UNC-Chapel Hill’s Commencement weekend events take place May 11-13

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UNC-Chapel Hill’s Commencement weekend events take place May 11-13

Alumnus and co-founder of Carolina for Kibera, Rye Barcott, to give keynote address

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C. –  May 9, 2018) – The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill will host its Spring Commencement on Sunday, May 13 at 9 a.m., featuring a keynote address from Rye Barcott, social entrepreneur, U.S. Marine Corps veteran and Carolina alumnus.

 

In addition to presiding over Commencement at Kenan Stadium, Chancellor Carol L. Folt will also speak at the Red, White and Carolina Blue Graduation honoring Carolina’s military-affiliated graduates and the doctoral hooding ceremony, which acknowledges students who have become masters in their fields.

The weekend will culminate in the formal Commencement presentation, with the Class of 1968 walking into Kenan Stadium along with the Class of 2018. During the Commencement ceremony, Carolina will award honorary degrees to three individuals. More information on this year’s honorary degree recipients can be found here.

 

Before graduating from UNC-Chapel Hill, Barcott co-founded Carolina for Kibera through the Center for Global Initiatives within UNC Global. CFK is a non-governmental organization based in the impoverished Kibera neighborhood of Nairobi, Kenya. Currently Barcott serves as co-founder and CEO of With Honor, a civic organization that is helping elect to Congress a cross-partisan coalition of post-9/11 veterans.

 

As of May 2, the University registrar estimates that 6,119 students will graduate Sunday: 3,886 with bachelor’s degrees, 1,596 with master’s, 262 with doctoral degrees and 637 with professional degrees from the schools of dentistry, law, medicine and pharmacy. You can find more information on the class of 2018 here. Students completing degree work this spring or summer will participate in Spring Commencement. The official number of graduates will be available when all grades are recorded.

 

Red, White and Carolina Blue Graduation

Friday May 11, 9 a.m.

Frank Porter Graham Student Union, Great Hall

Fifty-three graduates who are veterans, currently serving in the military or ROTC students commissioning upon graduation, will be presented with red, white and Carolina blue honor cords. The students will wear their cords at Sunday’s Commencement as special recognition for their military commitment. This ceremony is part of the University’s continued expansion of support for military-affiliated students.

 

On-site media contact: Audrey Smith, (919) 801-1936, audrey.smith@unc.edu.

 

Doctoral hooding ceremony

Saturday May 12, 9:30 a.m.

Dean E. Smith Center

Kathryn Lofton, Ph.D., professor of religious studies, American studies, history and divinity at Yale University, will deliver the keynote speech. She received both her master’s and doctoral degrees in religious studies from UNC-Chapel Hill.  A live stream of the ceremony can be found here.

 

On-site media contact: Kate Luck, (479) 629-6334 , kate.luck@unc.edu.

 

Spring Commencement

Sunday May 13, 9 a.m.

Kenan Stadium

As previously announced, Rye Barcott, a 2001 graduate of UNC-Chapel Hill, will deliver Carolina’s Spring Commencement address. He will have a small window of media availability following the ceremony. If you’re interested in speaking with Barcott after his remarks please RSVP to Jeni Cook, jeni.cook@unc.edu, no later than noon Friday, May 11.  A live stream of the ceremony can be found here.

 

Media check-in: 8:30 a.m.

From the parking lot, walk past the trees to Kenan Stadium. Enter through Gate 6. On-site media contact: Jeni Cook, (404) 309-3994, jeni.cook@unc.edu. All graduates will be seated on the field; however, media will not be permitted in student or guest seating areas during the ceremony. Broadcasters are asked to bring their own drop cords.

 

Inclement weather:

The Commencement ceremony will be held in Kenan Stadium. If it rains during Commencement, the Chancellor and organizers may shorten the ceremony, but it will not be relocated. Umbrellas will be permitted, but guests should use caution when using umbrellas and be mindful of those seated around them.

 

If severe weather is expected Commencement morning, the University may postpone the ceremony to allow for the threat to pass. If there are weather-related delays, the latest possible start time for Commencement would be 11 a.m. If severe weather threatens while the ceremony is in progress and the attendee’s safety is at risk, the ceremony will be canceled and guests will be advised to seek shelter. The ceremony will not resume. University Communications will inform media about the delay or cancellation. Weather-related updates will be available at unc.edu and on the Commencement website.

 

Media parking:

A limited number of spaces will be reserved in the UNC Police lot off Manning Drive. From Manning, turn onto Paul Hardin/Public Safety Drive (one traffic light west of the intersection of Manning and Skipper Bowles Drive/Ridge Road) and turn left into the UNC Police lot. Media identification will be required. Parking will be available along the left side of the cones across the lot and toward the 2nd entrance to the lot as indicated by a special sign at the entrance. Do not park in numbered spaces. Please RSVP to Jeni Cook, jeni.cook@unc.edu  no later than noon on Friday, May 11.

 

Media representatives may also use lots and shuttles provided for Commencement guests. Traffic into Chapel Hill is expected to be heavy from 7:30 a.m. to 9:15 a.m.

 

Other ceremonies:

Many individual schools and departments will hold their own ceremonies during Commencement weekend. Locations and times are available online.

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 111 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 322,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and 165 countries. More than 175,000 live in North Carolina.

 

University Communications: Media Relations, (919) 445-8555, mediarelations@unc.edu

 

University releases documents related to faculty grievance

Today Chancellor Carol L. Folt released the following memo. The documents referenced in the memo are included below.

 

 

 

  1. The letter of Provost Robert Blouin to Christopher B. McLaughlin, Chair of the Faculty Grievance Committee, dated November 30, 2017.
  2. The letter of Chancellor Carol L. Folt to Professor Jay Smith dated February 26, 2018.
  3. The letter of Chancellor Carol L. Folt to Board of Trustees Chair Haywood Cochrane dated March 20, 2018.
  4. The decision of the Board of Trustees denying Professor Smith’s appeal dated April 2, 2018.

 

Published May 4, 2018

 

 

Chancellor Folt statement on Board of Trustees vote on honorary degree

 

I recommended that the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Board of Trustees initiate a process via a mail ballot to revoke the honorary degree awarded to Bill Cosby in 2003. This is the first known time that the University has taken steps to rescind an honorary degree, and we do not take this action lightly. In this case, Cosby’s acts were so counter to our campus values that this prestigious honor is no longer appropriate.

 

Honorary degrees are awarded based on the information available at that time, and we do not intend to review the actions of each recipient years later. The Trustees are reviewing a recommendation to revoke his honorary degree, and they will formally vote on the matter at their regular May meeting.

 

The University has no tolerance for sexual assault, and we have worked diligently in recent years to comprehensively revise our sexual assault and misconduct policy and enhance resources for our community. We encourage anyone to visit safe.unc.edu for more information.

 

Carol L. Folt
Chancellor

 

Published May 2, 2018

 

UNC-Chapel Hill selects “Popular” for 2018 Summer Reading

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UNC-Chapel Hill selects “Popular” for 2018 Summer Reading

This year marks the 20th anniversary of the reading program

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— April 16, 2018) – “Popular: Finding Happiness and Success in a World that Cares Too Much About the Wrong Kinds of Relationships” is the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s 2018 selection for the Carolina Summer Reading Program. Written by UNC-Chapel Professor Mitch Prinstein, the book explores why popularity plays a key role in human development and ultimately, how it still influences people as adults.

 

The book examines how popularity affects success, relationships and happiness—and why people don’t always want to be the most popular. Prinstein serves as the John Van Seters Distinguished Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience, and the Director of Clinical Psychology at UNC-Chapel Hill.

 

“This book is directly relevant to incoming students and can spur tremendous conversation about the challenges of transitioning to college and adult life,” said Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs Winston Crisp. “We’re also thrilled to have work by one of Carolina’s own to mark a milestone for the reading program, the 20th anniversary.”

 

First-year and transfer students who enroll at UNC-Chapel Hill this fall are encouraged to read the book this summer and participate in small-group discussions during the Week of Welcome before fall 2018 semester classes begin.

 

The Carolina Summer Reading Program, now in its 20th year, aims to stimulate critical thinking outside the classroom and give new students a shared experience. Students are encouraged to come to their own conclusions about the book and will participate in summer reading discussion groups that serve as an academic icebreaker.

 

“I am so excited that students will get a chance to learn which type of popularity will help them over the course of their lives, which type is toxic, and the ways that social media may be influencing them without even realizing it,” said Prinstein. “Anyone who ever went to high school will find something in this book that makes them feel much better about their adolescence.”

 

Prinstein will be on campus to give a lecture about the book on Aug. 20, 2018, in Memorial Hall.

 

“Popular: Finding Happiness and Success in a World that Cares Too Much About the Wrong Kinds of Relationships” is available at the Bull’s Head Bookshop in UNC Student Stores. The paperback version, which includes a new chapter focusing on how adults can achieve the most useful type of popularity, will be available beginning June 19, 2018.

 

Past selections for the Carolina Summer Reading Program include: “How Does it Feel to be a Problem?” by Moustafa Bayoumi, “The Shallows: What the Internet is Doing to our Brains” by Nicholas G. Carr, “Absolutely American: Four Years at West Point” by David Lipsky, and “Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End” by Atul Gawande.

 

For more information, visit the Carolina Summer Reading website.

 

Photo Link: https://unc.photoshelter.com/galleries/C0000.jfK5DRIwnI/G0000O6f5v5HyJpw/I0000nPpQsOxGbRU/Mitch-Prinstein (Password: summer)

 

Photo credit: Somer Hadley, Revolution Studios 2017

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 111 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 322,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and 165 countries. More than 175,000 live in North Carolina.

 

University Communications: Media Relations, (919) 445-8555, mediarelations@unc.edu

 

UNC-Chapel Hill Graduate Programs Ranked Among “Best Graduate Schools”

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UNC-Chapel Hill Graduate Programs Ranked Among “Best Graduate Schools”

U.S. News & World Report ranked UNC School of Medicine first for its primary care program

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— March 20, 2018) – University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill graduate programs received high rankings as part of U.S. News & World Report’s 2019 “Best Graduate Schools.” Among the rankings, the UNC School of Medicine is first for its primary care program, following a second-place ranking last year.

 

U.S. News ranks business, education, engineering, law, nursing and medical programs annually, while various disciplines and specialties in the sciences, social sciences, humanities and other areas, are only ranked periodically.

 

This year, U.S. News ranked doctoral programs in criminology and criminal justice; master’s degree programs in social work, public affairs and related specialty areas; and doctoral programs in the sciences, specifically in biological sciences, chemistry, computer science, earth sciences, mathematics, physics and statistics.

 

The following are the complete UNC-Chapel Hill rankings and specialty listings. A comprehensive list of all rankings and data can be found here.

 

School of Medicine

Overall

  • Primary Care, 1st
  • Research, tied for 23rd

 

Specialty area

  • Obstetrics & Gynecology, 14th

 

School of Nursing

Overall

  • Master’s Degree, tied for 14th
  • Doctor of Nursing Practice, tied for 13th

 

Specialty areas

  • Nursing Administration, tied for 12th
  • Nurse Practitioner: Family, tied for 12th
  • Nurse Practitioner: Psychiatric/Mental Health, Across the Lifespan, tied for 9th

 

School of Social Work

Overall

  • Tied for 5th

 

Kenan-Flagler Business School

Overall

  • 19th

 

Specialty areas

  • Accounting, 11th
  • Executive MBA, 16th
  • Finance, 29th
  • Management, tied for 20th
  • Marketing, tied for 15th

 

School of Law

Overall

  •  45th

 

Specialty area

  • Legal Writing, tied for 12th

 

School of Education

Overall

  • Tied for 30th

 

Specialty areas

  • Administration/Supervision, tied for 14th
  • Curriculum/Instruction, 17th
  • Secondary Education, 14th
  • Special Education, tied for 11th

 

Public Affairs

Overall

  • Tied for 23rd

 

Specialty areas

  • Environmental Policy and Management, 14th
  • Local Government Management, 3rd
  • Public Finance and Budgeting, tied for 20th
  • Public Management and Leadership, tied for 15th
  • Public Policy Analysis, tied for 32nd

 

  • Carolina has programs and specialty areas within several units based in the School of Government, the College of Arts and Sciences and the Gillings School of Global Public Health with master’s degree programs that are ranked by U.S. News as part of a public affairs category.

 

Sciences

  • Biology, tied for 33rd
  • Biostatistics, tied for 8th
  • Chemistry, tied for 15th
  • Analytical Chemistry, 2nd
  • Inorganic Chemistry, 10th
  • Computer Science, tied for 25th
  • Earth Sciences, tied for 54th
  • Mathematics, tied for 34th
  • Physics, tied for 47th
  • Statistics, 19th

  

Methodology: U.S. News first ranked graduate programs in 1987 and has done so annually since 1990. Each year it ranks professional programs in business, education, engineering, law, nursing and medicine. Those rankings are based on two types of data: expert opinion on program excellence and statistical indicators that measure the quality of a school’s faculty, research and students. Its periodic rankings of additional disciplines and specialties in the sciences, social sciences, humanities and other areas are based solely on the ratings of peer academic experts, including deans, program directors and faculty.

 

The data come from statistical surveys sent to administrators at more than 1,970 graduate programs and from reputation surveys sent to more than 16,500 academics and professionals in the disciplines. Surveys for the 2019 rankings were conducted during the fall of 2017 and in early 2018.

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 111 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 322,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and 165 countries. More than 175,000 live in North Carolina.

 

University Communications: Jeni Cook, (919) 962-2091, jeni.cook@unc.edu

 

U.S. News & World Report contactEducation-PR@usnews.com

 

Rye Barcott, social entrepreneur, to speak at UNC-Chapel Hill Commencement

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Rye Barcott, social entrepreneur, to speak at UNC-Chapel Hill Commencement

U.S. Marine Corps veteran and co-founder of Carolina for Kibera to give keynote address

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— Feb. 15, 2018) –  Rye Barcott, social entrepreneur and a graduate of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, will deliver the University’s spring Commencement address on May 13 in Kenan Stadium.

 

Before graduating from UNC-Chapel Hill in 2001 on an ROTC scholarship, Barcott co-founded Carolina for Kibera through the Center for Global Initiatives within UNC Global. CFK is a non-governmental organization based in the impoverished Kibera neighborhood of Nairobi, Kenya. Named a Time magazine and Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation “Hero of Global Health,” CFK uses sports and public health initiatives to prevent ethnic and gender violence and to fight poverty.

 

“Rye’s amazing life journey began while he was an undergraduate at Carolina, when he co-founded an acclaimed non-governmental organization, Carolina for Kibera, dedicated to breaking cycles of violence and developing young leaders in Kenya,” said Chancellor Carol L. Folt. “Rye’s out-of-the box thinking and global entrepreneurial work – ranging from creating holistic youth development programs to establishing a clinic treating thousands in collaboration with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, has been recognized by the President of the United States, the World Economic Forum and international philanthropists, and is taught in graduate schools around the world. I know his authenticity and example of selfless service to others, mixed with his personal humility and humor, will inspire the Class of 2018 as they begin their own journeys.”

 

A former captain, Barcott served five years in the U.S. Marine Corps in Bosnia, the Horn of Africa and Iraq. He also wrote “It Happened on the Way to War: A Marine’s Path to Peace,” a book that juxtaposes social entrepreneurship with military service.

 

“What a thrilling honor it is to be this year’s commencement speaker for my beloved alma mater. Service has been part of Carolina’s DNA since 1789, when we were founded as the nation’s first public university,” said Barcott. “I’m grateful for the opportunities I’ve had to serve my country and I can’t wait to be in a sea of Carolina blue in Kenan Stadium with my kids by my side feeling the love.”

 

In 2001 Barcott earned bachelor’s degrees in peace, war and defense and international studies from Carolina. In 2009, he earned master’s degrees in public administration and business administration from Harvard University, where he was a Harvard Center for Public Leadership Social Enterprise Fellow. He then returned to North Carolina and co-founded Double Time Capital, an impact investment firm that played an integral role in helping the state become second in the nation in solar power.

 

Barcott currently serves as co-founder and CEO of With Honor, a new civic organization that is helping elect to Congress a cross-partisan coalition of post-9/11 veterans. With Honor is based in Charlotte, where Barcott lives with his wife, Dr. Tracy Barcott, a 2000 Carolina alumna, and their two children.

 

Folt chose Barcott in consultation with faculty and staff on the University’s Commencement Speaker Selection Committee.

 

Spring Commencement will be held at 9 a.m. in Kenan Stadium. Folt will preside over the ceremony. For more information, visit http://commencement.unc.edu/.

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill



The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 111 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 322,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and 165 countries. More than 175,000 live in North Carolina.

 

University Communications: Jeni Cook, (919) 962-2091, jeni.cook@unc.edu

 

UNC-Chapel Hill and the Town of Chapel Hill Launch Party Registration Program

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UNC-Chapel Hill and the Town of Chapel Hill Launch Party Registration Program

Effort will strengthen community relations and empower students

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C. – Jan. 10, 2018) – The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the Town of Chapel Hill today announced a new joint initiative, “Party, Police Free.” Modeled after programs at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, Colorado State University and the University of Colorado Boulder, “Party, Police Free” is designed to strengthen neighborhood relations, to help students party responsibly and to empower them to be accountable to their community.

 

“This initiative has the potential to be a win-win for everyone,” said Aaron Bachenheimer, UNC-Chapel Hill’s Executive Director of Off-Campus Student Life and Community Partnerships. “Students who register and party responsibly can have a great time, while giving neighbors and police greater peace of mind and a more efficient response option should things get out of control.”

 

Students can register their Friday or Saturday night parties online and then complete the registration in person at the Office of Community Involvement, Granville Towers South, Suite 2100. If the Chapel Hill Police Department receives a noise complaint about a registered gathering, the host will then receive one courtesy phone call or text message, giving them 20 minutes to quiet or disband the event. Police will only visit the party if a second complaint is received after the 20-minute grace period, helping the police to avoid unnecessary visits and to provide students the opportunity to avoid a fine.

 

“Our goal is always to keep everyone safe,” said Chapel Hill Police Chief and Executive Director for Community Safety Chris Blue. “This program provides us with another opportunity to partner with the University to improve the quality of life in our community. An added benefit is that this program will allow us to use our police patrol resources more effectively.”

 

Students who register their parties will also receive “party smart” tips on how to party safely and responsibly. These tips include: letting their neighbors know about the party beforehand, knowing who is on the guest list, designating party monitors and making sure guests have a safe way to get home.

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

 

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 111 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 322,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and 165 countries. More than 175,000 live in North Carolina.

 

University Communications: Jeni Cook, (919) 962-2091, jeni.cook@unc.edu

 

Off-Campus Student Life and Community Partnerships: Aaron Bachenheimer, (919) 843-5827, bachenhe@email.unc.edu

 

Town of Chapel Hill: Ran Northam, (919) 969-4878, rnortham@townofchapelhill.org

 

UNC-Chapel Hill MLK Celebration Week Begins Jan. 14

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UNC-Chapel Hill MLK Celebration Week Begins Jan. 14

Highlights include speakers Chancellor Carol L. Folt and former Attorney General Loretta Lynch

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— Jan. 8, 2018) – The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill will host several events as part of the 2018 Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration Week. The theme, “Voices. Presence. Community,” focuses on the importance of inclusion, diversity and community building.

 

North Carolina native and former U.S. Attorney General Loretta Lynch will deliver this year’s MLK Keynote Lecture on Jan. 18. Lynch was the first African-American female to serve as attorney general.

 

The week will begin with a keynote address by Chancellor Carol L. Folt at the annual MLK University/Community Banquet, followed by the MLK Day of Service 5K Run. The race honors Dr. King’s bridge-building legacy of community service, with proceeds benefiting two local non-profit organizations.

 

University/Community MLK Banquet with Chancellor Carol L. Folt

William and Ida Friday Center for Continuing Education

Sunday, Jan. 14, 6 p.m.

 

Chancellor Carol L. Folt will deliver the keynote at the 33rd annual University/Community Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Banquet and Award Presentation. The banquet is hosted by the MLK University/Community Planning Corporation in partnership with UNC-Chapel Hill’s Office for Diversity and Inclusion. The corporation, a non-profit group founded in 1993, raises scholarship funds for high school students in Chapel Hill, Carrboro and Orange County, as well as Carolina students who work to improve the quality of life for everyone in the community. Each year, the corporation also honors citizens in “recognition of enduring service to humanity by word and by deed” through the Annual Martin Luther King Jr. Citizen Awards.

 

MLK Day of Service 5K: “Voices. Presence. Community.”

Starts at the Old Well (Cameron Avenue)

Monday, Jan. 15, 7 a.m.

 

Early registration is now open online for the 15th annual MLK Day of Service run. On-site registration the day of the event begins at 6 a.m. at the Campus Y on Cameron Avenue. In keeping with Dr. King’s lifelong commitment to bridge building work, race proceeds will benefit Girls on the Run of the Triangle and Healthy Girls Save the World, an organization founded by a Carolina alumna.

 

MLK Keynote Lecture and Awards Ceremony with Loretta Lynch

Memorial Hall

Thursday, Jan. 18, 7 p.m.

 

North Carolina native and former U.S. Attorney General Loretta Lynch will deliver the 2018 MLK Keynote Lecture. Ms. Lynch, who was born in Greensboro, was sworn in as the first African-American female attorney general in April 2015, a position she held until January 2017. Additionally, the event includes a presentation of the University’s MLK Scholarships and Unsung Hero Awards.

 

More information and a complete list of events are available at diversity.unc.edu/mlk.

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill



The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 111 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 322,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and 165 countries. More than 175,000 live in North Carolina.

 

University Communications: Media Relations, (919) 445-8555, mediarelations@unc.edu

Diversity and Inclusion contact: Adrianne Gibilisco, (919) 843-6085, adrigibi@email.unc.edu

 

 

 

165 at UNC-Chapel Hill inducted into Phi Beta Kappa

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165 at UNC-Chapel Hill inducted into Phi Beta Kappa

 

103 inductees are from North Carolina

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— Nov. 9, 2017) – Phi Beta Kappa, the nation’s oldest and most honored college honorary society, has inducted 165 University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill students as new members.

 

The recent induction ceremony featured a keynote address by Martin H. Brinkley, Dean of the UNC-Chapel Hill School of Law and Arch T. Allen Distinguished Professor of Law. New members received certificates and Phi Beta Kappa keys, the organization’s symbol.

 

Phi Beta Kappa membership is open to undergraduates in the college and professional degree programs who meet stringent eligibility requirements.

 

A student who has completed 75 hours of course work in the liberal arts and sciences with a GPA of 3.85 or better (on a 4-point scale) is eligible for membership. Also eligible is any student who has completed 105 hours of course work in the liberal arts and sciences with a 3.75 GPA. Grades earned at other universities are not considered. Less than 1 percent of all college students qualify.

 

Past and present Phi Beta Kappa members from across the country have included 17 American presidents, 40 U.S. Supreme Court Justices and more than 130 Nobel Laureates.

 

Phi Beta Kappa has 286 chapters nationwide. UNC’s chapter, Alpha of North Carolina, was founded in 1904 and is the oldest of seven chapters in the state. Each year, Phi Beta Kappa chapters and alumni associations across the country raise and distribute more than $1 million in awards, scholarships and prizes benefiting high schools and college students.

 

Phi Beta Kappa officers at Carolina for 2017-2018 are students Rohanit Singh, president; Elaine Kearney, vice president; and Diana Lopez, recording secretary. James L. Leloudis, professor of history, Peter T. Grauer associate dean for Honors Carolina, and director of the James M. Johnston Center for Undergraduate Excellence, is chapter executive secretary and faculty advisor.

 

Listed below are 160 inductees, 103 of whom are from North Carolina. The names appear below in alphabetical order by North Carolina county, then by state and country. All study in the College of Arts and Sciences except where otherwise noted. Five students chose not to be listed.

 

 

Avery County

 

  • Charles Fischer Brown, a senior with a music performance major, son of Michael Brown and Susan Brown of Banner Elk.

 

Buncombe County

 

  • Margaret Scott Hilderbran, a junior with astrophysics and religious studies majors, daughter of Gregory Hilderbran and Carole Hilderbran of Asheville.

 

  • Dakota Hunter Koenigsberg, a May 2015 graduate with environmental studies and economics majors and a philosophy minor, of Asheville.

 

  • Samantha Lynn Pagan, a junior with a physics major, daughter of Tammy Sullivan of Weaverville and Juan Pagan of Houston, TX.

 

  • Christine Anne Zimmerman, a senior with an English major and French and studio art minors, daughter of Marjorie Zimmerman and Howard Zimmerman of Arden.

 

Burke County

 

  • Will Joseph Duncan, a senior with an economics major and Chinese and art history minors, son of Rich Duncan and Christine Post-Duncan of Chicago, IL.

 

Cabarrus County

 

  • Leah Baker, a May 2017 graduate with an English major and education and social and economic justice minors, daughter of Dr. Kristin Baker and Dr. Scott Baker of Concord.

 

  • Mallory Renee’ Croley, a senior with a biology major and a chemistry minor, daughter of Jill Croley and Dr. Glitz Croley of Concord.

 

  • Macey Elizabeth Fairchild, a senior with English and American studies majors and a history minor, daughter of Tierney Fairchild and James Fairchild of Harrisburg.

 

  • Alison Nancy Hollis, a senior with a biology major and chemistry and medical anthropology minors, daughter of Judi Hollis and Pete Hollis of Concord.

 

  • Sydra Larab Siddiqui, a senior with biology and religious studies majors and a chemistry minor, daughter of Rashid Siddiqui and Dr. Huma Siddiqui of Concord.

 

Catawba County

 

  • Anna-Kathryn Avonne Hass, a junior with psychology and history majors, daughter of Dr. Andrew Hass and Nicole Hass of Hickory.

 

  • Geoffrey Calvin McGee, a senior with public policy and economics majors and an education minor, son of Carmon McGee and Guy McGee of Black Mountain, NC.

 

  • Morgan Taylor Yapundich, a senior with a biochemistry major, daughter of Dr. Linda Billips and Dr. Robert Yapundich of Hickory.

 

Cumberland County

 

  • Faith Caroline Goldsmith, a senior with peace, war, and defense and Germanic and Slavic languages and literatures majors, daughter of Col. (R) Stu Goldsmith and Ann Goldsmith of Fayetteville.

 

Davie County

 

  • Meredith Anne Ratledge, a senior with an environmental science major and a business minor, of Advance.

 

Durham County

 

  • Emma Astrike-Davis, a senior with a nutrition major and a chemistry minor, daughter of Nancy Astrike and Joan Davis of Durham.

 

  • Emma Grace Crenshaw, a junior with a biostatistics major and medical anthropology and chemistry minors, daughter of Dr. Hugh Crenshaw and Dr. Donna Crenshaw of Durham.

 

  • Averyl Julian Edwards, an August 2017 graduate with Jewish studies and women’s and gender studies majors and a modern Hebrew minor, of Durham.

 

  • Caroline Scott Fowler, a senior with archaeology and anthropology majors, daughter of Sheryl Fowler of Durham.

 

Franklin County

 

  • Anna Elizabeth Dodson, a senior with a health policy and management major and a chemistry minor, daughter of Patricia Dodson and Terry Dodson of Bunn.

 

Gaston County

 

  • Michael Edward Purello, a senior with history and global studies majors, son of Joseph Purello and Sheila Purello.

 

Guilford County

 

  • Chris Chung, a junior with chemistry and mathematical decision sciences majors, son of Dave Chung and Clara Chung of Oak Ridge.

 

  • Cyrus John Fitzpatrick, a senior with exercise and sport science and psychology majors, of Greensboro.

 

  • Jake Ryan Mayer, a junior with computer science and applied mathematics majors and a physics minor, of Oak Ridge.

 

  • Russell Anderson McIntosh, a senior with mathematics and philosophy majors and a physics minor, son of Stan McIntosh and Lisa McIntosh.

 

  • Nishita Tushar Sheth, a junior with nutrition and biology majors and a neuroscience minor, of Jamestown.

 

  • Jacob Ryan Strauss, a junior with a computer science major and a biology minor, son of Dr. Brian Strauss and Andrea Strauss of Oak Ridge.

 

  • William Ross Taylor, a junior with a biomedical engineering major and a chemistry minor, of Greensboro.

 

  • Mary Elizabeth Triplett, a senior with psychology and anthropology majors, daughter of Cynthia Triplett and John Triplett, Jr. of Pleasant Garden.

 

  • Shan Yu, a senior with a biology major and chemistry and neuroscience minors, of High Point.

 

Halifax County

 

  • Patrick Oliver Fiorilli, a senior with a comparative literature major and a creative writing minor, son of Dr. Mario Fiorilli and Mona Fiorilli of Roanoke Rapids.

 

Henderson County

 

  • Seth McKenzie Alexander, a senior with a biology major and a chemistry minor, of Hendersonville.

 

  • Olivia Nicole Thiery, a senior with an exercise and sport science major and studio art and biology minors, daughter of Joel Thiery and Lynn Thiery of Hendersonville.

 

Jackson County

 

  • Rachel Katherine Nixon, a senior with political science and English majors and a politics, philosophy, and economics minor, daughter of Carla Nixon and Dr. Scot Nixon of Sylva.

 

Madison County

 

  • Anna Lynne Zimmerman, a senior with peace, war, and defense and English majors and an Asian studies minor, daughter of Robert Zimmerman and Tamara Ballard of Marshall.

 

Mecklenburg County

 

  • Alexander Bennett, a senior with biology and philosophy majors and a chemistry minor, of Huntersville.

 

  • Nicholas Chilton Blum, a senior with peace, war, and defense and political science majors and a public policy minor, of Charlotte.

 

  • Margaret Mclellan Bryant, a senior with a biology major and chemistry and neuroscience minors, of Charlotte.

 

  • Shouri Gottiparthi, a senior with a health policy and management major and a chemistry minor, son of Venkata Gottiparthi and Kalpana Gottiparthi of Charlotte.

 

  • Jacob Ian Greenblatt, a senior with public policy and political science majors and a social and economic justice minor, of Matthews.

 

  • Theresa Marie Jones, a senior with mathematics and geology majors and a French minor, daughter of Bonnie Likens Jones and George Wesley Jones of Charlotte.

 

  • David William Katibah, a senior with economics and political science majors and a philosophy minor, son of Dr. William Katibah, III and Maria Katibah of Huntersville.

 

  • Margaret Susan Lynch, a senior with a music (piano performance) major and an Hispanic studies minor, daughter of Jay Lynch and Susan Lynch of Charlotte.

 

  • Matthew Charles McKnight, a senior with history and public policy majors, son of Beth McKnight of Charlotte.

 

  • Elizabeth Houston Sheild, a senior with political science and Spanish literature majors and a women’s and gender studies minor, daughter of Susan Elizabeth Sheild (Phi Beta Kappa, Lambda of Virginia) and George Cabell Sheild, Sr. of Charlotte.

 

  • Kristin Grace Weiss, a senior with biology and German literature and culture majors and a chemistry minor, daughter of Richard Weiss of Davidson and Susan Gover of Hillsborough, NC.

 

  • Wilfred Chad Wong, a junior with quantitative biology and biochemistry majors and a computer science minor, son of Mela Chan of Charlotte.

 

  • Sarah Kathryn Yaghoubi, a senior with biology and philosophy majors and a chemistry minor, daughter of Pat Yaghoubi and Habibullah Yaghoubi of Charlotte.

 

Moore County

 

  • Joshua Daniel Barnes, a senior with peace, war, and defense and history majors and a public policy minor, son of Dr. Daniel Barnes and Laura Barnes of West End.

 

New Hanover County

 

  • Sarah Caroline Miller, a senior with a chemistry major and a business administration minor, daughter of Dr. Jon Miller and Diane Miller of Wilmington.

 

  • Brittney Louise Ortiz, a senior with a psychology major and an anthropology minor, daughter of Heather Wall and James Wall of Wilmington.

 

Orange County

 

  • Mike Gaitens Arneson, a May 2017 graduate with an economics major and a business minor, of Chapel Hill.

 

  • Noah Patrick Balamucki, a senior with a music major and a history minor, son of Susan Hollobaugh and Richard Balamucki of Chapel Hill.

 

  • Sarah Jane Brooks, a May 2017 graduate with an economics major and philosophy and business administration minors, daughter of Laura Brooks of Chapel Hill and Martin Brooks of Little River, SC.

 

  • Nathanael Connor Bedingfield Brown, a senior with peace, war, and defense and political science majors and a history minor, son of Thomas Brown and Robin Bedingfield of Hillsborough.

 

  • Veronica Carolyn Jean DaVanzo, a senior with a biology major and a chemistry minor, daughter of Dr. Robert DaVanzo of High Point, NC and Dr. Christie DaVanzo of Greensboro, NC.

 

  • Riley Bingham Foster, a senior with economics and public policy majors and a French minor, of Chapel Hill.

 

  • Ori Erna Hashmonay, a senior with an art history major and German and French minors, daughter of Dr. Ram Hashmonay and Michal Hashmonay of Kiryat Shmona, Israel.

 

  • James Hale Jushchuk, a senior with a computer science major, son of Leslie Bunce, MD of Pittsboro and Michael Jushchuk of Chapel Hill.

 

  • Rachael MinJung Kang, a senior with a psychology major, daughter of Robert Kang and Connie Kang of Chapel Hill.

 

  • Sanam Louise Kavari, a junior with an environmental health sciences major and medical anthropology and chemistry minors, daughter of Emily Xavier of Hillsborough and Masound Kavari of Chapel Hill.

 

  • Nicholas William McHenry, a senior with computer science and economics majors, of Chapel Hill.

 

  • Kayley Peters, a senior with biology and Spanish majors and a chemistry minor, daughter of Mark Peters and Mary Todd Peters of Chapel Hill.

 

  • Ramkumar Rao, a senior with a computer science major, of Chapel Hill.

 

  • Frances Emily Reuland, a senior with environmental science and Hispanic literatures and cultures majors and a chemistry minor, of Chapel Hill.

 

  • Arvind Sivashanmugam, a senior with a biostatistics major and Spanish for the professions and mathematics minors, of Chapel Hill.

 

  • Daniel Lee Stickel, a senior with a biology major and Spanish for the professions and neuroscience minors, son of David Stickel and Julie Stickel of Chapel Hill.

 

  • Claire Elizabeth Weintraub, a senior with economics and Hispanic literature and cultures majors and a public policy minor, daughter of Dr. Jory Weintraub and Julie Haughton.

 

  • Yusheng Zhang, a junior with business administration and global studies majors and a music minor, son of Xiaoyun Shen and Chongben Zhang of Chapel Hill.

 

Pitt County

 

  • Olivia Marie Holder, a senior with a history major and Chinese and comparative literature minors, daughter of Dr. David Holder and Ann Marie Holder of Greenville.

 

  • Violet Simmons Noe, a senior with a nutrition major and Spanish for the medical professions and chemistry minors, daughter of Marna Noe and Marion Noe of Greenville.

 

Polk County

 

  • Bridget Gallagher, a senior with a nutrition major and Spanish for the medical professions and chemistry minors, daughter of Dr. John Gallagher and Jane Gallagher of Columbus.

 

Rockingham County

  • Philip Murray Wilson, a senior with classics and medieval history majors, son of Dr. Ewain Wilson and Laura Wilson of Wilkesboro.

 

Rowan County

 

  • Katelyn Laine Buffett, a senior with a sociology major and an education minor, daughter of Eric Buffett and Lyndy Buffett of Rockwell.

 

Rutherford County

 

  • Michael Ian Hensley, a senior with a history major and a medieval and early modern studies minor, of Rutherfordton.

 

Transylvania County

 

  • Emma Griffith McLeod, a senior with geography and global studies majors, daughter of John McLeod and Beth McLeod of Brevard.

 

Union County

 

  • Lindsey Anne Davis, a senior with psychology and exercise and sport science majors, daughter of Christopher Davis and Tricia Davis of Matthews.

 

  • Lacey Elizabeth Hunter, a senior with history and archaeology majors and a Hispanic studies minor, of Weddington.

 

  • Christina Rayen Kresser, an August 2017 graduate with a biology major and a chemistry minor, daughter of David Kresser and Susan Kresser of Waxhaw.

 

  • Suzanne Michelle McLendon, a senior with a music education major, daughter of Mary McLendon and Woody McLendon of Waxhaw.

 

Wake County

 

  • Katherine Frances Cayton, a senior with history and political science majors and a media and journalism minor, daughter of Verne Ellis Cayton, Jr. and Alison Riopel Cayton of Raleigh.

 

  • Jen-Hsuan Chu, a senior with a biology major and Chinese and music minors, of Cary.

 

  • Elizabeth Ciociola, a senior with a chemistry major and business administration and biology minors, daughter of Catherine Hinkle of Raleigh and Arthur Ciociola of Fort Worth, TX.

 

  • Kennedy Michelle Crawford, a senior with a music major and a dramatic art minor, daughter of Pamela Plummer of Morrisville and Duke Crawford of Hillsborough, NC.

 

  • Sarah Elizabeth Gee, a senior with psychology and global studies majors and a Hispanic studies minor, daughter of Susan Margolis and M. Blen Gee, Jr. of Cary.

 

  • Gabriel Christian Gonzalez, a senior with a biology major and Spanish and chemistry minors, son of Jesus Gonzalez and Louise Gonzalez of Wake Forest.

 

  • Angelica Green, a senior with a psychology major, daughter of James Green and Jacqueline Green of Sanford, NC.

 

  • Hannah Leah Holtzman, a junior with geological sciences and archaeology majors and a mathematics minor, daughter of Adam Holtzman and Maria Holtzman of Raleigh.

 

  • Vishal Iyer, a senior with a biology major and a chemistry minor, of Cary.

 

  • Jacob Alexander Johnson, a May 2017 graduate with an economics major and a business administration minor, son of Douglas Johnson and Willa Burgess of Raleigh.

 

  • Pooja Dhanesh Joshi, a junior with a health policy and management major and entrepreneurship and Asian studies minors, daughter of Dhanesh Joshi and Shivangi Joshi of Cary.

 

  • Farhan Khan, a senior with a psychology major and a chemistry minor, of Raleigh.

 

  • Katherine Anne Kruse, a senior with biology and English majors and a chemistry minor, daughter of Mary Engel and Shawn Kruse of Cary.

 

  • Allison Li-Ping Lim, a senior with business administration and global studies majors, daughter of Timothy Lim and Kathleen Lim of Raleigh.

 

  • Kristen Rita Lospinoso, a senior with a psychology major and chemistry and neuroscience minors, daughter of Mita Lospinoso and Jeff Lospinoso of Cary.

 

  • Christina Elizabeth Miller, a senior with a psychology major and chemistry and biology minors, of Raleigh.

 

  • Elizabeth Nicholls, a senior with a global studies major and Hispanic studies and social and economic justice minors, daughter of Marc Nicholls and Kay Nicholls of Raleigh.

 

  • Nils Erik Persson, a senior with a computer science major, of Cary.

 

  • Addie Marie Rush, a May 2017 graduate with a psychology major and speech & hearing science and education minors, daughter of Greg Rush and Robin Rush of Raleigh.

 

  • Akshay Sankar, a junior with biostatistics and chemistry majors and a computer science minor, of Cary.

 

  • Courtney Schlachter, a senior with linguistics and music majors and a speech and hearing sciences minor, of Cary.

 

  • Lauren Ann Sugarman, a senior with a biology major and chemistry and neuroscience minors, daughter of Neal Sugarman and Denyce Sugarman of Apex.

 

  • Jayson Beck Wisk, a May 2010 graduate with an economics major and a chemistry minor, son of Dr. Joseph Wisk and Carolyn Wisk of Raleigh.

 

Alabama

 

  • Savannah Loehr, a senior with a biology major and neuroscience and chemistry minors, daughter of Leah Loehr and Tim Loehr of Montgomery.

 

Arizona

 

  • Gabrielle Rose Geenen, a senior with a psychology major and philosophy and women’s and gender studies minors, daughter of Daniel Geenen and Lisa Rosenfeld of Chandler.

 

Arkansas

 

  • Gordon Miller Wilbourn, a senior with English and classics majors, son of Penny Wilbourn and Gordon Wilbourn of Little Rock.

 

California

 

  • Brittney M Allyn, an August 2017 graduate with a biology major, daughter of Shelley Allyn and Dale Allyn of Seal Beach.

 

Colorado

 

  • Nicole Elizabeth Affleck, a senior with an environmental studies major and Hispanic studies and urban planning minors, daughter of Jack Affleck and Beth Affleck of Vail.

 

Connecticut

 

  • Caroline Joyce Keough, a May 2017 graduate with an environmental science major and mathematical decision sciences and Italian minors, daughter of Cami Keough and William Keough of Fairfield.

 

Delaware

 

  • Anna Claire McQuillin, a senior with African, African American, and diaspora studies and economics majors and a mathematics minor, daughter of Donna McQuillin and Alan McQuillin of Bear.

 

Florida

 

  • Sundus Alfi, a senior with public policy and economics majors, daughter of Nesreen Alsati of Tampa.

 

  • Stephen Baker, a senior with a psychology major and biology and chemistry minors, of Bradenton.

 

  • Brittany Marie Castellanos, a senior with a chemistry major and biology and Spanish for the medical professions minors, of Miami.

 

  • Khaleelah Lynne Elhajoui, a junior with linguistics and Japanese majors and a biology minor, daughter of Dylan Elhajoui and Anne Elhajoui of Sarasota.

 

  • Julia Marie Fehr, a senior with a chemistry major, of Longwood.

 

  • Rachel Elizabeth Joyner, a junior with a peace, war, and defense major and a philosophy, politics, and economics minor, of Tallahassee.

 

  • Ched Milic, a junior with economics and computer science majors and a business administration minor, of St Petersburg.

 

  • Margaret Eline Player, a senior with political science and peace, war, and defense majors, daughter of Shane Player and Lisa Player of Gulf Breeze.

 

  • Analisa Maria Sorrells, a senior with a public policy major and a media and journalism minor, daughter of Tom Sorrells and Mitra Sorrells of Windermere.

 

Georgia

 

  • Andrew James Bock, a senior with chemistry and French majors and a medical anthropology minor, son of Wendi Bock and Gregory Bock of Dawsonville.

 

  • Margaret Susan Cruser, a senior with a computer science major and a journalism minor, daughter of J. Robb Cruser and Laura Cruser of Alpharetta.

 

  • Kenny Le, a senior with a psychology major and a neuroscience minor, of Norcross.

 

  • Vishnu Ramachandran, a junior with computer science and philosophy majors, son of Swarnamani Ramachandran and Saraswathi Swarnamani of Peachtree Corners.

 

Illinois

 

  • Caroline Rose Stanton, a junior with chemistry and music majors, daughter of Charlotte Stanton and David Stanton, Jr. of Deer Park.

 

Indiana

 

  • Morgan Lane, a senior with a chemistry major and a biology minor, daughter of John Lane and Cindy Mason of Columbus.

 

Iowa

 

  • Nile Foxx Iverson, a senior with media and journalism and biology majors and a chemistry minor, of Iowa City.

 

Maryland

 

  • Leah Balkoski, a senior with comparative literature and religious studies majors and a French minor, of Baltimore.

 

  • Brooks James Knighton, a senior with a biology major and a chemistry minor, son of Michele Knighton and James Knighton of Catonsville.

 

  • Boateng Appiah Kubi, a May 2017 graduate with a biology major and philosophy and chemistry minors, son of Anthony Kubi and Naomi Kubi of Bowie.

 

Minnesota

 

  • Claire McBride Drysdale, a senior with biology and studio art majors, daughter of Julie Drysdale and Michael Drysdale of Golden Valley.

 

  • Lauren Groffsky, a May 2017 graduate with Hispanic literature and culture and Latin American studies majors, daughter of Jeffrey Groffsky and Natalie Wu.

 

Missouri

 

  • Eric Hanlin Lee, a senior with an economics major and a philosophy, politics, and economics minor, of St. Louis.

 

New Jersey

 

  • Madison Rihga Schaper, a senior with an English major and writing for the screen and stage and creative writing minors, daughter of Sheila Donohue and Todd Schaper of Metuchen.

 

  • Amanda Ruth Witwer, a senior with public policy and sociology majors, daughter of Rhonda Witwer of Clinton.

 

New York

 

  • Jimmy Chin, a senior with economics and Asian studies majors and a philosophy minor, son of Irene Lee of Chapel Hill, NC.

 

  • Kristen Michelle Marino, a senior with media and journalism and psychology majors, daughter of Dr. Mary Marino and Dr. Michael Marino.

 

  • Carolyn Jean Mistele, a senior with an exercise and sport science major and a neuroscience minor, daughter of Katherine Mistele and William Mistele, Jr. of New City.

 

  • Matthew Shear, a senior with peace, war, and defense and psychology majors and an Arabic minor, of Ardsley.

 

Oklahoma

 

  • Lauren Alexandra Moore, a May 2017 graduate with business administration and dramatic art majors, daughter of Hal Moore and Tonya Moore of Norman.

 

Pennsylvania

 

  • Adam Loeser, a senior with a chemistry major and a Spanish for the professions minor, son of Dr. Linda Malisan and Dr. Glen Loeser of Ambler.

 

  • Samantha Paisley, a senior with journalism and political science majors, daughter of Ian Paisley and Tess Dove of Perryville, MD.

 

  • Alexander Matthew Payne, a senior with biology and chemistry majors and a history minor, son of Susan Payne and Brett Payne of Downingtown.

 

  • Angela Lee Zhang, a senior with psychology and biology majors, daughter of Bin Zhang and Ping Lee of Pittsburgh.

 

Rhode Island

 

  • Camille M Oswald, a May 2017 graduate with dramatic arts and women’s and gender studies majors, daughter of Mindy Oswald and James Oswald of Barrington.

 

  • Magdalena Rainey, a senior with a nutrition major and chemistry and biology minors, of Barrington.

 

South Carolina

 

  • Rossi Akim Anastopoulo, a May 2017 graduate with global studies and sports and social issues majors, of Charleston.

 

Tennessee

 

  • David Isaac Doochin, a senior with linguistics and history majors, son of Lawrence Doochin and Janice Doochin of Franklin.

 

  • Gabrielle Blue Nair, a senior with political science and philosophy majors, daughter of Katy Burke-Nair and Brent Nair of Memphis.

 

Texas

 

  • Shelby Victoria Anderson, a senior with psychology and chemistry majors, daughter of Craig Anderson and Pamalla Anderson of Dallas.

 

Utah

 

  • Tony Hong Liu, a May 2017 graduate with a geography major and religious studies and anthropology minors, of Salt Lake City.

 

  • Isabel Margaret Romano, a senior with business administration and public policy majors, daughter of Bridget Romano and Rich Romano of Salt Lake City.


Virginia

 

  • Anita Amin, a junior with health policy and management and biology majors, of Arlington.

 

  • Allyson Sloan Barkley, a senior with global studies and Hispanic literature and cultures majors, daughter of Dr. Carolyn Dalldorf and James Barkley of Charlottesville.

 

  • Anna DeLancey Phares, a senior with a global studies major and chemistry and Hispanic studies minors, of Richmond.

 

Washington

 

  • Stenn Hollis Monson, a junior with economics and history majors and a business administration minor, son of Gregory Monson and Chalky Monson of Ephrata.

 

West Virginia

 

  • Jamie Austin Rose, a junior with chemistry and biology majors, son of Todd Rose and Rachel Rose of Beckley.

 

Canada

 

  • Renuka Rachel Koilpillai, a senior with sociology and psychology majors and a public policy minor, daughter of Dr. Chris Koilpillai and Prof. Anuradha Koilpillai of Halifax, Nova Scotia.

 

Costa Rica

 

  • Christopher Lee Brenes, a senior with computer science and economics majors, son of Margarita Brenes of San Pedro, San José and Robert Lee of Chapel Hill, NC.

 

Vietnam

 

  • My Linh H Luu, a senior with a comparative literature major and a creative writing minor, daughter of Dr. Doanh Luu and Thi Ngoc Mai Hoang of Hanoi.

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 111 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 322,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and 165 countries. More than 175,000 live in North Carolina.

 

University Communications contact: Media Relations, (919) 445-8555, mediarelations@unc.edu

Phi Beta Kappa contact: Jason Clemmons, (919) 843-7756, jclem@email.unc.edu