New members chosen for UNC-Chapel Hill Board of Visitors

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New members chosen for UNC-Chapel Hill Board of Visitors

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— June 11, 2018) – Today the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill announced the new appointment of select alumni and friends to serve one of the most active volunteer organizations at Carolina: the UNC Board of Visitors. The Board of Trustees elects a new class of members each year as fourth-year members complete their terms. The 54 new board members, appointed on May 31, will begin their terms on July 1, 2018.

 

As ambassadors of Carolina, approximately 175 Board of Visitors members inform their communities about on-going work and issues important to the University. In turn, the members share feedback from those communities with the University’s administration. These volunteers actively assist the Board of Trustees and Chancellor Carol L. Folt in student recruitment, government relations, marketing and fundraising. Members also volunteer their time and professional experience as a resource to students who seek guidance ahead of entering the workforce.

 

Sallie Glover of Raleigh will serve as chair of the Board of Visitors and Reyna Walters-Morgan of Raleigh will serve as vice chair.

 

The new members are listed below, alphabetically by North Carolina county and by locations outside of North Carolina.

 

North Carolina
Cabarrus: Paul Newton of Mount Pleasant

 

Carteret: Maxine Brown-Davis of Cedar Point

 

Davidson: Charles Broadwell of Denton

 

Durham: Paul Wright of Durham

 

Forsyth: Susan Mann of Winston-Salem

 

Guilford: Fleming Edwards of Greensboro

 

Lee: Robert Reives of Sanford

 

Mecklenburg: Omid Ahdieh, Kevin Griffin, Christian Robinson, Burnet Tucker, Dan Warren, Agnes Weisiger and Don Williams of Charlotte

 

New Hanover: Lindsey Walter of Wilmington

 

Onslow: Michael Surles of Jacksonville

 

Orange: Olive Greenwald of Efland; Jennifer McCafferty, Houston Summers, Roger Werner and Paige Zinn of Chapel Hill

 

Pitt: Robert Kemp, Suzanne Pecheles and Henry Louis Stephenson III of Greenville

 

Stokes: Kyle Hall of King

 

Wake: Priscilla Maynor of Holly Springs; Jim Blaine, Martin Boney, David Bull, Bart Goodson, Joshua Kmiec, Merrill Mason, Timothy McNeill and Samuel Sugg of Raleigh

 

Wayne: Garrett Strickland of Mount Olive

 

Alaska

Bill Murdock of Kodiak

 

California

Kimberley Kwok of San Francisco; Kristen McGuiness of Newport Beach

 

District of Columbia

Chris Riddick

 

Florida

Whitney Cohen of St. Petersburg

 

Georgia

Ruth Fowler of Dunwoody; Kevin Salvadori of Alpharetta; and Tony Kearney and Robert Turner of Atlanta

 

Illinois

Ward McNally of Chicago

 

Nevada

Frank Andrews of Las Vegas

 

New Jersey

Michael Bradshaw of Pennington

 

New York

Alec Guettel of Mount Kisco; Philip Yates of West Harrison; Kathryn Randolph and George Webster of New York

 

South Carolina

Robert Temple of Greenville

 

Virginia

Latta Chapman of Alexandria; Daryl Davis of Stafford

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill



The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 111 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 323,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and 149 countries. More than 169,000 live in North Carolina.

 

University Communications: Carly Miller, (919) 445-8555, mediarelations@unc.edu

Ackland Art Museum at UNC-Chapel Hill hosts “The Outwin: American Portraiture Today”     

For immediate use

Amy Sherald, American, born 1973: Miss Everything (Unsuppressed Deliverance), 2013. Oil on canvas, 54 x 43-1/8 in., 2013. Frances and Burton Reifler © Amy Sherald.

Ackland Art Museum at UNC-Chapel Hill hosts
“The Outwin: American Portraiture Today”   

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— May 31, 2018) – The Ackland Art Museum at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill will host “The Outwin: American Portraiture Today” on view from the Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery from June 1 through Aug. 26. The Ackland is the fourth and final stop and is the only Southeast location chosen to host the exhibition. A preview of the exhibition can be seen here.The selected finalists for the 2016 Outwin Boochever Portrait Competition finalists included in “The Outwin: American Portraiture Today” present a turning point in the advancement of American contemporary portraiture.

 

First-prize winner of the 2016 Outwin Boochever Portrait Competition Amy Sherald became the first woman to win the competition for her oil on canvas titled “Miss Everything (Unsuppressed Deliverance)” (2013). Former first lady Michelle Obama selected Sherald to create her official portrait for the National Portrait Gallery’s permanent collection, revealed in February 2018. Sherald and Moss will also participate in a public discussion on June 1 at 6:30 p.m. about modern portraiture in the age of the selfie and digitized personhood.

 

“We are thrilled to welcome “The Outwin” as the Museum’s major summer exhibition,” said Katie Ziglar, director of the Ackland Art Museum. “From the breadth of artistic medium to the diverse representations of participants and their subjects, this show reflects the Ackland’s commitment to providing experiences that spark insight into ourselves, each other, and the world.”

 

“The Outwin” is the latest art experience offered by the Ackland, a partner in the university’s Arts Everywhere initiative, which strives to make art accessible to the campus and wider community. Arts Everywhere is a signature initiative of the University’s $4.25 billion fundraising campaign, the Campaign for Carolina. Since January 2017 the Ackland has secured gifts valued at $69.2 million, including several Rembrandt drawings, paintings and prints by Joan Mitchell and a 1971 oil and charcoal on paper by Willem de Kooning. These gifts, among others, increased the Ackland’s growth by more than 500 percent over the prior four years, bolstering the museum’s position as the preeminent public university art museum in the country.

 

The Outwin: American Portraiture Today

Open June 1 – August 26, 2018

Ackland Art Museum

101 South Columbia St.

Chapel Hill, N.C.

 

Museum hours are Wednesday through Saturday 10 a.m. – 5 p.m., and Sundays 1 p.m. – 5 p.m. More information is available at ackland.org.

 

Discussion with artist Amy Sherald

Friday, June 1, 6:30 p.m.

Artist Amy Sherald and curator Dorothy Moss will host a public discussion

Sonja Haynes Stone Center for Black Culture and History

150 South Road

Chapel Hill, N.C.

 

This exhibition has been organized by the Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery, Washington, D.C. The competition and exhibition have been made possible by generous support from the Virginia Outwin Boochever Portrait Competition Endowment.

 

The Ackland presentation of this exhibition has been made possible by generous support from The Caldwell Family Fund for the Ackland Art Museum, The Seymour and Carol Levin Foundation, and Cathy and Hunter Allen.

 

-Carolina-

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill



The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 111 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 323,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and 149 countries. More than 169,000 live in North Carolina.

 

About the Ackland Art Museum

Featuring a year-round calendar of special exhibitions and dynamic public programs, the Ackland Art Museum on UNC-Chapel Hill’s historic campus is a local museum with a global outlook that bridges campus and community. Admission to the Ackland is free and accessible to all. The Ackland’s holdings include more than 18,000 works of art. The collection spans all cultures and time periods, showcasing the breadth of human creativity. A vital teaching resource, the museum’s mission is the art of understanding. Visitors can connect with the complexity and beauty of the wider world by getting close to art – the familiar, the unexpected, the challenging. The Ackland Art Museum is located at 101 South Columbia St. on the UNC-Chapel Hill campus. Museum hours are Wednesday through Saturday 10 a.m. – 5 p.m., and Sundays 1 p.m. – 5 p.m. The museum is open until 9 p.m. for Chapel Hill-Carrboro’s 2nd Friday ArtWalk. More information is available at ackland.org.

 

University Communications: Carly Miller, (919) 445-8555, mediarelations@unc.edu

Ackland Art Museum: Audrey Shore, (919) 843-3676, audrey.shore@unc.edu

 

Image: Amy Sherald, American, born 1973: Miss Everything (Unsuppressed Deliverance), 2013. Oil on canvas, 54 x 43-1/8 in., 2013. Frances and Burton Reifler © Amy Sherald.

 

Carolina Performing Arts announces 2018-2019 Season

News Release

 

 For immediate use

 

Carolina Performing Arts announces 2018-2019 Season

Nearly 40 performances and immersive installations in multiple venues explore

community, co-creation and citizenship

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— May 24, 2018) – Cutting-edge performances and interactive art from across the world find a home at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill during Carolina Performing Arts’ 14th season. The season’s theme, “You Are Everything,” combines new works, returning artists, plastic bags formed into grocery items, an Arabic language town hall and more for a dynamic season of connection and collaboration. In addition to performances slated for Memorial Hall and Moeser Auditorium, CURRENT ArtSpace + Studio will also host its first full season of installations and immersive art experiences.

The upcoming season at CPA explores how a community of strangers formed during performance can move beyond the theater walls and how questions asked and answered during a performance can propel social change. The 2018-2019 season at CPA offers opportunities to engage with visiting artists, promote engaged citizenship and collaborate with local creative partners.

 

“Now in our 14th year, we are a very different program from when we began,” said Emil Kang, CPA’s Executive and Artistic Director. “With the opening of CURRENT, we’ve witnessed powerful connections inspired by immersive and collaborative arts experiences taking place there. Our new season features themes of community and co-creation because we want to change, fundamentally, the nature of our relationship with everyone who comes through our doors—no matter the venue.”

 

CPA’s first event of the season is “Stories on Citizenship,” a public meal and gathering at CURRENT on Sept. 8. The flexible art space opened in February 2018 to break down barriers and foster a community connection through art. Members of the Carolina and Chapel Hill communities are invited to share a meal as local non-profit organizations use storytelling, song and more to convey how a sense of belonging and connection weave into their work. For more details on the event and RSVP information, visit currentunc.org/whats-on/.

 

“In this moment, many people are moved in new and urgent ways to explore their own civic responsibility,” said Amy Russell, director of programming. “At CPA, we believe that artists can be expert citizens engaging our own creativity and compassion and leading us to imagine new and better futures for everyone.”

 

On Sept. 14, CPA’s performance season kicks off with a public block party and two performances at different venues. Robin Frohardt’s “Plastic Bag Store” installation, created with plastic products collected from the community, will open to the public free of charge from 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. at CURRENT. No tickets are required for visitors to enjoy live music, interactive activities, a voter registration drive and local food trucks in the early evening on Memorial Hall’s front portico. At 8 p.m. Neko Case (with opener Thao of the Get Down Stay Down) will perform at Memorial Hall for ticketholders. For more information on purchasing tickets and other opportunities to experience “Plastic Bag Store,” visit carolinaperformingarts.org.

 

Other upcoming highlights of the 2018-2019 CPA season include:

  • Egyptian political satirist Bassem Youssef hosting an Arabic language town hall after his performance of “The Joke is Mightier than the Sword.”
  • Toshi Reagon, singer/songwriter and CPA Mellon Foundation DisTIL Fellow, brings together faculty, students, artists and Triangle collaborators in addition to a performance with her band BIGLovely.
  • The new music collective wild Up will perform “Future Folk” in Moeser Auditorium and then embark on a short residency during which they will create a piece of new music with students and community members. The piece will premiere at “We the People,” presented at CURRENT at the end of the week.
  • Interactive performances by DJ Kid Koala: one, an experience where participants become part of a turntable orchestra conducted by Kid Koala, and the other, a lively celebration where children create robot costumes and hit the dance floor as Kid Koala spins tracks for them.
  • DisTIL Fellow for 2018-20 Abigail Washburn will perform with husband and fellow banjo player Béla Fleck in an exploration of storytelling, song and performance.
  • Performers returning to CPA through the season include Branford Marsalis, Carrie Mae Weems, Buddy Guy, Dorrance Dance, Orchestre Révolutionnaire et Romantique, Compagnie Marie Chouinard, Steep Canyon Rangers, Brooklyn Rider, Mitsuko Uchida (performing with Mahler Chamber Orchestra), Batsheva Dance Company, Youssou N’Dour, and others.

 

Single tickets and new subscription packages for the general public are available on June 13, 2018. Ticket sales for 2017-18 subscribers, UNC staff/faculty and students begin June 6. UNC students are eligible for $10 tickets to all CPA performances (including CURRENT). Staff/faculty receive a fifteen percent discount on tickets and an additional five percent discount on subscriptions. For full performance listing, event details, pricing and venue information visit carolinaperformingarts.org.

 

-Carolina-

 

About Carolina Performing Arts

The core of the mission at Carolina Performing Arts (CPA) is to curate and present exceptional arts experiences that inspire and provoke our community — from UNC to across the globe. Therefore, we nurture artists and the development of new works; challenge and inspire our audiences with experiences that foster opportunities for discovery, thought and important social discourse; and solidify the bonds between the arts and academics through work that integrates the arts into the life of the University and its students.

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 111 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 323,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and 149 countries. More than 169,000 live in North Carolina.

 

University Communications contact: Carly Miller, (919) 445-8555, mediarelations@unc.edu

Carolina Performing Arts contact: Christina Rodriguez, (919) 962-6222, crodrig@unc.edu

 

UNC-Chapel Hill receives $10 million commitment from Pope Foundation to advance core areas of excellence and service

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UNC-Chapel Hill receives $10 million commitment from Pope Foundation to advance core areas of excellence and service

 

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C. – April 23, 2018) Today, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill announced a $10 million commitment from the John William Pope Foundation to support a combination of core areas where Carolina excels: cancer research, multidisciplinary and innovative thinking, excellence in sport and being of and serving the state’s citizens.

 

The gift supports For All Kind: the Campaign for Carolina, the most ambitious fundraising campaign in the University’s history. On Oct. 6, 2017, Carolina launched the second largest fundraiser for a public university in the nation. With a goal of $4.25 billion by Dec. 31, 2022, the Campaign for Carolina is inspired by the Blueprint for Next, the University’s overall strategic plan built on two core strategies: “of the public, for the public,” and “innovation made fundamental.”

 

“I am so grateful for this wonderful gift from the Pope Foundation,” said Chancellor Carol L. Folt. “They are providing much needed support in critical areas from growing educational programs to fighting disease to supporting our student-athletes. Taken together, this gift will touch our students and faculty, promoting their success, leadership and impact in North Carolina and beyond.”

 

“The foundation supports the challenge to give back to UNC’s ‘strategic triad’ of teaching, research and public service,” said Art Pope, Pope Foundation chairman and a Carolina alumnus. “When Chapel Hill and other state institutions of higher education succeed at their core missions, we all succeed. My family and I are honored to contribute to that success — to achieve the Lux et Libertas, the ‘Light and Liberty,’ that graces the University’s seal. We encourage other North Carolinians to do the same.”

 

The commitment announced today will provide:

  • $5 million to the Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center to establish the John William Pope “Tomorrow’s Best Hope” Endowed Fellowship Fund. The fund will generate nearly $250,000 each year for competitively awarded fellowships to recruit, educate and train future oncologists and cancer researchers to reduce cancer’s burden in the state and beyond. Lineberger is one of only 49 National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer centers in the U.S., and the only public comprehensive cancer center in North Carolina. 
  • $3.75 million to the Philosophy, Politics and Economics (PPE) Program in the College of Arts & Sciences to support hiring two new faculty positions and two visiting assistant professorships. The gift will also fund a lecture series to bring prominent speakers to campus to discuss public issues from a philosophical, political and economic perspective. The funds will help the college’s efforts to elevate one of the most popular and fastest-growing academic minors to a major. The PPE Program develops students’ analytical skills to see issues from the perspective of all three of the core disciplines. 
  • $1 million to track-and-field scholarships in the Department of Athletics to create two in-state scholarships, one male and one female. It will be the program’s 16th scholarship in men’s track and field and 14th scholarship in women’s track and field. Carolina’s track-and-field program has won 37 ACC team championships and 30 NCAA event championships. 
  • $250,000 to the UNC Horizons Program to conduct a follow-up study with up to 125 women and their children enrolled in the program. The data from that study will help other states and countries model their programs helping women and children break the cycle of addiction and poverty. The funds will also eliminate a barrier to successful completion of the Horizons program by ensuring child care services for women undergoing treatment. UNC Horizons provides an outreach service to the state to treat pregnant and parenting women with substance use disorders. In 2016-17, the program enrolled 266 women, with 77 percent employed by the time they graduated.

With this latest commitment, the Pope Foundation and family members have more than doubled their lifetime giving to Carolina. Past gifts include a $1.3 million gift in 2014 to fund cancer research and treatment and a $2 million gift in 2006 for Carolina athletics’ football program and other areas on campus.

 

Additional quotes from university leaders:

“Thank you to the Pope Foundation for this generous gift, which will allow us to recruit the best and brightest oncologists and cancer researchers to Chapel Hill where they will join our outstanding researchers in the development of new cancer therapies. The impact of this work will be felt by our patients here in Chapel Hill, and cancer patients around the world.”
– Dr. William L. Roper, CEO of UNC Health Care, dean of the School of Medicine and vice chancellor for medical affairs at UNC-Chapel Hill

 

“I am proud of this program for its interdisciplinary approach to learning and its emphasis on helping students develop transferable skills that prepare them for a wide variety of careers.”
– Kevin Guskiewicz, dean of the College of Arts & Sciences

 

“Carolina has a long history of excellence in track and field, and this generous gift from the Pope Foundation will add to that tradition. It will enable us to recruit the very best student-athletes in the sport, and it will help us continue to compete at the highest level.”
– Bubba Cunningham, UNC-Chapel Hill director of athletics

 

“This generous gift will provide the needed systematic outcome and cost effectiveness data to unlock the potential for the Horizons model to help women and children in North Carolina and across the country.”
– Dr. Hendrée Jones, UNC Horizons executive director and professor of obstetrics and gynecology

 

-Carolina-

 

About the John William Pope Foundation

Founded in 1986 and located in Raleigh, the Pope Foundation makes grants to advance individual freedom, personal responsibility and encourage opportunity for all North Carolinians. The Pope Foundation’s lifetime giving totals more than $145 million directed to over 400 nonprofits.  The Pope Foundation receives its support from the Pope family, owner and operator of the Henderson-based Variety Wholesalers, Inc.

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 111 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 322,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and 165 countries. More than 175,000 live in North Carolina.

 

University Communications Contact: Carly Swain, (919) 445-8555, mediarelations@unc.edu

 

 

UNC-Chapel Hill’s 2017 Harvey Award funds project to help relatives caring for abused or neglected children

For immediate release

 

UNC-Chapel Hill’s 2017 Harvey Award funds project to help relatives caring for abused or neglected children

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C. – April 18, 2018) – A multi-disciplinary team led by experts from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Social Work working to improve support for relatives fostering abused or neglected children is the winner of the 2017 C. Felix Harvey Award to Advance Institutional Priorities. In collaboration with community partners, the school is using the $75,000 award to spearhead an effort to help these caregivers qualify for and receive financial resources and community support commensurate to adoptive parents.

 

Reflecting a core Carolina value — serving the public good — the C. Felix Harvey Award recognizes exemplary faculty scholarship that addresses real-world challenges and reflects the University’s commitment to entrepreneurship and innovation.

 

According to the project’s investigators, nearly 500 children in North Carolina are removed from their birth homes each month because of child abuse or neglect. Almost 30 percent of these children are placed with relatives. While these short-term placements often turn into long-term situations, only 8 percent of relatives qualify for the same financial support available to traditional foster parents.

 

To qualify for financial help, caregivers must go through a licensing process that includes parenting training, home evaluation for appropriate safety preparedness and adequate sleeping quarters, among other requirements. Unlike traditional foster parents, relatives often become caregivers during crises and therefore few have taken the necessary training to unlock financial assistance. To help address this disparity, researchers will use the C. Felix Harvey Award funding to develop, implement and test a new approach to qualifying relative caregivers for the same level of guardianship assistance that adoptive parents receive.

 

“When a family is in turmoil, children are helpless victims with no control over their environment,” said principal investigator David Ansong, assistant professor in UNC-Chapel Hill’s School of Social Work. “Close relatives can provide immediate stability and allay fears, but may not have access to resources and services that meet their family needs. This project will help ensure families get the resources they need so they can focus on creating a stable family environment that is essential for healing.”

 

The UNC-Chapel Hill team also includes Selena Childs, clinical assistant professor; Kanisha Brevard, research associate; and Mark Testa, Sandra Reeves Spears and John B. Turner Distinguished Professor, whose research helped pave the way for the creation of the federal Guardianship Assistance Program (GAP) in 2008. North Carolina recently joined 35 other states in making this program available to grandparents and other relatives looking after children who have been removed from their birth homes.

 

The team will work with the N.C. Department of Health and Human Services and a coalition of community partners to develop a cost-effective licensing process tailored for relatives so that they will be eligible to receive GAP payments. The coalition includes the Children’s Home Society of North Carolina — whose innovative Family Finding program helps recruit relatives to care for children placed in foster care — as well as county social services leaders who administer the licensing process and manage the GAP program in North Carolina.

 

With expert advice from Testa, this process will address relatives’ needs for child care, transportation, case management and financial assistance, eliminating many barriers for relative caregivers. The intervention will also use social media and mobile technology to disseminate licensure resource guides to a broader audience and raise public awareness about the availability of GAP. Lastly, findings from the evaluation will inform statewide adoption of the new licensing approach for kin.

 

“Ultimately, this project will create a pathway for relatives to become licensed foster parents and eventually permanent legal guardians of these children,” said Michael A. Becketts, assistant secretary for human services in the N.C. Department of Health and Human Services.

 

The late C. Felix Harvey was chairman of Harvey Enterprises & Affiliates and founder of the Little Bank Inc., both in Kinston, North Carolina. A 1943 Carolina graduate, he joined his family in 2007 to endow the C. Felix Harvey Award to Advance Institutional Priorities with a $2 million commitment. Five generations of Harveys have earned UNC-Chapel Hill degrees.

 

A photo of the group may be downloaded here (password: harvey).

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill:
The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 111 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 322,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and 165 countries. More than 175,000 live in North Carolina.

 

 

University Communications: Carly Swain, (919) 445.8555, mediarelations@unc.edu

 

 

Statement: University comments on N.C. Court of Appeals decision in lawsuit seeking names of students found responsible

For immediate use

 

University comments on N.C. Court of Appeals decision in lawsuit seeking names of students found responsible

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C. April 17, 2018) – “We are disappointed with the N.C. Court of Appeals decision and are examining all legal options as we review the ruling. We firmly believe Judge Baddour made the correct decision last May by recognizing the University’s legal and ethical responsibility under federal law to protect the privacy rights of all students.

 

Our position is based on the principle that we must protect the identities of survivors and other parties who put their trust in the University’s Title IX process and their rights under federal privacy law.

 

Releasing the names of those found responsible in sexual assault or misconduct cases could lead to disclosures about the names of survivors and witnesses who filed reports expecting a confidential process. That change could have a chilling effect on survivors’ decisions to file reports and witnesses’ willingness to participate, jeopardizing years of work by the University to encourage more reporting under the Title IX process.”

 

Joel Curran
Vice Chancellor for University Communications

 

Published April 17, 2018

 

-Carolina-

 

PlayMakers Repertory Company Announces 2018-2019 Season

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Shifting Ground theatre that moves 18/19 PlayMakers Repertory Company

PlayMakers Repertory Company Announces 2018-2019 Season
New season marks 100 years of playmaking at UNC-Chapel Hill with a Pulitzer prize winner, several world and regional premieres and a cosmic musical tribute

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C. – March 1, 2018) – A merry romp through Sherwood Forest, a Pulitzer Prize winner, a high-stakes power play between working class and big business, a world premiere of depth and delicacy, the search for truth in the stars and one of the most romantic musicals of all time make up the Mainstage lineup of PlayMakers Repertory Company’s 2018-2019 season: “Shifting Ground – Theatre that Moves.”

 

The 2018-2019 Mainstage season delves into the reverberations caused by choice. Each of the six plays explores the power individuals wield to shape and shift everything– from our most intimate relationships, our memories and the institutions around us, to the broadest strokes of science, history and ultimately truth.

 

“In selecting this next season at PlayMakers, I wanted to take up the charge of using theater to provoke, represent and entertain our audiences and artists alike,” said Producing Artistic Director Vivienne Benesch. “Our 2018-2019 lineup is all about shifting ground – how power dynamics constantly realign and the ways in which we reclaim or rewrite the narratives of our lives. From the brilliant reach of Brecht to the intimacy of Paula Vogel, the rigor of Dominique Morrisseau and the touching poignancy of emerging playwright Charly Simpson, we have chosen a season of great plays that I hope will move us in every sense of the word.”

 

PlayMakers will also present three works in the PRC2 Kenan Stage season, complementing the Mainstage themes and adding new work and conversation to the PlayMakers experience.

 

The 2018-2019 PlayMakers season marks the 100th anniversary of the playmaking tradition at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. In 1918, a traveling troupe of University and local artists performed, calling themselves Carolina PlayMakers. The troupe took their final bow in 1976, and PlayMakers launched as a professional regional theater. In its 40-year history, PlayMakers has produced more than 300 productions, served nearly 50,000 audience members each year and reached more than 125,000 area youth through award-winning educational programs.

 

Subscription packages are available for purchase now and renewing subscribers can secure their current seats for the new season through May 1. Call (919) 962-7529 or visit PlayMakers’ website for more information.

 

Mainstage productions:

“Sherwood: The Adventures of Robin Hood” by Ken Ludwig, Sept. 12–30, 2018
The season opens with the regional premiere of a swashbuckling new comedy about that iconic hero of the people who learns that sometimes doing “the wrong thing” ends up being the right thing after all. Ken Ludwig’s “Sherwood: The Adventures of Robin Hood” is family fare that promises music, merry men, Maid Marian and much merriment.

 

“Skeleton Crew” by Dominique Morisseau, Oct. 10–28, 2018
The third in acclaimed playwright Dominique Morisseau’s Detroit Trilogy, “Skeleton Crew” is a searing drama about a tight knit group of employees facing the realities of big business bureaucracy in one of Detroit’s last-standing auto plants during the 2008 recession. As the power dynamics shift between blue- and white-collar workers, how far over the lines is each side willing to go to survive? “Skeleton Crew” has been described as “the best play you’ll see this year” (Detroit Free Press).

 

“She Loves Me” book by Joe Masteroff, music by Jerry Bock, lyrics by Sheldon Harnick, Nov. 1 –Dec. 2, 2018
Hum your way into the holidays! In this romantic musical comedy of mistaken identity, two perfume clerks who aren’t at all the best of friends can’t seem to find common ground – until they realize they are each other’s anonymous pen pals. Inspiration for the classic movie, “You’ve Got Mail,” this holiday event for the whole family has been called “the most romantic of all Broadway musicals” (The Wall Street Journal).

 

“Jump” by Charly Evon Simpson, Jan. 23–Feb. 10, 2019
This funny, heartbreaking and tender play takes us on a journey where lights flicker, things fall from the sky, and a sister finds solace on a bridge. PlayMakers is proud to present the world premiere of this work by emerging playwright Charly Evon Simpson.

 

“Life of Galileo” by Bertholt Brecht , Feb. 27–March 17, 2019
Brecht’s renowned drama explores the life of 17th century scientist Galileo Galilei, the ultimate groundshifter who upended not just the world’s view of our solar system, but our place in it. Political dogma, scienceand survival, still at the forefront of our cultural dialogue four centuries later, asks what price are we willing to pay for the truth? Featuring original music by Justin Ellington and directed by PlayMakers’ Producing Artistic Director Vivienne Benesch.

 

“How I Learned to Drive” by Paula Vogel, April 3–21, 2019
Winner of the Pulitzer Prize, this wildly funny and compassionate play travels across one woman’s adolescent memories and the complicated roads she was forced to navigate in a relationship with an older man. “How I Learned to Drive” has been called “a lovely, harrowing guide to the crippling persistence of one woman’s memories” (The New York Times).

 

PRC2 Kenan Stage productions for  2018-2019:

“Temples of Lung & Air” by Kane Smego, Aug. 22 –26, 2018
International hip-hop artist, groundbreaking educator and UNC graduate Kane Smego premieres his electric, personal spoken word odyssey and ode to hip-hop as a global tool for community building.

 

“Bewilderness” by Zachary Fine, Jan. 9–13, 2019
Few realize that Henry David Thoreau wrote a flop of epic proportions before he penned his American Masterpiece, Walden. This new work is a comedic look at one of America’s greatest philosophers and a celebration of the failures we all must face along the road to our greatest discoveries.

 

TBA: April 24–28, 2019

All performances will be presented in the Joan H. Gillings Center for Dramatic Art on the UNC– Chapel Hill campus. Mainstage productions will be in the Paul Green Theatre; PRC2 shows will be in the Elizabeth Price Kenan Theatre.

 

For information about PlayMakers’ 2018-2019 season, visit www.playmakersrep.org or call (919) 962-7529.

 

-Carolina-

 

About PlayMakers
PlayMakers is the professional theater in residence in the College of Arts & Sciences at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and North Carolina’s premier resident theater company for more than 40 years. The theater company produces relevant and courageous work that tells stories from and for a multiplicity of perspectives and creates transformational impact in its immediate and extended communities. PlayMakers has been named one of the “best regional theatres in America.”

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 111 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 322,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and 165 countries. More than 175,000 live in North Carolina.

 

PlayMakers contact: Diana Pineda, (919) 962-7114, dmpineda@email.unc.edu
University Communications contact: Carly Swain, (919) 962-7090, mediarelations@unc.edu

 

UNC-Chapel Hill experts available to discuss 2018 Winter Olympics

UNC-Chapel Hill experts available to discuss 2018 Winter Olympics

 

With the 2018 Winter Olympic Games approaching, UNC-Chapel Hill experts are available to discuss a variety of Olympic-related topics including historical links in history and the Olympics, athletic training, the consequences of traumatic injury specific to the Winter Games and more. To set up discussions and interviews with these experts, please email mediarelations@unc.edu or call (919) 445-8555.

 

 

Jonathan Jensen is an assistant professor in the Sport Administration program in the College of Arts & Sciences. An expert on sport sponsorship, Jensen can discuss what motivates corporations to sponsor the Olympics and the return on their investment. In February, Jensen will travel to the Olympics to present research at the International Sports Business Symposium at Kangwon University in South Korea. 

 

Anthony Hackney is a professor of exercise physiology and nutrition in the department of exercise and sport science in the College of Arts & Sciences and the department of nutrition in the UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health. Hackney worked with research development programs for the 1998 (Nagano) and 2006 (Turin) Winter Olympics and currently works with Estonian and Finnish Olympic coaches and athletes. He can discuss the physiology of Olympic athletes and impacts of performance enhancing drugs.


Kristen Kucera
is an assistant professor in the department of exercise and sport science in the College of Arts & Sciences and the incoming director of the National Center for Catastrophic Sport Injury Research. As an epidemiologist and certified athletic trainer, Kucera can discuss catastrophic injuries that occur in sport.

 

Claudio Battaglini is a professor of exercise and sport science in the College of Arts & Sciences and researches exercise oncology. Previously, Battaglini coached triathlon, marathon and mountain bike athletes who competed at the 2000 (Sydney), 2004 (Athens) and 2008 (Beijing) Olympics. Battaglini can discuss training methods for high-level athletes and physiology of sports performance.

 

Charlie Tuggle is a senior associate dean and distinguished professor in the School of Media and Journalism. Attending the summer games in 2008 (Beijing) and 2016 (Rio), Tuggle can provide insight on media reporting of the games. His most recent article on winningest athletes and the Olympic medal system can be found here.

 

 

Johna Register-Mihalik is an assistant professor in the department of exercise and sport science in the College of Arts & Sciences and a research scientist at both the Injury Prevention Research Center at UNC-Chapel Hill and the Matthew Gfeller Sport-Related Traumatic Brain Injury Research Center. Register-Mihalik can discuss both the treatment and management related to traumatic brain injuries in addition to the cultural biases around those injuries.

 

Jason Mihalik is an associate professor in the department of exercise and sport science in the College of Arts & Sciences and Co-Director of the Matthew Gfeller Sport-Related Trauma Brain Injury Research Center. Mihalik can discuss the dangers of winter-sport related head traumas and how recent research in concussions and head traumas applies to winter sports.

 


Dr. Christopher Hurt
is an assistant professor of medicine in the UNC School of Medicine’s Division of Infectious Diseases. He can discuss the threat of the flu and similar communicable illnesses in the Olympic village.

 

 

Matthew Andrews is a teaching assistant professor in the history department in the College of Arts & Sciences where he teaches a course titled “The Olympic Games—A Global History,” exploring issues of nationalism, amateurism, and the political meanings of international athletic competitions. Andrews can discuss how sports reflect and affect politics, race/gender identities and social reform movements.

 

P: (919) 445-8555  |  E: mediarelations@unc.edu

 

Carolina Performing Arts opens CURRENT ArtSpace + Studio

Not for publication

 

Carolina Performing Arts opens CURRENT ArtSpace + Studio

Immersive art space will open to the public Feb. 2

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— Jan. 31, 2018) – The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s Carolina Performing Arts will open the new CURRENT ArtSpace + Studio on Friday, Feb. 2 with a ribbon-cutting ceremony at 11 a.m. followed by a community open house.

 

CURRENT, located in the new Carolina Square, is designed to break down barriers and innovate art through interactive installations, immersive experiences and pushing performance past the stage and into the audience. CURRENT’s footprint in the heart of downtown Chapel Hill will foster a connection between campus and community through art. The nearly 7,000 square foot space is divided into two areas: the ArtSpace, is the main performance space designed to engage audiences with intimate and immersive artistic experiences, and the Studio, designed to be a multi-purpose rehearsal, event and performance space with windows on three sides.

 

The opening of CURRENT is the next step toward Carolina’s goal to lead the transformation of a 21st-century liberal arts education.  In 2016, Chancellor Carol L. Folt launched the Arts Everywhere initiative with the belief that the arts are an essential tool for learning and engaging communities.

 

To celebrate the opening, CURRENT will host a free community open house on Feb. 2 from 11:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m. and 5 – 7 p.m. Ticketed events also begin Feb. 2, and tickets can be purchased at www.carolinaperforming arts.org.

 

Prior to the ribbon-cutting ceremony at 11 a.m., Amy Russell, Director of Programming for Carolina Performing Arts, will lead a media b-roll tour of the interactive Sound Maze installation. The installation will also be available to media following the speaking program, during the community open houses. Sound Maze is a hands-on art experience featuring more than a dozen giant musical instruments invented by Paul Dresher, who has been lauded by the San Francisco Chronicle as a “musical Thomas Edison.” Visitors of all ages and abilities are invited to wander through and discover new ways of creating sound with these fantastical instruments.

 

Live-shot space will be available immediately outside of CURRENT following the speaking program for those wishing to remain for their noon programming.

 

Opening of CURRENT ArtSpace + Studio

Friday, Feb. 2

Media tour at 10:30 a.m., speaking program at 11 a.m.

CURRENT ArtSpace + Studio

123 W. Franklin St.

Chapel Hill, N.C.

 

Speakers: Chancellor Carol L. Folt, Emil Kang (Special Assistant to the Chancellor for the Arts), Scott Maitland (Chairman, Chapel Hill Downtown Partnership).

 

Media parking:

Directions: Coming from East Franklin Street, continue onto West Franklin Street and turn left before the Target Store into Carolina Square. Make an immediate left.  The event space is labeled 123 W. Franklin St.  The parking deck is straight ahead.

  • Live trucks may park in reserved spaces along the curb in front of CURRENT for easy live-shot access following the event.
  • News vehicles may park free of charge in the deck attached to the CURRENT ArtSpace + Studio.

 

Media rsvp: Carly Swain, (704) 305-1838.

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 111 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 322,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and 165 countries. More than 175,000 live in North Carolina.

 

University Communications: Media Relations, (919) 445-8555, mediarelations@unc.edu

 

UNC-Chapel Hill and United Health Foundation Launch New $1.6 Million Partnership to Help Train and Diversify Next Generation of Health Data Experts

For immediate use 

  • Training will take place through “Project ENABLE” – Extensible Network-Accessible Biomedical & Health Informatics Lifelong Learning Environment
  • Program expands access to training programs for minority undergraduate students from local Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs)
  • Funding supports the launch of online and classroom interdisciplinary training through UNC-Chapel Hill’s Carolina Health Informatics Program

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C. — Jan. 23, 2018) — To help address the growing need for a larger and more diverse workforce of health care data analysts, technologists and experts, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and United Health Foundation are expanding access to health care data and informatics educational and professional development resources through the University’s Carolina Health Informatics Program.

 

A three-year, $1.6 million grant from United Health Foundation to UNC-Chapel Hill will create “Project ENABLE,” the Extensible Network-Accessible Biomedical & Health Informatics Lifelong Learning Environment. The initiative will deliver high-quality biomedical and health informatics training – both online and in person – to people who currently lack access to training. It will focus on minority undergraduate students considering health informatics careers, as well as working professionals needing to advance their health informatics skills.

 

“Our university is committed to tackling tough problems and training the next generation of diverse leaders,” said Chancellor Carol L. Folt. “We are grateful for United Health Foundation’s support and partnership to expand educational and training resources in the health care technology and analytics field. This partnership means more students, especially minority students, from across our state, will have the opportunity to tackle the tough challenges in our health care system.”

 

This workforce development effort will support the nation’s growing need for health informatics experts, as more health care services rely on electronic records and incorporate patient and population data into decision making.  A recent report from the National Academy of Sciences shows that while underrepresented minority groups comprised 28.5 percent of the national population, they represent just 9.1 percent of college-educated Americans in science and engineering occupations.  This new initiative will address both of these challenges.

 

Funding Supports Boot Camp for Minority Students, New Online Master’s Degree Program

The grant will support three specific programmatic activities within Project ENABLE:

 

  • Creation of in-person summer boot camps for minority undergraduate students from local HBCUs to expose students to health informatics principles and encourage them to explore advanced training and health informatics careers. The first boot camp is scheduled to begin this summer.

 

  • Development of new health informatics online course content, based upon the boot camps, that introduces health informatics to a cross-section of students and working professionals.

 

  • Creation of a new online master’s degree to help working professionals develop expertise in health informatics, with a focus on data analytics, visualizations, statistics and database systems.

 

“I thank United Health Foundation for partnering with UNC-Chapel Hill and the Carolina Health Informatics Program to help expand access to the types of training and programs our states’ workers need to learn new skills and expertise in health care technology,” said Gov. Roy Cooper. “This is especially important for students enrolled in historically black colleges and universities who will see expanded training and educational opportunities because of this partnership.”

 

“We are grateful to partner with the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill to help create a 21st century health workforce ready to meet the health care needs of North Carolina, and the nation,” said UnitedHealth Group CEO David S. Wichmann.  “Investing in people’s skills and their education is critical in maximizing innovation in health care that will help people live healthier lives and help the health care system work better for everyone.”

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill



The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 111 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 322,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and 165 countries. More than 175,000 live in North Carolina.

 

About United Health Foundation

Through collaboration with community partners, grants and outreach efforts, United Health Foundation works to improve our health system, build a diverse and dynamic health workforce and enhance the well-being of local communities. United Health Foundation was established by UnitedHealth Group (NYSE: UNH) in 1999 as a not-for-profit, private foundation dedicated to improving health and health care. To date, United Health Foundation has committed nearly $315 million to programs and communities around the world. We invite you to learn more at www.unitedhealthgroup.com/SocialResponsibility or follow Facebook.com/UHGGives.

 

University Communications: Jeni Cook, (919) 962-2091, jeni.cook@unc.edu

 

United Health Foundation: L.D. Platt, (202) 413-7763, ld_platt@uhg.com

 

Governor’s Press Office: Jamal Little, (919) 814-2100, ncpress@nc.gov