Southern Historical Collection receives $877,000 from Andrew W. Mellon Foundation

For immediate use

 

Southern Historical Collection receives $877,000 from Andrew W. Mellon Foundation

 

Grant will for develop models for communities to tell their own stories

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— April 25, 2017) – The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill has received an $877,000 grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, which will allow the Southern Historical Collection (SHC) at the Wilson Special Collections Library to further develop its transformative model for “community-driven archives.” In addition to several community archiving projects, the SHC will also develop and share training and educational materials in this emerging area of practice.

 

Activities for the three-year grant, “Building a Model for All Users: Transforming Archive Collections through Community-Driven Archives,” will begin immediately.

 

Community-driven archives are created through partnerships between a community that wishes to document and preserve its own history and an archival repository. In many cases, these are stories of marginalized communities that past generations of historians and archivists did not consider significant enough to record or preserve.

 

“These projects let us reach communities where people tell us, ‘I didn’t think anyone cared about our history,’” said SHC Director Bryan Giemza.

 

Giemza thinks having the community direct archiving activities with support from an archivist can foster trust and understanding. At the same time, establishing a more complete historical record benefits everyone who seeks to understand the past and the present.

 

“It’s a very democratic process that places the owners of the story at the center of documentary efforts. We are grateful to the Mellon Foundation for supporting work that leads to dialogue, truth and even reconciliation, by creating opportunities for Americans to learn from and about one another,” said Giemza.

 

As part of the grant, the SHC will hire a full-time Community Archivist and advance or complete four community archiving projects currently underway:

 

 

The SHC will develop a web-based resource to connect researchers with potential community archives projects. Additionally, the SHC will use the grant to share the information about its processes so other archives and communities can replicate them. This includes innovations such as the “Archivist in a Backpack,” which contains starter materials and instructions, protective document sleeves, a microphone and activity suggestions. It will also hold a publishing workshop so participants can reflect on and create a record of their own experiences.

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 110 master’s, 64 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s 317,000-plus alumni live in all 50 states and 156 other countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

Libraries contact: Judy Panitch, (919) 843-3619, panitch@email.unc.edu

UNC-Chapel Hill Communications contact: MC VanGraafeiland, (919) 962-7090, mc.vangraafeiland@unc.edu

Morehead Planetarium to host UNC Science Expo as part of the North Carolina Science Festival

 

(CHAPEL HILL, NC– April 20, 2017) –  Morehead Planetarium will host the annual UNC Science Expo on Saturday.  The signature event of the North Carolina Science Festival (NCSF) showcases the wonders of science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) and is a partnership between Morehead Planetarium and Science Center, the University of North Carolina and the Town of Chapel Hill.

 

A free, family-friendly event, the Expo offers more than 100 exhibits with hands-on experiments, science demonstrations, laboratory tours and stage entertainment. New activities for 2017 include tours of Ackland Art Museum and Coker Arboretum, a Kid’s Zone, with small science and giant games, and in the spirit of the Tar Heel 10 Miler and Four Mile Fun Run, the first ever Zero K for kids. See how slow kids can go as they “freeze” in place, just like molecules do at absolute zero.

 

No registration is required. A food truck rodeo will be on-site for lunch, snacks and drinks. A map of the expo is attached.

 

Saturday, April 22

11 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Cameron Avenue

UNC-CH Campus

 

Media Parking: Parking is free on Stadium Drive, in the Cobb parking deck, and the Nash, Park Place and Bell Tower parking lots. Paid parking is available at metered street spaces or at the Rosemary Street parking decks. On Skipper Bowles Drive near the Dean Smith Center, a free U bus runs to campus.

 

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 113 master’s, 68 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty – including two Nobel laureates – staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 308,000 alumni live in all 50 states and 150 countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

About the North Carolina Science Festival

The North Carolina Science Festival presented by Biogen was founded in 2010 and is the first statewide science festival in the United States. Each spring, the Festival offers hundreds of events that celebrate the economic, educational and cultural impact of science throughout North Carolina. The Festival was founded and is produced by Morehead Planetarium and Science Center (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill). The 2017 Festival runs April 7-23 with “Art and Design” as the theme. Burroughs Wellcome Fund is a Diamond Champion sponsor. Platinum sponsors are Duke Energy, N.C. GlaxoSmithKline Foundation and Google. Gold sponsors are UTC Aerospace and SAS. Bronze sponsors are UNC Healthcare, PSNC Energy, NC Electric Cooperative, Syngenta and Novozymes. For more information about the North Carolina Science Festival, visit www.ncsciencefestival.org.

 

Morehead Planetarium contact: Molly Molpus, (919) 843-7952, molly.molpus@unc.edu

UNC-Chapel Hill launches University-wide initiative to integrate the arts, learning and public service with Arts Everywhere Day, on April 7

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IMG_3096 copy

 

UNC-Chapel Hill launches University-wide initiative to integrate the arts, learning and public service with Arts Everywhere Day, on April 7

 

First annual campus arts celebration to feature more than 50 performances and installations by 40 partners across 20 campus sites

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.—April 4, 2017) – Media are invited to join University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Chancellor Carol L. Folt and Special Assistant to the Chancellor for the Arts Emil Kang at 1 p.m. on April 7 on a tour of diverse student and professional arts experiences during Arts Everywhere Day, the official launch of Carolina’s groundbreaking Arts Everywhere initiative.

 

Converting the campus into a creative hub, Arts Everywhere Day will engage the University community with diverse arts experiences and opportunities for creative expression. Along with professional installations, student and departmental work will be on view and more than 50 pop-up performances by student arts groups are scheduled. Creative, hands-on activities will also take place at The Pit, Polk Place and Rams Head Plaza.

 

With the belief that the arts are an essential tool for learning and engaging communities, Folt created Arts Everywhere to revolutionize academics and enhance public service at Carolina. Kang will drive this long-term strategic initiative to invest in sustained creative practice, live arts experiences and arts learning, with the goal of making Carolina a leader in transforming the 21st century liberal arts education.

 

Chancellor Folt and Emil Kang will join students at 1 p.m. to paint the Arts Everywhere mural wall. Media are invited to cover and are encouraged to join them as they tour a variety of installations, exhibits and performances across campus. Both will be available for questions at the completion of the tour.

 

Friday, April 7

1 p.m. ET

Mural Wall, The Pit (in front of UNC Student Stores)

207 South Rd.

UNC-Chapel Hill campus

 

Media unable to complete the full tour are encouraged to cover campus activities on their own. The program of events kicks off at 12 p.m. and includes:

 

  • Arts Everywhere Mural Wall – Designed by the UNC Arts Ambassadors, in collaboration with the Undergraduate Art Association, the wall will feature outlines of figures representing Carolina students and community members. The campus community is invited to fill in portions of the outlined design with paints that will be provided.
  • Campus Keys – Ten pianos (nine painted by students), installed at outdoor locations across campus, will be played by student art groups and music students during class changes (12:05 p.m., 1:10 p.m., 2:15 p.m. and 3:20 p.m.). The pianos will remain on campus though April 12 and will be open for anyone to play.
  • Capstone event for Maker-in-Residence – Carolina Maker-in-Residence Donovan Zimmerman, of Paperhand Puppet Intervention, will showcase his mask work with Carolina students at the Murray Hall Makerspace. The event will culmintate with a presentation of these larger-than-life pieces at 3:30 p.m. at Historic Playmakers Theater.
  • Dumpster Monster – This unique installation by Carolina Performing Arts DisTIL Fellow Robin Frohardt on Polk Place sends a poignant message about the inordinate amount of waste that humanity contributes to the earth.
  • Los Trompos – A large-scale interactive outdoor installation by Mexican designers Héctor Esrawe and Ignacio Cadena. “Los Trompos” is inspired by spinning tops and will be on view at the Ackland Art Museum, Rams Head Plaza and the Campus Y courtyard through Sept. 17.
  • Snake Pendulum demonstrations – Designed and built by students and faculty of the physics and math departments, this kinetic sculpture, on view in front of Phillips Hall, will demonstrate tension, phase and simple harmonic motion, as well as the creativity inherent in both disciplines.
  • Evening lectures and performances – The day will close with a keynote speech by Nigerian novelist Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s at the Fifth Annual Global Africana Conference and evening performances by Kenan Theater Company, UNC Opera and UNC Baroque Ensemble and PlayMakers Repertory Company.

 

Media Check-In: Media must check-in at The Pit no earlier than 12:40 p.m. MC VanGraafeiland (Cell: 646-345-2802) will be the on-site contact.

 

Media Parking: A limited number of spaces will be available for press in lots near the Frank Porter Graham Student Union. Contact MC VanGraafeiland (mc.vangraafeiland@unc.edu) by 3 p.m. on Thursday, April 6 to reserve parking.

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill



The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 110 master’s, 64 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s 317,000-plus alumni live in all 50 states and 156 other countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

Arts Everywhere contact: Rachel Ash, (919) 843-9088, rachel_ash@unc.edu

Communications and Public Affairs contact: MC VanGraafeiland, (919) 962-7090, mc.vangraafeiland@unc.edu

Media invited to join UNC-Chapel Hill for Hill Hall ribbon cutting ceremony

Not for publication

 

Media invited to join UNC-Chapel Hill for Hill Hall ribbon cutting ceremony

 

110-year-old music and performance arts building is reopening after extensive 18-month renovation

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C. – Feb. 6, 2017) – The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill will celebrate the reopening of Hill Hall, home to Carolina’s music department, following an extensive 18-month, $15 million renovation. This is a private event; however, media are invited to attend.

 

The renovations add air conditioning for the first time to the building, which was built in 1907.  Other upgrades include a climate control system, state-of-the-art acoustical treatments, a professional-grade stage, and equipment and piano lift.

 

These upgrades will transform Hill Hall, which has hosted guests such as Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Joan Baez and Yo-Yo Ma, into an innovative performance and practice space for students. The addition of recording facilities will allow students, faculty and guests to record performances and create new opportunities to partner with Carolina Performing Arts.  An enhanced backstage area with updated dressing rooms and storage, improved lighting and modernized administrative and teaching spaces adjacent to the rotunda will complete the renovations.

 

Additionally, the performance space will be named the James and Susan Moeser Auditorium in honor of the former chancellor and his wife, who are organists and teachers at Carolina.

 

The renovations are made possible thanks to a $5 million gift from the William R. Kenan Jr. Charitable Trust. The Office of the Provost provided an additional $5 million. The College of Arts and Sciences raised the balance through private gifts. The renovation used no state-appropriated funding.

 

Wednesday, Feb. 8

3:30 p.m.

James and Susan Moeser Auditorium

Hill Hall

145 E. Cameron Ave

Chapel Hill, North Carolina

 

Media Check-In: Media must check in no earlier than 3:15 p.m. at the entrance of Hill Hall. Kate Luck (479-629-6334, kate.luck@unc.edu) will be the on-site contact.

 

Media Parking: Parking is very limited. Media are encouraged to use the parking deck located between Rosemary Street and Columbia Street.

 

— Carolina —

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 110 master’s, 64 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty – including two Nobel laureates – staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s 317,000-plus alumni live in all 50 states and 156 other countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

UNC University Communications contact: Kate Luck, (919) 445-8360, kate.luck@unc.edu

Brooke Baldwin, CNN anchor, to speak at UNC-Chapel Hill Commencement

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bbaldwinofficial2015

 

Brooke Baldwin, CNN anchor, to speak at UNC-Chapel Hill Commencement

 

The news anchor will give keynote address to newest graduates

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C. – Jan. 11, 2017)— Brooke Baldwin, CNN news anchor and a graduate of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, will deliver the Commencement address at the University on May 14 in Kenan Stadium.

 

Baldwin, who anchors the 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. weekday edition of CNN Newsroom, joined the network in 2008 as a reporter and took over the anchor position in 2010. Most recently, Baldwin played an integral role in CNN’s record-breaking coverage of the historic 2016 presidential election.

 

“We are fortunate to have Brooke Baldwin, an award-winning journalist and Carolina graduate, returning to her alma mater to share her experiences about broadcast journalism today,” said Chancellor Carol Folt. “I have had the pleasure of meeting Brooke and I know our students will be inspired by her story of building upon what she learned at UNC-Chapel Hill to create a successful career covering significant breaking news stories around the world.”

 

In addition to covering the 2016 presidential election, Baldwin traveled to the Persian Gulf last spring for an exclusive embedded opportunity with the US Navy, reporting on the War on Terror. She also traveled to Kenya ahead of President Obama’s historic visit and landed an exclusive interview with his half-sister and their 93-year-old grandmother. Baldwin also hosted a historic town hall in Washington, D.C. in September 2015 that included interviews with people who have been touched by gun violence.

 

Her live anchoring includes President Obama’s second inauguration, extensive special coverage of the Boston marathon bombings and the elementary school shootings in Newtown, Connecticut. She also covered the 2012 presidential election, anchoring her show from the Republican convention and participating in the network’s primetime coverage of the GOP primaries. Additionally, she contributed to the network’s Peabody award-winning coverage of the 2008 presidential election.

 

She has covered major breaking news from the earthquake and tsunami in Japan and the death of Osama bin Laden. She was part of CNN’s Peabody-award winning team, covering the oil spill disaster in the Gulf of Mexico. Baldwin worked with the network’s Special Investigations Unit to complete her first hour-long documentary “To Catch a Killer” which won a Silver World Medal for Best Investigative Report at the New York Festivals International Television & Film Awards in 2012. She began her news broadcasting career at WVIR in Charlottesville, Virginia, and served as a lead reporter for the 10 p.m. newscast at WTTG in Washington, D.C. before joining CNN.

 

A native of Atlanta, Georgia, Baldwin earned a bachelor’s degree in Journalism and Spanish from the University in 2001. She also studied at the Universidad Iberoamericana in Mexico City.

 

“Coming home to Carolina and speaking to the Class of 2017 is a ‘bucket list’ opportunity for me. Once in a lifetime. I’ll never forget standing in my blue robe in 2001 listening to the wise words of the legendary Stuart Scott,” said Baldwin. “I have big shoes to fill. I’m beyond honored. See y’all in May!”

 

Folt chose Baldwin in consultation with faculty and staff on the University’s Commencement Speaker Selection Committee.

 

Spring Commencement will be held at 9 a.m. in Kenan Memorial Stadium. Folt will preside over the ceremony. For more information, visit http://commencement.unc.edu.

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 113 master’s, 68 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty – including two Nobel laureates – staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 308,000 alumni live in all 50 states and 150 countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

Communications and Public Affairs contact: Karen Moon, (919) 962-8595, karen_moon@unc.edu

Clayton Somers appointed to newly created vice chancellor for public affairs post

For immediate use

 

Clayton Somers

 

Clayton Somers appointed to newly created vice chancellor for public affairs post

 

Position will enhance Carolina’s focus on state, federal relations issues

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C. – Jan. 9, 2017) – The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill has named Clayton Somers, a longtime North Carolina attorney, executive leader and state government official, to the new position of vice chancellor of public affairs and secretary of the university.

 

A Carolina alumnus, Somers started work today (Jan. 9). The UNC-Chapel Hill Board of Trustees approved his appointment. The position was approved by the UNC Board of Governors. He reports to Chancellor Carol L. Folt and brings a wealth of public policy, government, executive board relations and legal experience on complex governance and compliance issues to Carolina. Somers spent the past two years as chief of staff to the North Carolina Speaker of the House, providing counsel on legislative and legal issues to members of the House of Representatives in the General Assembly.

 

“I am pleased to add a highly skilled professional of Clayton Somers’ caliber to our senior leadership team,” Folt said. “The diverse range of Clayton’s public affairs and business experience, combined with his unique knowledge of the General Assembly and state government, will be a tremendous asset as we assess the University’s future needs and vital role in serving North Carolinians. He also brings an important perspective to our relationship with the federal government, which supports and shapes the vast majority of the faculty’s life-changing research – a nearly $1 billion annual enterprise.”

 

Folt created the new position to ensure UNC-Chapel Hill has a more dedicated focus on state and federal relations issues – collaborating closely with the UNC system’s General Administration – and to complete an organizational change that better defines the role of secretary of the university as the primary liaison with the Board of Trustees. Joel Curran, vice chancellor of university communications, chaired the committee that led the national search for the post.

 

As vice chancellor, Somers leads efforts to manage the critical issues affecting University operations associated with the state and federal governments. He will partner with President Margaret Spellings’ staff at General Administration to advocate for the UNC system’s state and federal initiatives, monitor proposed legislation and public policy issues, coordinate UNC-Chapel Hill’s relationships with state and federal agencies, and strengthen campus contributions to state and national committees, advisory panels and policy boards.

 

As secretary of the University, Somers has primary responsibility for supporting the UNC-Chapel Hill Board of Trustees through strategic planning and management under the direction of Folt, as well as the board chair and vice chair.

 

Somers’ prior experience includes stints leading the N.C. Turnpike Authority, advising the N.C. High School Athletic Association as general counsel, and serving as an executive vice president, vice president of human resources and associate general counsel for a sports and entertainment company (Wasserman Media Group and its predecessor, Onsport Strategies), based in Raleigh and Los Angeles.

 

A Durham resident, Somers worked for nearly a decade in three prominent Raleigh law firms: Kilpatrick Stockton, LLP, Smith Helms Mulliss & Moore LLP and Sanford Holshouser. He is an appeals panelist for USA Basketball’s coach licensing program and spent the past 16 years as a board member, including a term as president, for the Triangle Educational Advancement Foundation, a non-profit that raises scholarship funds for students in Triangle-area high schools.

 

The Reidsville native earned a bachelor’s degree in business administration in 1993 from Carolina, where he was a James M. Johnston Scholar and a member of the Honors Program. He completed his law degree at Wake Forest University in 1996, received academic honors and served on the law review and moot court boards.

 

-Carolina-

 

Photo Link:  http://unc.photoshelter.com/gallery-image/Somers-Clayton/G0000s4EITqIigUs/I0000bVCJ734kD28/C00005vwcu89jLJ4

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 113 master’s, 68 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty – including two Nobel laureates – staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s 317,000-plus alumni live in all 50 states and 150 countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

UNC-Chapel Hill contact: 919-445-8555, mediarelations@unc.edu

Decades of research notebooks from Carolina’s first Nobel laureate available online

For immediate use

 

Decades of research notebooks from Carolina’s first Nobel laureate available online

 

Archivists digitize nearly 50 years of prize-winning work documented by hand

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— Nov. 14, 2016) – Decades of scientific research from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s first Nobel prize winner are now available for anyone to view online.

 

Since his time as a graduate student, Dr. Oliver Smithies has kept hand-written notebooks to log and track his pioneering work. Now, with the help of the University Archives in UNC-Chapel Hill’s Wilson Library, those notebooks have been digitized and are available to visit at smithies.lib.unc.edu. Viewers can flip through thousands of pages and see Smithies’ scientific process unfold.

 

“These diaries are a real treasure for anyone interested in science or the extraordinary level of dedication and commitment it takes to build a career as brilliant as Dr. Smithies’,” said Chancellor Carol L. Folt. “Thanks to Carolina’s archivists, we can view his personal notes spanning a lifetime of work that inspires us all.”

 

Smithies, the Weatherspoon Eminent Distinguished Professor of pathology and laboratory medicine at UNC-Chapel Hill’s School of Medicine, was named a co-recipient of the 2007 Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine. In the mid-1980s Smithies co-discovered a technique for gene targeting. This allowed researchers to study diseases with specificity like never before.

 

“They have a record of what an everyday scientist is doing for a lifetime,” said Dr. Smithies. “It’s a continuous record which I thought was probably rather rare, and that’s the reason I thought they may be of value to somebody sometime.”

 

At the age of 91, Smithies faithfully continues his research in his laboratory in the School of Medicine.

 

A text story and video about the digitized notebooks can be viewed here.

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 113 master’s, 68 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty – including two Nobel laureates – staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 317,000 alumni live in all 50 states and 150 countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

 

University Library contact: Judy Panitch, (919) 843-3619, panitch@email.unc.edu

Communications and Public Affairs contact: Carly Swain, (919) 445-8555, mediarelations@unc.edu

Paul Cuadros to deliver Winter Commencement address

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paulcuadros-jpg
 

Paul Cuadros to deliver Winter Commencement address

 

Award-winning investigative reporter, Latino initiative director focuses on race, poverty issues in America

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C. – Oct. 14, 2016) – Paul Cuadros, associate professor in the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s School of Media and Journalism and executive director of the UNC Scholars’ Latino Initiative, will be the featured speaker at the Winter Commencement ceremony.

 

Chancellor Carol L. Folt will preside at the event, which takes place at 2 p.m. on Sunday, Dec. 18, in the Dean E. Smith Center.

 

Cuadros emboldens students to investigate issues affecting communities, the state, the country and the world by examining race and poverty in America. He was selected by Folt in consultation with the Commencement Speaker Selection Committee, which includes students and faculty. His selection highlights Carolina’s continued tradition of outstanding faculty speakers at the ceremony.

 

“Paul’s remarkable career as an award-winning reporter and his wonderful contributions that enlighten our students as a distinguished member of our faculty are shining examples of his superb professionalism and daily dedication to making a difference,” Folt said. “I am excited that he will share his insights and experiences with an even larger audience at our Winter Commencement. His commitment to uncovering and highlighting the important issues of race and poverty in North Carolina and across our country will inspire our graduates to go forward and make an impact in our state, nation and around the world.”

 

Cuadros, who joined the University in 2006, serves as the chair and executive director of the UNC Scholars’ Latino Initiative, a three-year mentoring and college preparatory program between Carolina students and Latino students at six area high schools. He is the co-founder of two campus organizations: the Carolina Latina/o Collaborative, a Latino educational and cultural center, and the Latina/o Caucus, a coalition of faculty and staff that advocates for Latino interests on campus. Cuadros won the UNC Diversity Award in 2012 for his work opening doors for minority students, faculty and staff on campus.

 
His book, “A Home on the Field: How One Championship Team Inspires Hope for the Revival of Small Town America,” which tells the story of Siler City’s struggles with Latino immigration through the lives of a predominantly Latino high school soccer team, was Carolina’s summer reading program selection for new students in 2009. Cuadros is the only faculty member to have his or her book selected. His book has also been chosen for summer reading programs at other universities and is currently the focus of a documentary film project and episodic series.

 

Cuadros has received numerous awards and recognitions, including a fellowship with the Alicia Patterson Foundation in 1999, considered one of the most prestigious journalism fellowships; the 2006 Alfred I. duPont-Columbia Journalism Award, for his contribution to the radio series “North Carolina Voices: Understanding Poverty;” and the National Association of Hispanic Journalists’ award for online reporting.

 

Cuadros completed his undergraduate degree in communication and media studies at the University of Michigan in 1985 and earned his master’s degree from Northwestern University’s Medill School of Journalism, Media, Integrated Marketing Communications in 1991.

 

-Carolina-

 

Photo Link: http://unc.photoshelter.com/gallery-image/Faculty-and-Staff/G0000lmW.B.5nfmQ/I0000g8mF.LnvQcY/C00005plBUJIuM28

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 113 master’s, 68 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty – including two Nobel laureates – staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 308,000 alumni live in all 50 states and 150 countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

UNC-Chapel Hill Communications and Public Affairs contact: Will Rimer, (919) 445-0945, rimerwp@unc.edu

Unvaccinated Adults Cost the U.S. More Than $7 Billion a Year

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Unvaccinated Adults Cost the U.S. More Than $7 Billion a Year

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.—Oct. 12, 2016) – Vaccine-preventable diseases among adults cost the U.S. economy $8.95 billion in 2015, and unvaccinated individuals are responsible for 80 percent, or $7.1 billion, of the tab, according to the most comprehensive analysis to date from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

 

Researchers at the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy, led by Associate Professor Sachiko Ozawa, studied 10 vaccines recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The study, which will be published today in the journal Health Affairs, examined the actual cost of inpatient and outpatient care, cost of medication and the value of productivity lost from time spent seeking care.

 

The 10 vaccines protect against hepatitis A, hepatitis B, the herpes zoster virus that causes shingles, human papillomavirus, influenza, measles, mumps, rubella, meningococcal disease, pneumococcal disease, tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis and chickenpox.

 

The flu was the most costly disease with a vaccine available, accounting for nearly $5.8 billion in health care costs and lost productivity in 2015. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that 42 percent of U.S. adults received the flu vaccine during the 2015-2016 flu season. Other notable diseases with significant economic burdens include pneumococcal disease, such as meningitis and pneumonia, which is associated with nearly $1.9 billion in costs, and herpes zoster that causes shingles rounding out at $782 million.

 

“We believe our estimates are conservative and highlight the potential economic benefit of increasing adult immunization coverage and the value of vaccines,” Ozawa said. “We hope our study will spur creative health care policies that minimize the negative spillover effects from people choosing not to be vaccinated while still respecting patients’ right to make informed choices.”

 

The statistical model researchers developed determined the unvaccinated cost to the U.S. economy at $9 billion. Inpatient and outpatient care accounted for 95 percent of costs with lost productivity making up the other 5 percent.

 

The new UNC-led research is a more comprehensive review of the economic burden of vaccine-preventable diseases among U.S. adults than previous studies, as the focus to date has been on one or a few specific vaccine-preventable diseases. The researchers consulted existing research and data from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey and the Nationwide Inpatient Sample database in their analysis.

 

The study was funded by the pharmaceutical company Merck, a leading producer of vaccines.

 

–Carolina–

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

 

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 113 master’s, 68 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty – including two Nobel laureates – staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 308,000 alumni live in all 50 states and 150 countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

UNC Communications and Public Affairs contact: Thania Benios, (919) 962-8596, thania_benios@unc.edu

UPDATED: Carolina welcomes 4,254 new undergraduate students

For immediate use

 

Carolina welcomes 4,254 new undergraduate students

 

Fall 2016 first-year class includes increases in North Carolinians and African Americans

 

(Note: The following statistics are preliminary and will not be final until after Aug. 31, 2016, the University’s official enrollment reporting date. A final profile of the undergraduate classes will be available in late September.)

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— Aug. 20, 2016) – The 4,254 first-year students expected to start classes at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill next week were chosen from 35,875 applicants. An additional 779 students are joining the Carolina community as transfer students.

 

The new first-year class includes 3,523 North Carolinians, an increase of 7.6 percent over last year’s class.

 

The 35,875 first-year applicants represent a 12 percent increase over last year and set an 11th consecutive record.

 

“We’re glad and grateful that these outstanding students have chosen UNC-Chapel Hill,” said Stephen Farmer, vice provost for enrollment and undergraduate admissions. “We’re especially grateful for the strong response from talented students from North Carolina, more of whom will be enrolling here than ever before. These young people will stand beside terrific students from outside our state and beyond to make us all better. From their hard work in the classroom to their contributions in their communities to their diversity of background and perspective, these students are truly inspiring.”

 

Undergraduate students entering this fall include veterans, scientists, entrepreneurs, artists, musicians and writers, as well as champion student-athletes and community activists. Specific accomplishments include:

  • Serving in the U.S. Army as an Apache Pilot in Command (Chief Warrant Officer Two) in Afghanistan;
  • Earning a scholarship through the U.S. Navy for the prestigious Navy Seaman to Admiral program;
  • Winning championships in soccer, swimming, basketball, football, equitation and track—including a gold medal in hurdling for Team USA in the International Association of Athletics Federations competition in Poland;
  • Achieving on the highest level in the arts—writing, music, dance and drama;
  • Conducting research on chemotherapy at the University of Texas; bone marrow transplants at Duke University; epigenetics at East Carolina University; and sea turtle nests for the Cayman Islands Department of the Environment;
  • Working with the National Climate Data Center to produce 3-D plots of snowfall record to validate accuracy of data and better manage disaster relief funding;
  • Inventing a mechanized walker as part of a team for the Pennsylvania Governor’s STEM Challenge that won first in state prize;
  • Developing Yoga4Nepal, a non-profit website to raise money for those affected by the earthquake in Nepal in April 2015;
  • Co-founding EZ World LLC and Soccertalk.net blog, creating and implementing business plans and social media marketing strategies;
  • Founding a company that manufactures and distributes tie-dyed socks;
  • Starting a business to build play sets and remodel bedrooms for children battling cancer;
  • Creating a YouTube channel featuring reviews of various technologies with over 12.5 million views and 100,000 subscribers;
  • Increasing support and awareness of LGTBQ issues in schools and communities;
  • Being named the youngest female glider pilot in North Carolina at age 14;
  • Cycling 500 miles across Spain.

 

Academic credentials

The University considers every candidate for undergraduate admission individually, holistically and comprehensively. These individual evaluations, taken together, do not aim to maximize any single, narrow outcome. Rather, they aim to draw together students who will enrich each other’s education, strengthen the campus community, contribute to the betterment of society and help the University achieve its broader mission. As a result, the statistics that follow are best understood as a description of the entire enrolling class, not as a prescription of the credentials that every candidate must present.

 

Among the 71 percent of the class whose schools reported an official rank in class, 43 percent ranked within the top 10 students in their high school class. Thirteen percent ranked first or second, and 77 percent ranked in the top 10 percent.

 

The middle 50 percent of the class scored between 1,790 and 2,110 on the SAT and between 1,210 and 1,420 on the critical reading and math sections combined. The middle 50 percent scored the following ranges on each component: 600-700, critical reading; 610-720, math; and 580-690, writing. For enrolling students who reported ACT scores, the middle 50 percent reported scores between 28 and 33.

 

In evaluating candidates, the Office of Undergraduate Admissions uses the highest score presented by each candidate on each part of the SAT reasoning and on each subject test of the ACT. When a candidate submits results from both the SAT and the ACT, the admissions office uses the test with the stronger results.

 

Seventy-seven percent of enrolling students reported submitting at least one AP score. They submitted a total of 22,595 scores. Of these, 19,121 were scores of three or higher. Enrolling students submitted 1,038 scores from IB exams.

 

Demographics

Enrolling first-year students hail from 96 North Carolina counties, 41 states and the District of Columbia and 18 countries (including the U.S).

 

The share of students identifying themselves as a race or ethnicity other than Caucasian is 34 percent. In addition to students identifying as African American (11 percent), other ethnicities includes Latino or Latina, 7 percent; Asian or Asian-American, 14 percent; and American Indian or Alaskan Native, two percent.

 

Students who will be the first in their families to graduate from a four-year college or university comprise 17 percent of the class. The class includes 96 international students.

 

Females comprise 60 percent of the incoming first-year class, men 40 percent.

 

The class also includes 202 students (five percent of the enrolling class) from one of the 64 partner high schools served in 2015-2016 by the Carolina College Advising Corps, a public service of the University that seeks to increase college-going rates among low-income, first-generation college and other underrepresented students. The Carolina Corps, a constituent program of the national College Advising Corps, places recent UNC-Chapel Hill alumni as admissions and financial-aid advisers in high schools statewide. The Carolina Corps will serve 71 high schools and more than 55,000 students (over 12,000 high school seniors) in 2016-2017. These numbers include 19 percent of the state’s African American students; 13 percent of Hispanic students; and 33 percent of Native American students.

 

Aid and scholarships

Thirty-nine percent of the incoming class will receive need-based aid, primarily in the form of grants and scholarships. Just over five percent will receive merit-based aid, including summer fellowships offered through Excel@Carolina, which connects top students with unique opportunities at Carolina.

 

Carolina Covenant Scholars, students from low-income backgrounds who earned a place at UNC-Chapel Hill and will have the opportunity to graduate debt-free, make up 13 percent of the new first-year and transfer students. The Covenant program offers a combination of grants and work-study funding, along with academic and personal support services, to help scholars make the most of their Carolina experience while working toward an on-time, debt-free graduation.

 

The Covenant has helped close the graduation gap between students from low-income families and their more affluent peers. Since the launch of the Covenant in 2004, four-year graduation rates among eligible students have risen by 23.7 percentage points, making Carolina a national leader in student success and economic diversity.

 

The University has led Kiplinger’s list of best-value public universities for more than 15 years and ranks near the top of the New York Times’ list of colleges doing the most for low-income students. A combination of exceptionally low tuition for in-state students and strong financial aid for all students helps keep Carolina affordable, regardless of family income. Only two-in-five students graduate with any federal debt, and the average loan amount among borrowers is more than $10,000 below the national level.

 

All aid statistics are preliminary and subject to revision.

 

Extracurricular achievements

  • 92 percent participated in community service;
  • 71 percent played a sport;
  • 62 percent contributed to a cause they believe in;
  • 62 percent pursued an independent hobby;
  • 49 percent participated in music, drama or other arts;
  • 48 percent held a position as president of their class or a club;
  • 22 percent conducted research outside the classroom;
  • 51 percent traveled outside their home country;
  • 52 percent assumed daily family responsibilities;
  • 49 percent held a job during the school year;
  • 46 percent participated in religious or faith-based communities;
  • 34 percent participated in student government.

 

Admission

For fall 2016 first-year admission, the University received 35,875 applications—12 percent more than last year and 50 percent more than five years ago. The overall admit rate fell from 30 percent to 26 percent this year, and the number of North Carolinians offered admission rose 7 percent to 5,700 compared to 5,330 last year.

 

Applied / Admitted 

First-year class

 

                             Applied       Admitted
North Carolina     11,662        5,700
Out-of-state          24,213         3,698
Total                      35,875         9,398        

**These numbers reflect residency information at the time of application.

 

Transfer class

Each year UNC-Chapel Hill enrolls approximately 750 transfer students into the sophomore and junior classes in the College of Arts and Sciences. Transfer students bring a diversity of backgrounds and experiences that enrich Carolina, and the University community welcomes these students into the full academic and extracurricular life of UNC-Chapel Hill.

Applied Admitted
2,879 1,151

**These numbers reflect residency information at the time of application.

Average college GPA: 3.70

 

The middle 50 percent of the enrolling transfer class scored between 1,610 and 1,980 on the SAT and between 1,080 and 1,330 on the critical reading and math sections combined. The middle 50 percent scored the following ranges on each component: 530-660, critical reading; 550-670, math; and 530-650, writing.

 

Transfer demographics

Approximately 33 percent of the enrolling transfer class is transferring from a North Carolina community college. The top partner community colleges and universities are Durham Technical Community College, North Carolina State University, Wake Technical Community College, Miami Dade College, Appalachian State University and UNC-Charlotte.

 

Incoming transfer students range in age from 17 to 53. Of the 779 enrolling transfer students, 94 students are at least 24 years old.

 

Military

Three hundred and twelve enrolling first-year students indicated an affiliation with the U.S. Armed Forces, primarily as a dependent with a parent who served or is serving in the military. Ninety-two transfer students indicated an affiliation with the military. Sixteen are currently serving and 20 have previously served in the U.S. Armed Forces. Sixty students are either the dependent or spouse of a current or prior service member. (Note: Some students qualify for multiple categories, i.e., many who served are also dependents.)

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 113 master’s, 68 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty – including two Nobel laureates – staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 308,000 alumni live in all 50 states and 150 countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

UNC-Chapel Hill Admissions contact: Stephen Farmer or Ashley Memory, (919) 843-2531, amemory@admissions.unc.edu

Communications and Public Affairs contact: MC VanGraafeiland, (919) 962-7090, mc.vangraafeiland@unc.edu