UNC-Chapel Hill study finds beta blockers not needed after heart attack if other medications taken

For Immediate Use

 

Beta blockers not needed after heart attack if other medications taken

 

UNC-Chapel Hill study first to challenge current clinical guidelines

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C. — Sept. 18, 2017) — A new study from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill finds beta blockers are not needed after a heart attack if heart-attack survivors are taking ACE inhibitors and statins. The study is the first to challenge the current clinical guideline that heart-attack survivors should take all three drugs – beta blockers, ACE inhibitors and statins –  for the rest of their lives.

 

Heart-attack survivors are usually prescribed all three drugs to help prevent a second attack and death. However, the beta blockers offer no additional benefit for patients who take the other two drugs as prescribed, according to the new study, which examined the trade-offs and consequences of using some of the medicines instead of others. The findings were published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

 

Researchers looked at more than 90,000 Medicare patients age 65 or older who had suffered a heart attack and were prescribed a beta blocker, ACE inhibitor or angiotensin receptor blocker and statin as preventive therapies after they were discharged from the hospital. Patients who only took the ACE inhibitor or an angiotensin receptor blocker and statin, as prescribed, were no more likely to die than those who took all three drugs.

 

The research team from UNC-Chapel Hill, Monash University, the University of Iowa and the University of Eastern Finland was led by Gang Fang, an assistant professor at the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy and senior author of the study.

 

Fang stressed that patients should not stop taking beta blockers or any other prescription medicine without first consulting their physician. “We are not saying that beta blockers have no value. It’s just that their benefits appear to have been eclipsed by the duo of ACE inhibitors and statins, which are relatively newer drugs,” Fang said.

 

Beta blockers were introduced more than 50 years ago and reduce blood pressure and heart rate. ACE inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers also reduce blood pressure and they have been around approximately 40 years. Statins reduce the amount of cholesterol and other fats in the bloodstream and have been in use for more than 30 years. For heart-attack patients, these drugs provide additional support to the heart.

 

For six months Fang’s team followed heart-attack survivors who filled prescriptions for all three drugs to study how well they adhered to their prescription drug regimen. Being adherent was defined as taking the medicines as prescribed at least 80 percent of the time. The team then followed the patients for up to 18 months to see how many died during that time. Six months after their heart attack about half the patients in the study had stopped taking at least one of their medications as prescribed, the researchers found.

 

For patients who took all three drugs as prescribed, the mortality rate at one year was 9.3 percent. For patients who adhered to ACE inhibitor or ARBs and statin prescriptions but not beta blockers, the mortality rate was 9.1 percent, a statistically insignificant difference. For patients not taking any of the medicines as prescribed, the mortality rate was 14.3 percent, a nearly 54 percent increase over adherent patients.

 

“The problem with this three-drug regimen is that it is difficult for people to take their medications as they are supposed to in the long term. This is especially true of older patients who are likely to already be taking many different drugs,” Fang said.

 

Fang also noted that patients in the study who had diabetes, dementia or both were more likely to die when taking beta blockers as prescribed. Further research is warranted, he said, and physicians should exercise more caution in prescribing beta blockers for elderly heart-attack survivors with diabetes or dementia.

 

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About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 111 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 322,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and 165 countries. More than 175,000 live in North Carolina.

 

Media Relations contact: Jeni Cook, (919) 445-8555, mediarelations@unc.edu

 

Vaccines save 20 million lives, $350 billion in poor countries since 2001

For immediate use

 

 

Vaccines save 20 million lives, $350 billion in poor countries since 2001

 

(CHAPEL HILL, N.C. — September 1, 2017) — Vaccination efforts made in the world’s poorest countries since 2001 will have prevented 20 million deaths and saved $350 billion in health-care costs by 2020, according to a new study from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. In addition, the researchers put the broader economic and social value of saving these lives and preventing disabilities at $820 billion.

 

Researchers led by Sachiko Ozawa, Ph.D., an associate professor at the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy, studied the economic impact of Gavi, the global vaccine alliance launched in 2000 to provide vaccines to children in the world’s poorest countries. Gavi support has contributed to the immunization of 580 million children, and it has operated primarily in the 73 countries covered by the team’s analysis, which was published in the Bulletin of the World Health Organization.

 

“Vaccination is generally regarded to be one of the most cost–effective interventions in public health,” Ozawa said. “Decision-makers need to appreciate the full potential economic benefits that are likely to result from the introduction and sustained use of any vaccine or vaccination program.”

 

Researchers looked at both short- and long-term costs that could be saved preventing illness. The costs – expressed in 2010 U.S. dollars – include averted treatment, transportation costs, productivity losses of caregivers and productivity losses due to disability and death. They used the value-of-a-life-year method to estimate the broader economic and social value of living longer, in better health, as a result of immunization.

 

“Our examination of the broader economic and social value of vaccines illustrates the substantial gains associated with vaccination,” she said. “Unlike previous estimates that only examine the averted costs of treatment, our estimates of the broader economic and social value of vaccines reflect the intrinsic value that people place on living longer and healthier lives.”

 

Each of the Gavi-supported countries in the study will have avoided an average of $5 million in treatment costs per year just as a result of these 10 vaccines. The vaccines will have prevented an estimated 20 million deaths, 500 million cases of illness, 9 million cases of long-term disability and 960 million years of disability by 2020. The value of preserved productivity, quality of life and other broad economic and social benefits for all 73 study countries is estimated to reach $820 billion by 2020, the researchers calculated.

 

The team used health-impact models to estimate the numbers of cases of illness, deaths and disability-adjusted life-years averted by achieving forecasted coverages for vaccination against hepatitis B, human papillomavirus, Japanese encephalitis, measles, rotavirus, rubella, yellow fever and three strains of bacteria that cause pneumonia and meningitis. The researchers found that vaccinating against hepatitis B, measles, and haemophilus influenzae type b and streptococcus pneumoniae — two bacteria that cause pneumonia and meningitis — provided the greatest economic benefits.

 

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About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 111 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 318,000 alumni live in all 50 states and 157 countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

Office of University Communications contact: Jeni Cook, (919) 962-2091, jeni.cook@unc.edu

 

 

 

 

 

UNC-Chapel Hill experts available to discuss impact of Hurricanes

For Immediate Use

 

UNC-Chapel Hill experts available to discuss impact of Hurricanes 

 

UNC-Chapel Hill researchers and faculty are among those helping communities deal with the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey and the impending threat of Hurricane Irma. University experts are available to discuss the storm’s effects including flooding-related issues, water quality and possible beach erosion.

 

If you would like to schedule an interview with one of our experts contact our media relations team at mediarelations@unc.edu or call our media line at (919) 445-8555.

 

Storm Surge Predictions

 

 

Rick Luettich is the director for UNC-Chapel Hill’s Institute for Marine Sciences in Morehead City, NC. He is on the front lines when it comes to predicting a storm’s potential force. FEMA as well as state and local leaders use Luettich’s data and analysis as they assess the risk factors and determine a course of action for their communities. He is one of the lead developers of ADCIRC, a system of computer programs used to predict storm surge and flooding. Those prediction models are updated every six hours and the most recent can be found here.

 

Luettich’s research and data has also been used to design protection systems around New Orleans following Hurricane Katrina and also New York and New Jersey following Hurricane Sandy. He is also the lead investigator of the Department of Homeland Security’s Coastal Resilience Center.

 

Storm Aftermath & Recovery

 

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Gavin Smith is the director of the Department of Homeland Security’s Coastal Resilience Center of Excellence (CRC) and also a research professor in Carolina’s department of city and regional planning. In both roles, part of his focus is to address the threats and unique challenges facing communities across the U.S. due to natural disasters and climate change. Smith also advises other nations, states and local governments about disaster recovery and risk reduction. Following Hurricane Katrina he served as director for the Mississippi Governor’s Office of Recovery and Renewal and also testified before Congress twice, providing recommendations for improving post-disaster recovery and reconstruction. Smith worked with Governor Hunt after Hurricane Floyd to develop more than 20 state programs addressing local recovery needs and he also served as assistant director of the North Carolina Division of Emergency Management.

 

Other recovery angles he can discuss: The role of state and local leadership in recovery and also the government’s ability to incorporate and implement precautionary measures; why some communities are more vulnerable to disasters than others and transitioning from immediate response to long-term recovery.

Flood Waters & Infrastructure

 

Bill Gentry is a lecturer in Health Policy and Management in UNC’s Gillings School of Global Public Health. An expert in disaster management and public health leadership, Gentry also directs the Department of Health Policy and Management master’s and certificate programs. He can discuss water rescue situations, the hazards of flood waters to public health and the long-term problems hurricanes and flooding can create for infrastructure. Gentry can also discuss caring for animals during natural disasters.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Water Quality

  

 

Hans Paerl is a professor of marine anduntitled3 environmental sciences. His area of expertise in regard to water quality is the harmful effect of toxic algae for both people and aquatic ecosystems. As we saw after Hurricane Floyd, contaminated water is prime breeding ground for algal blooms. Paerl can discuss the long-term impact of these blooms, including fish kills, as well as the different types of algae and the dangers, ranging from neurological problems to paralysis, posed by each. You can hear more about Paerl’s research and how hurricanes impact water quality in this recent episode of UNC- Chapel Hill’s podcast, Well Said.

 

 

 

 

 

untitled9Rachel Noble is a distinguished professor at UNC-Chapel Hill and also the Morehead City field site director of the Institute for the Environment. She can discuss water and the various contaminants that might be found in lakes and rivers following a storm like Hurricane Harvey. Water quality is especially a concern with flooding and also when the ground is oversaturated. Noble can discuss how those situations put stress on already taxed waste treatment systems and other infrastructure and how that also leads to water contamination.

 

 

Erosion

 

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Tony Rodriguez is a professor at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s Institute for Marine Sciences. He is available to talk about the overall, immediate effect of intense storms and weather conditions as they pertain to erosion. Rodriquez can further discuss the compounding factorsover time and just how problematic storm-related erosion can become after repeated exposure to intense weather systems and an increase in sea levels.

 

 

 

 

 

Carter Smith is a doctoral student at the UNC Institute for Marine Sciences. She studies the benefits of living shorelines, an alternative to seawalls, as a solution to combat erosion and property loss during storms. Living shorelines are both more cost effective than seawalls in the long-term, and are ecologically more sustainable. Smith can discuss how homeowners and property managers can better protect coastal properties from hurricanes.

 

 

 

  

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About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 111 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 322,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and 165 countries. More than 175,000 live in North Carolina.

Statement from Chancellor Carol L. Folt on repeal of HB2

 

I thank our legislators and the Governor for their efforts to reach a bipartisan compromise that allows the state to move forward. We remain steadfast in our commitment to inclusivity and diversity, and will continue to do all that we can to foster a welcoming environment for all.

 

 

Media invited to viewings of Final Four games

Not for publication
 

Media invited to cover large-screen viewings of men’s Final Four games Saturday, April 1

 
(Chapel Hill, N.C. – March 30, 2017) – Media are invited to cover the viewing events of the men’s Final Four basketball games in the Dean E. Smith Center at UNC-Chapel Hill on Saturday, April 1. Media may arrive at 5 p.m. to cover the large-screen viewing of the Gonzaga vs. South Carolina game that begins at 6:09 p.m. followed by the Carolina game against Oregon that begins at approximately 8:49 p.m. Both semifinal games in Phoenix will be shown on a large projection screen and on Smith Center video boards.

 

Cosponsored by Carolina athletics and Late Night Carolina Programs at Student Wellness, the Smith Center will open for media members covering the event at 5 p.m. The Smith Center will be open to the public all day prior to the events, so fans can cheer on the Carolina volleyball team, who will host its spring tournament in the Smith Center. Filming is allowed in the Carolina Basketball Museum that will be open from 9 a.m. until 5 p.m.

 

RSVP: Media intending to cover the viewings are asked to RSVP by close-of-business Friday, March 31, by emailing mediarelations@unc.edu or calling the media line at (919) 445-8555.

 

Arrival: Please bring media credentials; enter through entrance D beginning at 5 p.m. Saturday, April 1.

 

Lights: Videographers are asked to refrain from directing TV lights into fans’ faces as they watch the game. Lights can be on before the game, during commercials and between games.

 

Filming: Live shots are permitted in the concourse area only. For b-roll purposes, camera crews are permitted to stand on the Smith Center floor or in the aisles of the stands during commercial breaks, halftime and between games. Please do not block anyone’s view of the screen. Media representatives may sit anywhere in the stands.

 

Assistance on site: Call Jeni Cook at (404) 309-3994 or the media line at (919) 445-8555.

 

Media parking: Satellite trucks may park behind the Smith Center. Media are asked to send only one truck per station. Set-up may begin after 5 p.m. Other media vehicles may park in the Morehead Planetarium and Science Center lot off E. Franklin Street. Parking is available for $5.00 in the Manning, Bowles, Craige and Rams Head parking lots beginning at 3:30 p.m. Road closure and parking restriction information is available online.

 

Cable: Approximately 500 feet of cable is needed to reach from trucks in the back lot to filming areas inside the Smith Center.
 

 

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About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 110 master’s, 64 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s 317,000-plus alumni live in all 50 states and 156 other countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

 

UNC-Chapel Hill Communications contact: Will Rimer, (919) 445-0945 rimerwp@unc.edu

 

Carolina student earns Luce Scholars Program Fellowship

 

For immediate use

 

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Carolina student earns Luce Scholars Program Fellowship

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C. – Feb. 27, 2017) – Martha Isaacs, a fourth-year student at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill has been named a recipient of the 2017 Luce Scholars Program Fellowship. Carolina boasts more Luce Scholars than any other college or university in the United States, including eight recipients in the last five academic years.

 

Isaacs, a geography of human activity major and city and regional planning minor, is UNC-Chapel Hill’s 38th Luce Scholar and one of only 18 students in the United States selected for the prestigious program, which includes an internship in Asia.

 

“I am honored and overjoyed to have the opportunity to travel to Asia next year with the Luce Scholars Program,” said Isaacs. “As a Luce Scholar, I hope to work as a transportation planner in Singapore or Japan, beginning my professional career with a chance to shed North America-centric planning practices and learn from a different political, economic, and geographic context.”

 

Isaacs, 21, is from Reisterstown, Maryland. She will graduate from Carolina this May and is working on her senior honors thesis. She is a Morehead-Cain Scholar, Phi Beta Kappa member, Honors Carolina student and was named a Buckley Public Service Scholar in 2014 after completing more than 300 hours of public service.

 

While at Carolina, Isaacs served as the co-chair for Students United for Reproductive Justice. She plans to pursue a graduate degree in city and regional planning with a focus in transportation, and then start her career as a transportation planner in the governmental, private or non-profit sector.

 

“It is wonderful to see Martha selected for this outstanding program and fantastic opportunity to continue her studies of transportation and urban planning systems in Asia,” said Chancellor Carol L. Folt. “I am very excited for Martha and have no doubt that her studies will help shape the cities and transit systems of the future.”

 

The Henry Luce Foundation launched the Luce Scholars Program in 1974 to provide an immersion experience in Asia to young Americans who would not otherwise have the opportunity to learn about the region. The award provides stipends, language training, and individualized professional placement in Asia for graduating seniors, graduate students and professionals under age 30.

 

“The University is delighted that Martha will be Carolina’s 38th Luce Scholar,” said Inger Brodey, director of UNC-Chapel Hill’s Office of Distinguished Scholarships. “Martha stands out among her classmates for her originality, enthusiasm and sincerity. Spending a year interning in Asia with the Luce Scholars Program will enable her to pursue her dream of improving equity in transportation systems.”

 

 

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About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill



The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 110 master’s, 64 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s 317,000-plus alumni live in all 50 states and 156 other countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

Office of Distinguished Scholarships contacts: Inger Brodey, (919) 923-1414, brodey@email.unc.edu; and Malindi Robinson (919) 843-7757, malindi@email.unc.edu; Twitter @ODS_UNCCH

 

University Communications contact: Jeni Cook, (919) 962-2091, jeni.cook@unc.edu

 

UNC-Chapel Hill comments on, releases NCAA’s third notice of allegations

For immediate use

 

 

UNC-Chapel Hill comments on, releases NCAA’s third notice of allegations

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C. – Dec. 22, 2016) – The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill has released new NCAA communications about the joint investigation of academic irregularities in response to public records requests.

 

The communications are: a Nov. 28 letter from the NCAA’s Committee on Infractions about the University’s jurisdictional arguments; a third notice of allegations issued Dec. 13 by the enforcement staff; and the University’s Dec. 21 response to the infractions panel chair. As with prior NCAA communications, public record copies appear on the Carolina Commitment website.

 

The University’s letter to the infractions panel chair raised concerns about the process resulting in the third notice. The letter cited the process the committee chair followed in declining to consider key evidence the University asked to submit before the panel’s October hearing in Indianapolis. That evidence included letters reflecting months of dialogue between the University and the enforcement staff.

 
“We’ve worked collaboratively with the NCAA enforcement staff for more than two years,” said Bubba Cunningham, director of athletics. “We have serious concerns about the process that led to the third notice of allegations based on the principle that all member institutions should expect fair and consistent treatment. We will continue to work cooperatively with the NCAA and remain fully committed to seeking a fair outcome.”

 

The University’s letter to the infractions committee chair said the key evidence previously denied for consideration by the panel must be made part of the case record. That evidence includes previously released letters posted on the Carolina Commitment website.

 

Typically, NCAA rules provide a member school with 90 days to respond to a notice of allegations. The University is evaluating whether it may need more time to respond.

 

NCAA Bylaw 19.03.01 requires that all infractions-related information remain confidential throughout the infractions process. Consistent with NCAA protocol, University officials will not comment on details about the case until it is completed.

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About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 110 master’s, 64 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty – including two Nobel laureates – staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s 317,000-plus alumni live in all 50 states and 156 other countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

Issued by: Rick White, Associate Vice Chancellor for Communications and Public Affairs
Communications and Public Affairs Contact: (919) 445-8555, mediarelations@unc.edu

 

 

Carolina among new alliance to expand access for talented lower-income students

For immediate use

 

 

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Carolina among new alliance to expand access for talented lower-income students

 

Leverages success in promoting accessibility, affordability to help launch
national effort to educate 50,000 more deserving students

 

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C. – Dec. 13, 2016) – The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill long has been a national leader in making a college degree possible for deserving students regardless of whether they can pay the full cost of their education. Carolina again is showing that commitment by helping launch a new alliance to educate more lower- and moderate-income students at America’s top schools with the highest graduation rates.

 

The American Talent Initiative, supported by Bloomberg Philanthropies, brings together 30 founding members committed to providing more high-achieving, lower- and moderate-income students with a clear pathway to college and the promise of lifetime success. Joining Carolina are other leading public flagships, private universities and liberal arts colleges.

 

The national goal of the initiative is to attract, enroll and graduate 50,000 additional high-achieving, lower-income high school students at the 270 colleges and universities with the highest graduation rates by 2025. To reach that ambitious target, the initiative aims to gradually add more top-performing campuses to the ranks of the founding members.

 

Each year, an estimated 12,500 lower-income high school graduates with outstanding academic credentials do not attend a school where at least 70 percent of students graduate. However, research shows that when such students attend schools with strong graduation rates, they are more likely to earn their degrees and seize leadership opportunities that propel future success.

 

“North Carolinians have a deep faith in the power of higher education to change lives, reflected in our history as the nation’s first public university,” said UNC-Chapel Hill Chancellor Carol L. Folt said. “We are pleased to champion the American Talent Initiative’s effort to unlock the full potential of low- and moderate-income students.

 

“For over a decade, through the Carolina Covenant, we have offered low-income students the opportunity to graduate without debt,” Folt said. “The program’s academic and wellness support services have fostered student success and helped improve graduation rates. Carolina remains one of the country’s few public universities that is both need blind in admissions and meets the full financial need of every eligible student we admit.”

 

Other founding initiative members include Duke University and Davidson College, as well as flagship publics in California, Michigan, Texas and Maryland. Bloomberg Philanthropies awarded a $1.7 million, multi-year grant to the initiative, which is co-managed by the Aspen Institute’s College Excellence Program and Ithaka S+R. Both not-for-profit organizations will study practices that lead to measurable progress and report results in regular publications. Founding members will share best practices about recruiting and supporting lower-income students and contributing to research to help other schools succeed.

 

Carolina’s Successful Accessibility and Affordability Initiatives

 

Under Folt’s leadership, Carolina has remained focused on its historic commitment to provide outstanding access and affordability to students who earn admission regardless of their ability to pay. The low- to middle-income students the University enrolls through those mission-driven efforts strengthen both the campus community and the quality of the education available to those students. These students often are the first in their families to attend college or have parents who earn modest incomes as public servants such as teachers, ministers, veterans, police officers and others who are dedicated to improving society every day.

 

Deserving students benefit from nationally recognized programs like the Carolina Covenant, which has offered more than 6,000 low-income students who earn admission the chance to graduate debt free. The Carolina Firsts program created a path of opportunity for the 20 percent of undergraduates who will be the first in their families to graduate from a four-year campus. Carolina’s newest initiatives include UNC CORE, an undergraduate, distance-education certificate program designed to accelerate the degree path of active-duty service members in the U.S. armed forces, veterans and National Guard or Reserve members.

 

UNC-Chapel Hill meets 100 percent of the documented need of undergraduates qualifying for need-based aid who apply on time, and meets more than two-thirds of that need with grants and scholarships, thanks in large part to the contributions of generous donors.

 

In 2016, UNC-Chapel Hill’s four-year graduation rate was 82 percent, up 8 percentage points since 2005. The six-year rate was 91.4 percent and rose by more than 5 percentage points.

 

Among students receiving federal need-based Pell Grants, four- and six-year graduation rates increased sharply over the past decade – by 16 and 9 percentage points, respectively. In 2016, Pell Grant recipients posted a four-year graduation rate of 77 percent and a six-year graduation rate of 87 percent. Students receiving other need-based financial aid improved both four- and six-year rates by more than 10 percentage points. The 2016 four-year graduation rate for this group now is 81 percent, just 1 percentage point lower than the rate for all undergraduates, and the six-year rate is 93 percent, which exceeds the overall undergraduate rate by 2 percentage points.

 

Carolina helped nurture, expand and serve as the headquarters for the national College Advising Corps between 2007 and 2013. During that span, the campus successfully launched the Carolina College Advising Corps. Now in its 10th year, the Carolina College Advising Corps places recent UNC-Chapel Hill graduates as admissions and financial-aid advisers in underserved North Carolina high schools to help students find colleges where they will thrive. This year, 51 advisers are serving 71 high schools and 62,000 students statewide. Those schools enroll 19 percent of the state’s black students, 13 percent of the Hispanic students and 33 percent of the Native American students.

 

Carolina recently accepted a $20 million match challenge to expand private support for need- and merit-based scholarships. The “Give for Good: Scholarship Challenge” is structured as tandem $10 million matches – one benefiting the Carolina Covenant and the other the merit-based Morehead-Cain Scholarships. The match comes as part of a $40 million gift funding more student scholarship opportunities that epitomize the University’s mission.

 

Folt and campus leaders plan to share lessons about such successes with other American Talent Initiative founders. Current University priorities include removing disparities between the graduation rates of low-income and first-generation students and the student body. While the University has made steady progress, campus leaders continue to strive to reduce those gaps.

 

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About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 110 master’s, 64 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty – including two Nobel laureates – staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s 317,000-plus alumni live in all 50 states and 156 other countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

UNC-Chapel Hill contact: Mike McFarland, (919) 962-8593, mike_mcfarland@unc.edu
American Talent Initiative contact: Bridget DeSimone, (301) 280-5735, bdesimone@burness.com

 

2016 Election Coverage

UNC-Chapel Hill faculty experts are available to offer analysis and insight on everything from record-breaking, early voter turnout to fluctuating poll numbers.

 

 

If you would like to schedule an interview with one of our experts please contact our media relations team at mediarelations@unc.edu or call our media line at (919) 445-8555.

 

 

Tom Carsey is a pa52b147a765ba6509a0843a3510c76c91468874389_lolitical science professor and the director of the Odum Institute for Research in Social Science at UNC-Chapel Hill. He can talk about what drives public opinion and what shapes voters’ partisan loyalties. His research includes electoral behavior, campaigns, political parties and legislative politics in the U.S.

Carsey’s thoughts on last night’s election results are available here.

 

 

 

Daniel Kreiuntitled1ss is an associate professor in the School of Media and Journalism. He is available to discuss the evolution of new media and innovations in online campaigning. Through his research, Kreiss explores the impact of technology in the world of politics. More specifically, how social and digital media have changed the way candidates not only communicate with potential voters but also how they structure and plan their campaign overall.

 

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Sarah Treul’s area of expertise includes an assistant professor in the political science department. Her area of expertise includes U.S. Congress, the court system and what factors contribute to a divisive Congress. More specifically, how the ripple effects of state politics create a less responsive and less-productive federal government. She can also talk about the possible repercussions of contested election results.

 

 

robertsJason Roberts is an associate professor of political science. He can offer big-picture analysis on this year’s election. He’s available to discuss battleground states and specific issues in each state, congressional elections and the politics of Supreme Court appointments.

 

 

 

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Erika Wilson is an assistant professor of law. She can discuss public policy,race discrimination, school reform, civil litigation and civil rights. One of her areas of expertise: where race and law intersect.

 

 

 

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James Stimson is a political science professor. He can discuss public opinion and help connect the dots between mass political behavior and how it impacts our current government system. His areas of expertise include the impact of policy changes to voting behavior and participation.

 

 

 

11untitledjpgJoseph Cabosky is a UNC-Chapel is an assistant professor in the School of Media and Journalism. He can offer perspective on polling and projections, insight on which voters each candidate needs to win over in the week ahead and the last days before Nov. 8. Cabosky is an expert in the fields of public relations, data analytics and the value of modern public relations, particularly in the areas of politics, entertainment and investor relations.

 

 

 

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Jonathan Oberlander is a professor of health care policy and management in the School of Medicine. His area of expertise includes health care costs and more specifically, the implementation of the Affordable Care Act. He can talk about possible changes to consumers’ health care coverage and the President’s health care plan in both the long and short-term.

 

 

 

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Christian Lundberg is an associate professor of communication and co-director of the University Program in Cultural Studies. He can help break through the campaign rhetoric and offer insight as to how that rhetoric influences voters.

 

 

 

 

fguilloryFerrel Guillory is a professor of the practice in the School of Media and Journalism and also director of the Program on Public Life. He can talk about battleground states, specifically North Carolina and its hotly contested races. He can also offer insight as to why North Carolinais a key factor in this year’s presidential election.

 

Campus and community leaders to vote early at Chapel of the Cross

For immediate use

 

Campus and community leaders to vote early at Chapel of the Cross

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— Oct. 26, 2016) – Campus and town leaders will gather at Chapel of the Cross on Thursday, Oct. 27, at 2 p.m., to encourage University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill students and the Chapel Hill community to take part in the early voting process. Chancellor Carol L. Folt, Vice Chancellor of Student Affairs Winston Crisp, Chapel Hill Mayor Pam Hemminger and student government representative Wilson Sink will make brief remarks before casting their ballots. The public and media are invited to attend.

 

The Orange County Board of Elections selected Chapel of the Cross as an early voting site last year following concerns about the accessibility and availability of previous early voting sites on and near the UNC-Chapel Hill campus.

 

“Engaging with the community is at the core of what it means to be a Carolina student. In this election, students get to share their voice at the local, state and national level,” said Sink. “That’s why we want voting to be accessible to the University community as well as the greater Chapel Hill community.”

 

Chapel of the Cross is located at 304 E. Franklin St. Four other sites across Orange County will also be open for early voting through Saturday, Nov. 5. For more information about those locations please visit the Orange County Board of Elections website.

 

In an effort to get voters to the polls early, another coalition of student and community leaders is organizing a March to the Polls ahead of this event. The group plans to walk from the Pit, outside UNC-Chapel Hill student stores, to the Chapel of the Cross voting site starting at 1:45 p.m.

 

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About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 78 bachelor’s, 112 master’s, 68 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty – including two Nobel laureates – staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 317,000 alumni live in all 50 states and 150 countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

UNC Student Government contact: Wilson Sink, jwsink@live.unc.edu

Communications and Public Affairs contact: Jeni Cook, (919) 962-2091, jeni.cook@unc.edu