Board of Trustees leaders statement

Board of Trustees leaders statement on Chancellor Folt’s decision to remove Confederate Monument base and step down from office

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.—Jan. 14, 2019) – As current officers of the UNC-Chapel Hill Board of Trustees and a former chair who served with Chancellor Carol L. Folt, we support her decision to remove intact the base of the Confederate Monument and accept her decision to step down from her position. We thank Chancellor Folt for working tirelessly to elevate our University each and every day to serve the people of North Carolina and beyond.

 

The chancellor has ultimate authority over campus public safety, and we agree Chancellor Folt is acting properly to preserve campus security. Nothing is more important than keeping our campus community and visitors as safe as possible.

 

We are sincerely grateful to Chancellor Folt for her dedicated service to our great University and the State of North Carolina. When she arrived in July 2013, she brought remarkable energy and deep passion to countless initiatives that have made Carolina stronger and poised to inspire future generations of students, faculty, staff and alumni.

 

Under her leadership, our University launched new efforts to expand access and affordability for deserving students; surpassed for the first time $1 billion in research expenditures; and developed our first-ever overarching strategic framework, “The Blueprint for Next,” which will guide us well into the next decade. To ensure we have the continued resources to meet these goals and to bring us into our next chapter of growth, Chancellor Folt has played a vital role in the outstanding success of our $4.25 billion fundraising campaign. Above all, Chancellor Folt has cared deeply about her campus – students, faculty and staff – and has an abiding love and respect for the University community.

 

Carolina has been well served by its 11th chancellor. We will continue to work closely with Chancellor Folt and the UNC System to ensure a smooth leadership transition.

 

Charles “Chuck” Duckett, Vice Chair
Julia Grumbles, Secretary
Lowry Caudill, Current Member and Past Chair

 

 

Winston B. Crisp, UNC School of Law alumnus and former vice chancellor for student affairs, to speak at winter Commencement

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Winston B. Crisp, UNC School of Law alumnus and former vice chancellor for student affairs, to speak at winter Commencement

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— Nov. 13, 2018) – Winston B. Crisp, former University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill vice chancellor for student affairs, will deliver the University’s 2018 winter Commencement address on Sunday, Dec. 16, 2 p.m., in the Dean E. Smith Center.

 

Crisp joined student affairs at UNC-Chapel Hill in 2005 as assistant vice chancellor. In 2010, he was named vice chancellor and remained in that role until October 2018 when he retired from the University after 26 years of service. During his time at Carolina, Crisp became an integral part of the student experience, serving thousands of students and families. In the 2016-2017 academic year, student affairs conducted more than 1,200 workshops and events, employed nearly 1,500 students and supported approximately 780 student organizations.

 

“When we think about Carolina, it is because of people like Winston who leave personal and lasting Tar Heel footprints on our campus and in our hearts. He cares so deeply and gives so completely, and no one ever forgets their first Vice Crispy hug,” said Chancellor Carol L. Folt. “Winston always placed students at the center of our discussions as he worked to create student success and belonging in our Carolina Community. I was honored to have him as a most trusted advisor and friend. He is the right speaker to address a new generation of Carolina leaders who are beginning their personal journeys of service that will leave a mark on our state, nation and world.”

 

In March 2018, Crisp led the effort to convene a Mental Health Task Force at the University to assess the scope of mental health care needs for students and to provide recommendations to the administration and Board of Trustees about policies and programs related to mental health care. Crisp also co-chaired the Chancellor’s Task Force on UNC-Chapel Hill History, working with colleagues to tell the full, complete and accurate history of the University.

 

“I am humbled by the opportunity to be this year’s winter Commencement speaker and consider it an honor and privilege,” said Crisp. “I am looking forward to it tremendously.”

 

A 1989 graduate of Johnson C. Smith University in Charlotte, Crisp arrived at UNC-Chapel Hill that same year to attend the UNC School of Law. Upon graduation, he became the law school’s first full-time assistant dean for student affairs and the first associate dean for student services.  In those positions, he played a key role in strengthening coordination among the academic program, financial management, outreach and student support areas.

 

For more information on winter Commencement, visit http://commencement.unc.edu/.

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 74 bachelor’s, 104 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools including the College of Arts & Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s nearly 330,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, US Territories and 162 countries. Almost 178,000 live in North Carolina.

 

 

University Communications: Media Relations, (919) 445-8555, mediarelations@unc.edu

 

UNC-Chapel Hill School of Law receives a $1.53 million gift for new entrepreneurship program

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UNC-Chapel Hill School of Law receives a $1.53 million gift for new entrepreneurship program

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C. — June 18, 2018) – What does it take to be an entrepreneur? It takes drive, ambition, patience and persistence to identify a need and create a business to fill that need. It also takes access to legal resources.

 

The William R. Kenan, Jr. Charitable Trust recognizes that early-stage legal counsel is critical to the success of new for-profit and nonprofit ventures. To ensure that these ventures have access to legal counsel, the Kenan Trust has made a $1.53 million gift to support the establishment of a clinical entrepreneurship program at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s School of Law. The program will provide rigorous, hands-on training for the next generation of public-spirited lawyers while also filling gaps in North Carolina’s entrepreneurship ecosystem. In addition to the Kenan Trust, the North Carolina General Assembly has appropriated $465,000 in recurring funds to support the program.

 

“We are thrilled and inspired by the investment in the education of Carolina students that the Kenan Trust and the people of North Carolina, through their representatives, are making,” said Martin H. Brinkley, dean and Arch T. Allen Distinguished Professor at UNC School of Law.  “Clinical education geared toward organizational clients, and the business and social entrepreneurs who establish them, is important to large numbers of our students. The new entrepreneurship program will help Carolina Law embrace its mission by fulfilling dual goals of teaching and service. With this generous gift from the Kenan Trust and additional support from the state, we will be able to provide an invaluable experiential learning opportunity for approximately 30 students a year while serving several times that number of for-profit and nonprofit entrepreneurial ventures each year.”

 

The new program will serve business and social enterprise entrepreneurs on the campuses of UNC-Chapel Hill and North Carolina State University, in partnership with UNC Kenan-Flagler Business School, NC State University’s Poole College of Management, as well as the innovation and entrepreneurship infrastructures on both campuses. The UNC School of Law also intends to identify one or more economic incubators in underserved parts of North Carolina that the entrepreneurship program can support.

 

In addition to providing educational opportunities for law students, the program will fill the one consistent gap across all startup settings: a lack of access to legal counsel. Legal advice for early-stage businesses and nonprofits, which typically have limited resources, is hard to find. In an effort to control costs, too many entrepreneurs never consult a lawyer and come to regret it. Failing to consult competent counsel exposes a new business or nonprofit organization to a variety of risks. For clients of the program these risks will be lowered, giving them a greater chance of thriving and expanding. In the end, students, startup businesses, communities and the state’s economy will end up benefiting.

 

The state recognized the benefits of the proposed program, appreciated the Kenan Trust gift and chose to show its support through a $465,000 appropriation.  “Connecting the world-class legal community at Carolina with business professionals in the startup economy is a win-win approach to higher education that will prepare law students to succeed and provide valuable legal resources for emerging companies in our state’s rapidly growing economy,” said House Speaker Tim Moore.

 

The program is expected to kick off in the 2019-2020 academic year. An official name will be determined during the planning process with input from current students.

 

“The Kenan Trust has always focused on the needs of the communities it serves and education is the foundation,” said Douglas Zinn, executive director of the William R. Kenan Jr. Charitable Trust. “We recognize that student education doesn’t just happen in the classroom and we are excited to support the entrepreneurship program that will train law students while strengthening North Carolina communities and the state’s economy.”

 

Funding will support three interwoven legal clinics at UNC School of Law: a for-profit ventures clinic, an intellectual property clinic and Carolina Law’s existing Community Development Law Clinic, which is a longstanding, highly successful nonprofit social entrepreneurship clinic. Each clinic, supervised by a full-time member of the law school faculty, will train eight to 10 law students per semester. Students will counsel business founders on the advantages and disadvantages of various business entity structures, form appropriate entities, draft organizational documents, capture and license intellectual property assets, and seek tax-exempt status for community based nonprofit organizations.

North Carolina is consistently ranked as one of the nation’s top five places to start a new business. Because of the rich and thriving entrepreneurial culture of the Research Triangle Park area of North Carolina and the business schools and entrepreneurial initiatives at local universities, the institute will serve a pipeline of clients from potential partners across the state.

 

“This gift and challenge from the Kenan Charitable Trust will catapult UNC School of Law onto the cutting edge of legal education. From my own experience representing clients in mergers and acquisitions and startups, there is a great need for legal advice at the earliest stages,” said Larry Robbins, partner at Wyrick Robbins Yates & Ponton LLP. “My hat is off to the Kenan Trust and the North Carolina General Assembly for recognizing this need for an entrepreneurship institute and for funding it.”

 

The gift from the Kenan Trust supports For All Kind: The Campaign for Carolina, the most ambitious fundraising campaign in the University’s history. The gift also reinforces UNC School of Law’s commitment to train lawyer-leaders to address the issues and questions of today’s dynamic, ever-evolving industries, particularly in areas of growth and influence in North Carolina and beyond.

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 111 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 323,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and 149 countries. More than 169,00 live in North Carolina.

 

University Communications: Media Relations, (919) 445-8555, mediarelations@unc.edu

 

UNC School of Law Contact: Amy Barefoot Graedon, (919) 843-7148, abarefoot@unc.edu

UNC-Chapel Hill’s Commencement weekend events take place May 11-13

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UNC-Chapel Hill’s Commencement weekend events take place May 11-13

Alumnus and co-founder of Carolina for Kibera, Rye Barcott, to give keynote address

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C. –  May 9, 2018) – The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill will host its Spring Commencement on Sunday, May 13 at 9 a.m., featuring a keynote address from Rye Barcott, social entrepreneur, U.S. Marine Corps veteran and Carolina alumnus.

 

In addition to presiding over Commencement at Kenan Stadium, Chancellor Carol L. Folt will also speak at the Red, White and Carolina Blue Graduation honoring Carolina’s military-affiliated graduates and the doctoral hooding ceremony, which acknowledges students who have become masters in their fields.

The weekend will culminate in the formal Commencement presentation, with the Class of 1968 walking into Kenan Stadium along with the Class of 2018. During the Commencement ceremony, Carolina will award honorary degrees to three individuals. More information on this year’s honorary degree recipients can be found here.

 

Before graduating from UNC-Chapel Hill, Barcott co-founded Carolina for Kibera through the Center for Global Initiatives within UNC Global. CFK is a non-governmental organization based in the impoverished Kibera neighborhood of Nairobi, Kenya. Currently Barcott serves as co-founder and CEO of With Honor, a civic organization that is helping elect to Congress a cross-partisan coalition of post-9/11 veterans.

 

As of May 2, the University registrar estimates that 6,119 students will graduate Sunday: 3,886 with bachelor’s degrees, 1,596 with master’s, 262 with doctoral degrees and 637 with professional degrees from the schools of dentistry, law, medicine and pharmacy. You can find more information on the class of 2018 here. Students completing degree work this spring or summer will participate in Spring Commencement. The official number of graduates will be available when all grades are recorded.

 

Red, White and Carolina Blue Graduation

Friday May 11, 9 a.m.

Frank Porter Graham Student Union, Great Hall

Fifty-three graduates who are veterans, currently serving in the military or ROTC students commissioning upon graduation, will be presented with red, white and Carolina blue honor cords. The students will wear their cords at Sunday’s Commencement as special recognition for their military commitment. This ceremony is part of the University’s continued expansion of support for military-affiliated students.

 

On-site media contact: Audrey Smith, (919) 801-1936, audrey.smith@unc.edu.

 

Doctoral hooding ceremony

Saturday May 12, 9:30 a.m.

Dean E. Smith Center

Kathryn Lofton, Ph.D., professor of religious studies, American studies, history and divinity at Yale University, will deliver the keynote speech. She received both her master’s and doctoral degrees in religious studies from UNC-Chapel Hill.  A live stream of the ceremony can be found here.

 

On-site media contact: Kate Luck, (479) 629-6334 , kate.luck@unc.edu.

 

Spring Commencement

Sunday May 13, 9 a.m.

Kenan Stadium

As previously announced, Rye Barcott, a 2001 graduate of UNC-Chapel Hill, will deliver Carolina’s Spring Commencement address. He will have a small window of media availability following the ceremony. If you’re interested in speaking with Barcott after his remarks please RSVP to Jeni Cook, jeni.cook@unc.edu, no later than noon Friday, May 11.  A live stream of the ceremony can be found here.

 

Media check-in: 8:30 a.m.

From the parking lot, walk past the trees to Kenan Stadium. Enter through Gate 6. On-site media contact: Jeni Cook, (404) 309-3994, jeni.cook@unc.edu. All graduates will be seated on the field; however, media will not be permitted in student or guest seating areas during the ceremony. Broadcasters are asked to bring their own drop cords.

 

Inclement weather:

The Commencement ceremony will be held in Kenan Stadium. If it rains during Commencement, the Chancellor and organizers may shorten the ceremony, but it will not be relocated. Umbrellas will be permitted, but guests should use caution when using umbrellas and be mindful of those seated around them.

 

If severe weather is expected Commencement morning, the University may postpone the ceremony to allow for the threat to pass. If there are weather-related delays, the latest possible start time for Commencement would be 11 a.m. If severe weather threatens while the ceremony is in progress and the attendee’s safety is at risk, the ceremony will be canceled and guests will be advised to seek shelter. The ceremony will not resume. University Communications will inform media about the delay or cancellation. Weather-related updates will be available at unc.edu and on the Commencement website.

 

Media parking:

A limited number of spaces will be reserved in the UNC Police lot off Manning Drive. From Manning, turn onto Paul Hardin/Public Safety Drive (one traffic light west of the intersection of Manning and Skipper Bowles Drive/Ridge Road) and turn left into the UNC Police lot. Media identification will be required. Parking will be available along the left side of the cones across the lot and toward the 2nd entrance to the lot as indicated by a special sign at the entrance. Do not park in numbered spaces. Please RSVP to Jeni Cook, jeni.cook@unc.edu  no later than noon on Friday, May 11.

 

Media representatives may also use lots and shuttles provided for Commencement guests. Traffic into Chapel Hill is expected to be heavy from 7:30 a.m. to 9:15 a.m.

 

Other ceremonies:

Many individual schools and departments will hold their own ceremonies during Commencement weekend. Locations and times are available online.

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 111 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 322,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and 165 countries. More than 175,000 live in North Carolina.

 

University Communications: Media Relations, (919) 445-8555, mediarelations@unc.edu

 

University releases documents related to faculty grievance

Today Chancellor Carol L. Folt released the following memo. The documents referenced in the memo are included below.

 

 

 

  1. The letter of Provost Robert Blouin to Christopher B. McLaughlin, Chair of the Faculty Grievance Committee, dated November 30, 2017.
  2. The letter of Chancellor Carol L. Folt to Professor Jay Smith dated February 26, 2018.
  3. The letter of Chancellor Carol L. Folt to Board of Trustees Chair Haywood Cochrane dated March 20, 2018.
  4. The decision of the Board of Trustees denying Professor Smith’s appeal dated April 2, 2018.

 

Published May 4, 2018

 

 

Chancellor Folt statement on Board of Trustees vote on honorary degree

 

I recommended that the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Board of Trustees initiate a process via a mail ballot to revoke the honorary degree awarded to Bill Cosby in 2003. This is the first known time that the University has taken steps to rescind an honorary degree, and we do not take this action lightly. In this case, Cosby’s acts were so counter to our campus values that this prestigious honor is no longer appropriate.

 

Honorary degrees are awarded based on the information available at that time, and we do not intend to review the actions of each recipient years later. The Trustees are reviewing a recommendation to revoke his honorary degree, and they will formally vote on the matter at their regular May meeting.

 

The University has no tolerance for sexual assault, and we have worked diligently in recent years to comprehensively revise our sexual assault and misconduct policy and enhance resources for our community. We encourage anyone to visit safe.unc.edu for more information.

 

Carol L. Folt
Chancellor

 

Published May 2, 2018

 

UNC-Chapel Hill selects “Popular” for 2018 Summer Reading

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UNC-Chapel Hill selects “Popular” for 2018 Summer Reading

This year marks the 20th anniversary of the reading program

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— April 16, 2018) – “Popular: Finding Happiness and Success in a World that Cares Too Much About the Wrong Kinds of Relationships” is the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s 2018 selection for the Carolina Summer Reading Program. Written by UNC-Chapel Professor Mitch Prinstein, the book explores why popularity plays a key role in human development and ultimately, how it still influences people as adults.

 

The book examines how popularity affects success, relationships and happiness—and why people don’t always want to be the most popular. Prinstein serves as the John Van Seters Distinguished Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience, and the Director of Clinical Psychology at UNC-Chapel Hill.

 

“This book is directly relevant to incoming students and can spur tremendous conversation about the challenges of transitioning to college and adult life,” said Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs Winston Crisp. “We’re also thrilled to have work by one of Carolina’s own to mark a milestone for the reading program, the 20th anniversary.”

 

First-year and transfer students who enroll at UNC-Chapel Hill this fall are encouraged to read the book this summer and participate in small-group discussions during the Week of Welcome before fall 2018 semester classes begin.

 

The Carolina Summer Reading Program, now in its 20th year, aims to stimulate critical thinking outside the classroom and give new students a shared experience. Students are encouraged to come to their own conclusions about the book and will participate in summer reading discussion groups that serve as an academic icebreaker.

 

“I am so excited that students will get a chance to learn which type of popularity will help them over the course of their lives, which type is toxic, and the ways that social media may be influencing them without even realizing it,” said Prinstein. “Anyone who ever went to high school will find something in this book that makes them feel much better about their adolescence.”

 

Prinstein will be on campus to give a lecture about the book on Aug. 20, 2018, in Memorial Hall.

 

“Popular: Finding Happiness and Success in a World that Cares Too Much About the Wrong Kinds of Relationships” is available at the Bull’s Head Bookshop in UNC Student Stores. The paperback version, which includes a new chapter focusing on how adults can achieve the most useful type of popularity, will be available beginning June 19, 2018.

 

Past selections for the Carolina Summer Reading Program include: “How Does it Feel to be a Problem?” by Moustafa Bayoumi, “The Shallows: What the Internet is Doing to our Brains” by Nicholas G. Carr, “Absolutely American: Four Years at West Point” by David Lipsky, and “Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End” by Atul Gawande.

 

For more information, visit the Carolina Summer Reading website.

 

Photo Link: https://unc.photoshelter.com/galleries/C0000.jfK5DRIwnI/G0000O6f5v5HyJpw/I0000nPpQsOxGbRU/Mitch-Prinstein (Password: summer)

 

Photo credit: Somer Hadley, Revolution Studios 2017

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 111 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 322,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and 165 countries. More than 175,000 live in North Carolina.

 

University Communications: Media Relations, (919) 445-8555, mediarelations@unc.edu

 

UNC-Chapel Hill Graduate Programs Ranked Among “Best Graduate Schools”

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UNC-Chapel Hill Graduate Programs Ranked Among “Best Graduate Schools”

U.S. News & World Report ranked UNC School of Medicine first for its primary care program

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— March 20, 2018) – University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill graduate programs received high rankings as part of U.S. News & World Report’s 2019 “Best Graduate Schools.” Among the rankings, the UNC School of Medicine is first for its primary care program, following a second-place ranking last year.

 

U.S. News ranks business, education, engineering, law, nursing and medical programs annually, while various disciplines and specialties in the sciences, social sciences, humanities and other areas, are only ranked periodically.

 

This year, U.S. News ranked doctoral programs in criminology and criminal justice; master’s degree programs in social work, public affairs and related specialty areas; and doctoral programs in the sciences, specifically in biological sciences, chemistry, computer science, earth sciences, mathematics, physics and statistics.

 

The following are the complete UNC-Chapel Hill rankings and specialty listings. A comprehensive list of all rankings and data can be found here.

 

School of Medicine

Overall

  • Primary Care, 1st
  • Research, tied for 23rd

 

Specialty area

  • Obstetrics & Gynecology, 14th

 

School of Nursing

Overall

  • Master’s Degree, tied for 14th
  • Doctor of Nursing Practice, tied for 13th

 

Specialty areas

  • Nursing Administration, tied for 12th
  • Nurse Practitioner: Family, tied for 12th
  • Nurse Practitioner: Psychiatric/Mental Health, Across the Lifespan, tied for 9th

 

School of Social Work

Overall

  • Tied for 5th

 

Kenan-Flagler Business School

Overall

  • 19th

 

Specialty areas

  • Accounting, 11th
  • Executive MBA, 16th
  • Finance, 29th
  • Management, tied for 20th
  • Marketing, tied for 15th

 

School of Law

Overall

  •  45th

 

Specialty area

  • Legal Writing, tied for 12th

 

School of Education

Overall

  • Tied for 30th

 

Specialty areas

  • Administration/Supervision, tied for 14th
  • Curriculum/Instruction, 17th
  • Secondary Education, 14th
  • Special Education, tied for 11th

 

Public Affairs

Overall

  • Tied for 23rd

 

Specialty areas

  • Environmental Policy and Management, 14th
  • Local Government Management, 3rd
  • Public Finance and Budgeting, tied for 20th
  • Public Management and Leadership, tied for 15th
  • Public Policy Analysis, tied for 32nd

 

  • Carolina has programs and specialty areas within several units based in the School of Government, the College of Arts and Sciences and the Gillings School of Global Public Health with master’s degree programs that are ranked by U.S. News as part of a public affairs category.

 

Sciences

  • Biology, tied for 33rd
  • Biostatistics, tied for 8th
  • Chemistry, tied for 15th
  • Analytical Chemistry, 2nd
  • Inorganic Chemistry, 10th
  • Computer Science, tied for 25th
  • Earth Sciences, tied for 54th
  • Mathematics, tied for 34th
  • Physics, tied for 47th
  • Statistics, 19th

  

Methodology: U.S. News first ranked graduate programs in 1987 and has done so annually since 1990. Each year it ranks professional programs in business, education, engineering, law, nursing and medicine. Those rankings are based on two types of data: expert opinion on program excellence and statistical indicators that measure the quality of a school’s faculty, research and students. Its periodic rankings of additional disciplines and specialties in the sciences, social sciences, humanities and other areas are based solely on the ratings of peer academic experts, including deans, program directors and faculty.

 

The data come from statistical surveys sent to administrators at more than 1,970 graduate programs and from reputation surveys sent to more than 16,500 academics and professionals in the disciplines. Surveys for the 2019 rankings were conducted during the fall of 2017 and in early 2018.

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 111 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 322,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and 165 countries. More than 175,000 live in North Carolina.

 

University Communications: Jeni Cook, (919) 962-2091, jeni.cook@unc.edu

 

U.S. News & World Report contactEducation-PR@usnews.com

 

Rye Barcott, social entrepreneur, to speak at UNC-Chapel Hill Commencement

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Rye Barcott, social entrepreneur, to speak at UNC-Chapel Hill Commencement

U.S. Marine Corps veteran and co-founder of Carolina for Kibera to give keynote address

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— Feb. 15, 2018) –  Rye Barcott, social entrepreneur and a graduate of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, will deliver the University’s spring Commencement address on May 13 in Kenan Stadium.

 

Before graduating from UNC-Chapel Hill in 2001 on an ROTC scholarship, Barcott co-founded Carolina for Kibera through the Center for Global Initiatives within UNC Global. CFK is a non-governmental organization based in the impoverished Kibera neighborhood of Nairobi, Kenya. Named a Time magazine and Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation “Hero of Global Health,” CFK uses sports and public health initiatives to prevent ethnic and gender violence and to fight poverty.

 

“Rye’s amazing life journey began while he was an undergraduate at Carolina, when he co-founded an acclaimed non-governmental organization, Carolina for Kibera, dedicated to breaking cycles of violence and developing young leaders in Kenya,” said Chancellor Carol L. Folt. “Rye’s out-of-the box thinking and global entrepreneurial work – ranging from creating holistic youth development programs to establishing a clinic treating thousands in collaboration with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, has been recognized by the President of the United States, the World Economic Forum and international philanthropists, and is taught in graduate schools around the world. I know his authenticity and example of selfless service to others, mixed with his personal humility and humor, will inspire the Class of 2018 as they begin their own journeys.”

 

A former captain, Barcott served five years in the U.S. Marine Corps in Bosnia, the Horn of Africa and Iraq. He also wrote “It Happened on the Way to War: A Marine’s Path to Peace,” a book that juxtaposes social entrepreneurship with military service.

 

“What a thrilling honor it is to be this year’s commencement speaker for my beloved alma mater. Service has been part of Carolina’s DNA since 1789, when we were founded as the nation’s first public university,” said Barcott. “I’m grateful for the opportunities I’ve had to serve my country and I can’t wait to be in a sea of Carolina blue in Kenan Stadium with my kids by my side feeling the love.”

 

In 2001 Barcott earned bachelor’s degrees in peace, war and defense and international studies from Carolina. In 2009, he earned master’s degrees in public administration and business administration from Harvard University, where he was a Harvard Center for Public Leadership Social Enterprise Fellow. He then returned to North Carolina and co-founded Double Time Capital, an impact investment firm that played an integral role in helping the state become second in the nation in solar power.

 

Barcott currently serves as co-founder and CEO of With Honor, a new civic organization that is helping elect to Congress a cross-partisan coalition of post-9/11 veterans. With Honor is based in Charlotte, where Barcott lives with his wife, Dr. Tracy Barcott, a 2000 Carolina alumna, and their two children.

 

Folt chose Barcott in consultation with faculty and staff on the University’s Commencement Speaker Selection Committee.

 

Spring Commencement will be held at 9 a.m. in Kenan Stadium. Folt will preside over the ceremony. For more information, visit http://commencement.unc.edu/.

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill



The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 111 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 322,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and 165 countries. More than 175,000 live in North Carolina.

 

University Communications: Jeni Cook, (919) 962-2091, jeni.cook@unc.edu