Statement from Chancellor Carol L. Folt on ACC presidents’ vote

 

This is a positive step for North Carolina, for our state’s economy and for our student-athletes and fans.  Lifting the ban will allow our state to continue moving forward.  At Carolina, our commitment to fostering a welcoming environment that supports all individuals is steadfast. We have robust non-discriminatory policies that remain in place, and this commitment to diversity and inclusion is what allows our campus to thrive.

 

 

Media invited to attend Clean Tech Summit at UNC-Chapel Hill

Media invited to attend Clean Tech Summit at UNC-Chapel Hill

Gov. Roy Cooper will be the keynote speaker at the event, which convenes professionals in business, policy and academia for two days of problem solving to foster leadership and growth in North Carolina’s clean tech industry.

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C. – Feb. 23, 2017) – The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill will host its fourth UNC Clean Tech Summit March 2-3. The event highlights the latest innovations, trends and challenges in the clean technology industry and how North Carolina is playing a key role in leading the way to a green global economy. The Summit is co-hosted by the UNC Institute for the Environment and the Center for Sustainable Enterprise at UNC Kenan-Flagler Business School.

 

Speakers and panels at the summit will focus on four themes including innovation, clean energy, ­­­­­­food, and water and energy. A full agenda is available online.

 

Governor Roy Cooper will deliver the keynote address on March 2. Cooper is the 75th governor of North Carolina and a double Tar Heel, earning a B.A. in political science in 1979 and his juris doctor in 1982. Other featured speakers include Adam E. Bergman, senior vice president of Wells Fargo CleanTech Banking; Tom Darden (UNC ’76 and ’92) founder and CEO of Cherokee and Cherokee Investment Partners; Chuck McGrady, representative, N.C. House of Representatives; and Fran O’Sullivan, general manager of IBM GBS Global Operations.

 

Chancellor Carol L. Folt will moderate a panel that will explore partnerships between universities and the private sector as a way to advance clean tech innovation in the region.

 

This year’s summit includes special programs around careers, including the opportunity for students to engage with clean-tech industry leaders through one-on-one mentoring, networking sessions featuring company-hosted tables, and a luncheon featuring Triangle women in STEM on Thursday and a career networking luncheon on Friday.

 

 

March 2-3, 2017

Opening remarks begin at 9:00 a.m. on Thursday, March 2

UNC Friday Conference Center

 100 Friday Center Drive

Chapel Hill, North Carolina

 

Media Check-In: Media must have a pass to cover the conference. Passes can be obtained with a complimentary registration here: http://unc.live/2m1zv0r. Passes can be picked up at the registration desk at the Friday Center. Registered members of the media will have access to a private green room. Kate Luck (479-629-6334, kate.luck@unc.edu) and Emily Williams (330) 472-8417, emilywilliams@unc.edu) will be the on-site contacts.

 

Media Parking: Parking is available at the Friday Center.

 

— Carolina —

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 110 master’s, 64 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty – including two Nobel laureates – staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s 317,000-plus alumni live in all 50 states and 156 other countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

UNC Institute for the Environment contact: Emily Williams, (919) 962-0965, emilywilliams@unc.edu

 

UNC University Communications contact: Kate Luck, (919) 962-8596, kate.luck@unc.edu

UNC-Chapel Hill, NC State partner to offer innovative program for lateral entry teachers

For immediate use

 

 

UNC-Chapel Hill, NC State partner to offer innovative program for lateral entry teachers

Joint online program aims to help North Carolina address its growing teacher shortage

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C. – Feb. 9, 2017) – The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and North Carolina State University are launching a joint online program for people who have been hired to teach in North Carolina schools but haven’t yet been fully certified to work in classrooms.

 

The program is intended to help the state address its widening teacher shortage by providing a new avenue for “lateral entry” teachers to gain licensure. Lateral entry teachers are people who have content knowledge who have been hired to fill teaching vacancies but have yet to obtain teaching licensure.

 

“We expect that this new initiative will bring to bear strengths of our two campuses in helping the state of North Carolina address a critical need,” said Fouad Abd-El-Khalick, dean of the School of Education at UNC-Chapel Hill. “This initiative will help improve learning for tens of thousands of school students across the state.”

 

Mary Ann Danowitz, dean of the College of Education at NC State, added: “Given our growing need for new teachers, North Carolina must expand its ability to supply qualified educators for our classrooms. This program will help address that problem.”

 

The program, to be offered completely online, will be open to lateral entry teachers in the fall. In its pilot phase, the program will have capacity for approximately 50 participants in its first year, but will be designed so that it can quickly expand, said Diana Lys, assistant dean for educator preparation at the UNC-Chapel Hill School of Education and one of the organizers of the effort.

 

“We’ve designed this program to make it convenient for working lateral entry teachers, making it possible for them to master the competencies they need while they remain in their jobs and to gain knowledge that will help strengthen their effectiveness,” Lys said.

 

The accelerated program should take participants 12 to 18 months to complete and cost less than $5,000, she said.

 

 

Demand great for lateral entry teacher preparation

The program is needed because school districts are having to rely more heavily on hiring lateral entry teachers to fill vacancies, said Michael Maher, assistant dean for educator preparation and accreditation at NC State’s College of Education and one of the program’s organizers. But, lateral entry teachers leave the profession at a rate 79 percent greater than other teachers.

 

North Carolina employs more than 4,300 lateral entry teachers, according to a 2015 report by the State Board of Education. More than 850 of them work in school districts near the UNC-Chapel Hill and NC State campuses.

 

“This program will provide lateral entry teachers with the teaching skills and knowledge they need to be successful in the classroom thus assisting in their retention in North Carolina public schools,” Maher said.

 

The program will draw on expertise from faculty at the two campuses in the areas of teacher preparation, online and distance education, and competency-based instructional models, Lys and Maher said. The program will be offered in a partnership with D2L, a company that provides online platforms for university courses and has experience establishing and maintaining online competency-based education programs.

 

The program initially will offer preparation in the content areas mathematics, science, English/language arts and social studies. Organizers expect the program to be expanded in the future to offer a preparation program in special education.

 

“There is great demand for this type of preparation,” said Lys. “We hope that eventually we will be able to enroll hundreds of people in this program.

 

The program development is supported by a $148,000 grant from the UNC system’s General Administration, which sought requests for proposals from system campuses for new academic programs that would use competency-based education principles. Competency-based education typically relies on instruction that focuses on students learning and demonstrating mastery of concrete skills.

 

“Competency-based program design and delivery organizes learning around student mastery of content instead of seat time spent enrolled in a course,” said Michelle Soler, director for competency based education and assessment for the UNC system.

 

While the program will use D2L learning management software, as with all UNC system competency-based pilot programs, curriculum decisions and content development will be controlled by faculty, ensuring rigor and that the programs meet academic standards, Soler said.

 

“UNC system competency-based education programs will also incorporate mentoring and guidance by dedicated coaches who will work with students throughout their progress through the program, with the intent of ensuring timely graduation,” she said.

 

Higher quality preparation

The program will be designed to address the N.C. Professional Teaching Standards, Digital Learning Competencies and additional competencies developed by faculty at the two universities to address discipline-specific teaching strategies.

 

Organizers also plan to work closely with leadership of area school districts to identify additional competencies that address local needs.

 

The program will be more extensive than current lateral entry certification requirements. Lateral entry teachers currently are required to complete 18 hours of coursework over a three-year period. Those requirements are typically met by lateral entry teachers taking a variety of courses from different institutions, leading to inconsistency and lower-quality preparation, said Maher.

 

“This program is being designed to be comprehensive, with a coherence through the courses, Lys said. “As a result, participants should be able to complete the program more quickly and at less cost.”

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill



The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 110 master’s, 64 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s 317,000-plus alumni live in all 50 states and 156 other countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

 

About NC State University

NC State was founded with a purpose: to create economic, societal and intellectual prosperity for the people of North Carolina and the country. The university began as a land-grant institution teaching the agricultural and mechanical arts, and today stands as a pre-eminent research enterprise that excels in science, technology, engineering, math, design, the humanities and social sciences, education, textiles and veterinary medicine. NC State students, faculty and staff take problems in hand and work with industry, government and nonprofit partners to solve them. The university’s 34,000-plus high-performing students apply what they learn in the real world by conducting research, working in internships and co-ops, and performing acts of world-changing service. That experiential education ensures they leave here ready to lead the workforce, confident in the knowledge that NC State consistently rates as one of the best values in higher education.

 

UNC-Chapel Hill School of Education contact: Michael Hobbs, (919) 962-8687, michael_hobbs@unc.edu

 

NC State College of Education contact: Cherry Crayton, (919) 515-5912, ckcrayto@ncsu.edu

 

 

Media invited to join UNC-Chapel Hill for Hill Hall ribbon cutting ceremony

Not for publication

 

Media invited to join UNC-Chapel Hill for Hill Hall ribbon cutting ceremony

 

110-year-old music and performance arts building is reopening after extensive 18-month renovation

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C. – Feb. 6, 2017) – The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill will celebrate the reopening of Hill Hall, home to Carolina’s music department, following an extensive 18-month, $15 million renovation. This is a private event; however, media are invited to attend.

 

The renovations add air conditioning for the first time to the building, which was built in 1907.  Other upgrades include a climate control system, state-of-the-art acoustical treatments, a professional-grade stage, and equipment and piano lift.

 

These upgrades will transform Hill Hall, which has hosted guests such as Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Joan Baez and Yo-Yo Ma, into an innovative performance and practice space for students. The addition of recording facilities will allow students, faculty and guests to record performances and create new opportunities to partner with Carolina Performing Arts.  An enhanced backstage area with updated dressing rooms and storage, improved lighting and modernized administrative and teaching spaces adjacent to the rotunda will complete the renovations.

 

Additionally, the performance space will be named the James and Susan Moeser Auditorium in honor of the former chancellor and his wife, who are organists and teachers at Carolina.

 

The renovations are made possible thanks to a $5 million gift from the William R. Kenan Jr. Charitable Trust. The Office of the Provost provided an additional $5 million. The College of Arts and Sciences raised the balance through private gifts. The renovation used no state-appropriated funding.

 

Wednesday, Feb. 8

3:30 p.m.

James and Susan Moeser Auditorium

Hill Hall

145 E. Cameron Ave

Chapel Hill, North Carolina

 

Media Check-In: Media must check in no earlier than 3:15 p.m. at the entrance of Hill Hall. Kate Luck (479-629-6334, kate.luck@unc.edu) will be the on-site contact.

 

Media Parking: Parking is very limited. Media are encouraged to use the parking deck located between Rosemary Street and Columbia Street.

 

— Carolina —

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 110 master’s, 64 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty – including two Nobel laureates – staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s 317,000-plus alumni live in all 50 states and 156 other countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

UNC University Communications contact: Kate Luck, (919) 445-8360, kate.luck@unc.edu

Carolina sets 12th consecutive record for first-year applications

For immediate use

 

Carolina sets 12th consecutive record for first-year applications

Admissions office reports nearly 14 percent increase over last year

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C. – Jan. 24, 2017) – With the close of the final deadline for first-year admission for Fall 2017, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill announces a 12th consecutive record for first-year applications. The total of 40,792 applications received (as of Jan. 18) reflects an increase of 13.7 percent over last year and the second largest increase within the last 25 years.

 

“We continue to be humbled by the interest shown in us by so many terrific students from all over the world,” said Stephen Farmer, Vice Provost for Enrollment and Undergraduate Admissions. “We know that these young people have many choices for college, and we are grateful that they are considering Carolina. We will treat every one of them with the greatest care and respect.”

 

First-year applicants who applied in October will receive their decisions by the end of January; first-year applicants who applied in January will receive their decisions by the end of March.

 

While first-year application deadlines for Fall 2017 have passed, the University will accept transfer applications from students currently enrolled at other institutions through Feb. 15.

 

“Transfer admission continues to be a popular option for students who aren’t joining us right out of high school or need more time to get ready,” said Farmer.

 

The University expects to enroll a first-year class of 4,200 and an additional 800 students as transfer students.

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill



The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 110 master’s, 64 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s 317,000-plus alumni live in all 50 states and 156 other countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

University Admissions contact:  Stephen Farmer at sfarmer@admissions.unc.edu or Ashley Memory at amemory@admissions.unc.edu or  919-966-3621

University Communications contact: Kate Luck at kate.luck@unc.edu or 919-445-8360