University Statement on the Employee Forum ‘Microaggression’ blog post

(Chapel Hill, N.C. – June 28, 2016) – Last Thursday, the UNC-Chapel Hill Employee Forum posted an opinion blog on its website on the topic of microaggressions. Those opinions were wrongly reported as University policy and/or guidelines; they are not. The blog does not represent University policy nor was it intended to be an official or unofficial guidebook as it has been widely reported in social media. UNC-Chapel Hill has no policy, formal or informal, about microaggressions. The Employee Forum has since decided to remove the post because it was misconstrued as University policy.

 

The blog post reflected the opinions of some Employee Forum delegates and was intended to provide a general overview about microaggressions—not to fully examine the topic, which is nuanced and complex. The Employee Forum is an elected body of staff members; each UNC System institution has an organization that represents the concerns and interests of its respective staff. Like all UNC-Chapel Hill employees, Forum delegates have the freedom to share their views about issues important to them. In fact, UNC-Chapel Hill has earned the highest “green light” rating from the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education (FIRE) for our efforts in protecting free speech rights.

 

Joel Curran
Vice Chancellor for Communications and Public Affairs

Military Veterans attending Warrior-Scholar Project Academic Boot Camp at UNC-Chapel Hill

Military Veterans attending Warrior-Scholar Project Academic Boot Camp at UNC-Chapel Hill

Media invited to cover national program that aids enlisted servicemen and women transitioning from the military to four-year higher education opportunities

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.—June 6, 2016) – For the second year in a row, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is participating in the Warrior-Scholar Project (WSP), which is designed to help enlisted servicemen and women transition from the military to four-year higher education opportunities. WSP is hosting its one-week academic boot camp at Carolina from Sunday, June 5, through Saturday, June 11.

 

WSP attendees are enlisted veterans and transitioning service members who are enrolled or planning to enroll in or transfer into a four-year undergraduate program. Twenty WSP fellows are attending the academic boot camp at Carolina this year.

 

Members of the media are invited to cover the academic boot camp. Because of the intense schedule of classes, workshops, discussions and one-on-one tutoring sessions, media should coordinate an opportunity to cover the WSP program at Carolina with the Communications and Public Affairs contact listed on this media advisory.

 

WSP Background: The WSP launched its first program at Yale University in 2012 with nine participants. Since then, WSP has expanded to encompass 11 top schools, including Carolina. WSP boot camps consist of immersive academic preparation courses, assistance with academic reading and study techniques, personal advisement opportunities and one-on-one counselling that help enlisted military veterans who are returning to school and who have not been in a classroom setting for several years. The WSP has earned a track record of successfully assisting veterans in developing the skills and confidence necessary to pursue higher education opportunities.

 

Participation in the WSP is another way that the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill supports the military and its veterans.

 

-Carolina-

 

Communications and Public Affairs contact: Michael John, (919) 445-8555, michael.john@unc.edu

 

UNC-Chapel Hill scientists find likely cause for recent southeast U.S. earthquakes

For immediate use

 

UNC-Chapel Hill scientists find likely cause for recent southeast U.S. earthquakes

 

Study shows pieces of the underside of the North American Plate peel off, sink into the mantle – a process likely to produce more earthquakes in southeastern U.S. in the future

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C. – May 3, 2016) – The southeastern United States should, by all means, be relatively quiet in terms of seismic activity. It’s located in the interior of the North American Plate, far away from plate boundaries where earthquakes usually occur. But the area has seen some notable seismic events – most recently, the 2011 magnitude-5.8 earthquake near Mineral, Virginia that shook the nation’s capital.

 

Now scientists report in a new study a likely explanation for this unusual activity: pieces of the mantle under this region have been periodically breaking off and sinking down into the Earth. This thins and weakens the remaining plate, making it more prone to slipping that causes earthquakes. The study authors conclude this process is ongoing and likely to produce more earthquakes in the future.

 

“Our idea supports the view that this seismicity will continue due to unbalanced stresses in the plate,” said Berk Biryol, a seismologist at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and lead author of the new study. “The [seismic] zones that are active will continue to be active for some time.” The study was published today in the Journal of Geophysical Research – Solid Earth, a journal of the American Geophysical Union.

 

Compared to earthquakes near plate boundaries, earthquakes in the middle of plates are not well understood and the hazards they pose are difficult to quantify. The new findings could help scientists better understand the dangers these earthquakes present.

 

Old plates and earthquakes

Tectonic plates are composed of Earth’s crust and the uppermost portion of the mantle. Below is the asthenosphere: the warm, viscous conveyor belt of rock on which tectonic plates ride.

 

Earthquakes typically occur at the boundaries of tectonic plates, where one plate dips below another, thrusts another upward, or where plate edges scrape alongside each other. Earthquakes rarely occur in the middle of plates, but they can happen when ancient faults or rifts far below the surface reactivate. These areas are relatively weak compared to the surrounding plate, and can easily slip and cause an earthquake.

 

Today, the southeastern U.S. is more than 1,056 miles from the nearest edge of the North American Plate, which covers all of North America, Greenland and parts of the Atlantic and Arctic oceans. But the region was built over the past billion years by periods of accretion, when new material is added to a plate, and rifting, when plates split apart. Biryol and colleagues suspected ancient fault lines or pieces of old plates extending deep in the mantle following episodes of accretion and rifting could be responsible for earthquakes in the area.

 

“This region has not been active for a long time,” Biryol said. “We were intrigued by what was going on and how we can link these activities to structures in deeper parts of the Earth.”

 

A CAT scan of the Earth

To find out what was happening deep below the surface, the researchers created 3D images of the mantle portion of the North American Plate. Just as doctors image internal organs by tracing the paths of x-rays through human bodies, seismologists image the interior of the Earth by tracing the paths of seismic waves created by earthquakes as they move through the ground. These waves travel faster through colder, stiffer, denser rocks and slower through warmer, more elastic rocks. Rocks cool and harden as they age, so the faster seismic waves travel, the older the rocks.

 

The researchers used tremors caused by earthquakes more than 2,200 miles away to create a 3D map of the mantle underlying the U.S. east of the Mississippi River and south of the Ohio River. They found plate thickness in the southeast U.S. to be fairly uneven – they saw thick areas of dense, older rock stretching downward and thin areas of less dense, younger rock.

 

“This was an interesting finding because everybody thought that this is a stable region, and we would expect regular plate thickness,” Biryol said.

 

At first, they thought the thick, old rocks could be remnants of ancient tectonic plates. But the shapes and locations of the thick and thin regions suggested a different explanation: through past rifting and accretion, areas of the North American Plate have become more dense and were pulled downward into the mantle through gravity. At certain times, the densest parts broke off from the plate and sank into the warm asthenosphere below. The asthenosphere, being lighter and more buoyant, surged in to fill the void created by the missing pieces of mantle, eventually cooling to become the thin, young rock in the images.

 

The researchers concluded this process is likely what causes earthquakes in this otherwise stable region: when the pieces of the mantle break off, the plate above them becomes thinner and more prone to slip along ancient fault lines. Typically, the thicker the plate, the stronger it is, and the less likely to produce earthquakes.

 

According to Biryol, pieces of the mantle have most likely been breaking off from underneath the plate since at least 65 million years ago. Because the researchers found fragments of hard rocks at shallow depths, this process is still ongoing and likely to continue into the future, potentially leading to more earthquakes in the region, he said.

 

Editor’s note: This press release has been reproduced in its entirety from the American Geophysical Union and can also be found here.

 

– Carolina –

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 113 master’s, 68 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty – including two Nobel laureates – staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 308,000 alumni live in all 50 states and 150 countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

 

Communications and Public Affairs contact: Thania Benios, 919-962-8596, thania_benios@unc.edu

 

UNC-Chapel Hill Douglass Hunt Lecture features nationally-known writer and political theorist on college free speech

For immediate use

 

UNC-Chapel Hill Douglass Hunt Lecture features nationally-known writer and political theorist on college free speech

Thursday, April 14, program at Sonja Haynes Stone Center is free and open to the public

 

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C. – April 7, 2016) – The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s Carolina Seminars 2016 Douglass Hunt Lecture Series is featuring Danielle Allen, Ph.D., political theorist, writer and director of Harvard University’s Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics, who will speak about the current challenges on college campuses working to honor both free speech and the need for safe space.

 

 

Allen’s speech – Difference without Domination: Reconciling Free Speech and Social Equality on College Campuses – questions if it is possible to reconcile free expression and an egalitarian campus culture, which are often seen as competing commitments. Allen concludes that it is possible as institutions work to re-cast arguments about the first amendment, offensiveness and safe spaces.

 

 

The Thursday, April 14, lecture will be held in the Hitchcock Multipurpose Room of the Sonja Haynes Stone Center at 5:30 p.m. and is free and open to the public.

 

A 2015 Macarthur “Genius Grant” recipient, Allen has published broadly in democratic theory, political sociology and the history of political thought. She was Dean of the Division of Humanities at the University of Chicago and a professor at the Institute for Advanced Study before joining the Harvard faculty. She is a contributing writer for The Washington Post.

 

 

Widely known for her work on justice and citizenship in both ancient Athens and modern America, Allen is the author of The World of Prometheus: the Politics of Punishing in Democratic Athens (2000), Talking to Strangers: Anxieties of Citizenship since Brown vs. the Board of Education (2004), Why Plato Wrote (2010), and Our Declaration (2014). She is co-editor (with Rob Reich) of Education, Justice, and Democracy (2013).

 

 

The program is co-sponsored by the Department of African, African American, and Diaspora Studies, Department of Political Science, Department of Sociology, Institute for the Arts and Humanities, Institute of African American Research, and the Parr Center for Ethics.

 

 

For additional information, please contact Carolina Seminars Director, Andrew Perrin, andrew_perrin@unc.edu

 

 

-Carolina-

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 113 master’s, 68 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty – including two Nobel laureates – staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 308,000 alumni live in all 50 states and 150 countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

About the Douglass Hunt Lecture Series
The Carolina Seminars program organizes the Douglass Hunt lectures. The events are free and open to the public.  On the occasion of the first Douglass Hunt Lecture, which was held on October 23, 1995, Chancellor Paul Hardin recognized the contributions of Douglass Hunt to the University and to higher education, “Douglass Hunt always was and still remains enormously useful to the University of North Carolina. Indeed, he can’t help being useful because his close association with the University and the trust he earns daily by his life and work and friendships combine to inspire all of us who are influenced by him to redouble our own efforts to be useful to our beloved University.”

 

Carolina Seminars contact: Amatullah King, (919) 962-2501, kingamat@email.unc.edu

Communications and Public Affairs contact: Michael John, (919) 445-8360, Michael.john@unc.edu

 

 

UNC-Chapel Hill students traveling science roadshow visits northeastern North Carolina

For immediate use

 

 

UNC-Chapel Hill students traveling science roadshow visits northeastern North Carolina

 

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C. – March 14, 2016) – Two University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill second-year students will spend their spring break visiting communities in northeastern North Carolina with the state’s first-ever traveling science roadshow.

 

 

Jonathan Martinez and Steve Mow, student ambassadors for the North Carolina Science Festival, will present live science demonstrations aboard a ferry crossing the Currituck Sound, as well as at other community sites.

 

 

“One of the most important messages of the North Carolina Science Festival is that science is everywhere you look in our state,” said Jonathan Frederick, director of the North Carolina Science Festival. “We designed the festival’s traveling science roadshow to create opportunities for experiencing science in unexpected locations.

 

 

“It’s a fun way for people of all ages to learn more about science and the North Carolina Science Festival. Jonathan and Steve are great student ambassadors for the festival and for UNC-Chapel Hill.”

 

 

“We are hitting a lot of underrepresented areas where students don’t get a lot of exposure to science and don’t develop the interest for it,” said Martinez, an astrophysics and mathematics major from Gaston, North Carolina, and a graduate of Northampton County High School. “That’s something that we want to change.”

 

 

Mow, a biochemistry major from Longmont, Colorado, and a graduate of Niwot High School, agreed.

 

 

“I hope that this becomes a force for good,” Mow said. “Science is empowering, and getting people excited about it makes it accessible.”

 

 

As part of the traveling science roadshow, Martinez and Mow will lead interactive science experiences adapted from the popular “Science LIVE!” demonstration shows at Morehead Planetarium and Science Center, which produces the NC Science Festival.

 

 

The NC Science Festival traveling science roadshow will include these stops:

 

 

• Thursday, March 17, 9 a.m.–5 p.m.
Southern Vance Community Resource Fair
Southern Vance High School, 925 Garrett Road, Henderson, North Carolina
• Friday, March 18, 3–6 p.m.
Boys & Girls Club of Edenton/Chowan
131 Morristown Road, Edenton, North Carolina
• Saturday, March 19, 11 a.m. and 12 noon trips (plus others if the schedule permits)
Currituck-Knotts Island Ferry
173 Courthouse Road, Currituck (ferry terminal), North Carolina
• Sunday, March 20, 2–4 p.m.
Tyrrell County Public Library
414 Main Street, Columbia, North Carolina

 

 

The Science Festival Alliance, a network of nearly 50 science festivals across North America, provided funding for the NC Science Festival traveling science roadshow through its “Just Add Science” program.

 

 

-Carolina-

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 113 master’s, 68 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty – including two Nobel laureates – staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 308,000 alumni live in all 50 states and 150 countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

 

About Morehead Planetarium and Science Center
Morehead Planetarium and Science Center is the informal science education resource of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Its programs include planetarium shows, exhibits, live science demonstrations, lectures, camps and classes. Founded in 1949, the center serves more than 150,000 visitors each year, produces the North Carolina Science Festival and offers outreach programming to every county in North Carolina. For more information, visit www.moreheadplanetarium.org

 

 

About the North Carolina Science Festival
The North Carolina Science Festival presented by Biogen was founded in 2010 and is the first statewide science festival in the United States. Each spring, the Festival offers hundreds of events that celebrate the economic, educational and cultural impact of science throughout North Carolina. The Festival was founded and is produced by Morehead Planetarium and Science Center (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill). The 2016 North Carolina Science Festival is April 8-24. Platinum sponsors are Duke Energy and NC GlaxoSmithKline Foundation. Gold sponsors are Google, SAS, Time Warner Cable Connect A Million MInds, UNC-TV and UTC Aerospace. For more information about the North Carolina Science Festival, visit the Festival’s website, www.ncsciencefestival.org

 

 

Morehead Planetarium and Science Center contact: Karen Kornegay, (919) 843-7952, kck@unc.edu
Communications and Public Affairs contact: Michael John, (919) 445-8360, michael.john@unc.edu

Ackland Art Museum organizes first Ronald Lockett retrospective

For immediate use

 

Ackland Art Museum organizes first Ronald Lockett retrospective

 

Pioneering comprehensive exhibition devoted to the southern vernacular artist

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C. – March 11, 2016) – The Ackland Art Museum at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill has organized the groundbreaking retrospective, “Fever Within: The Art of Ronald Lockett,” the first comprehensive exhibition of this passionately inspired and little-understood figure in 20th century American art.

 

The exhibition, which will be presented in 2016-2017 in New York, Atlanta and Chapel Hill, marks the first time viewers will be able to gain insight into the full range of Lockett’s innovative and evocative paintings and assemblages.

 

“The Ackland is proud to be organizing this pioneering, highly significant exhibition,” said Chief Curator and Interim Director Peter Nisbet. “The Museum and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in which we are embedded, have become key institutions in the study of and engagement with the art of the American South.”

 

Largely unrecognized during his lifetime, by the time of his death at 32, Lockett (1965-1998) produced an estimated 400 works of art created from a wide variety of found materials. This first solo exhibition features almost 50 works of Lockett’s art and emphasizes the powerful themes the artist explored over the course of his career.

 

Raised in Bessemer, Alabama, Lockett was heavily influenced by other self-taught African American artists in his close-knit community, including his cousin Thornton Dial (1928-2016), who mentored and encouraged him.

 

Through his art, Lockett explored events in 20th century history that he sought to better understand, including acts of large-scale violence and terrorism like the Holocaust, the bombing of Hiroshima and the bombing of the Oklahoma City Federal Building. He also grappled with subjects such as racial and political tumult, including the rise of the Ku Klux Klan and the unfulfilled promises of the Civil Rights Movement; environmental degradation; and religious faith. In his final years, following his diagnosis with HIV/AIDS, his art explored mortality, salvation and remembrance.

 

“Fever Within” is curated by Bernard L. Herman, UNC-Chapel Hill’s George B. Tindall Distinguished Professor of Southern Studies and Folklore, in close collaboration with the Souls Grown Deep Foundation, an organization dedicated to documenting, researching, preserving and exhibiting the work of vernacular African American artists of the American South.

 

The exhibition will be featured at the American Folk Art Museum in New York (June 21 – Sept. 18, 2016) and the High Museum of Art in Atlanta (Oct. 9, 2016 – Jan. 8, 2017). The tour will culminate at the Ackland Art Museum (Jan. 27 – April 9, 2017).

 

It will be accompanied by a 160-page book, edited by Bernard L. Herman and published by the University of North Carolina Press. It includes 60 full-color plates of Lockett’s paintings and assemblages, as well as written contributions by Paul Arnett, Bernard L. Herman, Sharon Patricia Holland, Katherine L. Jentleson, Thomas J. Lax and Colin Rhodes.

 

“Building on the Ackland’s important acquisitions and exhibition projects such as “Thornton Dial: Thoughts on Paper” (2010, travelled to Fleming Museum of Art, University of Vermont, Burlington; Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts, Montgomery, Alabama; and the Knoxville Museum of Art, Tennessee), we look forward to stimulating a rich and multifaceted conversation about Ronald Lockett’s powerful and moving art,” said Nisbet. “We could not be more grateful to our guest curator, noted scholar Bernard L. Herman, to our lenders, and to our colleagues at the distinguished institutions in New York and Atlanta who will ensure a broad and diverse audience for the show.”

 

The Ackland’s exhibition “Fever Within: The Art of Ronald Lockett” is made possible in part by awards from the William R. Kenan, Jr. Charitable Trust and the National Endowment for the Arts. Additional funding was provided by the UNC-Chapel Hill Department of American Studies Chair’s Discretionary Fund for Southern Studies.

 

More information on the exhibition available at: http://ackland.org/exhibition/ronald-lockett/.

 

-Carolina-

 

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 113 master’s, 68 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty – including two Nobel laureates – staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 308,000 alumni live in all 50 states and 150 countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

About the Ackland

The Ackland Art Museum is located on the historic campus of The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The Ackland’s holdings consist of more than 17,000 works of art, featuring significant collections of European masterworks, twentieth-century and contemporary art, African art, North Carolina pottery, and folk art. In addition, the Ackland has North Carolina’s premier collections of Asian art and works on paper (drawings, prints, and photographs). As an academic unit of the University, the Ackland serves broad local, state, and national constituencies.

 

Ackland contact: Emily Bowles, Director of Communications, (919)843-3675, emily.bowles@unc.edu

Communications and Public Affairs contact: MC VanGraafeiland, (919) 962-7090, mc.vangraafeiland@unc.edu

 

 

 

 

Device hits pancreatic tumors hard with toxic four-drug cocktail, sparing the body

For immediate use

 

Device hits pancreatic tumors hard with toxic four-drug cocktail, sparing the body

 

Implantable device delivers first-line treatment for pancreatic cancer directly to tumors, bypassing bloodstream and limiting widespread side effects

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C. – Feb. 8, 2016) – A highly lethal cancer sometimes requires large doses of highly toxic drugs. However, a blitzkrieg approach can be unfeasible for some patients due to severe side effects. Now a powerhouse team of researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill has revealed that an implantable device can deliver a particularly toxic cocktail of drugs directly to pancreatic tumors to stunt their growth or in some cases, shrink them – all while showing signs that the rest of the body would be spared toxic side effects.

 

“We use the device to hit the primary tumor hard,” said associate professor Jen Jen Yeh, M.D., a UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center member and the vice chair for research in the UNC School of Medicine Department of Surgery. “It’s an exciting approach because there is so little systemic toxicity that it leaves room to administer additional drugs against cancer cells that may have spread in the rest of the body.”

 

The work, published Feb. 8 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, highlights the cocktail FOLFIRINOX, a combination of four chemotherapy drugs that has been shown to shrink tumors or halt their growth in nearly a third of pancreatic cancer patients. It’s one of today’s first-line treatments for pancreatic cancer, but it is not suitable for all patients due to its degree of toxicity when delivered through the bloodstream. The new device, currently tested in mice, delivers the drugs directly to the tumor, providing a viable alternative to sending this toxic cocktail through the bloodstream, limiting harsh effects throughout the rest of the body.

 

“We are striving to get our device into clinical trials within the next several years,” said Joseph M. DeSimone, Chancellor’s Eminent Professor of Chemistry in UNC’s College of Arts and Sciences and William R. Kenan, Jr. Distinguished Professor of Chemical Engineering at NC State University. “The prospect of halting tumor growth with our device, and potentially shrinking tumors, could help more patients qualify for surgery.” Surgically removing a tumor is currently the best chance of cure for patients with pancreatic cancer, but only 15 percent of patients have operable tumors.

 

The finding are the latest for the researchers in the testing of the implantable device, which uses electric fields to drive the chemotherapy drugs directly into tumors. In a study published last year in Science Translational Medicine, the team showed, for the first time in animal models, that the device could be implanted on top of pancreatic tumors to increase the amount of the cancer drug gemcitabine reaching them. The tumors stopped growing and shrunk, providing more favorable conditions to remove the tumor and cure the disease.

 

The discovery was hailed as a big advance for the treatment of pancreatic cancer, which has a 75 percent mortality rate within a year of diagnosis – a statistic that has not changed in more than 40 years.

 

The latest study builds on last year’s critical advance. Like the previous study, the device increased the amount of drug reaching the tumors, lowered drug concentration in the blood and significantly impacted tumor growth compared to intravenous delivery of the same drugs. But this time, the device was used with a more potent four-drug combination, making the treatment more effective while limiting unbearable side effects. The accumulation of drug in the tumor using the device was at least three times greater than when using IV administration.

 

“The beauty of this device is that all of the drug delivery is focused locally, with low delivery to the rest of the body,” said James D. Byrne, Ph.D., the paper’s first author and a current medical student at the UNC School of Medicine. “If this works in humans, we hope the device can be used as a plug-and-play approach to delivering the latest, most promising drug regimens for patients who have a dire need for new and better treatments.”

–Carolina –

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 113 master’s, 68 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty – including two Nobel laureates – staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 308,000 alumni live in all 50 states and 150 countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

UNC Communications and Public Affairs contact: Thania Benios, (919) 962-8596, thania_benios@unc.edu

Research Group of Prof. Joseph DeSimone contact: Crista Farrell, (609) 790-6360, farrellc@email.unc.edu

 UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center contact: Laura Oleniacz, (919) 445-4219, laura_oleniacz@med.unc.edu

 

 

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill offers early-action admission to 6,948

For immediate use

 

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill offers early-action admission to 6,948
Fourth consecutive year that Carolina has set a record for the number of early-action applicants

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C. – Feb. 4, 2016) – Almost 7,000 candidates from a record first-deadline pool of 19,842 were offered admission to the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s Fall 2016 entering class last week. The pool was 16 percent larger than last year, marking the fourth consecutive year that Carolina has set a record for the number of early-action applicants. Early action applicants from North Carolina increased by 18 percent over last year.

 

A total of 35,821 students (first and second deadline) have applied for first-year admission, setting the eleventh consecutive record of first-year applications at UNC-Chapel Hill and a 12 percent increase over last year. Decisions for second-deadline applicants will be released by the end of March. The University expects 4,000 new first-year students to enroll in August.

 

“Every year we are honored to offer admission to terrific students from North Carolina, the nation, and the world,” said Stephen Farmer, Vice Provost of Enrollment and Undergraduate Admissions. “The students we’ve admitted early this year are no exception. Through their achievements in and out of the classroom, and through their willingness to serve and lead, they’ve shown us that they’re ready to thrive at Carolina, and to help others thrive, too. Their talent, kindness, and courage, and their diversity of thought and experience, will help them make their mark here at Carolina and far beyond.”

 

Accomplishments of the 6,948 admitted students include winning regional, state and national awards for debating, acting, writing, musical performance, mathematics, science and athletics. For more, click here.

 

Eighty-four percent of all admitted students whose schools reported class rank are ranked in the top 10 percent of their class. Nearly half are ranked in the top 10 students of their high school class.

 

The first student to enroll, just fifteen minutes after decisions were released last Thursday, was Brian Fay, a senior at Athens Drive High School in Raleigh, where he is an all-conference varsity soccer player and served as a community volunteer. “Having visited my brother, who is a senior at UNC, over the past four years, I’m familiar with the caliber of the academic programs and the great atmosphere of the campus. The proximity to home and the fact that Carolina is consistently ranked as a top value for higher education also made this my first choice. I can’t wait to start at Chapel Hill.”

 

Admitted students hail from 96 North Carolina counties, 48 states and 21 countries (including the United States). Twelve percent will be the first generation of their family to graduate from college. Of those who reported race or ethnicity, 36 percent identified themselves as students of color. Three percent (215) are international students.

 

Farmer added that the University is committed to making sure that all students who choose to enroll at Carolina are well positioned to succeed. “Last fall we launched Thrive@Carolina, a University-wide initiative that unites campus partners—faculty, staff and fellow students—in an effort to help all students meet their academic goals,” said Farmer. “We’re excited about this initiative and the difference it will make in the lives of the students who attend Carolina.” For more information, please visit the Thrive@Carolina website.

 

“Even as we celebrate the accomplishments of our admitted students, we are dedicated to helping the thousands of students whom we couldn’t accommodate,” said Farmer. “Our staff will work hard to help the students we’ve disappointed in any way, whether that means consoling them or advising them on transfer admission in the future.”

 

Since July 2015, the admissions office welcomed almost 34,000 visitors (prospective students and family members) for an information session and student-led tour. During this same period, recruitment staff attended 246 regional college fairs, conducted 164 local high school visits and held 40 national college events across the state and nation. The staff also held events in 10 other countries. Along with other recruiting work, the office launched several social media campaigns to engage prospective students online.

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 113 master’s, 68 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty – including two Nobel laureates – staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 308,000 alumni live in all 50 states and 150 countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

Office of Undergraduate Admissions contacts: Stephen Farmer or Ashley Memory, (919) 966-3621, amemory@admissions.unc.edu
Communications and Public Affairs contact: Michael John, (919) 445-8360, michael.john@unc.edu

UNC-Chapel Hill resumes Condition 1 (reduced operations) on Monday, Jan. 24

For immediate use

UNC-Chapel Hill resumes Condition 1 (reduced operations) on Monday, Jan. 24

(Chapel Hill, N.C. – Jan. 24, 2016) – With travel conditions improving and a favorable National Weather Service forecast for rising temperatures, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill will move from Condition 2 (suspended operations) to Condition 1 (reduced operations) at noon on Monday. Classes scheduled at or after 12:20 p.m. will be held.

 

University crews have worked throughout the weekend to treat and clear campus sidewalks and parking lots. Refreezing is expected again overnight, and the need to allow time for additional thawing Monday morning was among the factors considered in the decision to resume Condition 1 (reduced operations) at noon.

 

Safety is the number one priority when making weather decisions about campus operations. As a general rule, students, faculty and staff are asked to use their own best judgment about whether they can travel safely to and from campus.

-Carolina-

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 113 master’s, 68 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty – including two Nobel laureates – staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 308,000 alumni live in all 50 states and 150 countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

Communications and Public Affairs contact: Michael John, (571) 439-9317, michael.john@unc.edu

Improvements for nonflammable lithium-ion batteries

For immediate use

 

Improvements for nonflammable lithium-ion batteries

 

Nonflammable lithium-ion batteries just got better

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C. – Dec. 21, 2015) – Joseph DeSimone from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and Nitash Balsara from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory revived industry and consumer confidence last year when they created the first prototype of a nonflammable lithium-ion battery. Now, they have made the nonflammable prototype even better, replacing the liquid electrolyte with a liquid-solid hybrid that makes the battery more conductive and more resistant to damage.

 

“A non-liquid electrolyte is better because the battery can’t leak, which makes it safer,” said Dominica Wong, who led last year’s findings at UNC-Chapel Hill and who is co-author of this year’s work, which appears in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. “For traditional liquid batteries, casing design around the battery pack is extremely important to prevent battery failure. With solid electrolytes, batteries can be made more flexible and robust against compression, which is important for several applications.”

 

The new work builds on the nonflammable material that DeSimone, Wong and their colleagues developed last year. In the new study, that same material – called perfluoropolyether – was attached to particles of glass to create a nonflammable film with high conductivity at room temperature.

 

Read the full release from the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory here.

 

–Carolina –

 

UNC Communications and Public Affairs contact: Thania Benios, (919) 962-8596, thania_benios@unc.edu