UNC-Chapel Hill experts available to discuss 2018-2019 flu topics

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UNC-Chapel Hill experts available to discuss 2018-2019 flu topics

 

Last year’s influenza season was the worst in nearly a decade and it’s too soon to say how severe the 2018-2019 season will be. UNC-Chapel Hill infectious disease researchers are available to discuss a wide range of topics, including infection rates in North Carolina and the United States, tips for preventing the flu, at-risk populations, facts and myths about the flu vaccine, the need for a universal flu vaccine, and pediatric flu concerns.

 

If you’d like to speak with an expert, call (919) 445-8555 or email mediarelations@unc.edu.

 

 

Flu Basics

 

Dr. Emily Ciccone is an infectious diseases fellow in the UNC School of Medicine’s Division of Infectious Diseases and a former pediatrics resident. She can discuss symptoms of the flu in children and adults as well as diagnostic testing for the flu and other viral respiratory illnesses.

 

 

 

Dr. Claire Farel is an assistant professor of medicine in the UNC School of Medicine’s Division of Infectious Diseases and the medical director of the Infectious Diseases Clinic at N.C. Memorial Hospital. She can discuss symptoms of the flu in adults and ways to prevent the flu, including vaccination and proper hand hygiene.

 

 

 

Dr. David Weber is a professor of epidemiology in the UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health and a professor of pediatrics and medicine in the UNC School of Medicine’s Division of Infectious Diseases and Department of Pediatrics. He can discuss various clinical aspects and epidemiology of the flu, such as complications arising from infections, current rates of infection in North Carolina and the United States, and which age populations are at high risk of getting the flu and becoming severely ill.

 

 

Pediatric Flu

 

Dr. Martha Perry is a professor of pediatrics in the UNC School of Medicine. She can discuss pediatric flu concerns, including why children get sick more often than adults, why children who are sick with the flu may take longer than adults to recover and the importance of vaccinating children against the flu.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Flu Prevention and Behaviors

 

Dr. Allison Aiello is a professor of epidemiology and leads the social epidemiology program in the UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health. Aiello is currently a member of a working group of leading experts for The World Health Organization to help develop guidance on nonpharmaceutical public health measures for mitigating the impact of pandemic influenza. She can discuss methods for preventing the flu through behavior change and non-pharmaceutical interventions, such as hand washing, isolation, quarantine and school closings. She can also discuss technologies for tracking flu in the community setting and outbreaks.

 

 

Vaccination

 

Dr. Noel Brewer is a professor of health behavior at the UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health. He is a decision scientist whose research focuses on how people make risky health decisions. He can discuss the reasons why people don’t get vaccinated and interventions that effectively increase uptake.

 

 

 

 

Dr. Macary Marciniak is a clinical associate professor in the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy. She is an immunizing pharmacist and a national trainer for student pharmacists and pharmacists regarding vaccine administration. She can discuss myths and facts about flu vaccine, and flu vaccine provision in pharmacy settings. She can also discuss tips to prevent the flu.

 

 

 

Dr. Tim Sheahan is an assistant professor of epidemiology at the UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health where he focuses on the development of therapeutics for emerging viruses like influenza, SARS and Middle East respiratory syndrome. He can discuss flu vaccine development and effectiveness. He can also discuss the need for a universal vaccine and antiviral drugs, and the current status of these drugs, including the new antiviral Xofluza.

 

 

 

P: (919) 445-8555  |  E: mediarelations@unc.edu