Ackland Art Museum to temporarily close for improvements

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Ackland Art Museum to temporarily close for improvements

 

The Ackland will be closed June 8-30 for building improvements

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.—May 12, 2015) – The Ackland Art Museum at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill announces that it will temporarily close for three weeks for building improvements.

 

The Ackland’s galleries will be closed to the public from Monday, June 8, through Tuesday, June 30.

 

“Along with such improvements as our conversion to 100 percent LED lighting and our repainting of the permanent collection galleries over the past couple of years, these further upgrades will significantly enhance the visitor experience, as well as contributing to the safety and security of our collections and our patrons” chief curator and interim director Peter Nisbet said in a statement. “We look forward to welcoming everyone back on 1 July 2015.”

 

The galleries will close on Sunday, June 7 at 5 p.m., at the end of the current exhibitions, Adding to the Mix 9: Marcel Duchamp’s “From or by Marcel Duchamp or Rrose Sélavy” (1966) and The Land of No Things: Selected Works by the MFA Class of 2015.

 

The Ackland Museum Store, on the corner of Franklin and Columbia Streets, in downtown Chapel Hill will remain open during the museum’s closure. The Ackland’s offices will remain open Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

 

The Ackland’s collection of more than 17,000 works of art will remain accessible online at ackland.org.

 

-Carolina-

 

Ackland contact: Emily Bowles, (919) 843-3675, emily.bowles@unc.edu

 

Communications and Public Affairs contact: Helen Buchanan, (919) 445-8555, helenb@unc.edu

 

UNC Library four-year Civil War blog comes to an end

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UNC Library four-year Civil War blog comes to an end

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.—May 1, 2015) – Exactly 150 years after the surrender of Confederate troops at Bennett Place in Durham, the University of North Carolina Library posted the black and white lithograph illustration “Conference Between General Sherman and General Johnston” commemorating the event on April 26.

 

The blog post was the last in the library’s award-winning four-year project, “The Civil War Day By Day” (http://blogs.lib.unc.edu/civilwar/). Using the magic of the social media, the blog allowed hundreds of readers each day to experience the Civil War as it unfolded, through the words of the people who were living through it.

 

Each of the 1,450 posts of the blog included a digital scan of a document created on that day, be it letters, diary entries, telegrams, or newspapers, as well as a description of the document and a transcription of its spidery script or faded print.

 

The result was a rich catalog of missives from top generals, diary entries from women on the home front, eloquent love letters, scribbled notes from the barely literate, painful reports from the front written by soldiers on both sides and messages from slaves to their masters.

 

Read more: http://gazette.unc.edu/2015/04/28/the-civil-war-day-by-day-comes-to-an-end-spoiler-alert-the-union-wins/

 

 

-Carolina-

 

Library contact: Biff Hollingsworth, (919) 962-3353, dcbh@email.unc.edu

 

Communications and Public Affairs contact: Helen Buchanan, (919) 445-8555, helenb@unc.edu

Two UNC graduate students receive Boren Fellowships

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Two UNC graduate students receive Boren Fellowships

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.—April 30, 2015) – Carissa Landes and Mary Elizabeth Walters have each been awarded a David L. Boren Fellowship through the National Security Education Program, which supports fields of study, particularly languages, identified as critical to United States national security.

 

A master of arts student in Russian and East European studies in the College of Arts and Sciences at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Landes plans to immerse herself in the Persian language and in Central Asian culture for nine months in Tajikistan. As an undergraduate at New York University, she gained an understanding of Russian language and culture while studying abroad at Saint Petersburg State University. In her graduate studies at UNC-Chapel Hill, Landes has expanded her expertise to encompass the history, culture, and politics of Eastern Europe, Central Asia, and Iran.

 

The Boren Fellowship will enable Landes to attend American Councils’ Eurasian Regional Language Program in Dushanbe, Tajikistan for nine months. She aims to gain proficiency in Persian Farsi and Persian Tajik. She will also conduct research for her master’s thesis on political Islam in contemporary Tajikistan, a project that examines how Islam is represented in the public discourse of the region.

 

“I am thrilled to have the opportunity to experience a culture that I have studied for the last two years,” Landes said. “With the support of the Boren Fellowship, I will gain important in-country experience, which will complement my master’s degree in area studies and prepare me for a career in international relations.”

 

“The Boren Fellowship provides high-achieving graduate students with an immersive experience of overseas study. Carissa’s excellent language skills as well as the critical importance of her research on political Islam in Central Asia make her a wonderful investment for the National Security Education Program,” said Mary Floyd-Wilson, the Bowman and Gordon Gray Distinguished Term Professor of English and Comparative Literature and director of UNC-Chapel Hill’s Office of Distinguished Scholarships.

 

Walters is a doctoral student in the history department in the College of Arts and Sciences at UNC-Chapel Hill conducting dissertation research on the dynamics and impact of interactions between NATO, the Albanian government, and local communities during the 1999 Kosovo refugee crisis. The NSEP Boren Fellowship gives Walters the opportunity to reside in Albania for eleven months, where she will attend intensive Albanian language programs, pursue research in the federal and municipal archives, and conduct oral histories with the Albanian communities. The acquisition of Albanian will supplement her already strong Serbo-Croatian skills.

 

“As a military historian, I hope to use lessons from the past to gain insight into present and future crises,” Walters said. “For my NSEP service requirement I hope to advance this aim by serving as a historian for the Department of Defense or as a professor in one of the Defense universities.” By contextualizing the military humanitarianism of NATO within a local Albanian context, Walters proposes to demonstrate that “the military and strategic cultures of NATO’s member-states provided NATO with a framework to guide the organization’s new humanitarian mission during the 1999 Kosovo refugee crisis.”

 

“Walters has the background and scholarly aptitude to become a Balkan area specialist, with a specialization in military history. The Boren Fellowship will help her achieve an advanced level of proficiency in Albanian and allow her to gather crucial evidence for her significant dissertation project,” Floyd-Wilson added.

 

The National Security Education Program granted 101 fellowships nationwide from a pool of 385 applicants. All Boren Fellows live and study in areas of the world that are important to national security.

 

The Fellowships, valued up to $30,000, are awarded to graduate students in exchange for their commitment to pursue work in the federal government after they graduate.  The program encourages fellowship recipients to seek work with the departments of defense, homeland security and state or intelligence agencies.  Boren also offers scholarships for undergraduate students.  https://www.borenawards.org.

 

-Carolina-

 

Photos of recipients:

 

Office of Distinguished Scholarships contacts: Mary Floyd-Wilson, Ph.D., floydwil@email.unc.edu; Alsace Gallop, gallop@email.unc.edu, http://distinguishedscholarships.unc.edu; follow ODS on Twitter: @ODS_UNCCH

 

Communications and Public Affairs contact: Helen Buchanan, (919) 445-8555, helenb@unc.edu

Carolina launches fund-raising campaign to honor life and legacy of Dean Smith

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Carolina launches fund-raising campaign to honor life and legacy of Dean Smith

 

The Dean E. Smith Opening Doors Fund will support outstanding undergraduate students

from lower-income families and enable professionals in education

and social work to pursue advanced degrees

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.—April 28, 2015) – The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, in consultation with the Smith family and with its full support, has launched a fund-raising campaign for student assistance to honor the life and legacy of legendary men’s basketball coach Dean E. Smith, who died Feb. 7, 2015.

 

The campaign will raise money for The Dean E. Smith Opening Doors Fund, which will make college a reality for outstanding undergraduates from lower-income families and enable professionals in education and social work to pursue advanced degrees.

 

“The world knew Coach Smith as a great basketball coach, but the Carolina family knew him as a great teacher and humanitarian. His care for his players was for life,” UNC-Chapel Hill Chancellor Carol L. Folt said. “He was a force for good and a remarkable pioneer, promoting equality, civil rights and respect for all. This fund will be a fitting tribute, opening doors to opportunity for many just as he did.”

 

To be funded by private gifts and matching University dollars, The Dean E. Smith Opening Doors Fund will be the first at UNC-Chapel Hill to support both undergraduate and graduate students. Recipients will exemplify Coach Smith’s qualities of leadership, service and excellence.

 

A teacher and humanitarian, Dean Smith was an outspoken advocate for equality and fairness in collegiate athletics and civic affairs. On the court, he brought standout player Charles Scott to Chapel Hill in 1966 as the University’s first African-American scholarship athlete, essentially introducing diversity to the Atlantic Coast Conference. Off the court, Smith was active in the local Civil Rights movement and pushed local business owners to desegregate. He received the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation’s highest civilian honor, in 2013.

 

Smith was the head coach of the Tar Heels from 1961 to 1997, retiring as the winningest coach in college basketball. He led the Tar Heels to national championships in 1982 and 1993, to 13 ACC Tournament titles, 11 Final Fours, and an NIT championship, and directed the United States Olympic Team to a gold medal at the 1976 Summer Games. More than 95 percent of his lettermen graduated.

 

Coach Smith taught us that excellence could be achieved through hard work, dedication and thorough understanding,” said Eric Montross, a two-time All-American at Carolina who starred on Smith’s 1993 NCAA title team. “Coach also believed in empowering motivated individuals by teaching them how to use their own tools to achieve their goals. This funding endeavor will give the priceless gift of opportunity through higher education.”

 

The campaign to support The Dean E. Smith Opening Doors Fund will solicit endowment gifts to generate revenue in perpetuity. Based on current attendance costs at UNC, the fund will provide annual $5,000 need-based scholarships for undergraduate students to help them cover college expenses; graduate awards will be up to $30,000 annually for a full scholarship, although smaller amounts also will be awarded to provide a range of resources, such as funding for innovative research, travel and dissertation stipends. The campaign has no set goal or duration, but officials hope to award the first scholarships to students entering Carolina in the fall of 2015.

 

Gifts to the fund will be divided evenly among the three areas targeted for support. The University will match all gifts dollar for dollar with non-state funds that the chancellor can use at her discretion to meet a campus priority, further leveraging the impact of donor contributions. The matching dollars will support Dean E. Smith Scholars at the undergraduate level, because of this population’s broad presence on campus.

 

People can make an online gift to the fund at http://giving.unc.edu/opening-doors. For more information, contact the UNC Office of University Development at openingdoors@unc.edu
or (919) 962-4385.

 

-Carolina-

 

Director of Development Communications: Scott Ragland, (919) 962-0027, scott_ragland@unc.edu

 

Communications and Public Affairs contact: (919) 445-8555, mediarelations@unc.edu

Broadway hit ‘Seminar’ joins PlayMakers’ 2015-2016 lineup

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Broadway hit ‘Seminar’ joins PlayMakers’ 2015-2016 lineup

 

Wickedly funny story features four aspiring writers who ante up big bucks to learn from a legendary novelist

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.—April 28, 2015) – “Seminar” by Theresa Rebeck has joined the 2015-2016 main-stage season for PlayMakers Repertory Company. The hit Broadway play will be presented Oct. 14 through Nov. 1, replacing “Dear Elizabeth” due to conflicts in guest artist schedules.

 

“Seminar” is a wickedly funny story of blood, sweat and tears in the writer’s den. Four aspiring young writers ante up big bucks to learn from a legendary novelist, but their fiction and their egos will be unsparingly dissected before he’s through. Ferocious and fast-paced with sparkling wordplay, “Seminar” takes no prisoners.

 

PlayMakers acting company favorite Ray Dooley will play the novelist leading a no-holds-barred master class on power, sex and the nature of art. Recently seen as Puck in PlayMakers’ “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” (“spectacular” raved The Herald-Sun), Dooley also scored kudos as George in the theater’s production of “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?,” another standout performance delivered with withering wit.

 

“I’m excited to include Theresa Rebeck in PlayMakers’ new season,” said producing artistic director Joseph Haj. “‘Seminar’ is a brilliant comedy that explores the creative process and the mystery and fallacy of some of our heroes. I know it will be an incredible addition to the 2015-16 lineup.”

 

The San Francisco Chronicle hailed “Seminar” as, “furiously funny,” and The Hollywood Reporter praised the show’s wit and, “juicy verbal showstoppers.”

 

Tickets for “Seminar” are available as part of the theater’s 2015-2016 season subscription packages. Renewing subscribers can secure their current seats for the new season through May 15. For more information, call the PlayMakers box office at (919) 962-7529 or visit www.playmakersrep.org.

 

Based in the College of Arts and Sciences, PlayMakers is the professional theater company in residence at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

 

PlayMakers’ current season concludes with “Mary’s Wedding” by Stephen Massicotte (April 29-May 3).

 

-Carolina-

 

PlayMakers contact: For more information, contact Connie Mahan, (919) 962-5359, cmahan@email.unc.edu

 

College of Arts and Sciences contact: Kim Spurr, (919) 962-4093, spurrk@email.unc.edu

 

Communications and Public Affairs contact: Helen Buchanan, (919) 445-8555, mediarelations@unc.edu
 

UNC Kenan-Flagler announces Institute for Private Capital

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UNC Kenan-Flagler announces Institute for Private Capital

 

The IPC will create databases, produce research and develop curriculum and educational initiatives for academic and industry leaders

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.—April 27, 2015) – The University of North Carolina Kenan-Flagler Business School has launched the Institute for Private Capital (IPC).

 

“Our mission is to promote a deep understanding of the role of private capital markets in the global economy, which is not widely understood,” said Douglas A. Shackelford, dean and Meade H. Willis Distinguished Professor of Taxation at UNC Kenan-Flagler.

 

“The institute will come to define how private capital is taught and learned in every business school,” said Shackelford when he announced the new institute at the business school’s eighth annual Alternative Investments Conference attended by 150 business and academic leaders and business students.

 

The IPC will create databases, produce research and develop curriculum and educational initiatives, which are of great interest to both academic and industry leaders.

 

“We will create and share the data and knowledge that are missing today,” said Gregory W. Brown, professor of finance and director of the IPC.

 

“By creating the most comprehensive database on private capital in the world, we will be able to provide dependable information, ground-breaking research and accurate benchmarking across the industry and the academy,” said Brown. “Few academic researchers focus on private capital because so little data is available – and IPC will change that.”

 

The database will cover private capital investment – such as venture capital funds, buy-out and growth capital funds, hedge funds, debt funds, real estate funds, natural resources funds, and closely held and family businesses.

 

“Curriculum development and educational initiatives are critical because students need to understand how decisions to invest private capital are made and the economic impact they have,” Brown said.

 

“This is just the beginning,” said Shackelford. “By establishing the Institute for Private Capital, UNC Kenan-Flagler has decided to expand our focus on research, teaching, public policy and outreach initiatives that affect private capital markets,” Shackelford said. “Since private capital constitutes the majority of global capital, IPC research will have a significant impact on practice and policy, and will spur curricular innovations nationally and internationally.”

 

IPC will work with a global team of faculty from other top universities, leading industry practitioners and key policy makers. It builds on the success of UNC Kenan-Flagler’s Private Equity Research Consortium (PERC) where academic and industry experts work together to generate new knowledge about private capital markets based on objective academic research. PERC has held an annual research conference hosted by UNC in Chapel Hill since 2010.

 

The IPC will have a research council which will help identify critical areas for new research and provide feedback on projects. Its founding members include Raymond Chan of Adams Street Partners, Peter Cornelius of AlpInvest Partners/The Carlyle Group, Barry Griffiths of Landmark Partners, Michael Miles of Guggenheim Investments, Kevin SigRist of the North Carolina Retirement Systems, Ruediger Stucke of Warburg Pincus and Brown.

 

For more information about IPC, visit ipc.unc.edu.

 

-Carolina-

 

UNC Kenan-Flagler contact: Allison Adams, (919) 962-7235, aadams@unc.edu

 

Communications and Public Affairs contact: Helen Buchanan, (919) 445-8555, mediarelations@unc.edu
 

Chancellor Folt honors 71 students for academic, service leadership

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Chancellor Folt honors 71 students for academic, service leadership

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.—April 27, 2015) – Seventy-one talented, driven students at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill were honored on Wednesday, April 22 with the University’s most prestigious awards for academic achievement and leadership.

 

Chancellor Carol L. Folt presided at the annual Chancellor’s Awards ceremony. Executive Vice Provost Ron Strauss, Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs Winston Crisp, and 2014-15 student body president Andrew Powell presented academic, student leadership activities, and student-selected undergraduate teaching and staff awards.

 

“Awards that reward excellence honor individuals today and also foster excellence for future classes and generations,” said Chancellor Folt. “Carolina is grateful to the 2015 Chancellor’s Awards recipients for their extraordinary contributions to our university and for the example they set for students and staff who will follow in their footsteps.”

 

Award recipients are listed below alphabetically by North Carolina city, then by state and country. Students noted with an asterisk (*) are listed in more than one location. Some students chose not to be listed.

 

North Carolina

Apex

Diana Dayal, daughter of Irina and Rana Dayal of Apex: the Jane Craige Gray Memorial Award, given to the woman of the junior class who has been judged most outstanding in character, scholarship, and leadership.

 

Burgaw

Diego C. Camposeco, son of Juana Carlos and Prudencio Camposeco of Burgaw: the Alexander Julian Prize is given to the undergraduate exhibiting an outstanding sense of design, which the faculty interprets as a mature integration of formal issues and content.

 

Cary

Claire Vita Clement, daughter of David and Jenifer Clement of Cary: the Class of ’56 Lives Award given to the member of the senior class who best demonstrates scholarship, leadership, and nursing excellence.

 

Sarah Dong Chen, daughter of Dion Chen and Sue Dong of Cary: the Edward McGowan Hedgpeth Award, given annually to two members of Alpha Epsilon Delta who are voted most outstanding in service on the campus and community through the society.

 

Jessica Leigh Maldonado, daughter of George and Elizabeth Maldonado of Cary: the Sterling A. Stoudemire Award for Excellence in Spanish, awarded annually to the senior who has excelled in Spanish.

 

Chapel Hill

*Aisha Anwar, daughter of John and Julie Anwar of Charlotte: the Class of 1938 Joseph F. Patterson, Jr. and Alice M. Patterson International Leadership Award, presented to the undergraduate who has made the most significant contribution to increasing international awareness and understanding.

 

William Matthew Collette, son of Perry and Kelly Collette of Chapel Hill: the Walter S. Spearman Award is presented to a man in the senior class whose academic achievements, co-curricular activities, leadership qualities, and strength of character are considered by a panel of judges to be most outstanding.

 

Abigail Marie Dennison, daughter of Priscilla Dennison of Chapel Hill: the Jacques Hardre Undergraduate Award for Excellence in French, presented by the department of romance languages to an undergraduate whose work in French language and literature has been judged most outstanding by a faculty committee.

 

*Anya Ellen Katsevich, daughter of Alexander and Tanya Katsevich of Oviedo, Florida: the Archibald Henderson Mathematics Medal given to the undergraduate judged by the department of mathematics to have demonstrated both a high degree of mathematical ability and the greatest promise of originality in the field.

 

*Kyle Ashley Leggett, husband of Sara Eagle of Goodfellow Air Force Base in San Angelo, Texas: the Kenneth C. Royall Award, given to the senior Air Force ROTC cadet at UNC-Chapel Hill who demonstrates excellence as an officer in scholarship and leadership.

 

Patrick Thomas Mateer, son of Jeffrey and Mary Mateer of Chapel Hill: the Robert B. House Distinguished Service Award, given to the undergraduate who best exemplifies the spirit of unselfish commitment through service to the University and the surrounding community.

 

Sarah Lee Molina, daughter of Paul and Grace Molina of Chapel Hill: the Undergraduate Prize in Art History, given to the undergraduate who has done the most outstanding work in art history.

 

*Camille Elyse Morgan, daughter of Doug and Lynne Morgan of Nashville, Tennessee: the Sport Clubs Council Achievement Award, given to the undergraduate who demonstrates leadership, commitment, and makes the greatest positive contribution to the strength and vitality of the sport clubs program.

 

Issac Maynard Warshauer, son of David Warshauer and B. Michele Maynar of Chapel Hill: the Willie P. Mangum Medal in Oratory, given to the member of the senior class who gives the best oration at an annual contest.

 

Charlotte

Abigail Banner Cooksey, daughter of Allyson Cooksey of Charlotte: the Peter C. Baxter Memorial Prize in American Studies, awarded to the undergraduate studying American studies who best exemplifies Mr. Baxter’s intellectual excellence, personal warmth, and contribution to the American studies program.

 

*Aisha Anwar, daughter of John and Julie Anwar of Charlotte: the Class of 1938 Joseph F. Patterson, Jr. and Alice M. Patterson International Leadership Award, presented to the undergraduate who has made the most significant contribution to increasing international awareness and understanding.

 

Deanna Zhong, daughter of Gregory and Lisa Lu Zhong of Charlotte: the Keith Shawn Smith Award for Community Development and Mentorship, given to a resident advisor or resident advisor mentor who has created a strong community, meaningful mentoring relationships, and campus connections.

 

Rebecca Marie Mitchell, daughter of Karen and Floyd Mitchell of Charlotte: the Mary Turner Lane Award in Women’s and Gender Studies, awarded to a senior to have made an outstanding contribution through original scholarship and/or creative production on gender and feminist issues.

 

Chuchitra Thanigaivasan, daughter of Thanigaivasan Chinnasamy and Kanchana Thanigaivasan of Charlotte: the Robert White Linker Award, given to the most outstanding undergraduate residence hall officer, based on leadership criteria of initiative, creativity, and effectiveness, and on lasting contributions to residence hall living.

 

Cornelius

Jennifer Elizabeth Surane, daughter of James and Robin Surane of Cornelius: the Ernest H. Abernethy Prize in Student Publication Work, presented annually to the undergraduate judged by a special committee to have done the most distinctive work during the current year in the field of student publications.

 

Edenton

Wilson Greene IV, son of Patricia and Wilson Greene III of Edenton: the Bernard Boyd Memorial Prize, to the member of the senior class majoring in religious studies who has been selected by a faculty committee as most outstanding in academic achievement.

 

Fayetteville

Rodney Oscar Anderson, son of Rodney and Linda Anderson of Fayetteville: the Ernest L. Mackie Award presented to the man in the junior class who has been judged most outstanding in character, scholarship, and leadership.

 

Tyler Scott Miranda, song of Steve and Sherry Miranda of Fayetteville: the George C. Marshall Award presented to the senior Army cadet who excels in professional excellence, leadership, scholarship, personal integrity, and selfless service to the nation.

 

Nikita Shamdasani, daughter of Deepak and Sapna Shamdasani of Fayetteville: the John Johnston Parker, Jr. Medal for Unique Leadership in Student Government, awarded to the member of the senior class who has demonstrated the highest qualities of leadership in perpetuating the spirit and honor of student self-government.

 

Gastonia

Clayton Scott Hackney, son of Spence and Robin Hackney of Gastonia: the Undergraduate Prize in Economics, awarded to the undergraduate majoring in economics who is judged to be the most outstanding based on performance in major and related courses.

 

Greenville

William Henry Harrison Chapman, son of William Chapman III and Deborah Chapman of Greenville: the Brenda W. Kirby Award annually recognizing the student who has most effectively worked to establish a community of cooperation and service between students and constituents of the larger University that might include administration, faculty, staff, trustees, and alumni.

 

Hope Mills

Chelsea Kay Barnes, daughter of Keith and Kay Barnes of Hope Mills: the Irene E. Lee Award presented annually to the woman of the senior class who is judged most outstanding in leadership, character, and scholarship.

 

Huntersville

Priyanka S. Mehta, daughter of Sudhir C. and S.D. Mehta of Huntersville: the Greek Alliance Council Award presented to undergraduates who have made the most significant contributions in the areas of leadership, scholarship, service to their individual chapters, and Greek and University communities.

 

Kinston

Angel Hannah Washington, daughter of Henry Ray and Sam Kim of Kinston: the Cornelius O. Cathy Award given annually to the student who has made the greatest contribution to a realization of the human ideals of equality, dignity, and community.

 

Mooresville

Blayne Brooks Telling, daughter of Laura Telling of Mooresville: the Louis D. Rubin, Jr. Prize in Creative Writing presented to the outstanding fiction writer in the senior class.

 

Murfreesboro

South Alexander Moore, son of Danny and Martha Moore of Murfreesboro: the J. Maryon Saunders Award presented to the member of the graduating class who, as an undergraduate student, has contributed most to the preservation and enhancement of loyalty and goodwill between UNC-Chapel Hill and its students, alumni, and friends.

 

New Bern

Aleksander Huryn Seymore, son of Noah McKimmey Seymore III of New Bern: the Chi Omega Award for Scholarship and Leadership presented to the senior student in the curriculum in global studies who is chosen as most outstanding on criteria of scholastic achievement and exemplary leadership.

 

Newton

Aura Victoria Castillo, daughter of Miguel and Maria del Carmen Leon of Newton: the Howard W. Odum Undergraduate Sociology Award presented annually to the senior who is judged most outstanding by the department’s faculty on the basis of academic performance.

 

Pfafftown

Meredith Grace Mock, daughter of Craig and Linda Mock of Pfafftown: the Patrick F. Earey Award, given to the member of the graduating class who has exhibited outstanding academic achievement, extracurricular involvement and leadership.

 

Raleigh

Mary-Grayson Sterrett Brook, daughter of David and Mary Ashley Brook of Raleigh: the Ria Stambaugh Undergraduate Award for Excellence in German, awarded to the graduating senior judged to have achieved the most distinguished academic record in German language and literature.

 

*Sarah Whiting Cooley, daughter of James and Allene Adams of Raleigh, NC: the Op White Prize in Geology, awarded to the outstanding senior in geology.

 

Ellen Corbitt Currin, daughter of Benjamin and Mary Currin of Raleigh: the McNally Award for Excellence in Geography, awarded to a graduating senior who is selected by the geography faculty based on superior academic performance.

 

Nicole Grace Curtis, daughter of John Curtis and Sylvia and Steve Hewitt of Raleigh: the Eben Alexander Prize in Greek, given to the undergraduate who, in the opinion of the faculty of the classics department, presents the best rendering into English of selected passages of Greek not previously read.

 

Kenan Lee Wilkinson Drum, son of Barry and Karen Drum of Raleigh: the Interfraternity Council Man of the Year Award, presented annually to a fraternity brother who has made a significant contribution in the areas of leadership, scholarship, service to his individual chapter, and Greek and University communities.

 

Samantha Jean Hovaniec, daughter of Gloris and Chuck Hovaniec of Raleigh: the L. Richardson Preyer Award for Excellence in Political Science, given to a senior judged by a committee of the faculty to have established the most distinguished record of scholarship in Political Science and service to the community.

 

Emily Catherine Morgan, daughter of Paul and Betty Morgan of Raleigh: the James M. Johnston Distinguished Senior Award in the Undergraduate Nursing Program presented to the senior student in the Johnston Nursing Awards Program who is most deserving of recognition for outstanding academic achievement and for leadership contributions in the School of Nursing and the Johnston Awards Program.

 

Alyssa Victoria Townsend, daughter of Eric Townsend and Angela Chisolm of Raleigh: the National Pan-Hellenic Council Award presented annually to undergraduates who have made the most significant contributions in the areas of leadership, scholarship, service to their individual chapters, and Greek and University communities.

 

Jasmine Lee Trinks, daughter of Thomas and Cynthia Trinks of Raleigh: the Paul Debreczeny Prize in Salvic Languages and Literatures, presented to the graduating senior whose work in Russian or Slavic language, literature, and culture is judged most outstanding.

 

Richlands

Michael Anthony Diaz, son of Jubentino and Josefina Diaz of Richlands: the Sessoms-Meyer Excellence in Recreation Administration Award awarded to the most outstanding undergraduate minoring in recreation administration.

 

Rocky Mount

Thomas Benton Moss III, son of Thomas and Ashley Benton Moss II of Enfield: the Jim Tatum Memorial Award, is given to the varsity intercollegiate athlete who has performed with distinction in his or her sport and contributed to the University community through constructive participation in extracurricular activities.

 

Roxboro

Clyde Mangum III, son of Clyde and Marie Mangum of Roxboro: the Edward Kidder Graham Award, given to the graduating senior who has made the most outstanding contribution to the University through his or her work as a member of an officially recognized student organization.

 

Southport

Bobby Glenn Warren III, son of Rose Warren of Hampstead: the Earl Slocum Band Award, given annually to the senior member of the University Bands who has demonstrated meritorious achievement with regard to musicianship, leadership, and academic excellence, and who also has made a significant contribution to the growth and success of the University Band program.

 

Walstonburg

Lonnie Wayne Carraway Jr., son of Lonnie and Cheryl Carraway of Walstonburg: the Josephus Daniels Scholarship Medal, given to the senior midshipmen in the Naval Reserve Officers Training Corps who has attained the highest average in academic courses of study at the University.

 

Waxhaw

Michael Paul Strawser, son of John and Rhonda Strawser of Waxhaw: the Algernon Sydney Sullivan Award, bestowed annually upon one man and one woman of the senior class who has best demonstrated unselfish interest in human welfare.

 

Weaverville

Natalie Nicole Broadway, daughter of Dante and Myra Broadway of Weaverville: the Edward McGowan Hedgpeth Award, given annually to two members of Alpha Epsilon Delta who are voted most outstanding in service on the campus and community through the society.

 

Winston-Salem

Emily Margaret Beaty, daughter of Harold and Laura Beaty of Winston-Salem: the Panhellenic Council Woman of the Year Award, presented annually to four members of the graduating class who have exhibited outstanding academic achievement, extracurricular involvement and leadership.

 

Other States

 

California

Mill Valley

Cora Margaret Went, daughter of Greg and Marjorie Went of Mill Valley, California: the Paul E. Shearin Outstanding Senior Award in Physics given to the undergraduate who is judged most outstanding on the criteria of scholarship, scientific insight, and professional seriousness.

 

Florida

Boca Raton

Alex Justin Nusbickel, son of John and Wendi Nusbickel of Boca Raton, Florida: the Camoes Prize in Portuguese, given annually to the outstanding undergraduate in Portuguese.

 

Clermont

Jessica Caitlin Porter, daughter of Denise and Robert Porter of Clermont, Florida: the Roger A. Davis Memorial Award, given by the Residence Hall Association to the undergraduate judged to have given outstanding service to the University, especially through residence hall leadership.

 

Orlando

Lily Ruth Broming, daughter of Jeri and Charles Broming of Orlando, Florida: the James M. Johnston Distinguished Senior Award in the Undergraduate Program who is most deserving of recognition for outstanding academic achievement and for leadership contributions to the University and the Johnston Awards Program.

 

Oviedo

*Anya Ellen Katsevich, daughter of Alexander and Tanya Katsevich of Oviedo, Florida: the Archibald Henderson Mathematics Medal given to the undergraduate judged by the department of mathematics to have demonstrated both a high degree of mathematical ability and the greatest promise of originality in the field.

 

Pembroke Pines

Jessica G. Cabrera, daughter of Jane and Nelson Cabrera of Pembroke Pines, Florida: the Algernon Sydney Sullivan Award, to the woman of the senior class who has best demonstrated unselfish interest in human welfare.

 

Georgia

Marietta

Blake Marie Hauser, son of Michael and Beth Hauser or Marietta, Georgia: the I.R. Hagadorn Award, given to an outstanding rising senior Biology major selected on the basis of academic achievement and excellence in biology research.

 

Powder Springs

Shamira Yuday Lukomwa, daughter of Ariat Nnava and Abudall Lukomwa, of Powder Springs, Georgia: the James O. Cansler Service Award presented annually in his memory to a student whose faith has inspired outstanding service to the needs of humanity.

 

Illinois

Aurora

Carla Isabel Salas, daughter of Isabel Salas of Aurora, Illinois: the George Moses Horton Award for Multicultural Leadership awarded to the senior who has demonstrated outstanding leadership, initiative, and creativity in multicultural education programs.

 

Louisiana

Baton Rouge

Coco Nell Wilder, daughter of Stanley Wilder and Jean Coco of Baton Rouge, Louisiana: the Robert B. House Memorial Prize in Poetry, awarded to the graduating senior who has done distinguished work in poetry.

 

Maine

Cape Elizabeth

*Sarah Whiting Cooley, daughter of James and Allene Adams of Raleigh, NC: the Op White Prize in Geology, awarded to the outstanding senior in geology.

 

Maryland

Burtonsville

Katrina Louise Hauprich, daughter of Donald and Anne Hauprich of Burtonsville, Maryland: the E. Eugene Jackson Award, given annually to the member of the graduating class whose leadership and selfless dedication have strengthened class pride and University loyalty, enriched the lives of seniors, and made a significant contribution to the University.

 

Massachusetts

Boston

Karen Ashley Winkfield, daughter of Karen Winkfield and Jeffrey Walker of Boston: the Wallace Ray Peppers Award in Performance of African and African-American Literature, given annually to the junior or senior in that department who is judged by a faculty committee to be most outstanding in performance of African and African-American literature.

 

Missouri

St. Louis

Raquel Emiko Dominguez, daughter of Lea Takasugi of St. Louis: the Ferebee Taylor Award, given annually to the member of the senior class who has made the greatest contribution to the continued vitality and strength of the Honor Code in the community.

 

New Jersey

Basking Ridge

Kristina Wendi Cheung, daughter of Yiu Wah and Kwok Cheung of Basking Ridge, New Jersey: the Albert Suskin Prize in Latin, to the undergraduate who shows the best ability to understand Latin poetry and translate selected passages at sight.

 

Morganville

Austin John Root, son of Brian and Holly Root of Morganville, New Jersey: the Albert and Gladys Hall Coates Award, to the member of Student Congress whose service through Student Congress is judged most outstanding on criteria of statesmanship, commitment, and constructive involvement in issues affecting the quality of the University community.

 

New York

Bellmore

Andrew Jonathan Wood, son of David and Susan Wood of Bellmore, New York: the Hampton Shuping Prize, given to the graduating senior who is the outstanding undergraduate majoring in business, not only in academic achievement, but in integrity, honor, and leadership potential.

 

Elmhurst, Queens

Stacy Saithy Tse, daughter of Hoi Kei and Chai Lui Tse of Elmhurst, New York: the George H. Cocolas Pharmacy Student Body Award recognizes a member of the graduating class who has demonstrated the highest qualities of character, deportment, scholarship, professionalism, and promise of future distinction in the profession of pharmacy.

 

Nebraska

Lincoln

Kiran Marie Bhardwaj, daughter of Michael Boyle and Vas and Mary Bhardwaj of Lincoln, Nebraska: the Boka W. Hadzija Award, given to the graduate or professional student who has been judged most outstanding in character, scholarship and leadership.

 

Oklahoma

Oklahoma City

Olivia Leigh Branscum, daughter of David Branscum and Heather Hintz of Oklahoma City: the Worth Award, given annually for sustained excellence in undergraduate study of philosophy.

 

Pennsylvania

Lancaster

Amaya O. Madden, daughter of Gregory and Kirsten Madden of Millsersville, Pennsylvania: the March Adam Eisdorfer Award in Linguistics, given to recognize the senior judged most outstanding in academic achievement in linguistics.

 

Tennessee

Nashville

*Camille Elyse Morgan, daughter of Doug and Lynne Morgan of Nashville, Tennessee: the Sport Clubs Council Achievement Award, given to the undergraduate who demonstrates leadership, commitment, and makes the greatest positive contribution to the strength and vitality of the sport clubs program.

 

Texas

San Angelo

*Kyle Ashley Leggett, husband of Sara Eagle of Goodfellow Air Force Base in San Angelo, Texas: the Kenneth C. Royall Award, given to the senior Air Force ROTC cadet at UNC-Chapel Hill who demonstrates excellence as an officer in scholarship and leadership.

 

Other Countries

 

China

Qingdao

Ashelee Yue Yang, daughter of Daxing Yang and Jianjiong Lou of Hangzhou, China: the Howard W. Odum Undergraduate Sociology Award, presented to the senior who is judged most outstanding by the department’s faculty on the basis of academic performance.

 

-Carolina-

 

Communications and Public Affairs contact: (919) 445-8555, mediarelations@unc.edu

Three Tar Heels win NOAA 2015-2017 Hollings Scholarship

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Three Tar Heels win NOAA 2015-2017 Hollings Scholarship

 

Sheridan Green, Carrie Hamilton, and Alfrë Wimberley earn prestigious oceanic and atmospheric science undergraduate opportunity

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.—April 24, 2015) – Three UNC-Chapel Hill sophomores earned 2015-2017 Ernest F. Hollings Undergraduate Scholarships from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Sheridan Green, Carrie Hamilton, and Alfrë Wimberley were awarded the scholarships, which also come with a 10-week, full-time internship during the summer at a NOAA facility.

 

The Hollings Scholarship Program provides up to $8,000 in academic assistance per year, a total $16,000 over the two-year scholarship. The internship between the student’s undergraduate junior and senior years provides practical experience in NOAA-relation science, research, technology, policy, management, and education activities. Awards also include travel funds to attend a mandatory NOAA Scholarship Program orientation, conferences where students present a paper or poster, and a housing subsidy for scholars who do not reside at home during the summer internship.

 

Green, from Harrisburg, is working towards a double major in astrophysics and applied mathematics and a minor in computer science. As a research assistant in UNC-Chapel Hill’s Joint Applied Math and Marine Sciences Fluids Lab, he has worked on the Taylor Pipe Flow project garnering a greater understanding of fluid dynamics. Green plans to conduct research at UNC-Charlotte this summer and research cosmology in the UNC-Chapel Hill department of physics and astronomy throughout his junior year.

 

Hamilton, from Chapel Hill, is majoring in environmental science and geography and minoring in marine science. She spent the Fall 2014 semester studying at the UNC Institute of Marine Science in Morehead City where she conducted semester-long research on the behaviors of the striped hermit crab. While studying at UNC IMS, Hamilton also participated in a group capstone project, which analyzed the ecosystem services of oyster reefs open versus closed to shellfishing. During the summer between her first and second years at Carolina, Hamilton conducted independent research on trumpeter swan behavior at the University of Montana Flathead Lake Biological Station and also participated in fieldwork around Glacier National Park.

 

Wimberley, from Raleigh, is an environmental science major and chemistry minor, concentrating her studies in energy and sustainability. She is the first African-American student at UNC-Chapel Hill to win the Hollings Scholarship. She has served as an undergraduate researcher in the Dempsey Research Group at Carolina, researching proton coupled electron transfer. During the summer of 2014, she interned with the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources, a NOAA facility, in Charleston, South Carolina, conducting marine toxicology research of grass shrimp culminating in scientific writing and symposium experience. Wimberley presented her research from last summer at the Association for the Sciences of Limnology & Oceanography Symposium in Granada, Spain during February of this year.

 

Established in 1970, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is a Federal environmental science agency within the U.S. Department of Commerce. The Hollings Scholarship Program was established in 2005 to increase undergraduate training in oceanic and atmospheric science, research, technology, and education and foster multidisciplinary training opportunities.

 

-Carolina-

 

Photos of recipients:

 

Office of Distinguished Scholarships contact: Mary Floyd-Wilson, Ph.D., floydwil@email.unc.edu

 

Communications and Public Affairs contact: Helen Buchanan, (919) 445-8555, mediarelations@unc.edu

UNC Kenan-Flagler students and Phil Ford Host Charity Basketball Tournament April 28

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UNC Kenan-Flagler students and Phil Ford Host Charity Basketball Tournament April 28

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.—April 24, 2015) – MBA students at the University of North Carolina Kenan-Flagler Business School have partnered with former Carolina basketball star Phil Ford to host a charity basketball tournament April 28 from 5 to 8 p.m. at Woollen Gym.

 

The co-ed round-robin tournament will raise money for The Phil Ford Foundation, which supports obesity research and prevention efforts at UNC Children’s Hospital and the UNC-Chapel Hill department of Pediatrics.

 

“About six months ago, I was approached by a professor at UNC Kenan-Flagler Business School about this wild idea he had for some MBA students,” said Ford. “The idea was to have about 20 students form a league, and have the students to recruit players to play in this league. Little did I know that the money that they raised is going to help The Phil Ford Foundation, which supports childhood obesity research.”

 

The tournament is part of the MBA Leadership Immersion Capstone Course, which is unique among business schools. Students spend seven weeks – an entire quarter of their second year as MBA’s – working solely on honing their leadership skills. The module teaches real-world leadership skills through “Apprentice”-style team competitions, business simulations, outdoor challenges, engagement with C-suite executives and individual observation, coaching and feedback.

 

“Students are challenged to apply leadership lessons to see what they can accomplish in business and in their communities,” said Mindy Storrie, director of leadership development at UNC Kenan-Flagler. “We are thrilled that Phil Ford is providing a valuable learning experience for our students and they can contribute to the important work he is doing through his foundation.”
MBA and other graduate students and undergraduate students will square off to raise money for the foundation. Tickets are $5 and available at the door and at philfordcharitybasketball.eventbrite.com.

 

-Carolina-

 

UNC Kenan-Flagler contact: Allison Adams, (919) 962-7235, aadams@unc.edu

 

Communications and Public Affairs contact: (919) 445-8555, mediarelations@unc.edu

The Morehead-Cain Foundation announces its Class of 2019

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The Morehead-Cain Foundation announces its Class of 2019

 

59 new Morehead-Cain Scholars from across North Carolina, the United States, and the world will matriculate at UNC-Chapel Hill this fall

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.—April 24, 2015) – The Morehead-Cain Foundation – home of the first merit scholarship program in the United States – is proud to announce its class of 2019.

 

This fall, Morehead-Cain will welcome to the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 59 new Morehead-Cain Scholars from across North Carolina, the United States, and the world. The class of 2019 includes:

 

  • 34 scholars from North Carolina
  • 25 scholars from outside North Carolina, including:
    • 18 scholars from 10 different states;
    • 4 scholars from the United Kingdom;
    • 1 scholar from Canada;
    • 1 scholar from China; and
    • 1 scholar from South Africa

 

The Morehead-Cain Scholarship covers all expenses for four years of undergraduate study at UNC-Chapel Hill. In addition, it features a distinctive program of summer enrichment experiences designed to support students as they learn and grow. During the course of four summers, scholars will have opportunities to complete an outdoor leadership course, commit themselves to public service in the U.S. or abroad, conduct research at sites around the world, and gain experience in private enterprise.

 

The Summer Enrichment Program is complemented by the Morehead-Cain Discovery Fund. With financial support, scholars are encouraged to more deeply explore their interests, whether they involve studying under celebrated artists, attending leadership retreats, or obtaining wilderness first responder certification. From researching renewable energy technologies in Europe to tracing the path of native bumblebees in the Patagonia region of Chile, Morehead-Cain Scholars have the resources to pursue educational opportunities wherever they may find them.

 

As set out in the program’s founding documents, selection criteria for the Morehead-Cain are leadership, academic achievement, moral force of character, and physical vigor. Morehead-Cain recipients are chosen solely on the basis of merit and accomplishment.

 

Currently, more than 200 Morehead-Cain Scholars study on campus, making outstanding contributions across the full range of University life. From student government to community service to the performing arts, Morehead-Cain Scholars play a prominent role in Carolina’s vibrant student community. For example, during the past ten years five student body presidents, four student attorneys general, and four honor court chairs have all been Morehead-Cain Scholars.

 

Within the past 15 years, 14 Morehead-Cain Scholars have won Rhodes Scholarships to England’s Oxford University, one of the world’s most competitive and prestigious awards for graduate study. Since the first Morehead Scholars graduated from Carolina in 1957, 31 of UNC’s 34 Rhodes Scholars have been Morehead-Cain graduates.

 

Morehead-Cain Scholars have accounted for 24 of the University’s 36 Luce Scholars and 19 of Carolina’s 32 Truman Scholars, among the nation’s most generous and distinguished awards for graduate study. Twenty-seven Morehead-Cain Scholars have won Fulbright Fellowships.

 

Like the scholars, the 3,000 Morehead-Cain Alumni across the world are a diverse and distinguished group. They include:

 

  • Pulitzer Prize-winning author Taylor Branch;
  • U.S. Congressmen Jim Cooper, Mike McIntyre and David Price;
  • Sallie Krawcheck, owner of Ellevate Network and former head of Merrill Lynch and Smith Barney;
  • Jonathan Reckford, chief executive officer of Habitat for Humanity International;
  • Karen Stevenson, a Los Angeles attorney and the first black American woman to win a Rhodes Scholarship;
  • New York Times columnist and author Frank Bruni;
  • Tim Sullivan, chief executive officer of Ancestry.com;
  • Ann Livermore, current board of directors member and former executive vice president at Hewlett-Packard;
  • Adam Falk, president of Williams College;
  • Peter Henry, dean of New York University’s Stern School of Business;
  • Danae Ringelmann, co-founder of the crowdfunding platform Indiegogo; and
  • Francis Collins, director of the National Institutes of Health.

 

Founded in 1945, the Morehead-Cain has been a model for countless merit awards throughout the United States. These include the University of Virginia’s Jefferson Scholars Program, Duke University’s Benjamin N. Duke Scholars Program, and Emory University’s Woodruff Scholars Program.

 

For more information, visit http://www.moreheadcain.org or call the foundation at (919) 962-1201. Portraits of scholarship recipients can be downloaded at http://urxserve.ur.unc.edu/res/sites/Luminosity/.

 

Class of 2019
New Morehead-Cain Scholars are listed below alphabetically by North Carolina county, state, and country. Students noted with an asterisk (*) are listed in more than one location.

 

NORTH CAROLINA

Buncombe

*Yunfei Ma (Conrad) will graduate this spring from Christ School in Arden, where he is founder and president of Love & Elite Education, an organization that has helped more than 7,000 Chinese students develop their social and learning skills. Conrad also founded the Hip-Hop Outreach Club at Christ School and is a world-class beat boxer, winning the 2015 U.S. Beat Box Battle and performing in competitions worldwide. Conrad is interested in computer science, business, and entrepreneurship. He is the son of Hongliang Ma and Junhong Fan of Yantai, Shandong, China.

 

Isabelle Smith will graduate this spring from the Asheville School in Asheville, where she is editor-in-chief of the school newspaper and a leading member of the girls’ varsity soccer team. Isabelle is also passionate about sustainable farming and environmental issues, founding the Asheville School Apiary and working at the Essex Farm Institute. Isabelle is looking forward to studying environmental studies, English, and women’s studies. She is the daughter of Arthur and Anne Smith.

 

Cabarrus

Sophia McFarlane will graduate this spring from Central Cabarrus High School in Concord, where she is student body president, vice president of the community service club Interact, and captain of the girls’ varsity basketball team. Sophia is also the president of the school math club, vice president of the school’s chapter of the National Honor Society, and a mentor of young girls in the group Teaching Responsible Actions in Life (TRAiL). She is interested in studying biochemistry and genetics and may pursue a career in medicine. Sophia is the daughter of Barrington McFarlane and Lorraine Warner.

 

Catawba

Jacob Schmidt will graduate this spring from Fred T. Foard High School in Newton, where he is captain of the varsity football team and a volunteer, tutoring his peers in math-related courses. Jacob is also a talented vocalist, serving as president of the school choral program, and has led volunteer missions as part of his church youth group. He is interested in learning more about European history, environmental sciences, and business management. Jacob is the son of Darren and Kelli Schmidt.

 

Chatham

*Elizabeth Essen (Elia) will graduate this spring from Woods Charter School in Chapel Hill, where she is vice president of student council and co-president of the prom committee, and has won awards for her scientific research. Elia is also an accomplished dancer and has played multiple lead roles in Barriskill Dance Theatre School’s production of the Nutcracker. Elia enjoys learning about English and psychology and is considering a career in journalism or design. She is the daughter of Jeff Essen and Elizabeth Foley of Pittsboro.

 

Cumberland

Jessie Keener will graduate this spring from the Fayetteville Academy in Fayetteville, where she is president of the student government association and captain of the girls’ varsity soccer team. Jessie has also helped raise thousands of dollars for Maggie Lee for Good, an organization dedicated to random acts of kindness. Jessie loves to perform, singing or playing piano or the guitar. She is interested in learning about business operations and law. Jessie is the daughter of James and Mildred Keener.

 

Rohun Shah will graduate this spring from Terry Sanford Senior High School in Fayetteville, where he is student body president, president of the Key Club, and a member of the school’s varsity golf team. Rohun is also an Eagle Scout and an active volunteer for Communities in Schools (CIS), collecting school supplies for at-risk students living in Cumberland County. Interested by geography and anatomy, Rohun is considering a career in medicine. He is the son of Sanjay and Liza Shah.

 

Durham

Darryl Beasley, Jr. (Keith) will graduate this spring from Hillside High School in Durham, where he serves as treasurer of student government and captains the varsity football team. Keith is also a member of the Durham Youth Council, advising city leaders on issues relevant to teens, and a volunteer with Peace Toys for War Toys. Keith, who is interested in studying biomedical engineering and applied mathematics, is the son of Darryl Beasley, Sr. and Tamera Coyne-Beasley.

 

Jordan Bermudez will graduate this spring from Charles E. Jordan Senior High School in Durham, North Carolina, where she serves on student government as the diversity and recruitment chair. Jordan is also captain of the varsity field hockey team and a volunteer assistant counselor with Camp Kaleidoscope at Duke Children’s Hospital, working closely with children suffering from chronic and terminal illnesses. Jordan is interested in studying biology and may pursue a career as a surgeon or an athletic trainer. She is the daughter of Jacqueline Looney.

 

Sarah McAdon will graduate this spring from Northern High School in Durham, where she is senior class vice president and a member of Goals for Girls, a charity that helps connect girls around the world to address social and health issues through the game of soccer. Sarah is passionate about the sport; in addition to playing girls’ varsity soccer for her school, she plays club soccer with the Triangle United Soccer Association. Sarah, who wants to learn more about societies around the world and politics, is considering a career as a legislator or diplomat. She is the daughter of Paul and Joann McAdon.

 

Forsyth

Ryan Armstrong will graduate this spring from Mount Tabor High School in Winston-Salem, where he is a distinguished student-athlete, captaining both the varsity cross country and track teams. Ryan also volunteers at the science museum SciWorks, creating interactive demonstrations for the museum’s curious young visitors. Ryan enjoys learning about physics, mathematics, and chemistry and is considering a career in renewable energy. He is the son of Douglas and Laura Armstrong.

 

*Mary Beth Browne will graduate this spring from Salem Academy in Winston-Salem, where she founded the school’s Model U.N. Club and is a member of the school’s honor cabinet. Mary Beth also loves to perform and has served as an officer of the Drama Club, earned roles in several stage productions, and is a member of the Drama Llamas—a group that performs for kids. Mary Beth, who is interested in chemistry and mathematics, is the daughter of Charles and LuAnn Browne of Mt. Airy.

 

Carly Cannoy will graduate this spring from North Forsyth High School in Winston-Salem, where she is president of the Crosby Scholars, president of the Science Club, and co-captain of the girls’ varsity swim team. She is also a section leader in the school orchestra and a member of the Rho Kappa Social Studies Honor Society. Carly enjoys learning about history and religion and may pursue a career in government or higher education. She is the daughter of Jeffrey and Lori Cannoy.

 

Corrine Spencer (Cory) will graduate this spring from R. J. Reynolds Senior High School in Winston-Salem, where is the president of Youth United. The organization is part of Habitat for Humanity of Forsyth County and raises $65,000 a year to help fund a Habitat home for a local family in need. Cory is also a talented athlete—she captained the girls’ varsity swim and tennis teams during her junior and senior years. In the classroom, Cory enjoys learning about science and mathematics. She is the daughter of Patricia and John Spencer III.

 

Guilford

Robert Jarrell (Rob) will graduate this spring from High Point Central High School in High Point, where he served as freshman, sophomore, and junior class president before being elected student body president for his senior year. He also tutors students, volunteers with area nonprofits, and runs his own chauffeur business with an old limousine he bought himself. Rob is interested in history, economics, business administration, and law. He is the son of Cynthia and Thomas Jarrell, Jr.

 

Harnett

Elizabeth Reaves Houston (Reaves) will graduate this spring from Triton High School in Erwin, where she is an award-winning peer tutor, president of the Interact Club, and executive treasurer in the Student Government Association. She also volunteers with SAFE of Harnett County, helping raise money for survivors of domestic violence. Reaves enjoys learning about biology, political science, and law. She is the daughter of Keith and Paige Houston of Dunn.

 

Johnston

Melanie Langness will graduate this spring from West Johnston High School in Benson, where she is editor-in-chief of the online newspaper Scratchpost, serves in student government, and is a member of the Science Olympiad. Melanie also loves to dance and is a member of the national dance honor society Nu Delta Alpha. Melanie is interested in journalism and global studies. She is the daughter of Joshua and Brandie Langness.

 

Lincoln

Danielle Fowler (Dani) will graduate this spring from Lincoln Charter School in Denver, where she is a member of the Lincoln Student Advisory Council and Project Unify, a club serving disabled children. Dani is also a member of HEROES, an organization for students interested in health careers. Dani wants to learn more about medicine and criminology and may pursue a career as a doctor or forensic criminologist. She is the daughter of Mark and Dana Fowler of Vale.

 

Mecklenburg

John Amoroso (Jack) will graduate this spring from Cannon School in Concord, where he is president of Model U.N. and captain of the varsity baseball team. Jack also leads Cannon School’s House Animus, organizing and leading service, academic, and social events for his fellow students. Jack enjoys learning about accounting, business management, and international relations. He is the son of Gregory and Michele Amoroso of Charlotte.

 

Ana Guerrero will graduate this spring from Harding University High School in Charlotte, where she is a member of the Hispanic Organization of Leadership and Advancement (HOLA) and a volunteer at Carolinas Medical Center. Ana is also captain of the girls’ varsity tennis team and plays girls’ varsity soccer. Ana, who is interested in studying Latino studies and public health, is the daughter of Gaston Guerrero and Santa De Lerma.

 

Clare MacDonald will graduate this spring from Woodlawn School in Mooresville, where she helps plan and lead events as a member of the Chartered Committee for Youth and captains the three-time conference champion girls’ varsity volleyball team. Clare also loves shooting water rockets; she and her grandfather have won three first-place titles from the National Physics Laboratory competition in England. Clare is the daughter of David and Janet MacDonald of Huntersville.

 

Sebastian Nabatoff will graduate this spring from Charlotte Latin School in Charlotte, where he is student body president and co-founder of the Current Events Club, leading weekly discussion groups among its more than thirty members. Sebastian also plays boys’ varsity basketball and golf. Sebastian wants to learn more about international relations and business and may pursue a career in business or the Foreign Service. Sebastian is the son of Larry Nabatoff and Kelly Katterhagen.

 

Mary Selzer will graduate this spring from Christ the King Catholic High School in Huntersville, where she is the chair of the Honor Council, president of her school’s chapter of the National Honor Society, and a member of the Superintendent’s Student Advisory Board. Mary has also served as captain of the girls’ volleyball team and co-captain of the girls’ basketball team. Mary, who is interested in a career as a sports nutritionist or exercise physiologist, is the daughter of Stuart and Jenifer Selzer.

 

Nash

Colby Kirkpatrick will graduate this spring from Rocky Mount Academy in Rocky Mount, where he is student body president and chair of the STARS Tutoring Program. Colby’s interest in journalism inspired him to create the Media Office, designing a curriculum and launching Rocky Mount Academy’s weekly newspaper and website. Colby is interested in learning about English, history, journalism, and international relations. He is the son of James Kirkpatrick and April Livermon.

 

New Hanover

Aisling Henihan will graduate this spring from John T. Hoggard High School in Wilmington, where she is a member of student council and Beta Club, organizing service events and tracking volunteers’ hours. Aisling is also a talented dancer—she has performed in several productions and attended summer programs with the Carolina Ballet and American Ballet Theatre. Aisling enjoys learning about English and social sciences and may pursue a career in public policy or law. She is the daughter of Robert and Alison Henihan.

 

Orange

*Elizabeth Essen (Elia) will graduate this spring from Woods Charter School in Chapel Hill, where she is vice president of student council and co-president of the prom committee, and has won awards for her scientific research. Elia is also an accomplished dancer and has played multiple lead roles in Barriskill Dance Theatre School’s production of the Nutcracker. Elia enjoys learning about English and psychology and is considering a career in journalism or design. She is the daughter of Jeff Essen and Elizabeth Foley of Pittsboro.

 

Margaret Hassel will graduate this spring from East Chapel Hill High School in Chapel Hill, where she is the co-president of Students for Academic Integrity and Leadership and co-captain of the Ethics Bowl. Margaret also serves as co-editor-in-chief of the school newspaper and founded a program that donates books to elementary school students. Margaret is interested in political science and economics and may pursue a career in politics or public policy. She is the daughter of Bryan and Emily Hassel.

 

Pitt

Olivia Dunn will graduate this spring from D. H. Conley High School in Greenville, where she is president of the National Spanish Honor Society and serves as news editor, sports editor, and photographer for her school newspaper. Olivia is also a Distinguished Young Woman of North Carolina and started the nonprofit organization “Kidney for Coach” to help her basketball coach find a transplant match. Olivia, who enjoys learning about biology and political science, is the daughter of Vernon and Carolyn Dunn.

 

Randolph

Matthew Queen will graduate this spring from Asheboro High School in Asheboro, where he is student body president, co-founder and captain of the Mock Trial team, and a member of the cross country and club soccer teams. Matthew is also devoted to music; he can play five different instruments and serves in leadership positions with Asheboro High School’s jazz and concert bands. Matthew is thinking about a career in law or politics. He is the son of Scott and Louann Queen.

 

Stanly

Regan Johnson will graduate this spring from West Stanly High School in Oakboro, where she is co-president of Future Business Leaders of America, president of student council, and president of the school’s chapter of the National Honor Society. In her multiple leadership roles, Regan has helped raise more than $16,000 for West Stanly High School athletics; organized prom, homecoming, and spirit week; and organized a 5K for the Pregnancy Resource Center. Regan is the daughter of Charles and Carolyn Johnson of Stanfield.

 

Surry

*Mary Beth Browne will graduate this spring from Salem Academy in Winston-Salem, where she founded the school’s Model U.N. Club and is a member of the school’s honor cabinet. Mary Beth also loves to perform and has served as an officer of the Drama Club, earned roles in several stage productions, and is a member of the Drama Llamas—a group that performs for kids. Mary Beth, who is interested in chemistry and mathematics, is the daughter of Charles and LuAnn Browne of Mt. Airy.

 

Tyrrell

John Stanton will graduate this spring from Columbia High School in Columbia, where he has served as president of the National Beta Club and of Future Farmers of America. John is also lead trumpet in the Wildcat Marching Band, a member of the cross country team, and has earned open water and advanced SCUBA certification. John enjoys learning about biology and chemistry and may pursue a career as a marine research biologist or chemist. John is the son of Wendy and John Stanton III.

 

Wake

Meghana Ganapathiraju will graduate this spring from Green Hope High School in Cary, where she started and coaches a Math Olympiad team, volunteers with several clubs and organizations, and has helped raise money for several social causes. Meghana also loves the fine arts and performs Indian classical dance. She hopes to study the biological and computational sciences and is considering a career in medicine. Meghana is the daughter of Saraswati Kumar and Kowsayla Devi Ganapathiraju.

 

Pooja Joshi will graduate this spring from Raleigh Charter School in Raleigh, where she is captain of the Science Olympiad team, serves on the Honor Council, and is working on research projects at both Duke University and East Carolina University. Pooja also enjoys dance and performs regionally with a traveling Indian dance team. She enjoys studying biology, political science, and government. Pooja is the daughter of Dhanesh and Shivangi Joshi of Cary.

 

Watauga

Catherine Mackenzie Nelsen (Mackenzie) will graduate this spring from Watauga High School in Boone, North Carolina, where she is president of the National Honor Society and captain of the girls’ varsity soccer team. Mackenzie is also a standout musician; twice she has been selected to the North Carolina All-State Orchestra. Interested in environmental science and biochemistry, Mackenzie is considering careers in academia or environmental engineering. She is the daughter of Patricia and William Nelsen III.

 

Wilson

James Willis Benson (Will) will graduate this spring from Ralph L. Fike High School in Wilson, where he is vice president of the Student Government Association, president of the school’s chapter of the National Honor Society, and a senior leader of the YMCA Young Leaders Program. Will is also captain of the boys’ varsity soccer, tennis, and swimming teams and helped organize a 5K to benefit the deaf community. Will is the son of Scott and Paula Benson.

 

Yancey

Lauren Zitney will graduate this spring from Mountain Heritage High School in Burnsville, where she is a dancer and singer, and works in all facets of theater production, including acting, costume design, and choreography. Lauren is also deeply involved with student government and has served as student body president during her senior year. Lauren enjoys learning about biology, history, and philosophy and is considering careers in medicine or academia. She is the daughter of James and Victoria Zitney.

 

OUT-OF-STATE

California

Ezra Rawitsch will graduate this spring from Polytechnic School in Pasadena, California, where he is the founding editor-in-chief of the school’s magazine for the arts, Volume Magazine. Ezra is also the director of technology for the school newspaper and has helped develop a youth-oriented TEDx conference at Caltech. In the classroom, Ezra likes learning about physics and astronomy and is considering a career as an entrepreneur or researcher. Ezra is the son of James Rawitsch and Corey Madden.

 

Florida

Jakob Hamilton will graduate this spring from Saint Stephen’s Episcopal School in Bradenton, Florida, where he is the school’s student organist and music director, and a member of the boys’ varsity cross country and track teams. A talented pianist, Jakob has competed in the Anna Maria Concert Choir and Orchestra Young Artists Concerto Competition. He also teaches students at the Florida Enrichment Academy. Jakob, who is considering a career in music or medicine, is the son of Stephen Hamilton and Nicole Scholer.

 

Nicholas McKenzie (Nick) will graduate this spring from Trinity Preparatory School in Winter Park, Florida, where he is student body president, leading weekly assemblies for more than 5,000 students. In addition to being co-captain of the Spanish Competition Team, Nick is the captain of the varsity swim team and Trinity Aquatics. Nick enjoys studying chemistry and Spanish and may pursue a career in medicine. He is the son of Lance and Sandra McKenzie of Orlando, Florida.

 

Rachel Joyner will graduate this spring from Leon High School in Tallahassee, Florida, where she is editor-in-chief of the school newspaper and captain of the girls’ cross country team. Rachel also loves science, and for the past two years has helped conduct research at the world-renowned National High Magnetic Field Laboratory. Rachel enjoys learning about biology, chemistry, math, literature, and writing. She is the daughter of Daryll and Elizabeth Joyner.

 

Georgia

Nicholas Byrne will graduate this spring from Clarke Central High School in Athens, Georgia, where he is captain of the Mock Trial team, the broadcast managing editor for the student news outlet ODYSSEY, and president of the Southern Interscholastic Press Association. Nicholas is also president of the school’s yoga club and plays varsity tennis. Nicholas is interested in studying journalism and macroeconomics and is considering a career in business management. He is the son of Robert and Katherine Byrne.

 

*Rachel Gideon will graduate this spring from the Darlington School in Rome, Georgia, where she serves on the Honor Council and is president of the Spanish Club. Rachel also founded a business called Band Together, selling hair ties and headbands and sending profits to the refugee resettlement organization NICE. Interested in economics and finance, Rachel is considering a career in investment banking or law. She is the daughter of Cecile and Clarence Gideon III of Nashville, Tennessee.

 

Carter Guensler will graduate this spring from Henry W. Grady High School in Atlanta, Georgia, where he is assistant managing editor of the school newspaper and captain of the cross country team. Carter also loves theatre; he is a 20-star International Honor Thespian, the highest achievement in high school theatre arts. Carter is interested in the sciences, communication, and the fine arts, and is thinking about a career in journalism, communications, or theatre and film. He is the son of Randall Guensler and Kelly Fortin.

 

Kansas

Kent McDonald will graduate this spring from Blue Valley West High School in Stilwell, Kansas, where he is president of the National Honor Society and an executive advisory mentor, developing a curriculum to help freshmen transition to high school. Kent is also a team leader with Relay for Life, planning and executing events, and is considering careers in business or politics. He is the son of Mark and Judy McDonald in Overland Park, Kansas.

 

Louisiana

John Drouilhet IV (Drew) will graduate this spring from Isidore Newman School in New Orleans, Louisiana, where he is an officer for the concert band, co-leader of the SADD Club, and captain of the varsity football team. Drew is also an active volunteer, helping third graders with their homework and packaging food at an area food bank. Interested in biology and genetics, Drew may pursue a career as a surgeon or researcher. Drew is the son of Liana and the late John Drouilhet III.

 

Maryland

Erik Johnson will graduate this spring from Winston Churchill High School in Potomac, Maryland, where he co-founded ThinkBig—an organization that introduces classmates to new technologies, potential career paths, and aspects of life that aren’t covered in the classroom. Erik is also the captain of his Mock Trial team and has interned at the Naval Research Lab. Erik enjoys studying physics, engineering, and economics. He is the son of Mark Johnson and Donna Tasso-Johnson.

 

Anna Kiyonaga (Annie) will graduate this spring from Stone Ridge School in Bethesda, Maryland, where she is a United Nations Girl Up teen advisor, raising money and awareness for girls in developing countries, and a group leader with Amnesty International. Annie is also a member of the varsity swim and track teams. Interested in English literature and political science, Annie is considering a career in journalism or law. She is the daughter of Paul Kiyonaga and Debra Soltis of Chevy Chase, Maryland.

 

Massachusetts

*Malik Jabati will graduate this spring from Groton School in Groton, Massachusetts, where he co-founded and leads the Groton Mentorship Program and serves as a student leader on the Groton School Faculty and Student Diversity and Inclusion Task Force. Malik is also a jazz musician and has recorded several CDs, plays in a classical saxophone quartet, and has toured Cuba with his band. Malik, who is interested in biomedical engineering and political science, is the son Keith Jabati and Myra Compton-Jabati of Alexandria, Virginia.

 

Ohio

Allison Carter will graduate this spring from Ursuline Academy in Cincinnati, Ohio, where she serves as student council vice president, runs cross country, and coaches a team for Girls on the Run—an after-school program for young girls designed to teach them life skills and build their confidence. Allison is also a member of TAP MD, a program that allows select high school students to shadow doctors at hospitals, clinics, and research centers. Allison is the daughter of William and Elizabeth Carter of Loveland, Ohio.

 

Megan Rogge will graduate this spring from Sycamore High School in Cincinnati, Ohio, where she is president of the Biology Club and an award-winning member of Model U.N. Megan is captain of the cross country team, runs winter and spring track, and is an avid rock climber. Megan is interested in engineering, biology, and chemistry and is considering a career in engineering or law. Megan is the daughter of Michael and Beth Rogge of Loveland, Ohio.

 

Pennsylvania

Oliver Mitchell-Boyask will graduate this spring from Germantown Friends School in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, where he serves on the Judiciary Review Board, is captain of the varsity baseball team, and is co-leader of the Sexuality and Gender Association. Oliver also writes regular columns for the school’s literary magazine and student newspaper, and enjoys studying economics and public policy. He is the son of Robin and Amanda Mitchell-Boyask.

 

Tennessee

*Rachel Gideon will graduate this spring from the Darlington School in Rome, Georgia, where she serves on the Honor Council and is president of the Spanish Club. Rachel also founded a business called Band Together, selling hair ties and headbands and sending profits to the refugee resettlement organization NICE. Interested in economics and finance, Rachel is considering a career in investment banking or law. She is the daughter of Cecile and Clarence Gideon III of Nashville, Tennessee.

 

Kate Goldenring will graduate this spring from Harpeth Hall School in Nashville, Tennessee, where she serves on student council and is a member of the honor council. She also leads the Sierra Club Nashville Toxins Project, researching toxins emitted in Nashville, compiling the symptoms they cause, and presenting the findings. Kate, who enjoys learning about environmental sciences and biomedical engineering, is the daughter of James Goldenring and Colleen Brophy.

 

Adam Hasan will graduate this spring from Bearden High School in Knoxville, Tennessee, where he is class president, the student representative on the Knox County School Board, and the founder of his school’s chapter of Model U.N. Adam is also a competitive rock climber and founded the first high school curling team in the southeast. He is interested in studying public policy and economics and is considering a future in law or business. Adam is the son of Husein and Sherri Hasan.

 

Gabriella Stein (Gabi) will graduate this spring from Hutchison School in Memphis, Tennessee, where she is class treasurer, a member of the Wilson Society (a community service organization), and co-editor-in-chief of the upper school newspaper. Gabi also helped develop the lower school newspaper, working closely with and teaching younger students. Interested in studying bioinformatics and scientific journalism, Gabi is considering careers in medical research or education reform. She is the daughter of Sidney and Kim Stein of Cordova, Tennessee.

 

Virginia

*Malik Jabati will graduate this spring from Groton School in Groton, Massachusetts, where he co-founded and leads the Groton Mentorship Program and serves as a student leader on the Groton School Faculty and Student Diversity and Inclusion Task Force. Malik is also a jazz musician and has recorded several CDs, plays in a classical saxophone quartet, and has toured Cuba with his band. Malik, who is interested in biomedical engineering and political science, is the son Keith Jabati and Myra Compton-Jabati of Alexandria, Virginia.

 

INTERNATIONAL

Canada

Carolyne Barker will graduate this spring from Marshall McLuhan Catholic Secondary School in Toronto, Ontario, where she is student council vice president and president of the Duke of Edinburgh Award Club, organizing meetings and helping provide volunteer opportunities. She is also captain of the varsity field hockey team, captain of the varsity ski team, and manager of the varsity track team. Carolyne is interested in studying political science and global development. She is the daughter of Paul Barker and Breda Clifford-Barker.

 

China

*Yunfei Ma (Conrad) will graduate this spring from Christ School in Arden, North Carolina, where he is founder and president of Love & Elite Education, an organization that has helped more than 7,000 Chinese students develop their social and learning skills. Conrad also founded the Hip-Hop Outreach Club at Christ School and is a world-class beat boxer, winning the 2015 U.S. Beat Box Battle and performing in competitions worldwide. Conrad is interested in computer science, business, and entrepreneurship. He is the son of Hongliang Ma and Junhong Fan of Yantai, Shandong, China.

 

South Africa

Thokozile Zimba (Thoko) will graduate this spring from the African Leadership Academy in Northcliff, South Africa, where she is a peer counselor, represents the school during events and tours as a student ambassador, and manages the student-run radio station Radio Skika. Thoko is also the captain of the volleyball squad. Interested in writing, speech, and the visual and performing arts, Thoko is considering careers in entrepreneurship and human rights law. She is the daughter of Shadreck and Miriam Zimba of Honeydew, Guateng, South Africa.

 

United Kingdom

Chris Combemale will graduate this spring from the Haberdashers’ Aske’s Boys’ School in Elstree, Hertfordshire, England, where he founded and runs a public speaking club, serves as a house captain, and is one of six school council directors. Chris is also a passionate performer and musician who has won awards for his acting. He enjoys learning about English literature and theatre studies. Chris is the son of Christopher and Magdalene Combemale of St. Albans, Hertfordshire.

 

Constance Longmate (Connie) will graduate this spring from the Mary Erskine School in Edinburgh, Scotland, where she is Head Girl and captain of both the field hockey and indoor hockey teams. Connie is also a member of the Combined Cadet Force and has earned the rank of Senior Royal Air Force Cadet. She is interested in studying public health and medicine. Connie is the daughter of Andrew Longmate and Catherine Labinjoh.

 

Phillippa Owens will graduate this spring from Runshaw College in Leyland, Lancashire, England, where she leads a Catholic youth group and has achieved the nationally recognized bronze and gold Youth Achievement Awards. She also serves as captain of Runshaw College’s netball team and founded a running club. Interested in the biological sciences and business management, Phillippa is considering a career in entrepreneurship or scientific research. She is the daughter of Adrian and Jocelyn Owens of Wigan, England.

 

Anamay Viswanathan will graduate this spring from Dulwich College in London, where he is a mentor; a member of the Philosophy, Politics, and Economics Society; and the founder of the Cooking Society at Dulwich College. He also served as managing director of the school’s Young Enterprise team that won awards for its development of eco-friendly products. Anamay is interested in studying political philosophy and economics and may pursue a career in journalism or in non-governmental organizations. Anamay is the son of Sanjay and Anamika Viswanathan.

 

-Carolina-

 

Portraits of scholarship recipients: http://urxserve.ur.unc.edu/res/sites/Luminosity/

 

Morehead-Cain Foundation: http://www.moreheadcain.org, (919) 962-1201

 

Communications and Public Affairs contact: (919) 445-8555, mediarelations@unc.edu