Min Yang named Schwarzman Scholar

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 Min Yang named Schwarzman Scholar  

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— Dec. 4, 2017) – Min Yang, a 2015 graduate of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, has been selected for the Schwarzman Scholars program, an elite China-based scholarship modeled after the Rhodes Scholarship and founded by Blackstone co-founder and CEO Stephen A. Schwarzman.

 

This innovative master’s degree program supports study at China’s prestigious Tsinghua University and bridges the academic and professional worlds to educate students about leadership and China’s expanding role in the world.

 

Yang was one of only 142 recipients selected worldwide for the award, which provides unparalleled learning opportunities with leaders from China and the world through high-level interactions at lectures, an internship program, a mentorship network and intensive travel seminars. He is Carolina’s fifth Schwarzman Scholar since the program began in 2016.

 

“Being named a Schwarzman Scholar is an exceptional achievement and we are incredibly proud that Min will have an opportunity to pursue his master’s studies in China,” said Chancellor Carol L. Folt. “During his time at Carolina, Min’s accomplishments as a scholar and social entrepreneur included organizing one of the largest Sino-U.S. student conferences in the U.S. and work as a research fellow exploring business models in AIDS charity organizations. The quality of his scholarship, entrepreneurial mindset and commitment to making the world a better place – coupled with this wonderful opportunity – will be the stepping stone to success as he works to improve people’s health, with a particular focus on those most in need in our world.”

 

Yang, 25, is from Shunde, Guangdong Province, China. He graduated in 2015 majoring in health policy and management as well as mathematical decision sciences.

 

“I am excited to join a network of 100-plus future leaders who will be shaping the future of China and the rest of the world,” said Yang. “Coming from a research background in college and hoping to improve people’s health as an entrepreneur, I feel I need a systematic training in business and leadership, and a deeper understanding of China. I believe the Schwarzman Scholarship is the perfect program for that.”

 

While at Carolina, Yang served as president of the Duke-UNC China Leadership Summit, an achievement recognized by Forbes. Yang was also a research fellow for UNC’s Project China. As a result of his accomplishments, Yang was recognized by China Hands magazine as one of 25-under-25 future leaders in US-China relations. Yang also interned for both the World Health Organization in Geneva, Switzerland, and the China Center for Health Economics Research in Beijing, China. He played the saxophone with UNC’s Marching Tar Heels.

 

Yang recently helped launch ofo, the biggest station-free bike share platform in the world. He previously worked as a senior analyst for CBPartners and co-founded DocFlight, an international telemedicine startup that bridges healthcare services in the U.S. with patients abroad.

 

“We are so pleased that Min will join the proud group of UNC alums who have graduated from or are currently participating in the Schwarzman program,” said Inger Brodey, director of the Office of Distinguished Scholarships at UNC-Chapel Hill. “I know he will make the most of the program and use the experience to leverage his social and medical entrepreneurship to achieve even greater good worldwide.”

 

The Schwarzman Scholars program is the first scholarship created to respond to the geopolitical landscape of the 21st century by giving students the opportunity to develop leadership skills and professional networks through a one-year master’s degree at Tsinghua University in Beijing, China. Immersed in the culture of Beijing, the scholars are surrounded by an international community of thinkers, innovators and senior leaders in business, politics and society. In this environment of intellectual engagement, professional development and cultural exchange, they pursue their academic disciplines, travel, build their leadership capacities and develop a better understanding of China. Up to 200 individuals are chosen annually from around the world for this highly selective, fully funded program.

 

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About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 111 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 322,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and 165 countries. More than 175,000 live in North Carolina.

 

Schwarzman Scholars news release: https://www.schwarzmanscholars.org/news-article/schwarzman-scholars-announces-class-2019/

 

Photo of Yang: http://bit.ly/2A1ObV5

 

Office of Distinguished Scholarships contacts: Inger Brody, (919) 843-0965,

brodey@email.unc.edu and Maggie Douglas, (919) 843-7757, mdouglas@unc.edu

 

University Communications: Media Relations, (919) 445-8555, mediarelations@unc.edu

 

Alexander Peeples and Shauna Rust named Mitchell Scholars

 

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Alexander Peeples and Shauna Rust named Mitchell Scholars

 

Peeples is a Carolina Covenant Scholar; Rust is a Buckley Public Service Scholar

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— Nov. 19, 2017) – Alexander Peeples, a University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill senior, and Shauna Rust, a 2016 graduate, have been named recipients of the George J. Mitchell Scholarship, which supports graduate studies in Ireland.

 

Peeples and Rust were two of 12 Americans selected Nov. 18 for the award, which provides tuition, accommodations, a living expenses stipend and an international travel stipend for one year. They are UNC-Chapel Hill’s sixth and seventh Mitchell Scholars since the program began in 2001.

 

“Being named a Mitchell Scholar is an exceptional achievement and we are incredibly proud of both Alexander and Shauna for receiving this outstanding honor,” said UNC-Chapel Hill Chancellor Carol L. Folt. “Both students have shown their dedication to academics and giving back to our campus and local communities, stepping stones to success Alexander can use as he works to advance the field of education law in the developing world with a particular focus on our most vulnerable populations and Shauna as she works to create a healthier world particularly for those most in need.”

 

Peeples, 21, from Mobile, Ala., is the son of Steven and Larene Peeples. He graduated from the Alabama School of Math and Science in 2014. Peeples will graduate in May 2018 with majors in history and political science and a minor in African studies.

 

Peeples came to UNC-Chapel Hill as a Covenant Scholar and as part of the Bonner Leaders Program, a sustained service program designed to engage students in addressing community-identified needs. Peeples serves as co-president of the Campus Y and is a columnist for The Daily Tar Heel. He also works for The Marian Cheek Jackson Center, which serves the Northside neighborhood of Chapel Hill. Peeples holds a leadership role at Heavenly Groceries food bank, and has helped raise over $45,000 for The Jackson Center.

 

“I’m honored to be selected as a Mitchell Scholar,” said Peeples. “So much of who I am is a result of UNC and the spirit of service created by spaces like the Campus Y. I look forward to a year in Ireland and I hope UNC continues to be a university where a radical commitment to service and advocacy is fostered.”

 

Peeples developed a passion for East Africa during an African studies seminar in his first semester at UNC-Chapel Hill, and he has traveled to Tanzania to research their education law. Peeples plans to use his time in Ireland to study international justice at Maynooth University. Ultimately, Peeples plans to work in a global education think tank to improve education law in the developing world and among especially vulnerable populations.

 

“Beyond his remarkable academic achievements, Alexander consistently dedicates himself to serving the needs of the socially deprived—both locally and internationally,” said Inger Brodey, director of Carolina’s Office of Distinguished Scholarships.  “I have confidence that the Mitchell scholarship will take Alexander to new heights and allow him to reach even greater numbers of people through educational reform policy.”

 

Rust, 23, from Charlotte, is the daughter of Mark and Janine Lazar Rust. She graduated from Myers Park High School in 2012. She graduated from the Gillings School of Global Public Health with a BSPH in health policy and management in 2016. Rust currently works in Washington, D.C., as special assistant and public health analyst for the Health Resources and Services Administration within the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services.

 

“It is incredibly humbling to be selected as a Mitchell Scholar and I am so grateful to my mentors at UNC, especially in the Gillings School of Global Public Health, who have been tremendous supporters of my career in health policy and public health,” said Rust. “I am excited to study how Ireland is reforming their healthcare system and to bring these lessons back with me, as I seek to make a difference in the U.S. health system throughout my career.”

 

At UNC-Chapel Hill, Rust was an Honors Carolina student and a Buckley Public Service Scholar for her commitment to public service. Rust served as co-president of the Campus Y and co-chaired Tar Heel TABLE, which hosts food drives to alleviate child hunger. In her senior year, Rust was selected as the 2015-2016 Roosevelt Institute Emerging Fellow for Health Care – the highest ranking national health policy fellow with the Roosevelt Institute – representing thousands of undergraduate students involved in this movement through white papers and editorials, including one in The New York Times. Rust also completed an honors thesis about the implications of tobacco marketing.

 

Rust plans to pursue an MPP in health policy at University College Dublin in Ireland. Rust ultimately wants to be at the forefront of creating a healthier nation, whether as an elected official or a public servant.

 

“The Mitchell committee foresees that Shauna will be in an excellent position to shape public health policy in the U.S. in the coming decades,” said Brodey. “A Mitchell Scholarship will enable her to do so from a perspective enriched by experience of public health policy in Ireland as well as the U.S.”

 

The nationwide competition attracted 326 applicants for 12 Mitchell Scholarships. Recipients are chosen on the basis of academic distinction, leadership and service and spend a year of post-graduate study at institutions of higher learning in Ireland.

 

The Mitchell Scholarship program is administered by the U.S.-Ireland Alliance, a nonprofit organization based in Washington, D.C. It is also funded by corporate, government and private entities and by the participating Irish universities. The program honors former U.S. Senate Majority leader George Mitchell for his leadership.

 

 

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The Mitchell Scholarship press release: http://www2.us-irelandalliance.org/content/670/en/

 

Photos of Peeples and Rust: http://bit.ly/2zU15km and http://bit.ly/2zP9K9W

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 111 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 322,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and 165 countries. More than 175,000 live in North Carolina.

 

Office of Distinguished Scholarships contacts: Inger Brody, (919) 843-0965, brodey@email.unc.edu and Maggie Douglas, (919) 843-7757, mdouglas@unc.edu

 

University Communications: Media Relations, (919) 445-8555, mediarelations@unc.edu

 

UNC receives $50 million commitment to kick off historic fundraising campaign

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UNC receives $50 million commitment to kick off historic fundraising campaign

 

Commitment from John and Marree Townsend supports arts, humanities, business and athletics

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C. – Oct. 6, 2017) With the public launch of “For all Kind: The Campaign for Carolina” today — the largest fundraising effort to date in the Southeast and second-largest among public institutions nationally with a goal of $4.25 billion —University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Chancellor Carol L. Folt announced a gift of more than $50 million from alumni John ’77, ’82 (M.B.A.) and Marree ’77 Townsend of Greenwich, Connecticut. Working closely with deans and campus leadership to identify their highest priorities, the Townsends chose to support areas where their gift would have the greatest impact.

 

Comprising current and deferred funding and gifts-in-kind, their commitment provides $25 million in works of art to the Ackland Art Museum; $10 million to the College of Arts & Sciences, including an initial commitment to the Institute for the Arts and Humanities; $10 million to Kenan-Flagler Business School; a gift of more than one $1 million to Carolina Athletics; and a portion to be allocated at a later date.

 

“We are incredibly grateful to John and Marree for their generous and meaningful gift for the Campaign for Carolina that speaks directly to their passion for excellence, commitment to helping future generations of Tar Heels and their love for Carolina,” said Chancellor Carol L. Folt. “Their gift will help the arts play a fundamental role at Carolina, advance our core mission in Arts & Sciences and the business school and help us maintain outstanding athletic programs. Their belief in Carolina’s capacity to change lives and willingness to help in so many ways inspires us all and creates exciting momentum for the campaign.”

 

A true Carolina family, John and Marree’s fathers are alumni, as are their two daughters. John’s mother, Beverley Chalk Townsend, is also a 1953 graduate and Phi Beta Kappa. The couple have long supported and volunteered for the University, and for them, this gift is especially meaningful.

 

“Carolina is a place that we both love, and this is definitely a shared enthusiasm between us,” John said on behalf of the couple. “We were privileged to go to the University, and we both got fabulous educations, for which we are grateful. Carolina was one of the first organizations that we felt fortunate to be able to support, and it’s been such a rewarding place to continue to give to over the years. It’s wonderful to watch our contributions making a difference.”

 

John Townsend retired as a senior advisor with Tiger Management Corp. in 2015 after more than 30 years in investment management and banking. A Campaign for Carolina Steering Committee co-chair, Townsend also serves on the Chancellor’s Philanthropic Council, the Ackland Art Museum National Advisory Board, the UNC-Chapel Hill Endowment Fund Board, the UNC-Chapel Hill Foundation Board and the UNC-Chapel Hill Investment Fund Board. He previously served on the Board of Trustees, UNC Kenan-Flagler Board of Visitors and the 2013 Campaign Planning Cabinet.

 

Marree Townsend owns Marree Townsend Interiors in Greenwich, Connecticut. She serves on the Arts & Sciences Foundation Board of Directors, the Campaign for Carolina Women’s Campaign Cabinet and the Carolina Women’s Leadership Council.

 

The Townsends’ gift continues strong fundraising momentum as the University launches the Campaign for Carolina, seeking to raise $4.25 billion by Dec. 31, 2022, to transform campus and the world. This past fiscal year, which concluded June 30, 2017, marked the University’s best fundraising year in history; at $543 million in commitments, it surpassed the previous 2016 record by nearly $50 million.

 

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About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 111 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 322,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and 165 countries. More than 175,000 live in North Carolina.

 

Office of University Development: Kim Elenez, (919) 962-1628, kelenez@email.unc.edu

University Communications: Media Relations, (919) 445-8555, mediarelations@unc.edu

UNC-Chapel Hill’s Ackland Art Museum continues expansion with major art gifts, bringing yearly gift total to $66.5 million

Fact Sheet:

 

UNC-Chapel Hill’s Ackland Art Museum continues expansion with major art gifts, bringing yearly gift total to $66.5 million

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C. – Oct. 6, 2017) – With the launch of “For All Kind: The Campaign for Carolina” earlier today, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s Ackland Art Museum has accepted three new major gifts – collectively valued at $41.5 million. Committed by alumni John L. Townsend III and Marree Townsend, alumnus John G. Ellison Jr., and former Ackland director Charles W. Millard III, the art gifts include diverse works from a wide array of artists that will increase the museum’s top-quality, encyclopedic collection and accelerate its mission to become the preeminent public university art museum in the country.

 

  • The gifts join a $25 million commitment by alumnus Sheldon Peck and his wife, Leena, in January, which included an $8 million endowment and a $17 million art gift of 134 primarily 17th-century European masterworks, including seven works by Rembrandt.

 

  • These commitments bring the Ackland’s grand gift total for 2017 to $66.5 million, continuing an exciting year of tremendous growth, which has brought the museum to a new level of international prominence.

 

  • The Townsend portion of the gift significantly enhances the Ackland’s collection of modern and contemporary art.

 

  • The gifts also help the museum make a significant step toward meeting its $250 million campaign goal.

 

GIFT DETAILS

  • A $25 million gift from John and Marree Townsend features a collection of 150 pieces of art by American and European modern masters, including paintings and prints by Joan Mitchell and prints of Jasper Johns’ most iconic images. Other highlights include works by Howard Hodgkin, Alex Katz, Marsden Hartley, Ad Reinhardt, Hans Hofmann, Gerhard Richter, Richard Diebenkorn, Jennifer Bartlett, Lee Krasner, Sean Scully, Anton Henning, Rachel Howard, Glenn Brown, Mark Alexander and Adrien Ghenie.

 

  • An $11.5 million gift from John Ellison features Joan Mitchell’s 1967 “Untitled,” a 1971 untitled oil and charcoal on paper by Willem de Kooning, and Helen Frankenthalter’s 10-foot-wide and seven-foot-tall, 1976 work “Vernal.”

 

  • A $5 million landmark gift from Millard encompasses his entire 375-work collection ranging from South Asian sculpture and 19th-century photographs to North Carolina pottery and 20th-century abstraction, and including early cartoons and comic strips, Byzantine earthenware of the 12th century, Japanese calligraphy and master prints from the Western tradition.

 

GIFT IMPACT

  • The gifts support the core pillars of the University’s overarching Blueprint for Next — “Of the Public, for the Public” and “Innovation Made Fundamental” — which uphold Carolina’s commitment to grow and evolve while remaining rooted in its public service mission.

 

  • The gifts also support a key priority in “For All Kind: The Campaign for Carolina,” Innovation and Impact: A Culture of Innovation, which aims to enhance and accelerate Carolina’s impact as an innovative and entrepreneurial research university. This includes strengthening creativity and critical thinking among students, faculty and the community through signature initiatives like Arts Everywhere.

 

  • The Ackland is one of 10 campus programs that have partnered to form Arts Everywhere, the University’s groundbreaking, campus-wide arts signature initiative, which seeks to revolutionize academics and enhance public service at Carolina by investing in sustained creative practice, live arts experiences and arts learning.

 

QUOTES

“These extraordinary additions to the Ackland Art Museum’s collection continue an incredible year of support for Carolina’s enduring commitment to the visual arts,” said Chancellor Carol L. Folt. “The generosity of John Ellison, Charlie Millard, and John and Marree Townsend and our Arts Everywhere initiative is making Carolina a must-experience destination for the visual arts.”

 

“These profoundly generous collection gifts build on a wonderful tradition of giving art collections to the Ackland, for which we are very grateful,” said Ackland Art Museum director Katie Ziglar. “Exceptional artworks such as these, by accomplished, world-renowned artists, will be tremendous resources for Carolina students in many fields for decades to come, and will excite and delight members of the public as well. Such outstanding gifts greatly enhance our ability to succeed in our mission to be the preeminent public university art museum in the country.”

 

DONOR BIOS

John Townsend retired as a senior advisor with Tiger Management Corp. in 2015 after more than 30 years in financial management and investment banking. A Campaign for Carolina Steering Committee co-chair, Townsend serves on the Chancellor’s Philanthropic Council, the Ackland Art Museum National Advisory Board, the UNC-Chapel Hill Endowment Fund Board, the UNC-Chapel Hill Foundation Board and the UNC-Chapel Hill Investment Fund Board. He previously served on the Board of Trustees, UNC Kenan-Flagler Board of Visitors, and the 2013 Campaign Planning Cabinet. Marree Townsend owns Marree Townsend Interiors in Greenwich. She serves on the Arts & Sciences Foundation Board of Directors, the Campaign for Carolina Women’s Campaign Cabinet and the Carolina Women’s Leadership Council.

 

John Ellison, of Greensboro, also a Campaign for Carolina Steering Committee co-chair, is the chairman of the Ellison Co. and has served on multiple boards, including the UNC Board of Visitors and the UNC Institute for the Arts and Humanities Advisory Board. He concluded an eight-year tenure on the UNC Board of Trustees in 2011.

 

A 2015 UNC-Chapel Hill honorary degree recipient, Charles Millard, of Chapel Hill, served as the Ackland’s director from 1986-1993 and as a long-term member of its National Advisory Board. He has already donated more than 50 works of art to the Ackland, an impressive record further enhanced by exceptional gifts in 2008 through 2010 from his Tyche Foundation, set up specifically to acquire major works of art for the Ackland.

 

PHOTOS

https://unc.photoshelter.com/galleries/C0000.jfK5DRIwnI/G0000d._y1gt9Syg/Ackland-Gifts-Fall-2017

Password: ackland (all lowercase)

 

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About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill



The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 110 master’s, 64 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 322,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and 165 countries. More than 175,000 live in North Carolina.

 

Office of University Development: Kim Elenez, (919) 962-1628, kelenez@email.unc.edu

University Communications: Media Relations Office, (919) 445-8555, mediarelations@unc.edu

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

UNC-Chapel Hill creates Institute for Convergent Science to focus on tackling the world’s biggest problems through multidisciplinary collaboration

Fact Sheet:

 

UNC-Chapel Hill creates Institute for Convergent Science to focus on tackling the world’s biggest problems through multidisciplinary collaboration

 

Institute to speed commercialization of new discoveries and treatments

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C. – Oct. 6, 2017) – As part of “For All Kind: The Campaign for Carolina,” launched earlier today, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill will create the UNC Institute for Convergent Science (ICS). By embracing this emerging model for scientific research, Carolina aims to tackle the world’s biggest problems by fostering greater multi-disciplinary collaboration among researchers, students and entrepreneurs in an effort to speed the application of new discoveries, and the commercialization of technological breakthroughs and next-generation medical therapies.

 

  • Convergent science is at the core of an expanded “team-science” concept, where basic and applied scientists from many disciplines—from mathematics to physics to computer science to biology—pursue new discoveries alongside physicians, manufacturers and technology innovators. It unites scientists with entrepreneurs for a seamless and more timely transition from discovery to impact.

 

DETAILS

  • The Institute for Convergent Science will empower convergent science across the University, providing collaborative and entrepreneurial research space, meeting space, offices for visiting entrepreneurs and scientists from partnering companies. It will become the new home for the new department of applied physical sciences.

 

  • The institute is an important addition to, and the last phase of, the Carolina Physical Science Complex, which broke ground in 2004 and whose first buildings opened in 2007. With the creation of the ICS, the complex itself will provide an even wider range of dynamic, creative and collaborative approaches across the sciences.

 

  • The institute will be a resource for scientist-entrepreneurs who seek to engage companies in their work or to start their own enterprises. It will also strengthen the preparedness of the talent pipeline by engaging existing and new undergraduate, graduate and postdoctoral training programs so that students learn to approach their own research with a “convergence” mindset.

 

  • It will co-locate individual science laboratories with spaces for team science and collaboration, and include a state-of-the-art technology hub.

 

  • The ICS aims to annually fund six Carolina faculty fellowships and six fellowships to visiting faculty partners, who will team up to tackle the greatest obstacles to translating nanotechnology, materials science and neuroscience technologies into practical applications. It also seeks to provide 12 to 14 emerging scholar fellowships for graduate students, interns and postdocs.

 

  • The Institute also aims to fund faculty and graduate student research opportunities in Silicon Valley – “Carolina West.”

 

  • Start-up costs for the ICS include hiring a director, associate director and support staff, as well as five new faculty per year – up to 25 new hires over five years – to build up the departments of applied physical sciences and biomedical engineering, along with related units.

 

IMPACT & EXAMPLES

  • The ICS is a signature initiative in the University’s the Campaign for Carolina and supports the core pillars of the University’s overarching Blueprint for Next— “Of the Public, for the Public” and “Innovation Made Fundamental” — which uphold Carolina’s commitment to grow and evolve while remaining rooted in its public service mission.

 

  • BeAM (Be A Maker) — the name for UNC’s network of makerspaces — has already started a collaborative revolution on campus by injecting the excitement of designing and making physical objects into the lives of students and faculty across the arts and sciences using technologies like 3-D printing, electronics, wood- and metal working, and digital fabrication. The institute will allow the College of Arts & Sciences to expand the BeAM network.

 

  • Carolina’s Virtual Lung Project is a key example of the benefits of a convergent science approach. Seeking a better way to treat cystic fibrosis, a team of 15 UNC-Chapel Hill mathematicians, computer scientists, physicists, chemists, biomedical engineers and health sciences faculty came together to study the debilitating lung disease. This led to the development of drug therapies administered via inhalation and a deeper understanding of how gene-based defense mechanisms function. Having a variety of experts at the table enabled Carolina to create a different approach to understanding treatment issues that health scientists had not yet addressed.

 

QUOTES

“Carolina has a rich history of conducting research that transformed society and improved the lives of people in our state and around the globe. We now take the next step into the future, and the UNC Institute for Convergent Science will be the heart of an enterprise that empowers proven convergent thinkers here and around the world with the tools and space they need to harness innovation and big ideas. Students will train in interdisciplinary approaches, research teams will collaborate across the spectrum of applications and we will speed the transition from discovery to real-world impact.”

Chancellor Carol L. Folt        

 

“With the Institute for Convergent Science, Carolina is rewriting the rules by encouraging faculty from a variety of disciplines to work together alongside end users such as physicians, manufacturers and technology innovators to solve complicated problems. An interdisciplinary approach brings fresh perspectives, as scientists pool their collective expertise and adapt techniques and approaches from one discipline to another. It’s synergistic thinking.”

-Kevin Guskiewicz, Dean of the College of Arts & Sciences     

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 111 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 322,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and 165 countries. More than 175,000 live in North Carolina.

 

Office of University Development: Kim Elenez, (919) 962-1628, kelenez@email.unc.edu

University Communications: Media Relations, (919) 445-8555, mediarelations@unc.edu

Carolina launches ambitious five-year, $4.25 billion comprehensive fundraising campaign

For immediate use

 

Carolina launches ambitious five-year, $4.25 billion comprehensive fundraising campaign

 

“For All Kind: The Campaign for Carolina” is the largest fundraising effort by a North Carolina university

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— Oct. 6, 2017) – The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill today launched the most ambitious fundraising campaign by a university in the history of the state. For All Kind: the Campaign for Carolina” aims to raise $4.25 billion by Dec. 31, 2022, to foster an innovation generation prepared to lead the world to a better future through research and scholarship, example and ethos. This campaign is the largest in the Southeast and second largest among public institutions in the nation.

 

Students, faculty, staff, alumni, key stakeholders, campaign leaders and volunteers joined Board of Trustees chairman Haywood Cochrane, Chancellor Carol L. Folt and Vice Chancellor for Development David Routh for the announcement, which highlighted several gifts and initiatives supporting the Blueprint for Next, the University’s overarching strategic framework. Developed by Folt, to guide Carolina’s growth and future direction, the Blueprint’s key pillars — “Of the Public, for the Public” and “Innovation Made Fundamental” — uphold Carolina’s commitment to grow and evolve while remaining rooted in its public service mission.

 

“Our ambitious Campaign for Carolina unites us with a shared and meaningful vision for the future of our leading global public research university,” said Chancellor Carol L. Folt. “Underlying this clear vision lies the Blueprint for Next, a unifying strategic framework that guides our commitment to Carolina’s historic mission of providing superior educational opportunities at the best and most affordable price, conducting game-changing research, innovating for the public good and bringing health and prosperity to people in our state and beyond.”

 

In an overflow event on the campus’ historic Polk Place, Folt and Routh announced several gifts and signature initiatives to kick off the campaign. By the end of the weekend, the University will have announced over $100 million in support of the Campaign for Carolina’s priorities and the encompassing vision of the Blueprint for Next. Signature initiatives and gifts announced as part of the launch include:

 

  • The Carolina Edge, a new campus-wide scholarship program focused on recruiting top students. Nearly 25 percent of the Campaign’s funds will help to expand Carolina’s deep commitment to access and affordability, as the University relies on philanthropic gifts to meet its promise to students. The campaign seeks to raise $1 billion as part of this initiative for undergraduate scholarships and graduate fellowships in areas such as the Carolina Covenant, middle-income scholarships, merit scholars, summer internship grants, athletics and graduate and professional school financial aid.

 

  • A $50 million gift by alumnus and the Campaign for Carolina chair John L. Townsend III and his wife Marree Townsend. The commitment benefits several units on campus including the Ackland Art Museum, the College of Arts & Sciences, UNC Kenan-Flagler Business School and Carolina Athletics, with a fifth portion to be allocated at a later date.

 

  • The continued expansion of the Ackland Art Museum thanks to three major art gifts collectively valued at $41.5 million. The diverse collections of work featuring a wide array of artists will increase the museum’s encyclopedic collection and accelerate its mission to become the preeminent public university art museum in the country. The Ackland expansion supports one of the campaign’s signature initiatives, Arts Everywhere, a groundbreaking, campus-wide arts initiative, which seeks to revolutionize academics and enhance public service at Carolina by investing in sustained creative practice, live arts experiences and arts learning.

 

  • The creation of the UNC Institute for Convergent Science (ICS) a new signature campaign initiative. By embracing this emerging model for scientific research, Carolina aims to tackle the world’s biggest problems through greater cross-disciplinary collaboration among students, researchers and entrepreneurs with the goal of speeding the commercialization of new discoveries, breakthroughs and treatments.

 

“The incredible generosity of our donors like the Townsends will continue to provide the margin of excellence that makes Carolina better in everything we do,” said David Routh, Vice Chancellor for University Development. “The Campaign for Carolina will help us attract the best students and keep the most outstanding faculty members on our campus. We will be able to conduct research and deliver care that improves the lives of people across our state and around the world. The impact will be felt for many years ahead, by all kind.”

 

The four key priorities of the comprehensive fundraising campaign are:

 

  • Students and the Educational Experience: The New Graduate focuses on scholarships, as well as supporting innovative teaching and experiential learning, with an emphasis on digital- and data-literacy, that prepares students for a fast-changing world. This includes providing access to a globally-focused education and creating buildings and spaces to optimize student success.

 

  • Faculty and Scholarship: The 21st-Century Professoriate focuses on recruiting and retaining world-class faculty and providing an environment that inspires creativity, collaboration and service to the state and beyond. This includes supporting high-potential, high-reward research, creating buildings and spaces to optimize faculty success in teaching and multi-disciplinary research and developing a 21st century Professor of Practice program to ensure students learn from the top professionals in their fields.

 

  • Innovation and Impact: A Culture of Innovation focuses on enhancing Carolina’s position as a preeminent translational research university and accelerating the pace of the University’s entrepreneurial ideas with commercial impact or social promise across the state, nation and world. This includes creating buildings and spaces that foster innovation and multi-disciplinary solutions and expanding thought-provoking arts programming to strengthen creativity and critical thinking among students, faculty and the community.

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  • Signature Initiatives focus on addressing issuesand opportunities that emerge over the course of the campaign and leveraging Carolina’s strengths to remain responsive to the times and needs of the people. Three initial signature initiatives have been announced, with more to come:
    • The Carolina Edge – to recruit the very best students
    • The Institute for Convergent Science – to translate research into impact
    • Arts Everywhere – to bring the arts to everyone on campus

 

Carolina’s last comprehensive campaign “Carolina First: The Campaign for the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill”— concluded on Dec. 31, 2007, during which more than 194,000 donors contributed $2.38 billion to support and advance UNC-Chapel Hill’s vision of becoming the nation’s leading public university. At that time, it was the fifth-largest fundraising total among completed campaigns in the history of U.S. higher education and the largest in the South.

 

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About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 110 master’s, 64 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty – including two Nobel laureates – staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 322,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and 165 countries. More than 175,000 live in North Carolina.

 

University Development: Kim Elenez, (919) 962-1628, kelenez@email.unc.edu

University Communications: Media Relations, (919) 445-8555, mediarelations@unc.edu

Dwayne Pinkney named senior associate vice chancellor for finance and administration

For immediate use

 

 

Dwayne Pinkney named senior associate vice chancellor for finance and administration

 

Pinkney has been secretary of the university since 2014     

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— Dec. 2, 2016) – Dwayne Pinkney has been named the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s chief financial officer and senior associate vice chancellor for finance and administration, starting Dec. 5, 2016.

 

“Dwayne’s wealth of experience in financial and administrative management at Carolina, the UNC system and the state positions him well to help me lead the strategic management of our University’s financial resources,” said Vice Chancellor for Finance and Administration Matt Fajack.

 

Pinkney will serve as the strategic advisor and principal deputy to Fajack. Additionally, he will provide oversight of the University’s financial, budget, and accounting operations and will provide leadership for the division’s shared administrative and business services functions. Pinkney will collaborate with Information Technology Services and other functional divisions to optimize the financial component of ConnectCarolina and improve management reporting. Pinkney will also work closely with campus senior leaders, UNC Health Care Administration, UNC General Administration, and the greater campus community to improve the strategic management of the University’s financial resources.

 

“I am excited for this opportunity to help serve the Carolina campus through strategic leadership of our financial, budget and accounting operations,” said Pinkney. “I have had the opportunity to work with many of the finance staff over the years and have gotten to know the newer members of the team most recently. I feel privileged to have the chance to work with each of them more closely in this new role.”

 

Pinkney most recently served as vice provost for finance and academic planning since 2010 and secretary of the university since 2014. Previously, he served as the assistant vice chancellor for finance and administration and special assistant to the Chancellor for state and local relations. In that role, Pinkney was responsible for the Student Stores and Trademarks Licensing operations, and was the campus’ primary liaison to the state legislature and advised the Chancellor and senior leadership on all matters related to state government affairs and local/municipal government.

 

Prior to joining UNC-Chapel Hill in 2004, Pinkney was an associate vice president for finance at the University of North Carolina General Administration. He also has six years of experience as a fiscal analyst with the North Carolina General Assembly and served a short stint as the deputy secretary for administration with the North Carolina Department of the Secretary of State.

 

Pinkney earned his Ph.D. in political science at UNC-Chapel Hill and his master’s degree in public administration at the University of Pittsburgh. He earned his bachelor’s degree in English and journalism from North Carolina A&T State University.

 

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Photo link: http://bit.ly/2gK1jnb

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 113 master’s, 68 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty – including two Nobel laureates – staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 317,000 alumni live in all 50 states and 150 countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

Communications and Public Affairs contact: Betsy Greer, (919) 962-7250, betsy.greer@unc.edu

 

 

Media invited to cover two ceremonies honoring the military at UNC-Chapel Hill

Not for publication

 

 

Media invited to cover two ceremonies honoring the military at UNC-Chapel Hill

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— Nov. 7, 2016) – In observance of Veterans Day, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill will hold two events this week honoring veterans and active duty military that offer media representatives an opportunity for news coverage.

 

Third Annual Tar Heel Tribute Ceremony

Thursday, Nov. 10

11:30 a.m. – 2:30 p.m.

Alumni Hall rooms of The Carolina Club, inside the George Watts Hill Alumni Center,

550 Stadium Dr.

 

This invitation-only event honors brave members of the Carolina community who have either served or are currently serving in the military. Chancellor Carol L. Folt will make opening remarks before an address by keynote speaker Imogene M. Jamison, former lieutenant colonel for the U.S. Army Judge Advocate General’s Corps and current associate general counsel with the U.S. Department of Defense Education Activity. The event will also include time to network, a complimentary lunch and guest speakers. Additional event details are available here.

 

Carolina Alumni Memorial Ceremony

Friday, Nov. 11

11 a.m.

Carolina Alumni Memorial in Memory to Those Lost in Service, located between Phillips and Memorial Halls on Cameron Avenue

Rain Site: Nelson Mandela Auditorium, inside the FedEx Global Education Center, 301 Pittsboro St.

 

Hosted by the University’s Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) programs, the ceremony honors all military members, both those currently serving and those who have served in the past. The featured speaker is Dr. Bruce Cairns, director of the North Carolina Jaycee Burn Center at UNC Health Care, John Stackhouse Distinguished Professor of Surgery at the School of Medicine, chair of the faculty and Navy veteran. Additional event details are available here.
 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 113 master’s, 68 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty – including two Nobel laureates – staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 317,000 alumni live in all 50 states and 150 countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

Tar Heel Tribute ceremony media contact: Karen Moon, (919) 962-8595, karen_moon@unc.edu

Carolina Alumni Memorial ceremony media contact: MC VanGraafeiland, (919) 962-7090, mc.vangraafeiland@unc.edu

 

 

Annual Veterans Day ceremony honors military

For immediate use

 

Annual Veterans Day ceremony honors military


Attendees to gather at memorial chronicling names of all alumni lost in service

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— Nov. 4, 2016) – The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill will honor veterans and active duty members of the armed services during an annual Veterans Day ceremony at a memorial devoted to alumni military members at 11 a.m. on Friday (Nov. 11).

 

Hosted by the University’s Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC) programs, the free, public event is also for families, students, faculty, staff and the local community. The event will be held at the Carolina Alumni Memorial in Memory of Those Lost in Military Service, located off Cameron Avenue between Phillips and Memorial halls. The rain site is FedEx Global Education Center’s Nelson Mandela Hall.

 

“We have a Veterans Day ceremony to honor not only UNC’s veterans, but veterans nationwide who have served in conflicts past and present,” said event organizer CPT. Jared Miller, a lecturer in military science and executive officer of the Army ROTC Tar Heel Battalion.

 

Dr. Bruce Cairns, director of the North Carolina Jaycee Burn Center at UNC Health Care, John Stackhouse Distinguished Professor of Surgery at the School of Medicine and Chair of the Faculty at UNC, will be the featured speaker at the ceremony.

 

Cairns served in Guam, where, as lieutenant commander in the Navy, he was a general surgeon at the U.S. Naval Hospital. In 2000, he joined the School of Medicine faculty and his interest in aiding veterans led him to eventually help launch the Advanced Medic Instructor Training program, a collaborative effort between Fort Bragg’s Joint Special Operations Medical Training Center and UNC-Chapel Hill. The program served as a model for the School of Medicine’s Physician Assistant Program, which is dedicated to providing educational and career-development opportunities for non-traditional students, including veterans with medical experience.

 

Since the War of 1812, 715 UNC-Chapel Hill students have lost their lives either in conflicts or in wartime training accidents. Each student is named in the Carolina Alumni Memorial’s bronze Book of Names. The UNC General Alumni Association has compiled an online memorial, which includes a biographical page about each fallen student: https://alumni.unc.edu/news-publications/war-memorial-complete-list/.

 

Carolina also will honor members of the student body, faculty and staff who have served or are currently serving in the military in a separate, but linked event, the third annual Tar Heel Tribute, on Thursday (Nov. 10). This event will be held at the George Watts Hill Alumni Center. Organizers are still accepting requests to receive invitations. For more information, visit http://veterans.unc.edu/tarheeltribute/.

 

As UNC-Chapel Hill has experienced growth in the number of students from the military – the most significant increase since World War II – the campus has enhanced and launched programs to help veterans and other military-affiliated students make the most of their Tar Heel experience. Some of the military and veteran resources at Carolina include:

 

  • UNC CORE, a UNC-Chapel Hill led program, is designed to accelerate higher education opportunities for N.C. active duty military, veterans, National Guard and Reserve members.
  • The Veterans Resource Team encompasses staff members from multiple University offices who provide a coordinated approach to serving students and employees who are active duty military or veterans. The team includes the first student veteran assistance coordinator – Amber Mathwig, a 10-year Navy veteran.
  • UNC Kenan-Flagler Business School has a portfolio of online and on-campus programs empowering military personnel and veterans to leverage leadership, management and relationship skills that help them further their education and advance their career in today’s complex global environment.
  • Warrior Scholar Project serves as a unique bridge for veterans by immersing them in an intensive program of reading and writing that prepares them for university-level coursework. Carolina is honored to be one of the 11 host institutions for the intensive, donor-funded academic boot camp that prepares student-veterans to be classroom leaders and has increased veteran graduation rates. Carolina launched this effort in 2015; read more here.
  • The Green Zone Training Program educates faculty and staff about issues facing veterans, including sensitive topics of discussion that may arise in the classroom. Since the program’s inception, more than 150 staff and faculty have completed this special training.

 

-Carolina-

Photo link: http://bit.ly/2elB3ug

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 113 master’s, 68 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty – including two Nobel laureates – staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 317,000 alumni live in all 50 states and 150 countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

Communications and Public Affairs contact: Betsy Greer, (919) 962-7250, betsy.greer@unc.edu