Angel.”

 

Sigmon is scheduled to graduate from Rocky Mount Academy. She started the book club and film club at her school, plays the drums and piano, and has been involved in the Rocky Mount community theater. She also officiates soccer games for younger kids. Sigmon has published works through the Nash-Rocky Mount Council of the International Reading Association. She enjoys running and photography.

 

Sigmon participated in a course through the Duke TIP eStudies program called “After the Apocalypse: Critical Studies in Film and Literature.” Joseph R. Lease, assistant professor of English at Wesleyan College who taught Sigmon in that course, wrote in a nomination letter that her capstone story, “Hands,” is “the best story I have received from a TIP student in the decade that I have been teaching that program.”

 

“From the very first page, I knew I was seeing something different from the norm — her control of voice and tone, and her patience with the pace of her story showed a level of sophistication that I do not regularly see from writers who are so young,” Lease wrote.

 

Sigmon counts Cormac McCarthy, Sylvia Plath and Lisa Gardner among her favorite authors.

 

In her essay “Why I Write,” Sigmon shared: “I write because I have to do it. It’s ingrained in my bones, always in the back of my mind. I’m never lonely; my stories are with me. I never keep anything bottled inside; I let it pour from pen to paper.”

 

Marianne Gingher, professor of English and co-director of the scholarship program, said Sigmon will make a fine addition to the Carolina creative writing community.

 

“Hayley Sigmon’s writing is simply marvelous: poised, character-driven, vivid, specific. I couldn’t believe I was reading the work of somebody 17 years old,” Gingher said. “On a sentence level, Hayley’s work conveys a mature and thoughtful sensibility, but her storyline is also riveting. Beyond her talent, Hayley’s obvious thirst for and curiosity about the literary arts is genuine and compelling. “

 

-Carolina-

 

Sigmon’s essay: http://college.unc.edu/2015/05/11/why-i-write/

 

Photo of Sigmon: http://uncnews.unc.edu/files/2015/05/sigmon.jpg.jpeg

 

College of Arts and Sciences contact: Kim Spurr, (919) 962-4093, spurrk@email.unc.edu

 

Communications and Public Affairs contact: Helen Buchanan, (919) 445-8555, helenb@unc.edu