Carolina sets 13th consecutive record for first-year applications

For immediate use

 

Carolina sets 13th consecutive record for first-year applications

The admitted Class of 2022 was selected from a record-setting 43,384 applicants.

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C. – Feb. 1, 2018) – For the 13th consecutive year, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill received a record number of first-year applications for fall 2018. The 43,384 applications reflect a 6 percent increase over last year.

 

The 25,867 first-year applicants who applied before the early action deadline in October were notified of their admissions decisions on Jan. 26. Admission was offered to 5,125 North Carolina students and 2,742 out-of-state students. The out-of-state students include 454 international students, an increase of 142 over last year. These numbers reflect an admissions rate of 48 percent for North Carolinians and 18 percent for out-of-state students, though this number will change after the second and final round of admissions decisions are made in March.

 

“We are again honored that so many wonderful students have given us the chance to get to know them through their applications,” said Stephen Farmer, vice provost for enrollment and undergraduate admissions. “In reading these applications one by one, we never forget that each one represents an individual, a young person with strengths and challenges, hopes and dreams. We hope they’re drawn to Carolina because they want to live and study alongside classmates who will change their lives for the better and whose lives they will change in return. We’re also sure that our ability to offer a world-class education at an affordable price made a difference to them and to their families.”

 

While first-year application deadlines for fall 2018 have passed, the University will accept transfer applications from students currently enrolled at other institutions through Feb. 15.

 

The University expects to enroll a first-year class of 4,205 and an additional 725 transfer students in the College of Arts & Sciences.

 

UNC-Chapel Hill was recently named the best value in U.S. public higher education by Kiplinger’s Personal Finance magazine. The top ranking reflects the University’s commitment to opening access to a high-quality, affordable education to talented students from all backgrounds. The University is one of the few public flagships to practice need-blind admissions and provide low-debt, full-need student aid.

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 111 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 322,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and 165 countries. More than 175,000 live in North Carolina.

University Communications contact: Kate Luck at kate.luck@unc.edu or 919-445-8360

Chancellor Carol L. Folt names need-based scholarships to honor Bridge Builders

For immediate use

 

Chancellor Carol L. Folt names need-based scholarships to honor Bridge Builders

Scholarships are named for those who helped fulfill Carolina’s mission as a public institution and whose leadership represents the values that define the University. 

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.- Jan. 23, 2018)—After receiving nominations from the campus community and the general public, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Chancellor Carol L. Folt has named 20 scholarships for “Bridge Builders,” individuals whose work, advocacy and personal example helped forge a more inclusive, unified and aspirational Carolina community.

 

The need-based scholarships will recognize people who helped unite and strengthen the Carolina community through their work and advocacy, like Daniel Pollitt, a School of Law professor who fought to desegregate Chapel Hill and advance civil rights in North Carolina, and Susie Marshall Sharp, the first woman to serve as chief justice of the North Carolina Supreme Court.  Another example is Larry D. Keith, who paved the way for hundreds of students of color to succeed in the health professions when he served as Director of the Medical Education Development program.  A full list of Bridge Builders can be found here.

 

“By honoring these courageous Bridge Builders with scholarships in their name, we find new ways to represent and celebrate our diverse history,” said Chancellor Folt. “These individuals helped strengthen our community with their advocacy, and we believe these scholarships will serve as motivation for our students to discover and thrive as they carve their own paths at Carolina.”

 

Folt was inspired to launch this initiative after former Carolina student Shelby Dawkins-Law made a suggestion at the Town Hall on Race and Inclusion in November 2015. Dawkins-Law recommended University leadership find more ways to honor the contributions people of color have made to the University.  Folt asked Stephen Farmer, vice provost for enrollment and undergraduate admissions, to chair a special naming committee to develop a process and recommend honorees. In 2016, Folt announced the first round of scholarships, named for Noteworthy Firsts, courageous people who represent important “firsts” in the University’s history.

 

The Bridge Builders scholarships are included as part of qualifying students’ aid packages. Recipients will be notified of their scholarships in the coming weeks, after they’re admitted to Carolina and complete a financial aid application. A reception for the scholarship recipients to honor the Bridge Builders will be held in the fall.

 

Chancellor Folt announced the nominating process for the Bridge Builders during University Day on Oct. 12, 2017. She invited any member of the community to nominate someone they thought was deserving of the honor. A panel of faculty and University leaders selected the 20 Bridge Builders from those nominations.

 

The Bridge Builders scholarships are just one way Carolina maintains its commitment as a leader in access and affordability. As part of the University’s $4.25 billion fundraising campaign, For All Kind: the Campaign for Carolina, The Carolina Edge, a new campaign signature initiative focused on recruiting top students, will seek to raise $1 billion for undergraduate scholarships and graduate fellowships, including the Bridge Builders scholarships, which receive donations through the History Makers Funds.

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 111 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 322,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and 165 countries. More than 175,000 live in North Carolina.

 

University Communications contact: Kate Luck, (479) 629-6334, kate.luck@unc.edu

UNC-Chapel Hill named best value in U.S. public higher education

For immediate use

 

UNC-Chapel Hill named best value in U.S. public higher education

Kiplinger’s Personal Finance magazine declared Carolina the leader in higher education based on quality of education and affordability 

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.- Dec. 22, 2017)– For the 17th time, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is the best value in American public higher education, according to Kiplinger’s Personal Finance.

 

The top ranking reflects the University’s commitment to opening access to a high-quality, affordable education to talented students from all backgrounds. The University is one of the few public flagships to practice need-blind admissions and provide low-debt, full-need student aid.

 

“We have fantastic students and a faculty dedicated to providing each one with the opportunity to achieve their dreams in all areas of human endeavor,” said Chancellor Carol L. Folt. “An excellent and affordable education, without fear of overwhelming debt, is one of the many ways we support our students. Being recognized for the 17th time as the best value in American public higher education demonstrates our long-standing commitment.”

 

Carolina leads the way in college affordability with several innovative initiatives. In 2017, the University committed $83 million in institutional funds to need-based financial aid. In June 2017, the University was recognized nationally for its efforts to ensure all students had the opportunity to succeed with the prestigious Cooke Prize for Equity in Educational Excellence.

 

Some of the ways Carolina has expanded college affordability include:

 

  • Carolina Covenant Eligible students whose household income is less than 200 percent of the federal poverty level have the opportunity to graduate from Carolina debt-free. Currently, 13 percent of UNC-Chapel Hill undergraduates are Covenant Scholars.
  • Carolina Edge As part of the Campaign for Carolina, the University’s $4.25 billion fundraising campaign, the Carolina Edge seeks to raise $1 billion for undergraduate scholarships and graduate fellowships in areas such as the Carolina Covenant, middle-income scholarships, merit scholars, summer internship grants, athletics and graduate and professional school financial aid.
  • Generous need-based financial aid packages Ninety-three percent of institutional financial aid and scholarship resources are devoted to meeting financial need, with only seven percent directed to merit-based scholarships.

 

These initiatives and programs have proven results. Only 40 percent of seniors who graduated from Carolina in 2015 accumulated any debt, compared with nearly 70 percent nationally, and the average debt among those who borrowed was $20,127, nearly $10,000 below the national average. Over the last decade, cumulative debt at graduation among borrowers grew by about $3,000 at UNC-Chapel Hill, compared to $10,000 nationwide.

 

Carolina is not only committed to helping students afford college, but also to supporting them throughout their college career and on to graduation. Through strong retention efforts, the gaps in retention and graduation rates between low-income and other students has narrowed dramatically over the last decade and are now almost completely closed.

 

The Kiplinger’s rankings are developed based on measures of academic quality, including SAT or ACT scores, admission and retention rates, student-faculty ratios, and four-year graduation rates. The editors then rank the schools using cost and financial aid measures. Academic quality carries more weight than costs.

 

The full rankings are now available online at kiplinger.com/links/colleges and will appear in February 2018 print issue of Kiplinger’s Personal Finance, on newsstands January 9.

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 111 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 322,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and 165 countries. More than 175,000 live in North Carolina.

 

University Communications contact: Kate Luck, (479) 629-6334, kate.luck@unc.edu

For interviews with Kiplinger’s editors: Kailey McGarvey, (646) 695-7046, kailey@rosengrouppr.com

Kiplinger’s Personal Finance magazine: http://www.kiplinger.com/

UNC-Chapel Hill to graduate more than 1100 students at December Commencement

UNC-Chapel Hill to graduate more than 1100 students at December Commencement

 

2 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 17
Dean E. Smith Center
Bowles Drive
Chapel Hill

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C. – Dec. 14, 2017) – Dr. Satish Gopal, Cancer Program Director for UNC Project-Malawi, will deliver Carolina’s December Commencement address on Sunday, Dec. 17, at 2 p.m.

 

Chancellor Carol L. Folt will preside at the ceremony for students who graduated in August as well as those graduating Sunday.

 

Graduates: To date, 1,182 students have applied to graduate in December or were awarded degrees in August. Administrators expect to award degrees to 491 undergraduates, 567 master’s students, 99 doctoral students and 9 professional students.

 

Speaker: Dr. Satish Gopal innovative cancer researcher on the forefront of cancer treatment in Malawi, Africa, will be the featured speaker at the Winter Commencement ceremony.

 

Gopal is the only board-certified medical oncologist practicing in Malawi, a southern African country of about 18 million people. As the cancer program director for UNC Project-Malawi, a research and care collaboration between UNC-Chapel Hill and the Malawi Ministry of Health, Gopal is working to build the care infrastructure that will both help Malawi address its rising cancer burden and serve as model for effective cancer care in low-resource settings across the globe.

 

Gopal joined the UNC-CH faculty in 2012 and is jointly appointed in the Divisions of Hematology-Oncology and Infectious Diseases as an Associate Professor Medicine. He lived in Tanzania from 2007 until 2009, during which time he developed a career interest in cancer in Africa. He has lived in Lilongwe, Malawi, with his family since 2012.

 

UNC has been conducting HIV and STD research in Malawi since 1990 when it began a collaboration with the Malawi Ministry of Health (MOH).

 

Click here for an interactive view of the Dean E. Smith Center.

 

Live stream of the ceremony: http://commencement.unc.edu/winter/livestream.php

www.facebook.com/uncchapelhill

 

RSVP: Media interested in covering the event should RSVP to Kate Luck by 5 p.m. Friday, Dec. 15 by emailing kate.luck@unc.edu.

 

Check-in: Media check-in will be at Section 100.  Use Entrance B or Entrance C.

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 111 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 322,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and 165 countries. More than 175,000 live in North Carolina.

 

Communications & Public Affairs contact: Kate Luck, (479) 629-6334, kate.luck@unc.edu

 

Dr. Satish Gopal, Cancer Program Director for UNC Project-Malawi, to deliver Winter Commencement address

Dr. Satish Gopal, Cancer Program Director for UNC Project-Malawi, to deliver Winter Commencement address

Gopal is a member of the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center and works to prevent, diagnose, and treat cancer in one of the most resource-limited settings in the world

 

Dr. Satish Gopal innovative cancer researcher on the forefront of cancer treatment in Malawi, Africa, will be the featured speaker at the Winter Commencement ceremony.

 

Gopal is the only board-certified medical oncologist practicing in Malawi, a southern African country of about 18 million people. As the cancer program director for UNC Project-Malawi, a research and care collaboration between UNC-Chapel Hill and the Malawi Ministry of Health, Gopal is working to build the care infrastructure that will both help Malawi address its rising cancer burden and serve as model for effective cancer care in low-resource settings across the globe.

 

Chancellor Carol L. Folt will preside at the event on Sunday, Dec. 17.

 

“Dr. Gopal embodies the transformative and inspirational spirit and drive that exemplifies Carolina’s faculty and their global mission of research, education, service and caring for others that is changing our world,” said Chancellor Folt. “His dedication and commitment to improving the health of the Malawi people – and work to teach future generations of care givers – will inspire the minds and spark the imaginations of our graduates who are now prepared to go out and make their own impact in our state, nation and world.”

 

Gopal joined the UNC-CH faculty in 2012 and is jointly appointed in the Divisions of Hematology-Oncology and Infectious Diseases as an Associate Professor Medicine. He lived in Tanzania from 2007 until 2009, during which time he developed a career interest in cancer in Africa. He has lived in Lilongwe, Malawi, with his family since 2012.

 

Gopal provides care to patients in the Kamuzu Central Hospital Cancer Clinic and leads cancer research activities, including mentoring American and Malawian trainees working on cancer projects. He is Principal Investigator of the Malawi Cancer Consortium and Regional Center of Research Excellence for Non-Communicable Diseases, and leads Malawi participation in several cancer care and research networks sponsored by the National Cancer Institute. He is also appointed as Honorary Senior Lecturer at the University of Malawi College of Medicine and contributes to cancer-related teaching for Malawian undergraduate and postgraduate trainees.

 

UNC has been conducting HIV and STD research in Malawi since 1990 when it began a collaboration with the Malawi Ministry of Health (MOH).

 

In 1999, these efforts were consolidated into a center of excellence for HIV/STD research called UNC Project-Malawi. Located in the capital city of Lilongwe, UNC Project-Malawi is on the premises of Kamuzu Central Hospital (KCH), a 1,000-bed, public care hospital that serves a population of nearly six million people.

 

From the foundation of groundbreaking and life-changing infectious disease research, UNC-Project Malawi now employs more than 300 people and supports clinical care and education in disciplines including cancer, surgery and women’s health.

 

The research led by UNC in this small nation has made an impact across the globe, shaping world-wide understanding of the treatment of HIV. Gopal is hopeful his cancer research can have a similar impact.

 

Gopal received his undergraduate degree in biology and music and his Masters in Public Health at UNC-Chapel Hill. He completed his M.D. at Duke University and residency training at the University of Michigan before returning to UNC for fellowships in the fields of infectious disease and medical oncology.

 

Winter commencement will be held at 2 p.m. on Sunday, Dec. 17, in the Dean E. Smith Center.  For more information, visit http://commencement.unc.edu.

 

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About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 111 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 322,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and 165 countries. More than 175,000 live in North Carolina.

 

University Communications contact: Kate Luck, (919) 445-8555, mediarelations@unc.edu

Media invited to join UNC-Chapel Hill for grand re-opening of newly designed UNC Student Stores

Not for publication

 

Media invited to join UNC-Chapel Hill for grand re-opening of newly designed UNC Student Stores

Grand re-opening marks the end the $3.8 million renovation with store proceeds going to fund student scholarships

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— Sept. 8, 2017) – The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill will celebrate the grand re-opening of its UNC Student Stores with a ribbon cutting event and reception for the campus community. Media will have the opportunity to tour the renovated store in advance of the ceremony. The nearly $4 million redesign has transformed the Student Stores into a central destination for the campus community to study and socialize or enjoy events like book signings, lectures or live music.

 

Chancellor Carol L. Folt, Barnes & Noble College Vice President Paul Maloney, Lloyd Kramer, director of UNC’s Program in the Humanities and Human Values, and Makayla Proctor (class of 2016), course materials supervisor at UNC Student Stores and a former student employee, will participate in the celebration.

 

When UNC Student Stores operations transitioned to Barnes & Noble College management in July 2016, as part of the 10-year, $30 million agreement, Barnes & Noble agreed to invest $3.8 million in store renovations. Renovations include an expanded café – now called “Stone and Leaf Café” to honor North Carolina author Thomas Wolfe — with seating space for up to 100, a larger Bull’s Head Bookshop on the third floor with 70,000 titles, and a new lounge and event area overlooking the Pit. Additionally, UNC Student Stores now boasts one of the largest campus Nike and Jordan shops in the country, and a new “Glossary” cosmetic and care bar.

 

Net proceeds from UNC Student Stores sales continue to support need-based scholarships. Barnes & Noble forecasts an annual payment to the university of more than $3 million, with a guaranteed minimum payment of $3 million annually for the first two years. After the University covers operating expenses, it is expected that it could nearly quadruple its recent contribution to need-based scholarships annually. In addition, last academic year students saved nearly $1.9 million on their textbook purchases at UNC Student Stores through discounts and the textbook rental program.

 

Tuesday, Sept. 12

12:30 p.m.

Media tour at 11:45 p.m.

UNC Student Stores

207 South Rd.

Chapel Hill, North Carolina

 

Media Check-In: Media must check in no earlier than 11:30 a.m. at UNC Student Stores. Kate Luck will be the on-site contact.

 

Media Parking: A limited number of spaces will be available for media at the 24 hour Student Union Loading Lot located off Raleigh Street. Contact Kate Luck (contact information below) by 9 a.m. on Tuesday, Sept. 12, to reserve parking.

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 111 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 322,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and 165 countries. More than 175,000 live in North Carolina.

 

Communications and Public Affairs contact:

Kate Luck, (479) 629-6334, kate.luck@unc.edu

UNC Student Stores contact: Olivia James, (919) 604-3767, olivia.james@unc.edu

 

 

Statement from Chancellor Carol Folt on the UNC Board of Governors vote regarding the Center for Civil Rights

For immediate use

 

Statement from Chancellor Carol Folt on the UNC Board of Governors vote regarding the Center for Civil Rights

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C. – Sept. 8, 2017) – “I am disappointed in the vote of the UNC Board of Governors today regarding the Center for Civil Rights. I believe that the University and the people who testified on behalf of the Center made a compelling case about why the Center is so important to the people of our state. I am proud of the Center, its history and all who worked so hard to answer the board’s questions and provide important facts about how the Center serves the needs of our citizens.

 

“We now must determine a path forward for the Center and reconfirm our commitment to educating the next generation of civil rights lawyers and providing assistance to the poor and disadvantaged in North Carolina. I will work with other University leaders, stakeholders and the school of law to explore all options and develop a course of action that allows us to continue this vitally important work while adhering to the new policy adopted by the Board of Governors today.  The School of Law is one of not only the University’s strongest assets, but it is one of our state’s, training generations of students who continue on in service to the state, the nation and the world.  That tradition of excellence and service is the core of the school’s identity and it defines our greater purpose.” – Chancellor Carol Folt

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 111 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 322,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and 165 countries. More than 175,000 live in North Carolina.

 

University Communications contact: Media Relations, (919) 445-8555, mediarelations@unc.edu

 

 

Media invited to cover Solar Eclipse Celebration at Morehead Planetarium and Science Center

Media Advisory: https://uncnews.unc.edu/2017/08/14/65947/

 

 

 Media invited to cover Solar Eclipse Celebration at Morehead Planetarium and Science Center

The event is part of 50 Carolina Solar Eclipse Parties across North and South Carolina

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— August 14, 2017) – Morehead Planetarium and Science Center will host a Solar Eclipse Celebration at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in conjunction with the solar eclipse on August 21. Events include a live stream of the eclipse from the path of totality, eclipse-related games and activities, food trucks and presentations inside the GlaxoSmithKline Fulldome Theatre. Tickets to the eclipse-related presentations inside the Theatre are sold out.  Attendance is expected to be very high.

 

August 21, 2017

12:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Morehead Planetarium and Science Center

250 East Franklin Street

Chapel Hill, NC 27514

 

RSVP: Media intending to cover the eclipse from Morehead Planetarium are asked to RSVP by 12 p.m. on Wed., August 16 by contacting Molly Molpus, molly.molpus@unc.edu, (919) 843-7952. Traffic is expected to be very heavy in the area beginning around 11 a.m. on August 21. Arrival before 10 a.m. is suggested.

 

Assistance on-site: Call Molly Molpus at (216) 973-2009 (cell).

 

Media parking: Media-designated parking spots can be found here. Please contact the media relations office at 919-445-8555 if you need live truck parking.

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 113 master’s, 68 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 318,000 alumni live in all 50 states and 157 countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

About Morehead Planetarium and Science Center

Opened in 1949, Morehead was the first planetarium in the South, the first on the campus of a major research university and the sixth in the nation. Morehead provided training for America’s astronauts during the Space Race, counts 11 moonwalkers among its “alumni” and has hosted more than eight million visitors. In 2001, Morehead added “Science Center” to its name to more fully reflect its mission. Since then, through its outreach programming, it has tripled the number of children and families served and nearly tripled revenues and support. Founded in 2010, the North Carolina Science Festival is Morehead’s largest outreach program, having served 1.8 million people of all ages since its inception.

 

Communications and Public Affairs contact: Kate Luck, (919) 445-8360, kate.luck@unc.edu

Morehead Planetarium contact: Molly Molpus, (919) 843-7952, molly.molpus@unc.edu

 

UNC-Chapel Hill experts available to discuss upcoming total solar eclipse

UNC-Chapel Hill experts available to discuss upcoming total solar eclipse

As the country looks forward to the rare total solar eclipse on August 21, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill researchers and staff are prepared to offer insight into all aspects of the eclipse from events happening across the state, what scientists can learn from an eclipse and how to view an eclipse without damaging your eyes.

 

If you would like to schedule an interview with one of our experts, contact our media relations team at mediarelations@unc.edu or call our media line at (919) 445-8555.

 

For a complete list of activities associated with the eclipse, please visit moreheadplanetarium.org/Eclipse

 

 

 

Astronomy and Astrophysics

Dr. Chris Clemens is an astrophysicist who studies white dwarf stars and other phenomena. He is currently senior associate dean for natural sciences in the College of Arts & Sciences and a former chair of the Department of Physics and Astronomy. Before he joined UNC, Clemens built SOAR’s Goodman Spectrograph, which is utilized during nearly 80 percent of SOAR (Southern Astrophysical Research Telescope) research. Clemens also studies the sun extensively, researching what could happen when it is no longer a star.

Dr. Clemens can speak about the physics and technical aspects of the eclipse – especially the path of the eclipse, frequency of eclipses similar phenomena and exact timing.

Recent Media Coverage:

WRAL – UNC Student astronomers use remote technology to touch the stars

 

 

 

 

 

Carolinas Star Party and Morehead Planetarium

As part of the 2017 Carolinas Solar Eclipse Party, Morehead Planetarium and Science Center will hold an onsite eclipse viewing event for the public on Monday, August 21, 2017.

Mickey Jo Sorrell and Amy Sayle are science educators at Morehead Planetarium and Science Center on the campus of UNC-Chapel Hill. Their responsibilities include educating visitors to the Planetarium, including school groups, about astronomy. Sorrell and Sayle coordinated the Carolinas Solar Eclipse Party.

Sorrell and Sayle can share tips and tricks for people interested in viewing the eclipse, and speak about the Carolinas Solar Eclipse viewing parties.

Recent Media Coverage:

WRAL: Excitement building for Aug. 21 solar eclipse

News and ObserverStatewide Star Party Helps light up NC Science Festival

Teen Science Café A Woman of Many Hats—Spotlight on Mickey Jo Sorrell  

 

 

 

Optometry

Dr. Donald Budenz graduated magna cum laud and Phi Beta Kappa from the University of Pennsylvania and received his medical degree from Harvard Medical School.

Dr. Budenz is available to discuss the importance of wearing eclipse glasses and the damaging effect staring at the sun has on the eye.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

-Carolina-

 About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

 

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 113 master’s, 68 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 318,000 alumni live in all 50 states and 157 countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

 

About Morehead Planetarium and Science Center:

 

Opened in 1949, Morehead was the first planetarium in the South, the first on the campus of a major research university and the sixth in the nation. Morehead provided training for America’s astronauts during the Space Race, counts 11 moonwalkers among its “alumni” and has hosted more than eight million visitors. In 2002, Morehead added “Science Center” to its name to more fully reflect its mission. Since then, through its outreach programming, it has tripled the number of children and families served and nearly tripled revenues and support. Founded in 2010, the North Carolina Science Festival is Morehead’s largest outreach program, having served 1.8 million people of all ages since its inception.

 

Communications and Public Affairs contact: Kate Luck, (919) 445-8360, kate.luck@unc.edu

 

Morehead Planetarium contact: Molly Molpus, (919) 843-7952, molly.molpus@unc.edu

UNC-Chapel Hill selects “How Does It Feel To Be A Problem” for 2017 summer reading

UNC-Chapel Hill selects “How Does it Feel to be a Problem?” for 2017 summer reading

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C. – May 4, 2017) – “How Does it Feel to be a Problem?,” which introduces readers to young men and women who are navigating college, family and finding purpose as they face stereotypes or clichés tied to their ethnicities, is the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s 2017 selection for its Carolina Summer Reading Program.

 

An eight-person panel consisting of faculty members, staff and students selected critically-acclaimed author Moustafa Bayoumi’s 2008 book, which explores deeper discussions of identity and a concept of otherness in an account of how young Arab- and Muslim-Americans are forging paths for themselves in modern America.

 

Rita Balaban, senior lecturer of economics and chair of the committee, said this book uses the portraits of young adults to humanize familiar themes that incoming students can relate to “leading to thought-provoking discussions as it increases our awareness of our fellow neighbor’s struggle to just BE.”

 

“This book justifiably rose to the top of the list because of the light it shines on ethnic differences and how people are treated. One cannot help but wonder, could this happen to me?,” said Balaban. “Bayoumi points out in the preface that the issues facing young Arab-Americans post 9/11 are not new and at many points in America’s history, various other groups have faced similar situations. While most of the incoming students this year were toddlers on September 11th, 2001, they live in a society greatly impacted by those events which they cannot recall first hand.”

 

First-year and transfer students who enroll at UNC-Chapel Hill this fall are encouraged to read the book this summer and participate in small group discussions during the Week of Welcome before fall 2017 semester classes begin.

 

Bayoumi will be on campus to give a lecture about the book on Wednesday, Sept. 6, 2017 at 6 pm in Memorial Hall.

 

The Carolina Summer Reading Program, now in its 19th year, aims to stimulate critical thinking outside the classroom and give new students a shared experience. Students are encouraged to come to their own conclusions about the book and will participate in the Summer Reading discussion groups that serve as an academic icebreaker.

 

“How Does it Feel to be a Problem?” is available at the Bull’s Head Bookshop in UNC Student Stores at a discounted price of $13.60.

 

This book has been selected for various group reading and discussions at other colleges and universities across the country, including UNC-Charlotte, University of South Carolina and Northern Kentucky University.

 

Past selections for the Carolina Summer Reading Program include: “The Shallows: What the Internet is Doing to our Brains” by Nicholas G. Carr, “Absolutely American: Four Years at West Point” by David Lipsky, and “Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End” by Atul Gawande.

 

For more information, visit the Carolina Summer Reading website.

 

-Carolina-

Photo Link:

https://unc.photoshelter.com/galleries/C00005vwcu89jLJ4/G00007YEsIzoGQ4o/Carolina-Summer-Reading

Photo credit: Neville Elder

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 110 master’s, 64 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s 317,000-plus alumni live in all 50 states and 156 other countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

UNC-Chapel Hill Office of University Communications: mediarelations@unc.edu, (919) 962-4515