UNC classes canceled from 2 p.m. Monday to 11 a.m. Tuesday; offices open

For immediate use

UNC-Chapel Hill classes canceled from 2 p.m. Monday to 11 a.m. Tuesday; offices open

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C. – Feb. 16, 2015) – Due to expected winter weather, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill has canceled classes from 2 p.m. Monday, Feb. 16, until 11 a.m. Tuesday, Feb. 17. Offices remain open.

 

The University has activated Condition 2 in its list of adverse weather operating conditions.

 

For Students and Faculty

Classes are canceled starting at 2 p.m. on Monday, Feb. 16, 2015, and will resume at 11 a.m. Tuesday, Feb. 17, 2015. Classes prior to 11 a.m. Tuesday will not be held. Arrangements to make up missed classes are at the discretion of the faculty member.

 

For Employees

The University is suspending non-mandatory operations; offices will remain open in a limited capacity between 2 p.m. Monday, Feb. 16, 2015, and 11 a.m. Tuesday, Feb. 17, 2015. Severe weather essential employees are required to report to work. The University also encourages non-mandatory employees to leave campus or not to report to work for later shifts, as deemed necessary for personal safety. Employees are reminded that a new state policy requires SPA employees to use personal leave time when Condition 2 is in effect. Employees (SPA and EPA non-faculty) are reminded of the University’s Adverse Weather Policy. Non-mandatory employees are responsible for their regular duties. As noted above, if employees choose not to work due to concerns about personal safety or family considerations, a new state policy requires SPA employees to use personal leave time.

See the Adverse Weather Policy Clarification for Employees for additional information.

 

Adverse Weather Operating Conditions

UNC uses three main adverse weather operating conditions:  Condition 1 (open), Condition 2 (classes canceled; University has suspended non-mandatory operations; offices are open and non-mandatory employees should report to work if possible) or Condition 3 (classes canceled; offices closed). Reports of state government closings do not apply to the University. The University generally announces adverse weather news on www.unc.edu, the campus information sources listed below, and through the news media. Unless a change is announced, the University always operates under Condition 1 – regular schedule.

Please continue to check the University’s homepage, www.unc.edu, for updates about University operations, along with the information sources listed below.

 

Other Information Sources

  • Alert Carolina website, alertcarolina.unc.edu, and Alert Carolina informational emails.
  • (919) 843-1234. Adverse Weather and Emergency Phone Line for recorded information and announcements about campus operations.
  • UNC Traveler’s Information System Radio, 1610 AM, near campus.
  • UNC Department of Public Safety for details including parking lot conditions.
  • Chapel Hill Transit inclement weather news and routes and schedules.

– Carolina –

Contact:  Communications and Public Affairs, (919) 962-2091 (main office number); 216-2584 (on-call pager)

Carolina community mourns loss of Dean Smith

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Carolina community mourns loss of Dean Smith

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C. – Feb. 8, 2015) — The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill mourns the death of Dean Smith, Carolina’s beloved and admired basketball coach from 1961 to 1997. He was widely known as a leader on the court, throughout the Carolina community and across the country.

 

“The Carolina family lost a cherished member today,” said Chancellor Carol L. Folt. “Over the next few days, people around the world will pause to remember Coach Smith, honor his legacy and grieve his passing. We can find solace in knowing that because of his leadership on and off the court, the world is a better and more accepting place.

 

“Everyone who knew Coach Smith has stories to share about his kindness to others and his love for Carolina. He was truly a giant who lived a life that was an inspiration to so many, and the love they gave back was heartfelt and genuine. I hope his wife, Linnea, and his family are feeling the warm embrace of all who loved him.”

 

A teacher and humanitarian, Smith was an outspoken advocate for equality and fairness in collegiate athletics and civic affairs. On the court, he brought standout player Charles Scott to Chapel Hill in 1966 as the University’s first African American scholarship athlete, essentially introducing diversity to the Atlantic Coast Conference. Off the court, Smith was active in the local Civil Rights movement and pushed local business owners to open their doors to everyone. Over the many decades of coaching, more than 95 percent of his lettermen graduated.

 

“Coach Smith was always so much more than a brilliant basketball strategist,” said Lowry Caudill, chair of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Board of Trustees. “He was a father figure to his players, a loyal friend to his associates, a compassionate humanitarian who championed equality, and a strong advocate for the importance of education. He cared about others more than himself. He will forever be remembered as a giant in the history of our great University. We are grateful to his wife, Linnea, and his family for sharing him with all of us for so many years.”

 

Smith’s philosophy, faith and talent brought acclaim and respect to the University. Beyond championships, Smith received many individual awards, most recently the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2013, the nation’s highest civilian honor, for his humanitarian legacy. Yet Smith – a selfless, humble and private man – was always the first to remind people that the real credit for his career went to those around him: his players, coaches, staff and colleagues.

 

“We lost a man of the highest integrity who did so many things off the court to help make the world a better place to live in,” said UNC head basketball coach Roy Williams, who had played for and coached under Smith. “He was the greatest there ever was on the court but far, far better off the court with people. His concern for people will be the legacy I will remember most.

 

Carolina Athletic Director Bubba Cunningham echoed Williams’ sentiment. “Dean Smith was a legendary Hall of Fame coach who will long be remembered as an innovator in the game of basketball and a pioneer for social justice. His legacy will always be a part of the University of North Carolina and will continue to inspire students for generations to come.”

 

Folt said the University community was grateful to Smith for dedicating so much of his life to enriching Carolina in many ways. “His dedication to opening doors for all people to achieve their goals contributed to UNC’s reputation for achievement in academics and in life,” she said. “From his very public coaching successes to his quiet support of programs and people at UNC and beyond, he advanced this great public university and what it stands for. As deeply as the Carolina family feels his loss, we know his family and close friends feel it more intensely. I extend our collective gratitude to Coach Smith, and send wishes of comfort and peace to his family and close friends.”

 

The Atlantic Coast Conference has suggested that ACC schools observe a moment of silence at their next home men’s basketball games, perhaps prior to the playing of the national anthem.

 

Plans for a public celebration of Smith’s life and memorial gifts will be announced separately.

 

– Carolina –

Alert Carolina siren, text message test successful

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Alert Carolina siren, text message test successful

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C. – January 20, 2015)The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Tuesday (Jan. 20) successfully tested its emergency sirens as well as text-message delivery as part of the Alert Carolina safety awareness campaign.

 

The sirens sounded an alert tone in conjunction with a brief pre-recorded public address message. The test siren activation was followed by two test text messages – one for when the sirens initially sounded and another for the “all clear” – to cell phone numbers registered by students, faculty and staff in the online campus directory.

 

The sirens are located at Hinton James Residence Hall off Manning Drive; the Gary R. Tomkins Chilled Water Operations Center behind the Dogwood Parking Deck; Winston Residence Hall at the corner of Raleigh Street and South Road; near Hill Hall behind University Methodist Church; and next to University buildings and support facilities near the Giles Horney Building off Martin Luther King Boulevard; as well as at the Friday Center, located about three miles east of the central campus.

 

Text messages were sent to 44,354 unique cell phone numbers registered to students, faculty and staff, with 90 percent of the siren activation messages delivered within 4.17 minutes. In addition, the University sent 54,083 emails for both the initial siren activation and “all clear”; the send time for delivery of 90 percent of the test messages was approximately five minutes and for the “all clear” messages, just under six minutes. Because it is so important to get emergency-related information to people as quickly as possible, University officials constantly work to improve the delivery times for Alert Carolina messages.

 

In an actual emergency, the sirens would sound if an armed and dangerous person was on or near campus, a major chemical spill or hazard had been reported or a tornado warning was issued for the Chapel Hill-Carrboro area by the National Weather Service. The sirens also could sound for a different emergency, as determined by the Department of Public Safety, for which a general siren and alert message would be activated.

 

When the sirens sound, people should go inside or take cover immediately, close windows and doors, and stay until the “all clear” message sounds. The sirens are not designed to be heard inside buildings or while driving in vehicles. And there can be limitations with text messaging if there are problems with cell phone service or if users are out of service range.

 

To help educate faculty, staff and students about what to do when the sirens sound for a significant emergency or immediate threat to health and safety, the University created and distributed “What You Should Do For An Emergency Warning” posters to all campus classrooms, offices, residence halls and laboratory spaces. The poster is accessible at alertcarolina.unc.edu.

 

University officials emphasize that the sirens and text messages are part of a multi-layered approach to communicating in an emergency. Those efforts are anchored by alertcarolina.unc.edu. The University also communicates through means including campus-wide email and voice mail (only for campus land lines), official University social media accounts, the Adverse Weather and Emergency Phone Line, 919-843-1234, for recorded information, and the University Access Channel (Chapel Hill Time Warner Cable Channel 4) along with other campus cable television channels.

 

– Carolina –

 

Communications & Public Affairs contact:  Melanie Busbee, (919) 962-0550, mbusbee@unc.edu

 

UNC Classes canceled until 10 a.m.; offices closed until 10 a.m.

For immediate use

UNC Classes canceled until 10 a.m.; offices closed until 10 a.m.

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C. – Jan. 14, 2015) – Classes will be canceled until 10 a.m.; offices will be closed until 10 a.m., Wednesday, Jan. 14, 2015.  Condition 3

 

Employees (SPA and EPA non-faculty) are reminded of the University’s Adverse Weather Policy. Emergency employees are expected to report for work. All other employees are instructed not to come to work during this period. See the Adverse Weather Policy Clarification for Employees for additional information.

 

UNC uses three main adverse weather operating conditions:  Condition 1 (open), Condition 2 (classes canceled; University has suspended non-mandatory operations; offices are open and non-mandatory employees are expected to report to work if possible) or Condition 3 (classes canceled; offices closed). Reports of state government closings do not apply to the University. The University generally announces adverse weather news on www.unc.edu, the campus information sources listed below, and through the news media. Unless a change is announced, the University always operates under Condition 1 – regular schedule.

 

Other information sources:

 

– Carolina –

 

Contact:  Communications and Public Affairs, (919) 962-2091 (main office number); 216-2584 (on-call pager)

 

University to test emergency sirens Jan. 20

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University to test emergency sirens Jan. 20

Sirens will sound between noon and 1 p.m. as part of Alert Carolina, a campus-wide safety awareness campaign

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C. — Jan. 13, 2015) – The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill will test its emergency sirens on Tuesday, Jan. 20, between noon and 1 p.m. as part of Alert Carolina, a campus-wide safety awareness campaign.

 

Anyone outside on or near campus, including downtown Chapel Hill and locations near the William and Ida Friday Continuing Education Center and University facilities off Martin Luther King Boulevard north of campus, may hear the sirens during the test. No action is required. The sirens will sound an alert tone along with a brief pre-recorded public address message. When testing is complete, a different siren tone and voice message will signal “All clear. Resume regular activities.” Samples of the alert and “all clear” audio tones are available at alertcarolina.unc.edu.

 

The sirens sound only for a major emergency or an immediate safety or health threat such as:

  • An armed and dangerous person on or near campus;
  • A major chemical spill or hazard;
  • A tornado warning for the Chapel Hill-Carrboro area issued by the National Weather Service; or
  • A different emergency, as determined by the Department of Public Safety.

 

If the sirens sound, go inside or take cover immediately. Close windows and doors. Stay until further notice. The sirens also broadcast short pre-recorded voice messages. When the threat is over, the sirens sound again with a different tone to announce along with the voice message: “All clear. Resume regular activities.”
“The sirens are the fastest way for the University to alert people about a major emergency or life-threatening situation on or near campus,” said Chief Jeff McCracken, director of public safety. “We conduct regular tests of the siren system so people will be familiar with what the sirens sound like and to help our students, faculty and staff think about what to do in an actual emergency.”
During the test, the University will send test text messages to the 44,000 cell phone numbers registered by students, faculty and staff – one when the sirens sound and a second one to mark the “all clear.” In an emergency, the University also will post safety-related announcements on the Alert Carolina website (alertcarolina.unc.edu).
To help educate faculty, staff and students about what to do when the sirens sound for a significant emergency or immediate threat to health and safety, the University created and distributed “What You Should Do For An Emergency Warning” posters to all campus classrooms, offices, residence halls and laboratory spaces. The poster is accessible on the Alert Carolina website at http://www.alert.unc.edu/external/content/document/1395/1255639/1/AlertClassroomPoster.pdf.

 

People outside on or near campus may hear the sirens at six locations:  Hinton James Residence Hall off Manning Drive; the Gary R. Tomkins Chilled Water Operations Center behind the Dogwood Parking Deck; Winston Residence Hall at the corner of Raleigh Street and South Road; near Hill Hall behind University Methodist Church; University buildings and support facilities near the Giles Horney Building off Martin Luther King Boulevard; and near the William and Ida Friday Continuing Education Center about three miles east of the central campus.  If you are inside a building or driving in a car, don’t expect to hear the sirens.
The sirens and text messaging were last tested in August 2014. The University will continue regular testing at least once each semester as part of Alert Carolina, launched in March 2008.
The University uses multiple ways to reach students, faculty and staff based on criteria outlined in the Emergency Notification Protocols, which were adopted in 2011. The University will inform the campus community using four different types of notifications: Emergency Warning (sirens), Timely Warning (text and email), Informational Message (email) and Adverse Weather Message (text and email).

 

– Carolina –


Communications & Public Affairs contact: Patty Courtright, 919-962-7124, patty_courtright@unc.edu.

Practice Photo Essay

Here is a photo essay by Dan Sears.

 

 

 

 

How to increase health care enrollment for N.C.’s immigrants

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How to increase health care enrollment for N.C.’s immigrants

UNC study underscores the potential of the Affordable Care Act to reach many N.C. immigrants

 

(CHAPEL HILL, N.C. – Sept. 12, 2014) — Sixty-one percent of immigrants in North Carolina have no health insurance coverage, yet the average monthly premium for insurance available through the Affordable Care Act’s health insurance marketplace is within the price range many immigrants thought would be affordable for themselves or their families, according to a new report from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

 

The Carolina Population Center study, “Implementing Health Care Reform in North Carolina: Reaching and Enrolling Immigrants and Refugees,” also shows that immigrants who participated in focus groups believe that health insurance is a necessity they would not give up if they could afford it.

 

“Most people felt they could afford a premium between $50 and $70, so it was a wonderful coincidence when we looked online at health insurance premium rates and found that the average, with subsidies, was $69,” said co-author Krista Perreira, a professor of public policy and associate dean for undergraduate research in UNC’s College of Arts and Sciences and a Carolina Population Center fellow. “That’s right in that sweet spot of affordability.”

 

In 2013-2014, authors completed more than 100 interviews with state and county community leaders and conducted 11 focus groups with nearly 100 immigrants in the Charlotte metropolitan area, the Piedmont Triad, the Research Triangle and the eastern region of the state. Ninety-four percent of focus group participants said they knew little if anything about the ACA. The next N.C. enrollment period is Nov. 15, 2014 to Feb. 15, 2015.

 

Key recommendations include:

  • Statewide groups should partner with local community leaders to develop translated materials and community-based information sessions where immigrants can receive personalized enrollment assistance. In the past 12 months, there has been a concentrated effort toward making videos, brochures and website information accessible in multiple languages. Future written materials should be succinct, straightforward and have colorful graphics.
  • Short text messages providing brief information — such as a phone number to call for more information or a reminder that enrollment season is open — should be developed.
  • Public awareness campaigns urging immigrants to enroll should emphasize the following themes: financial security, family responsibility and protecting personal health for work. They should stress that premiums are affordable.
  • Health providers and community-based organizations that serve immigrants should continue to work together to promote Medicaid expansion in N.C.

 

“Many immigrants are eligible to participate in the health insurance marketplace, yet they remain one of the most hard-to-reach population groups,” said Jonathan Oberlander, professor and vice chair of social medicine in the UNC School of Medicine and a professor of health policy and management in the UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health. “To further reduce the number of uninsured in North Carolina, outreach to immigrants is critical.”

 

Local and community leaders are eager to engage in outreach to immigrants about health care coverage, but there’s no one-size-fits-all medium to get the word out to them. Perreira said organizations should concentrate enrollment efforts on the five counties where nearly 50 percent of noninsured citizens live — Durham, Forsyth, Guilford, Mecklenburg and Wake.

 

UNC researchers say N.C. is a compelling case study to increase enrollment because:

  • It is one of 34 states that has not implemented a state-run health insurance marketplace.
  • It has chosen not to expand Medicaid.
  • It has had one of the fastest-growing immigrant populations in the United States. (Between 1990 and 2012, the foreign-born population in N.C. increased by 550 percent.)

 

The report, which can be found online at http://perreira.web.unc.edu/implementing-health-care-reform-in-north-carolina/, was supported by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development.

 

Note: Perreira can be reached at (919) 962-6152, perreira@email.unc.edu; Oberlander can be reached at (919) 843-8269, oberland@med.unc.edu.

 

College of Arts and Sciences contact: Kim Spurr, (919) 962-4093, spurrk@email.unc.edu

UNC Communications & Public Affairs contact: Thania Benios, (919) 962-8596, thania_benios@unc.edu

 

 

 

 

University Statement

For immediate use

 


Update on University Investigation

Office of Student Affairs conducts investigation following Aug. 4th off-campus incident

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C. – Sept. 11, 2014) — “When the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill first learned of an off-campus incident that occurred Aug. 4, reports of that incident were taken very seriously, and a thorough review was immediately initiated.

 

Since the incident involved students, that investigation was conducted by the Office of Student Affairs as part of a well-defined process. The process also involved administrative notification to the University’s Department of Public Safety to ensure compliance with the federal Clery Act and proceeded – in a timely fashion – with the full cooperation of all departments involved.

 

The Office of Student Affairs has completed its investigation. On Wednesday (Sept. 10), the Dean of Students and the Office of Student Conduct provided the results of that investigation to the Student Attorney General as the next step in the student-led Honor System. The Student Attorney General receives reports of possible student behavior violations and independently determines whether to file disciplinary charges.

 

Because of the University’s commitment to protect the privacy rights of students and to protect the integrity of the ongoing process, the University will offer no additional comment at this time.”

 

Related Links:

Instrument of Student Judicial Governance (covers behavior standards and how misconduct allegations are resolved):
http://studentconduct.unc.edu/sites/studentconduct.unc.edu/files/documents/Instrument.pdf

Student Honor System (background):
http://studentconduct.unc.edu/honor-system

 

– Carolina –

UNC-Chapel Hill announces an improved, comprehensive policy addressing sexual violence

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UNC-Chapel Hill announces an improved, comprehensive policy addressing sexual violence

Collaborative process creates streamlined policy that bolsters and clarifies support options, defines types of prohibited conduct and other key terms and creates a more easily navigable adjudication process

 

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.—August 28, 2014) – The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill today announced the adoption of a more comprehensive policy on sexual violence. The policy, which also covers discrimination, harassment and related misconduct, interpersonal violence and stalking, clearly lays out the types of conduct prohibited by the University, offers clarity on key terms such as “consent” and creates a easily navigable adjudication process to ensure fairness and balance.

 

In 2013, a 22-member task force – comprising students, faculty, staff and a community member – was charged with reviewing and improving institutional processes and developing recommendations. The task force’s dedication and hard work over the course of a year builds on input from the Carolina community, recommendations from a prior student task force and significant feedback collected from hundreds of interviews during a University-commissioned listening tour.

 

“The Carolina community is steadfast in their dedication to addressing this major issue. The policy is part of a comprehensive, thoughtful approach to addressing sexual violence and is a critical component of our commitment to student well-being,” said Chancellor Carol L. Folt. “We are not done – we will continue to identify ways to provide a safe place to learn and work.”

 

Most notably, the streamlined policy reflects input from the campus community and addresses four key areas:

  • Clearly identified support and resource options: The policy makes it easier for the campus community to access confidential support and additional resources for both the reporting and responding parties.
  • More precise scope of prohibited conduct: The policy distinguishes among the forms of prohibited conduct: discrimination, harassment, sexual violence, sexual exploitation, interpersonal (relationship) violence, stalking, complicity for knowingly assisting in an act that violates the policy and retaliation.
  • Comprehensive definitions of key terminology: The policy contains more comprehensive definitions for terms such as “consent” to sexual contact and “incapacitation” where alcohol or drug use is involved.
  • Fair and balanced adjudication and resolution process: The revised process offers a supportive environment for both reporting and responding parties and increases overall efficiency. It will leverage the expertise of well-trained personnel; students will not serve in an adjudicating role.

 

The policy revises procedures for the investigation and resolution of reports involving students. The University also will develop specific procedures for reporting and responding when a faculty or staff member is the responding party.

 

In February 2013, the University engaged Gina Maisto Smith, a former prosecutor, educator and national expert on campus sexual misconduct, to obtain feedback from the Carolina community about sexual misconduct and on how the University addresses reports of such prohibited conduct.

 

“The way the Carolina community came together to develop this policy is remarkable,” Smith said. “The task force carefully crafted the policy to address issues voiced during conversations with hundreds of community members. The result is an improved policy that signifies the University’s continuing commitment to addressing and eliminating sexual violence.”

 

Carolina has created a website (http://sexualassaultanddiscriminationpolicy.unc.edu) to help the campus community understand the policy. The University will provide training sessions beginning during the month of September about the policy and reporting responsibilities for those individuals who are required to report incidents that are potential violations.

 

“Carolina is deeply committed to providing a safe and welcoming environment,” task force Chair Christi Hurt added. “We will form an advisory committee of faculty, staff, students and the community to review the implementation of the policy and to provide further recommendations.”

 

The policy complies with the Dear Colleague Letter issued in 2011 by the U.S. Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights (OCR), Section 304 of the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013, and Questions and Answers on Title IX and Sexual Violence issued on April 29, 2014 by OCR. The policy is consistent with the recommendations issued by the White House Task Force to Protect Students from Sexual Assault and the system-wide UNC Campus Security Initiative.

 

-Carolina-

 

Equal Opportunity and Compliance Office contact: Hilary Delbridge, (919) 445-1575, hilarydelbridge@unc.edu

Media contact: Karen Moon, (919) 962-8595, karen_moon@unc.edu

 

Public information meeting about 2014 Carolina North Annual Report set for Sept. 15

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Public information meeting about 2014 Carolina North Annual Report set for Sept. 15

UNC and Town welcome comments and feedback from the public

 

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.—Aug. 27, 2014) — A public information meeting will be held at 5:30 p.m. Monday, Sept. 15, to receive comments and feedback on the 2014 Carolina North Development Agreement Annual Report to the Town of Chapel Hill. The meeting will be held in the Magnolia Conference Room of the Giles F. Horney Building at 103 Airport Drive. Free parking is available, and Chapel Hill Transit serves the building via the NU route.

 

The report is posted at http://carolinanorth.unc.edu/, where the public can access the Carolina North conservation areas baseline and initial monitoring reports by the Triangle Land Conservancy.

 

Carolina North is envisioned as a mixed-use academic campus on university-owned property along Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard, two miles north of the main campus of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. University and Town representatives signed a development agreement in 2009 that covers the first 20 years of development on the site. The agreement contains guidelines and standards for the development of the first 3 million square feet of a mixed-use research and academic campus on 133 acres.

 

The annual report lets the Town and public know what development activities have occurred on the Carolina North site in the past year and the ways in which the University is complying with the terms of the development agreement. The report is part of the structure established by the agreement for providing continued town-gown communication. The report will also be posted online at http://www.townofchapelhill.org/carolinanorth.

 

Town Manager Roger Stancil will review the report and the public input before reporting to the Town Council on his review of the development agreement and its requirements.

 

Public input is welcome. Send comments about the annual report or other issues related to Carolina North at any time to carolinanorth@townofchapelhill.org or write Town of Chapel Hill Planning Department, Carolina North, 405 Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd., Chapel Hill, NC 27514.

 

Detailed information is available online at http://www.townofchapelhill.org/carolinanorth and http://carolinanorth.unc.edu/. To be added to a mailing list to receive regular updates about the Carolina North development agreement, please contact info@townofchapelhill.org.

 

 

-Carolina-

 

 

Direct link to report: http://carolinanorth.unc.edu/Portals/CarolinaNorth/Documents/pdf/2014%20Carolina%20North%20Annual%20Report.pdf

Communications and Public Affairs contact: Susan Hudson, (919) 962-8415, susan_hudson@unc.edu