Dean Smith personal papers collection now available at UNC’s Wilson Library

The collection of personal papers are now available for viewing

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— Nov. 30, 2017) – On Thursday, November 30th, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill announced that the UNC-Chapel Hill Libraries received a gift of personal records from Coach Dean Smith. The nearly 12,000-item collection offers a closer look at Dean Smith the man and includes photographs, correspondence, newspaper clippings and more.

 

Archivists recommend those who want to see the collection make an appointment by emailing wilsonlibrary@unc.edu or calling (919) 962-3765.

 

For more information, please see:

Some of the items in the collection include:

  • Cover page from Smith’s 1946 high-school report on Emporia, Kansas (he got an A)
  • Handwritten notes by Smith for his acceptance speech on receiving the Kansan of the Year award in 2001 (the notes mention Roy Williams)
  • Souvenir brochure from the 1952 University of Kansas basketball team (Smith was on the team)
  • Invitation to the 55th reunion of the 1952 Kansas basketball team in 2007 (Smith attended the reunion)
  • Photo of Smith, players shortly after winning the 1982 NCAA championship (used in his autobiography)
  • Note of congratulations to Smith after winning career game number 877 from “fellow former Jayhawk” Senator Bob Dole
  • Note of congratulations on 877 from Clemson coach Rick Barnes
  • Telegram from Michael (Jordan, curators are fairly certain) to Smith after win number 877
  • Letter from Smith explaining his decision not to run against Jesse Helms for U.S. Senate in 1990
  • Handwritten note from Bobby Knight expressing his gratitude to Smith for his support after an unflattering article about Knight ran in Sports Illustrated
  • Cover of the program from the 1982 NCAA final four
  • Cover of a 1980 copy of Tar Heel magazine with Smith on the cover and the caption: “Dean Smith: Gentleman or Phony?”

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill:
The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 111 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 322,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and 165 countries. More than 175,000 live in North Carolina.

 

University Communications: Media Relations, (919) 445-8555, mediarelations@unc.edu

Cunningham signs six-year contract

News Release:

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— Nov. 17, 2017) – UNC-Chapel Hill Director of Athletics Lawrence R. (Bubba) Cunningham, whose leadership has continued to propel the success of the Tar Heels’ 28-team program in the classroom, in competition and in the community, has signed a new six-year contract, Chancellor Carol L. Folt announced.

 

Cunningham has been dedicated to the student-athlete experience since he became UNC’s director of athletics in 2011, and it has shown. With a mission to “educate and inspire through athletics,” he has included academic metrics in coaching contracts, launched a strategic plan that aligned the Department of Athletics’ priorities with those of the University, and helped develop and co-lead with the Provost the Student-Athlete Academic Initiative Working Group (now known as the Process Review Group), which rigorously reviews processes to promote academic success for student-athletes from the time they are recruited through the time they graduate.

 

He also established a degree completion program for Tar Heels who left school before graduation; initiated regular academic awards banquets; conceived The Rammys, an innovative end-of-year awards show that celebrates the success of student-athletes; and guided the addition of resources to promote the physical, mental and academic health and wellness of Carolina’s student-athletes.

 

In so doing, the Tar Heels’ grade point averages and Academic Progress Rates have steadily risen: Carolina student-athletes for the first time posted a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better for the last two years, and 16 teams scored a perfect 1000 APR in 2015-16. In addition, more than 300 Carolina student-athletes have made the ACC Academic Honor roll each of the past five years.

 

All while the Tar Heels have won nine national titles, made an additional 10 runner-up finishes – and logged more than 25,000 hours of community service — during Cunningham’s tenure.

 

 

“I deeply appreciate Bubba’s commitment, day-in and day-out, to our student-athletes, coaches and university,” Folt said. “He is a key member of my executive team, and his dedication to the student-athlete experience, both on and off the field, is just one example of why he is such an important leader in the field of college athletics and student success both at Carolina and in the United States.”

 

 

Also during Cunningham’s tenure:

  • The Tar Heels have finished in the top eight of the Directors Cup five times.
  • Twelve former Carolina student-athletes from six sports have graduated using Complete Carolina, a degree completion program officially established in 2014.
  • The Tar Heels have broken ground on a transformative array of athletics facilities projects – including a new football practice facility, lacrosse/soccer stadium, field hockey stadium and track and field complex. Those will be completed by the fall of 2018 and are part of a master plan for UNC’s athletic facilities.
  • The department launched a partnership with Disney to enhance customer service.

“Carolina Athletics’ mission is to educate and inspire through athletics, and I am honored and excited to continue to work each day with our talented student-athletes, dedicated coaches and staff, and committed University colleagues,’’ Cunningham said. “Thank you to Chancellor Folt, as well as to the Boards of Trustees and Board of Governors, for continuing to provide me with this incredible opportunity.”

 

Cunningham currently serves as the president of the National Association of Collegiate Directors of Athletics (NACDA), sits on the board of LEAD1, and is his seventh year on the ACC television committee.

 

The new contract, which runs through June 30, 2023, was approved by Carolina’s Board of Trustees; a provision of the contract also was approved by the University System’s Board of Governors last week. The contract includes a base salary of $740,440.

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill



The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 111 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 322,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and 165 countries. More than 175,000 live in North Carolina.

 

University Communications: Media Relations, (919) 445-8555, mediarelations@unc.edu

 

UNC-Chapel Hill trustees honor four with prestigious Davie Awards

The William Richardson Davie Award is the highest honor given by the Board of Trustees

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— Nov. 14, 2017) – The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Board of Trustees presented its highest honor, the William Richardson Davie Award, to four alumni in recognition of their “dedication, commitment, loyalty and service.”

 

During a dinner on Tuesday, Nov. 14, at the Carolina Inn, Chancellor Carol L. Folt and the trustees honored Alston Gardner of Chapel Hill, Sheldon Peck of Boston, Massachusetts, Sallie Shuping-Russell of Chapel Hill, and John Townsend of Greenwich, Connecticut.

 

Established by the trustees in 1984, the Davie Award is named for the Revolutionary War hero who is considered the father of UNC-Chapel Hill. It recognizes extraordinary service to the University or society.

 

Alston Gardner is a North Carolina native who has made his career in the tech business industry. He founded OnTarget, Inc., a consulting and training firm focused on the information technology industry. Under his leadership, OnTarget grew from a start-up to the industry leader in sales force development. He earned his bachelor’s degree in history from Carolina and completed a post-baccalaureate certificate in psychology at Columbia University. His involvement at UNC has included the Chancellor’s Innovation Circle, Kenan-Flagler Business School Board of Visitors and the Kenan-Flagler Foundation Board. He served on the Steering Committee for the Carolina First Campaign, chaired the University’s Global Advisory Board and helped lead the effort to build the FedEx Global Education Center. He served on the UNC Board of Trustees and was vice chairman 2013 to 2015.

 

Sheldon Peck was born in Durham, North Carolina, and received both his bachelor’s degree in dentistry and his D.D.S. from Carolina. He then went on to have an extremely successful orthodontics career in Boston, Massachusetts, and became a professor of developmental biology at Harvard University’s School of Dental Medicine. His passion for art led him to be a collector of rare drawings. In January of 2017, Peck and his wife, Leena, donated 134 of these drawings, which included seven Rembrandts, to the Ackland Art Museum. Sheldon Peck has served on the National Advisory Board of the Ackland Art Museum, the Collections Committee of the Harvard University Art Museums, and the visiting committees at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, and the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City. He is currently an adjunct professor of orthodontics at UNC.

 

Sallie Shuping-Russell is a well-renowned leader in investment and financial management. She has helped found numerous companies and is currently serving as a senior advisor with BlackRock’s Private Equity Partners group. She was born in Greensboro, North Carolina, and graduated from Carolina with a degree in English and political science. She then earned an M.B.A. from Columbia University. She has continued to devote her time to her alma mater throughout her adult life. She has served on the UNC Health Care System Board, the UNC Board of Trustees and is currently vice chairman of the UNC Investment Fund. She also chairs the newly established Carolina Research Ventures Board, which invests in companies formed from technologies developed at UNC. In 2011, she received the Distinguished Alumni Award from the UNC General Alumni Association.

 

John Townsend graduated from Carolina with an undergraduate degree in English and history as well as an M.B.A. He then went on to become a proficient investment banker, working at firms such as Goldman, Sachs & Co., where he was a general partner and managing director. He continued his business career after retiring from Goldman Sachs in 2002, serving in a leadership position for numerous companies, including Tiger Management, LLC. At Carolina, he has served on the executive committee of the UNC Investment Fund, UNC Kenan-Flagler Business School’s Board of Visitors and Ackland Art Museum’s National Advisory Board. A former member of the UNC Board of Trustees, Townsend co-chairs the Campaign for Carolina, the University’s current $4.25 billion fundraising drive. He and his wife, Maree, recently made a $50 million gift that will benefit areas and programs across campus, including the Institute for the Arts and Humanities and the Ackland Art Museum.

 

For photos, please visit:   https://unc.photoshelter.com/galleries/C00005vwcu89jLJ4/G0000DN5.pfkpnhI/Davie-Award-2017 and when prompted, enter the password: Davie.

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of the American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in the U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 110 master’s, 64 doctorate and 7 professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research, and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 322,000 alumni live in all 50 states and 165 counties. More than 175,000 live in North Carolina.

 

University Development: Kim Elenez, (919) 962-1628, kelenez@email.unc.edu

University Communications: Media Relations, (919) 445-8555, mediarelations@unc.edu

Veterans Day events scheduled at UNC-Chapel Hill

Media Advisory: not for publication

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— Nov. 9, 2017) – UNC-Chapel Hill students, faculty and staff will join community members to honor veterans on Friday, November 10, during two events on campus.

 

Tar Heel Tribute:

Three university offices partnered to host a networking event and breakfast for student and employee veterans beginning at 8:30 a.m. at The Carolina Club (inside the George Watts Hill Alumni Center). The Tar Heel Tribute program begins at 9 a.m. with the presentation of the Colors, followed by remarks from student veteran Frankie Bergos, Chancellor Carol L. Folt and others.

On site contact: Carly Swain: (704) 305-1838.

 

Veterans Day Ceremony:

The UNC-Chapel Hill ROTC will host a Veterans Day ceremony at 11 a.m. at the Alumni Memorial (between Phillips and Memorial halls, along E. Cameron Avenue). ROTC members will be present, in uniform, for the presentation of Colors and remarks from Major General Peggy Wilmoth, U.S. Army Reserves (retired) and executive dean and associate dean academic affairs at UNC’s School of Nursing.

On site contact: Carly Swain: (704) 305-1838.

 

For more information on programs and services tailored to the military-affiliated population at Carolina, please visit this site.

 

Carolina

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 111 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 322,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and 165 countries. More than 175,000 live in North Carolina.

 

University Communications: Media Relations, (919) 445-8555, mediarelations@unc.edu

 

UNC Experts available to discuss the opioid epidemic and diverse impacts

 

UNC-Chapel Hill researchers and faculty members are among those on the leading edge of research on the opioid crisis in the United States. They can discuss a variety of topics such as patient-centered outcomes, policy development, treatment programs and opioid treatment in rural settings.

 

 

If you’d like to speak with an expert, call (919) 445-8555 or email mediarelations@unc.edu.

 

Dr. Hendrée Jones is the executive director of UNC Horizons, a comprehensive drug treatment program for pregnant and parenting women. She is a professor in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology and an adjunct professor in the Department of Psychology at UNC-Chapel Hill. Dr. Jones can discuss opioid use disorder, comprehensive treatment programs for mothers and their children, neonatal abstinence syndrome and the benefits of medication assisted treatment.

 

 

Dr. Nabarun Dasgupta is a senior research scientist with the UNC Injury Prevention Center and UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy. Dr. Dasgupta is one of the primary architects of “Project Lazarus,” an initiative to put naloxone (the emergency opioid overdose medication) kits across North Carolina.  His work made the project both functional and adaptable for diverse communities. He can discuss how the opioid epidemic evolved in the United States, ideal methods for addressing the health-care delivery system and the science behind an overdose. He can also discuss how racial bias plays into and perpetuates the opioid crisis.

 

 

Dr. Kim Sanders is a clinical assistant professor in the Division of Practice Advancement and Clinical Education at the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy and an assistant professor in the Department of Dental Ecology at the UNC School of Dentistry. Dr. Sanders can discuss opioid prescribing trends in dentistry, balancing the pain management dilemma and opioid-related deaths county-by-county in North Carolina. She can also discuss the North Carolina Controlled Substance Reporting system and the use of prescription drug monitoring programs.

 

 

Dr. Tim Ives is a professor of pharmacy and adjunct professor of medicine at the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy and directs the Chronic Pain Program in the Division of General Medicine and Clinical Epidemiology at the UNC School of Medicine. Dr. Ives can discuss both chronic pain management and substance misuse. He can also discuss North Carolina House Bill 243 – Strengthen Opioid Misuse Prevention, the (STOP) Act, and specifically how it can impact dental practices.

 

 

Dr. Lauren Brinkley-Rubinstein is an assistant professor in the Department of Social Medicine in the UNC School of Medicine, as well as a core faculty member in the UNC Center for Health Equity Research. Her expertise is in medication assisted treatment for individuals who have been incarcerated or those who are currently involved in the justice system. Dr. Brinkley-Rubinstein also has knowledge relevant to rising overdose rates, naloxone distribution (and usage) and the development of statewide strategic initiatives to stem addiction, opioid use and overdose.

 

 

P: (919) 445-8555  |  E: mediarelations@unc.edu

 

General Alumni Association Honors Three with Distinguished Young Alumni Awards

For immediate use

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C. — Oct. 16, 2017) — The General Alumni Association of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill honored two journalists and a nonprofit entrepreneur with Distinguished Young Alumni Awards.

 

The recipients of the 2017 awards are: Brooke Baldwin, of New York, an anchor for CNN; Nicholas Black of Mount Pleasant, S.C., founder of entrepreneurial nonprofits; and Nikole Hannah-Jones, of Brooklyn, N.Y., a writer for The New York Times Magazine.

 

“The remarkable accomplishments of many of Carolina’s younger alumni such as Brooke, Nick and Nikole are truly inspiring,” said GAA President Douglas Dibbert.

 

The awards were presented by the GAA Board of Directors at its fall board meeting. The GAA has given the awards since 1989, recognizing alumni age 40 or younger at the time of their selection for bringing credit to the University through their achievements.

 

Baldwin, who graduated from UNC in 2001 with a degree in journalism and mass communication, is the midafternoon host of “CNN Newsroom,” among other duties for the network.

 

Baldwin, who was the keynote speaker at UNC’s spring Commencement this year, has covered top stories of the day, such as the Sandy Hook massacre, the bombing at the Boston Marathon, a terrorist attack in France, the wars in the Middle East and the 2016 presidential campaign.

 

Twice she has been part of a Peabody Award-winning team at CNN — once for coverage of the 2008 presidential election and another time for the BP oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. She won two Emmys as part of a news team covering breaking news. In 2012, the New York Festivals International Television & Film Awards bestowed on her its Silver World Medal for Best Investigative Report for her first hour-long documentary, “To Catch a Killer.”

 

Black, who graduated from UNC in 2013 with an MBA, is co-founder of Stop Soldier Suicide (SSS), a nonprofit dedicated to preventing suicide among soldiers leaving the military and ensuring that veterans get other kinds of help.

 

Black served in the Army in Afghanistan as a Ranger-qualified captain, platoon leader and battalion fire-support officer for the 173rd Airborne Brigade Combat Team. While he completed his service with medals for valor and effectiveness, he saw that others survived the battlefield only to bring home psychological trauma and issues with substance abuse, some so severe that they killed themselves. SSS has more than 700 clients receiving case-management services around the country and connects by phone and email to thousands more.

 

Black also is CEO and co-founder of GoodUnited, a venture-backed startup that uses automated email-personalization technology to bring donors and nonprofits together. The service uses the technology to suggest what donors might want to support next based on their previous philanthropic activities.

 

Hannah-Jones, who graduated from UNC in 2003 with a master’s degree in mass communication, has focused on racial and socioeconomic segregation in education, housing and other areas of society. She won the National Magazine Award for her 2016 article in the Times magazine, “Choosing a School for My Daughter in a Segregated City,” detailing how she and her husband picked between schools that were predominantly black and Latino or predominantly white and what either might mean for the quality of education their daughter would get.

 

Hannah-Jones — previously a reporter for The News & Observer in Raleigh, The Oregonian in Portland and ProPublica — also received a Peabody Award in 2016 for an episode of the public radio show ‘This American Life” addressing the achievement gap between black and white students, and she has been named Journalist of the Year by the National Association of Black Journalists. She is co-founder of The Ida B. Wells Society, a training and mentorship organization aimed at increasing the number of investigative reporters of color.

 

For work with such personal and societal impact, the MacArthur Foundation on Oct. 11 named Hannah-Jones a MacArthur Fellow, more commonly known as the “genius grants.”

The General Alumni Association is a self-governed, nonprofit association serving alumni and friends of UNC since 1843.

 

For photographs of the recipients, please visit: https://unc.photoshelter.com/galleries/C0000.jfK5DRIwnI/G0000YRctqVTS9xU/2017-GAA-Distinguished-Young-Alumni-Awards and enter the password: GAA .

 

-Carolina-

 

GAA Distinguished Young Alumni Award website: http://alumni.unc.edu/awards

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill



The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 111 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 322,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and 165 countries. More than 175,000 live in North Carolina.

 

GAA contact: Doug Dibbert, GAA president, (919) 962-7050, doug_dibbert@unc.edu

University Communications contact: Media Relations, (919) 445-8555, mediarelations@unc.edu

Message from Chancellor Carol L. Folt on NCAA decision

Dear Carolina Community,

 

Today, we received the decision from the NCAA’s Committee on Infractions in our case resulting from academic irregularities that ended more than six years ago.

 

The hearing panel found no NCAA bylaw violations by the University; you may read its decision here. We believe this is the correct—and fair—outcome.

 

I am grateful that this case has been decided and the University can continue to focus on delivering the best possible education to our students. We wish to thank the NCAA staff and the Committee on Infractions for their work and time during the joint investigation and hearing process.

 

Carolina long ago publicly accepted responsibility for what happened in the past. One of the highest priorities of this administration has been to resolve this issue by following the facts, understanding what occurred, and taking every opportunity to make our University stronger. We have been open and transparent in everything we have done, as documented on our Carolina Commitment website.

 

The resolution of this case is part of a comprehensive effort working with administrators, faculty and staff across campus and with the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges, our accrediting agency, to fully address these issues.

 

Strong collaboration with our faculty was critical to developing the more than 70 groundbreaking reforms and initiatives, including in the areas of academic advising and academic oversight. I believe we have done everything possible to correct and move beyond the past academic irregularities and have established very robust processes to prevent them from recurring. We continue to devote extraordinary resources to monitoring and refining these reforms and initiatives that already had such a profound impact on our University.

 

I want to thank our dedicated students, and especially our student-athletes, who have shown so much passion and drive in the classroom and in competition while all of these things that had nothing to do with them were addressed. Carolina is proud of the accomplishments of our coaches and faculty and their commitment to our students and our campus. We are very grateful for the loyal support of our alumni and friends.

 

Carolina is in a better place, and we continue to focus on deserving your trust and ensuring integrity in everything we do. We are as resolute as we have ever been to our commitment to excellence, guided by our historic mission to serve the people in our state and beyond.

 

Sincerely,

 

Carol L. Folt
Chancellor

 

Published Oct. 13, 2017

UNC-Chapel Hill exceeds challenge by $25 million, raising $65 million for scholarships

For immediate release

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C. – Oct. 12, 2017) – The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill celebrated its 224th anniversary and announced that the one-year Give for Good: Scholarship Challenge raised more than $65 million to support the Carolina Covenant and the Morehead-Cain scholarship.

 

One year ago, Chancellor Carol L. Folt announced the challenge, prompted by a $20 million gift from an anonymous donor. The donor made the gift as tandem $10 million challenges to double the amount, in order to help bring the best and brightest students to Carolina. More than 2,300 additional donors responded, contributing more than $45 million.

 

As Chancellor Folt announced today during the University Day ceremony and celebration, “I’m thrilled to report that we more than met the challenge issued by this generous anonymous donor. While he hoped to double the challenge gift, we ended up raising more than $65 million, more than tripling the original gift, all for student scholarships.”

 

Gifts to the challenge count toward The Carolina Edge, a Campaign for Carolina signature initiative that aims to raise $1 billion to support undergraduate scholarships, graduate fellowships and professional school financial aid. The campaign launched publicly Oct. 6, 2017, with an overall goal of $4.25 billion.

 

Launched in 2004, the Carolina Covenant scholarship program is a groundbreaking initiative that affords children of low-income families — many of whom are first-generation college students — an opportunity to attend Carolina without borrowing a penny. The program supports UNC-Chapel Hill’s mission of staying truly public and provides intellectually driven, hard-working young individuals the chance to study at one of the most prestigious public universities in the country — and the freedom to pave a future unburdened by college debt regardless of their background. Since its beginning, the scholarship program has enabled more than 6,500 high performing, low-income students to attend Carolina and graduate debt free. The Give for Good: Scholarship Challenge will help ensure the Carolina Covenant continues to thrive at Carolina.

 

Since its founding in 1945, the Morehead-Cain Foundation — home of the first merit-based scholarship program in the country — has connected the world’s most talented, high-achieving young leaders to a fully funded UNC-Chapel Hill undergraduate experience. More than 3,100 scholars have benefited from the program since its inception, channeling academic and leadership potential to make a positive and profound impact on the lives of others, beginning on campus and continuing after graduation. Funds raised by the Give for Good: Scholarship Challenge will help increase the number of scholars the program can bring to Carolina.

 

 

“We’re thrilled that we more than met the challenge issued by our anonymous donor,” said David Routh, vice chancellor for development. “This is one more example of the great momentum donors have provided to carry us into the public phase of the Campaign for Carolina.”

 

 

-Carolina-

 

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of the American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in the U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 110 master’s, 64 doctorate and 7 professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research, and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 322,000 alumni live in all 50 states and 165 counties. More than 175,000 live in North Carolina.

 

University Development: Kim Elenez, (919) 962-1628, kelenez@email.unc.edu

University Communications: Media Relations, (919) 445-8555, mediarelations@unc.edu

 

UNC-Chapel Hill accepts $10 million challenge to support world-class faculty

News Release:  For immediate use

 

Commitment from John G. Ellison Jr. triggers drive for faculty recruitment and retention funds

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C. – Oct. 9, 2017) – Triggered by a $10 million gift from alumnus John G. Ellison, Jr., the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill has accepted a $10 million challenge to help retain and reward current outstanding faculty and attract extraordinary teachers, scholars and scientists to Carolina. Announced by Chancellor Carol L. Folt at an Oct. 6 gala celebrating the launch of “For All Kind: The Campaign for Carolina,” the Faculty Excellence Challenge will support incentives such as salary supplements and research funds.

 

Running through Oct. 8, 2018, the challenge will enable the University to sustain the faculty’s current excellence and strategically grow its professoriate in key areas to enhance overall academic quality, strengthen the research enterprise, broaden innovation and entrepreneurship initiatives and better serve a growing undergraduate, graduate and professional student body. If met, the challenge will provide at least an additional $10 million for similar support.

 

“John’s extraordinary pledge jumpstarts the Faculty Excellence Challenge and supports our mission to attract, reward and retain talented faculty who open minds and change the lives of our students,” said Chancellor Carol L. Folt. “John has been a dedicated Tar Heel volunteer and contributor to our university for decades. Thanks to his wonderful new investment in Carolina, we have the opportunity to champion our faculty whose dedicated work helps create our understanding of science, medicine and the humanities.”

 

Carolina has been focused on increased faculty recruitment and retention efforts, which has yielded stunning results in the last several years including retaining 79% of faculty and recruiting 94 new faculty (18 tenured, 76 tenure-track) in academic year 2015-2016. Ellison’s gift will further bolster these efforts to keep top scholars and researchers in Chapel Hill and bring new talent to campus.

 

The Faculty Excellence Challenge supports a key priority in the Campaign for Carolina — Faculty & Scholarship: The 21st Century Professoriate — which aims to raise funds to help the University attract, reward and retain top faculty amidst stiff competition from other institutions. It also supports the core pillars of the University’s overarching Blueprint for Next — “Of the Public, for the Public” and “Innovation Made Fundamental” — which uphold Carolina’s commitment to grow and evolve while remaining rooted in its public service mission.

 

“I have been fortunate in my life and career to have incredible teachers, mentors and leaders who invested their time and energy in my success, not just in the business world, but in every facet of my life,” said Ellison. “So many of those seminal individuals were my professors here, and their impact on my life has not only been profound, but it continues even today. I want that for every student who comes to Carolina, because they deserve it and society needs their leadership for our future.”

 

Ellison, of Greensboro, who also committed artwork valued at more than $11.5 million to the Ackland Art Museum, is chairman of Ellison Co. Inc. A Campaign for Carolina Steering Committee co-chair, Ellison has served on multiple University boards, including the UNC Board of Visitors and the UNC Institute for the Arts and Humanities Advisory Board. He concluded an eight-year tenure on the Board of Trustees in 2011.

The giving challenge and Ellison’s $21.5 million total donation continue strong fundraising momentum for the Campaign for Carolina’s $4.25 billion fundraising goal, which seeks to foster an innovation generation prepared to lead the world to a better future through research and scholarship, example and ethos.

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 110 master’s, 64 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 322,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and 165 countries. More than 175,000 live in North Carolina.

 

University Development: Kim Elenez, (919) 962-1628, kelenez@email.unc.edu

University Communications: Media Relations, (919) 445-8555, mediarelations@unc.edu

Red, White and Carolina Blue Challenge: UNC-Chapel Hill accepts $20 million challenge to support education for military families

News Release: For immediate use

 

Matching gift will add support to the Carolina Covenant

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C. – Oct. 7, 2017) – With the launch of “For All Kind: The Campaign for Carolina” on Oct. 6, 2017, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill has announced a $20 million challenge in support of need-based aid for the children of service men and women. Running through October 2019, the Red, White and Carolina Blue Challenge will further open the door to a world-class, Carolina education for students from military families who qualify for the Carolina Covenant.

 

The challenge results from a gift commitment totaling $40 million from Steve and Debbie Vetter of Greensboro. $20 million will support the Red, White and Carolina Blue Challenge, $10 million will support UNC Kenan-Flagler Business School and $10 million will support Carolina Athletics.

 

If met by Oct. 7, 2019, the Red, White and Carolina Blue Challenge will provide $40 million in total to create scholarship opportunities for students from military families. Recipients of their gift will be recognized as Steve and Debbie Vetter Military Family Scholars.

 

“As we launch the Campaign for Carolina with a focus on people and innovation, this incredibly generous and thoughtful gift from the Vetters builds on our 224-year tradition of supporting America’s service people and their families,” said Chancellor Carol L. Folt. “Our veterans and military service members are the last to ask and the most grateful to receive. The Red, White and Carolina Blue Challenge reaffirms our ongoing pledge to create future opportunities for the men and women who serve our nation and their families.”

 

Carolina remains one of the few U.S. public universities that is truly need blind during the admissions process. The challenge will help sustain that tradition by meeting the full financial need of Carolina Covenant-qualifying children of retired and active duty military personnel.

North Carolina ranks third in the nation with more than 96,000 active duty personnel stationed in the state as of December 2016. Each year, UNC-Chapel Hill enrolls hundreds of undergraduates affiliated with the military — many of whom have financial need. In the fall of 2016, the University enrolled 402 undergraduates with military ties; 55 qualified for the Carolina Covenant.

 

“As military dependents ourselves, we are excited to be able to honor our fathers and our families by establishing this program to benefit the children of military service members who wish to attend UNC and who qualify for the Carolina Covenant. Too often, we forget the many sacrifices made by the families of the military and we hope this program will, in some small way, say thank you to those families,” said Debbie Vetter.

 

UNC-Chapel Hill is committed to supporting veterans and military-affiliated students. In 2015, the University announced two initiatives to help service members and veterans succeed in the classroom — both on campus and online. UNC Core, a distance-learning program, provides active duty service members, veterans and National Guard and Reserve members with the opportunity to complete general education college courses on a flexible schedule. The full-time Student Veteran Assistance Program in the Office of the Dean of Students works across the University and state to help veterans navigate the higher education process. Programs in the UNC Kenan-Flagler Business School and the UNC School of Medicine help veterans to advance their careers after the military.

 

Launched in 2004, the Carolina Covenant scholarship program is a groundbreaking initiative that affords children of low-income families — many of whom are first-generation students — an opportunity to attend Carolina without borrowing a penny. The program supports UNC-Chapel Hill’s mission of staying truly public and provides intellectually driven, hard-working young individuals from low-income backgrounds the chance to study at one of the most prestigious public universities in the country – and the freedom to pave a future unburdened by college debt. Since its beginning, the scholarship program has enabled more than 6,000 high-performing, low-income students to attend Carolina and graduate debt-free.

 

The giving challenge and the Vetters’ $40 million total donation continue strong fundraising momentum for the Campaign for Carolina’s $4.25 billion fundraising goal, which seeks to foster an innovation generation prepared to lead the world to a better future through research and scholarship, example and ethos. This campaign is the largest in the Southeast and the second largest among public institutions in the nation.

 

“We are so grateful to the Vetters for a transformative gift that aligns with our core values, upholds Carolina’s commitment to excellence, accessibility and affordability, and also honors the men and women who bravely serve our country. With their gift and their challenge to the Carolina community, we will help enrich the lives of deserving students and their families,” said David Routh, vice chancellor for university development.

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 111 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 322,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and 165 countries. More than 175,000 live in North Carolina.

 

Office of University Development: Kim Elenez, (919) 962-1628, kelenez@email.unc.edu

University Communications: Media Relations Office, (919) 445-8555, mediarelations@unc.edu