Media invited to join UNC-Chapel Hill for grand re-opening of newly designed UNC Student Stores

Not for publication

 

Media invited to join UNC-Chapel Hill for grand re-opening of newly designed UNC Student Stores

Grand re-opening marks the end the $3.8 million renovation with store proceeds going to fund student scholarships

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— Sept. 8, 2017) – The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill will celebrate the grand re-opening of its UNC Student Stores with a ribbon cutting event and reception for the campus community. Media will have the opportunity to tour the renovated store in advance of the ceremony. The nearly $4 million redesign has transformed the Student Stores into a central destination for the campus community to study and socialize or enjoy events like book signings, lectures or live music.

 

Chancellor Carol L. Folt, Barnes & Noble College Vice President Paul Maloney, Lloyd Kramer, director of UNC’s Program in the Humanities and Human Values, and Makayla Proctor (class of 2016), course materials supervisor at UNC Student Stores and a former student employee, will participate in the celebration.

 

When UNC Student Stores operations transitioned to Barnes & Noble College management in July 2016, as part of the 10-year, $30 million agreement, Barnes & Noble agreed to invest $3.8 million in store renovations. Renovations include an expanded café – now called “Stone and Leaf Café” to honor North Carolina author Thomas Wolfe — with seating space for up to 100, a larger Bull’s Head Bookshop on the third floor with 70,000 titles, and a new lounge and event area overlooking the Pit. Additionally, UNC Student Stores now boasts one of the largest campus Nike and Jordan shops in the country, and a new “Glossary” cosmetic and care bar.

 

Net proceeds from UNC Student Stores sales continue to support need-based scholarships. Barnes & Noble forecasts an annual payment to the university of more than $3 million, with a guaranteed minimum payment of $3 million annually for the first two years. After the University covers operating expenses, it is expected that it could nearly quadruple its recent contribution to need-based scholarships annually. In addition, last academic year students saved nearly $1.9 million on their textbook purchases at UNC Student Stores through discounts and the textbook rental program.

 

Tuesday, Sept. 12

12:30 p.m.

Media tour at 11:45 p.m.

UNC Student Stores

207 South Rd.

Chapel Hill, North Carolina

 

Media Check-In: Media must check in no earlier than 11:30 a.m. at UNC Student Stores. Kate Luck will be the on-site contact.

 

Media Parking: A limited number of spaces will be available for media at the 24 hour Student Union Loading Lot located off Raleigh Street. Contact Kate Luck (contact information below) by 9 a.m. on Tuesday, Sept. 12, to reserve parking.

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 111 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 322,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and 165 countries. More than 175,000 live in North Carolina.

 

Communications and Public Affairs contact:

Kate Luck, (479) 629-6334, kate.luck@unc.edu

UNC Student Stores contact: Olivia James, (919) 604-3767, olivia.james@unc.edu

 

 

Statement from Chancellor Carol Folt on the UNC Board of Governors vote regarding the Center for Civil Rights

For immediate use

 

Statement from Chancellor Carol Folt on the UNC Board of Governors vote regarding the Center for Civil Rights

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C. – Sept. 8, 2017) – “I am disappointed in the vote of the UNC Board of Governors today regarding the Center for Civil Rights. I believe that the University and the people who testified on behalf of the Center made a compelling case about why the Center is so important to the people of our state. I am proud of the Center, its history and all who worked so hard to answer the board’s questions and provide important facts about how the Center serves the needs of our citizens.

 

“We now must determine a path forward for the Center and reconfirm our commitment to educating the next generation of civil rights lawyers and providing assistance to the poor and disadvantaged in North Carolina. I will work with other University leaders, stakeholders and the school of law to explore all options and develop a course of action that allows us to continue this vitally important work while adhering to the new policy adopted by the Board of Governors today.  The School of Law is one of not only the University’s strongest assets, but it is one of our state’s, training generations of students who continue on in service to the state, the nation and the world.  That tradition of excellence and service is the core of the school’s identity and it defines our greater purpose.” – Chancellor Carol Folt

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 111 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 322,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and 165 countries. More than 175,000 live in North Carolina.

 

University Communications contact: Media Relations, (919) 445-8555, mediarelations@unc.edu

 

 

Media invited to cover Solar Eclipse Celebration at Morehead Planetarium and Science Center

Media Advisory: https://uncnews.unc.edu/2017/08/14/65947/

 

 

 Media invited to cover Solar Eclipse Celebration at Morehead Planetarium and Science Center

The event is part of 50 Carolina Solar Eclipse Parties across North and South Carolina

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— August 14, 2017) – Morehead Planetarium and Science Center will host a Solar Eclipse Celebration at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in conjunction with the solar eclipse on August 21. Events include a live stream of the eclipse from the path of totality, eclipse-related games and activities, food trucks and presentations inside the GlaxoSmithKline Fulldome Theatre. Tickets to the eclipse-related presentations inside the Theatre are sold out.  Attendance is expected to be very high.

 

August 21, 2017

12:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Morehead Planetarium and Science Center

250 East Franklin Street

Chapel Hill, NC 27514

 

RSVP: Media intending to cover the eclipse from Morehead Planetarium are asked to RSVP by 12 p.m. on Wed., August 16 by contacting Molly Molpus, molly.molpus@unc.edu, (919) 843-7952. Traffic is expected to be very heavy in the area beginning around 11 a.m. on August 21. Arrival before 10 a.m. is suggested.

 

Assistance on-site: Call Molly Molpus at (216) 973-2009 (cell).

 

Media parking: Media-designated parking spots can be found here. Please contact the media relations office at 919-445-8555 if you need live truck parking.

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 113 master’s, 68 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 318,000 alumni live in all 50 states and 157 countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

About Morehead Planetarium and Science Center

Opened in 1949, Morehead was the first planetarium in the South, the first on the campus of a major research university and the sixth in the nation. Morehead provided training for America’s astronauts during the Space Race, counts 11 moonwalkers among its “alumni” and has hosted more than eight million visitors. In 2001, Morehead added “Science Center” to its name to more fully reflect its mission. Since then, through its outreach programming, it has tripled the number of children and families served and nearly tripled revenues and support. Founded in 2010, the North Carolina Science Festival is Morehead’s largest outreach program, having served 1.8 million people of all ages since its inception.

 

Communications and Public Affairs contact: Kate Luck, (919) 445-8360, kate.luck@unc.edu

Morehead Planetarium contact: Molly Molpus, (919) 843-7952, molly.molpus@unc.edu

 

UNC-Chapel Hill experts available to discuss upcoming total solar eclipse

UNC-Chapel Hill experts available to discuss upcoming total solar eclipse

As the country looks forward to the rare total solar eclipse on August 21, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill researchers and staff are prepared to offer insight into all aspects of the eclipse from events happening across the state, what scientists can learn from an eclipse and how to view an eclipse without damaging your eyes.

 

If you would like to schedule an interview with one of our experts, contact our media relations team at mediarelations@unc.edu or call our media line at (919) 445-8555.

 

For a complete list of activities associated with the eclipse, please visit moreheadplanetarium.org/Eclipse

 

 

 

Astronomy and Astrophysics

Dr. Chris Clemens is an astrophysicist who studies white dwarf stars and other phenomena. He is currently senior associate dean for natural sciences in the College of Arts & Sciences and a former chair of the Department of Physics and Astronomy. Before he joined UNC, Clemens built SOAR’s Goodman Spectrograph, which is utilized during nearly 80 percent of SOAR (Southern Astrophysical Research Telescope) research. Clemens also studies the sun extensively, researching what could happen when it is no longer a star.

Dr. Clemens can speak about the physics and technical aspects of the eclipse – especially the path of the eclipse, frequency of eclipses similar phenomena and exact timing.

Recent Media Coverage:

WRAL – UNC Student astronomers use remote technology to touch the stars

 

 

 

 

 

Carolinas Star Party and Morehead Planetarium

As part of the 2017 Carolinas Solar Eclipse Party, Morehead Planetarium and Science Center will hold an onsite eclipse viewing event for the public on Monday, August 21, 2017.

Mickey Jo Sorrell and Amy Sayle are science educators at Morehead Planetarium and Science Center on the campus of UNC-Chapel Hill. Their responsibilities include educating visitors to the Planetarium, including school groups, about astronomy. Sorrell and Sayle coordinated the Carolinas Solar Eclipse Party.

Sorrell and Sayle can share tips and tricks for people interested in viewing the eclipse, and speak about the Carolinas Solar Eclipse viewing parties.

Recent Media Coverage:

WRAL: Excitement building for Aug. 21 solar eclipse

News and ObserverStatewide Star Party Helps light up NC Science Festival

Teen Science Café A Woman of Many Hats—Spotlight on Mickey Jo Sorrell  

 

 

 

Optometry

Dr. Donald Budenz graduated magna cum laud and Phi Beta Kappa from the University of Pennsylvania and received his medical degree from Harvard Medical School.

Dr. Budenz is available to discuss the importance of wearing eclipse glasses and the damaging effect staring at the sun has on the eye.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

-Carolina-

 About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

 

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 113 master’s, 68 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 318,000 alumni live in all 50 states and 157 countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

 

About Morehead Planetarium and Science Center:

 

Opened in 1949, Morehead was the first planetarium in the South, the first on the campus of a major research university and the sixth in the nation. Morehead provided training for America’s astronauts during the Space Race, counts 11 moonwalkers among its “alumni” and has hosted more than eight million visitors. In 2002, Morehead added “Science Center” to its name to more fully reflect its mission. Since then, through its outreach programming, it has tripled the number of children and families served and nearly tripled revenues and support. Founded in 2010, the North Carolina Science Festival is Morehead’s largest outreach program, having served 1.8 million people of all ages since its inception.

 

Communications and Public Affairs contact: Kate Luck, (919) 445-8360, kate.luck@unc.edu

 

Morehead Planetarium contact: Molly Molpus, (919) 843-7952, molly.molpus@unc.edu

UNC-Chapel Hill selects “How Does It Feel To Be A Problem” for 2017 summer reading

UNC-Chapel Hill selects “How Does it Feel to be a Problem?” for 2017 summer reading

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C. – May 4, 2017) – “How Does it Feel to be a Problem?,” which introduces readers to young men and women who are navigating college, family and finding purpose as they face stereotypes or clichés tied to their ethnicities, is the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s 2017 selection for its Carolina Summer Reading Program.

 

An eight-person panel consisting of faculty members, staff and students selected critically-acclaimed author Moustafa Bayoumi’s 2008 book, which explores deeper discussions of identity and a concept of otherness in an account of how young Arab- and Muslim-Americans are forging paths for themselves in modern America.

 

Rita Balaban, senior lecturer of economics and chair of the committee, said this book uses the portraits of young adults to humanize familiar themes that incoming students can relate to “leading to thought-provoking discussions as it increases our awareness of our fellow neighbor’s struggle to just BE.”

 

“This book justifiably rose to the top of the list because of the light it shines on ethnic differences and how people are treated. One cannot help but wonder, could this happen to me?,” said Balaban. “Bayoumi points out in the preface that the issues facing young Arab-Americans post 9/11 are not new and at many points in America’s history, various other groups have faced similar situations. While most of the incoming students this year were toddlers on September 11th, 2001, they live in a society greatly impacted by those events which they cannot recall first hand.”

 

First-year and transfer students who enroll at UNC-Chapel Hill this fall are encouraged to read the book this summer and participate in small group discussions during the Week of Welcome before fall 2017 semester classes begin.

 

Bayoumi will be on campus to give a lecture about the book on Wednesday, Sept. 6, 2017 at 6 pm in Memorial Hall.

 

The Carolina Summer Reading Program, now in its 19th year, aims to stimulate critical thinking outside the classroom and give new students a shared experience. Students are encouraged to come to their own conclusions about the book and will participate in the Summer Reading discussion groups that serve as an academic icebreaker.

 

“How Does it Feel to be a Problem?” is available at the Bull’s Head Bookshop in UNC Student Stores at a discounted price of $13.60.

 

This book has been selected for various group reading and discussions at other colleges and universities across the country, including UNC-Charlotte, University of South Carolina and Northern Kentucky University.

 

Past selections for the Carolina Summer Reading Program include: “The Shallows: What the Internet is Doing to our Brains” by Nicholas G. Carr, “Absolutely American: Four Years at West Point” by David Lipsky, and “Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End” by Atul Gawande.

 

For more information, visit the Carolina Summer Reading website.

 

-Carolina-

Photo Link:

https://unc.photoshelter.com/galleries/C00005vwcu89jLJ4/G00007YEsIzoGQ4o/Carolina-Summer-Reading

Photo credit: Neville Elder

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 110 master’s, 64 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s 317,000-plus alumni live in all 50 states and 156 other countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

UNC-Chapel Hill Office of University Communications: mediarelations@unc.edu, (919) 962-4515

Morehead Planetarium to host UNC Science Expo as part of the North Carolina Science Festival

 

(CHAPEL HILL, NC– April 20, 2017) –  Morehead Planetarium will host the annual UNC Science Expo on Saturday.  The signature event of the North Carolina Science Festival (NCSF) showcases the wonders of science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) and is a partnership between Morehead Planetarium and Science Center, the University of North Carolina and the Town of Chapel Hill.

 

A free, family-friendly event, the Expo offers more than 100 exhibits with hands-on experiments, science demonstrations, laboratory tours and stage entertainment. New activities for 2017 include tours of Ackland Art Museum and Coker Arboretum, a Kid’s Zone, with small science and giant games, and in the spirit of the Tar Heel 10 Miler and Four Mile Fun Run, the first ever Zero K for kids. See how slow kids can go as they “freeze” in place, just like molecules do at absolute zero.

 

No registration is required. A food truck rodeo will be on-site for lunch, snacks and drinks. A map of the expo is attached.

 

Saturday, April 22

11 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Cameron Avenue

UNC-CH Campus

 

Media Parking: Parking is free on Stadium Drive, in the Cobb parking deck, and the Nash, Park Place and Bell Tower parking lots. Paid parking is available at metered street spaces or at the Rosemary Street parking decks. On Skipper Bowles Drive near the Dean Smith Center, a free U bus runs to campus.

 

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 113 master’s, 68 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty – including two Nobel laureates – staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 308,000 alumni live in all 50 states and 150 countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

About the North Carolina Science Festival

The North Carolina Science Festival presented by Biogen was founded in 2010 and is the first statewide science festival in the United States. Each spring, the Festival offers hundreds of events that celebrate the economic, educational and cultural impact of science throughout North Carolina. The Festival was founded and is produced by Morehead Planetarium and Science Center (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill). The 2017 Festival runs April 7-23 with “Art and Design” as the theme. Burroughs Wellcome Fund is a Diamond Champion sponsor. Platinum sponsors are Duke Energy, N.C. GlaxoSmithKline Foundation and Google. Gold sponsors are UTC Aerospace and SAS. Bronze sponsors are UNC Healthcare, PSNC Energy, NC Electric Cooperative, Syngenta and Novozymes. For more information about the North Carolina Science Festival, visit www.ncsciencefestival.org.

 

Morehead Planetarium contact: Molly Molpus, (919) 843-7952, molly.molpus@unc.edu

Media invited to cover large-screen viewing of men’s NCAA National Championship Game Monday, April 3

 

Not for publication
 

Media invited to cover large-screen viewing of men’s NCAA National Championship Game Monday, April 3

(Chapel Hill, N.C. – April 3, 2017) – Media are invited to cover the viewing  of the men’s NCAA National Championship basketball game in the Dean E. Smith Center at UNC-Chapel Hill on Monday, April 3.

Cosponsored by Carolina athletics and Late Night Carolina Programs at Student Wellness, the Smith Center will open for media members covering the event at 7:30 p.m.

 

 

RSVP: Media intending to cover the viewings are asked to RSVP by close-of-business Monday, April 3, by emailing mediarelations@unc.edu or calling the media line at (919) 445-8555.

Arrival: Please bring media credentials; enter through entrance D beginning at 7:30 p.m. Monday, April 3.

Lights: Videographers are asked to refrain from directing TV lights into fans’ faces as they watch the game. Lights can be on before the game, during commercials and between games.

Filming: Live shots are permitted in the concourse area only. For b-roll purposes, camera crews are permitted to stand on the Smith Center floor or in the aisles of the stands during commercial breaks, halftime and between games. Please do not block anyone’s view of the screen. Media representatives may sit anywhere in the stands.

Assistance on site: Call Jeni Cook at (404) 309-3994 or the media line at (919) 445-8555.

Media parking: Satellite trucks may park behind the Smith Center. Media are asked to send only one truck per station. Other media vehicles may park in the Morehead Planetarium and Science Center lot off E. Franklin Street. Parking is available for $5.00 in the Manning, Bowles, Craige and Rams Head parking lots. Road closure and parking restriction information is available online.

Cable: Approximately 500 feet of cable is needed to reach from trucks in the back lot to filming areas inside the Smith Center.

-Carolina-

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 110 master’s, 64 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s 317,000-plus alumni live in all 50 states and 156 other countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

UNC-Chapel Hill Communications contact: Jeni Cook, (404) 309-3994 jeni.cook@unc.edu

Statement from Chancellor Carol L. Folt on ACC presidents’ vote

 

This is a positive step for North Carolina, for our state’s economy and for our student-athletes and fans.  Lifting the ban will allow our state to continue moving forward.  At Carolina, our commitment to fostering a welcoming environment that supports all individuals is steadfast. We have robust non-discriminatory policies that remain in place, and this commitment to diversity and inclusion is what allows our campus to thrive.

 

 

Media invited to attend Clean Tech Summit at UNC-Chapel Hill

Media invited to attend Clean Tech Summit at UNC-Chapel Hill

Gov. Roy Cooper will be the keynote speaker at the event, which convenes professionals in business, policy and academia for two days of problem solving to foster leadership and growth in North Carolina’s clean tech industry.

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C. – Feb. 23, 2017) – The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill will host its fourth UNC Clean Tech Summit March 2-3. The event highlights the latest innovations, trends and challenges in the clean technology industry and how North Carolina is playing a key role in leading the way to a green global economy. The Summit is co-hosted by the UNC Institute for the Environment and the Center for Sustainable Enterprise at UNC Kenan-Flagler Business School.

 

Speakers and panels at the summit will focus on four themes including innovation, clean energy, ­­­­­­food, and water and energy. A full agenda is available online.

 

Governor Roy Cooper will deliver the keynote address on March 2. Cooper is the 75th governor of North Carolina and a double Tar Heel, earning a B.A. in political science in 1979 and his juris doctor in 1982. Other featured speakers include Adam E. Bergman, senior vice president of Wells Fargo CleanTech Banking; Tom Darden (UNC ’76 and ’92) founder and CEO of Cherokee and Cherokee Investment Partners; Chuck McGrady, representative, N.C. House of Representatives; and Fran O’Sullivan, general manager of IBM GBS Global Operations.

 

Chancellor Carol L. Folt will moderate a panel that will explore partnerships between universities and the private sector as a way to advance clean tech innovation in the region.

 

This year’s summit includes special programs around careers, including the opportunity for students to engage with clean-tech industry leaders through one-on-one mentoring, networking sessions featuring company-hosted tables, and a luncheon featuring Triangle women in STEM on Thursday and a career networking luncheon on Friday.

 

 

March 2-3, 2017

Opening remarks begin at 9:00 a.m. on Thursday, March 2

UNC Friday Conference Center

 100 Friday Center Drive

Chapel Hill, North Carolina

 

Media Check-In: Media must have a pass to cover the conference. Passes can be obtained with a complimentary registration here: http://unc.live/2m1zv0r. Passes can be picked up at the registration desk at the Friday Center. Registered members of the media will have access to a private green room. Kate Luck (479-629-6334, kate.luck@unc.edu) and Emily Williams (330) 472-8417, emilywilliams@unc.edu) will be the on-site contacts.

 

Media Parking: Parking is available at the Friday Center.

 

— Carolina —

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 110 master’s, 64 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty – including two Nobel laureates – staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s 317,000-plus alumni live in all 50 states and 156 other countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

UNC Institute for the Environment contact: Emily Williams, (919) 962-0965, emilywilliams@unc.edu

 

UNC University Communications contact: Kate Luck, (919) 962-8596, kate.luck@unc.edu

UNC-Chapel Hill, NC State partner to offer innovative program for lateral entry teachers

For immediate use

 

 

UNC-Chapel Hill, NC State partner to offer innovative program for lateral entry teachers

Joint online program aims to help North Carolina address its growing teacher shortage

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C. – Feb. 9, 2017) – The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and North Carolina State University are launching a joint online program for people who have been hired to teach in North Carolina schools but haven’t yet been fully certified to work in classrooms.

 

The program is intended to help the state address its widening teacher shortage by providing a new avenue for “lateral entry” teachers to gain licensure. Lateral entry teachers are people who have content knowledge who have been hired to fill teaching vacancies but have yet to obtain teaching licensure.

 

“We expect that this new initiative will bring to bear strengths of our two campuses in helping the state of North Carolina address a critical need,” said Fouad Abd-El-Khalick, dean of the School of Education at UNC-Chapel Hill. “This initiative will help improve learning for tens of thousands of school students across the state.”

 

Mary Ann Danowitz, dean of the College of Education at NC State, added: “Given our growing need for new teachers, North Carolina must expand its ability to supply qualified educators for our classrooms. This program will help address that problem.”

 

The program, to be offered completely online, will be open to lateral entry teachers in the fall. In its pilot phase, the program will have capacity for approximately 50 participants in its first year, but will be designed so that it can quickly expand, said Diana Lys, assistant dean for educator preparation at the UNC-Chapel Hill School of Education and one of the organizers of the effort.

 

“We’ve designed this program to make it convenient for working lateral entry teachers, making it possible for them to master the competencies they need while they remain in their jobs and to gain knowledge that will help strengthen their effectiveness,” Lys said.

 

The accelerated program should take participants 12 to 18 months to complete and cost less than $5,000, she said.

 

 

Demand great for lateral entry teacher preparation

The program is needed because school districts are having to rely more heavily on hiring lateral entry teachers to fill vacancies, said Michael Maher, assistant dean for educator preparation and accreditation at NC State’s College of Education and one of the program’s organizers. But, lateral entry teachers leave the profession at a rate 79 percent greater than other teachers.

 

North Carolina employs more than 4,300 lateral entry teachers, according to a 2015 report by the State Board of Education. More than 850 of them work in school districts near the UNC-Chapel Hill and NC State campuses.

 

“This program will provide lateral entry teachers with the teaching skills and knowledge they need to be successful in the classroom thus assisting in their retention in North Carolina public schools,” Maher said.

 

The program will draw on expertise from faculty at the two campuses in the areas of teacher preparation, online and distance education, and competency-based instructional models, Lys and Maher said. The program will be offered in a partnership with D2L, a company that provides online platforms for university courses and has experience establishing and maintaining online competency-based education programs.

 

The program initially will offer preparation in the content areas mathematics, science, English/language arts and social studies. Organizers expect the program to be expanded in the future to offer a preparation program in special education.

 

“There is great demand for this type of preparation,” said Lys. “We hope that eventually we will be able to enroll hundreds of people in this program.

 

The program development is supported by a $148,000 grant from the UNC system’s General Administration, which sought requests for proposals from system campuses for new academic programs that would use competency-based education principles. Competency-based education typically relies on instruction that focuses on students learning and demonstrating mastery of concrete skills.

 

“Competency-based program design and delivery organizes learning around student mastery of content instead of seat time spent enrolled in a course,” said Michelle Soler, director for competency based education and assessment for the UNC system.

 

While the program will use D2L learning management software, as with all UNC system competency-based pilot programs, curriculum decisions and content development will be controlled by faculty, ensuring rigor and that the programs meet academic standards, Soler said.

 

“UNC system competency-based education programs will also incorporate mentoring and guidance by dedicated coaches who will work with students throughout their progress through the program, with the intent of ensuring timely graduation,” she said.

 

Higher quality preparation

The program will be designed to address the N.C. Professional Teaching Standards, Digital Learning Competencies and additional competencies developed by faculty at the two universities to address discipline-specific teaching strategies.

 

Organizers also plan to work closely with leadership of area school districts to identify additional competencies that address local needs.

 

The program will be more extensive than current lateral entry certification requirements. Lateral entry teachers currently are required to complete 18 hours of coursework over a three-year period. Those requirements are typically met by lateral entry teachers taking a variety of courses from different institutions, leading to inconsistency and lower-quality preparation, said Maher.

 

“This program is being designed to be comprehensive, with a coherence through the courses, Lys said. “As a result, participants should be able to complete the program more quickly and at less cost.”

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill



The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 110 master’s, 64 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s 317,000-plus alumni live in all 50 states and 156 other countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

 

About NC State University

NC State was founded with a purpose: to create economic, societal and intellectual prosperity for the people of North Carolina and the country. The university began as a land-grant institution teaching the agricultural and mechanical arts, and today stands as a pre-eminent research enterprise that excels in science, technology, engineering, math, design, the humanities and social sciences, education, textiles and veterinary medicine. NC State students, faculty and staff take problems in hand and work with industry, government and nonprofit partners to solve them. The university’s 34,000-plus high-performing students apply what they learn in the real world by conducting research, working in internships and co-ops, and performing acts of world-changing service. That experiential education ensures they leave here ready to lead the workforce, confident in the knowledge that NC State consistently rates as one of the best values in higher education.

 

UNC-Chapel Hill School of Education contact: Michael Hobbs, (919) 962-8687, michael_hobbs@unc.edu

 

NC State College of Education contact: Cherry Crayton, (919) 515-5912, ckcrayto@ncsu.edu