Chancellor Carol L. Folt’s University Day 2018 welcome remarks, as delivered

Oct. 12, 2018

 

Before I begin, I want to send our thoughts and prayers to our fellow North Carolinians and sister Universities who have been deeply impacted by Hurricane Florence and now Michael. We care and will continue to help.

 

Good morning.

 

I’m honored to welcome you as the Chancellor of this special place to this special birthday. It is wonderful to see you all here.

 

225 years ago, the University of North Carolina was established right here in Chapel Hill, the first public university in America to open its doors.

 

Our founders believed that the best way to protect the hard-fought freedoms won in the revolutionary war was to invest in public education.

 

To stand the trials of time, they said, our democracy would depend on Lux et Libertas, Light and Liberty.

 

And since then, with the generous support of North Carolinians we have strived to realize that vision, evolving and reaching to meet the dreams and needs of each generation.

 

And they have come – from tiny towns, cities across North Carolina and the world… some are first in their families, others carry the stories and love of this place from generations of family members who preceded them, with their own dreams.

 

I think I speak for all of us, when I say that our love for Carolina comes from the grand vision of public education born here. Accessibility, affordability and excellence – the citizens of North Carolina deserve no less.

 

Their support strengthens our resolve to discover, to create, and to open possibilities for every person here so they too can build meaningful lives and advance the public good.

 

Today, Carolina is one of the world’s greatest, global, public, research universities.

 

Creativity flourishes. The artistry and intellectual power of our faculty, staff and students produce game-changing discoveries that save lives and drive innovation.

 

Serving others is as fundamental to our culture as the low stone walls that make our teaching and research so collaborative.

 

Our graduates fuel the economy, build new industries, and strengthen the fabric of communities across the state and the world.

 

Every day, as I walk this beautiful campus, I feel grateful to the people who spend their lives caring for our students, nurturing the beauty of our historic grounds, managing our safety, and so much more.

 

And I think of the more than 300,000 alumni whose lives of purpose are our greatest reward.

 

The joy and drive in our people embody our celebrated motto, Lux et Libertas, light and liberty.

 

Of course, our history truly began long ago as the home of the first peoples of the land. And later, many who built our first structures were enslaved, sold as property, couldn’t vote, and were denied, by the laws of the state and nation, the most basic human rights and dignity.

 

Eleven years ago, the North Carolina General Assembly passed a resolution apologizing for the practice of slavery. They explicitly urged universities “to do all within their power to acknowledge the transgressions, to learn the lessons of history, avoid repeating mistakes and to promote racial reconciliation”.

 

And so today, on our 225th birthday, I join them.

 

As Chancellor of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, I offer our university’s deepest apology for the profound injustices of slavery, our full acknowledgment of the strength of enslaved people in the face of their suffering, and our respect and indebtedness to them. I reaffirm our University’s commitment to facing squarely and working to right the wrongs of history so they are never again inflicted.

 

We are the only public university to have experienced our nation’s history from the start – war, slavery, suffrage, civil unrest, as well as the hope, freedom, progress, opportunity, learning, and great discoveries fostered here.

 

Our unique legacy demands that we continue to reconcile our past with our present and future and be the diverse and just community that is fitting for America’s first public university.

 

Our apology must lead to purposeful action, and build upon the great efforts and sacrifices of those across the years who fought so hard for much of what we value about Carolina today.

 

We salute the people in the present who work daily to increase access and affordability, to create programs that open our doors even wider, and to embrace the diversity that is our national heritage.

 

If done with honesty, resolve, and strength of purpose, our choices will help us come to terms with our past, and move us to a better future.

 

Two years ago, in this Hall, President Spellings said: “Higher education is the next frontier – a new civil right.”

 

That resonates with all of us at Carolina.  We will be planning and working in that spirit for years to come.

 

As author Terry Tempest Williams said, “The eyes of the future are looking back at us and they are praying for us to see beyond our own time….that we might leave room for the life that is destined to come’.

 

As we create the future that time will judge, here are some of our challenges:

 

Can we open our doors even wider?

 

Can we hold the public trust?

 

Can we be a place where political disagreement is a source of lively and respectful debate?

 

Can we do even more to solve the toughest problems, while training the workforce and strengthening future economies?

 

This will test us and our capacity to partner with others beyond our walls. We will need to recognize and let go of some old habits and norms, to make way for more relevant, inclusive, innovative ways to be a university and a just community.

 

I believe that we are up to the task. And you are why I believe it.

 

Esteemed guests, members of the platform party, faculty, students, staff, Chapel Hill Board of Trustees, UNC Board of Governors, Board of Visitors, former Chancellors, elected officials, community members, and friends – you honor us with your presence, your connection to Carolina, and your lives of service.

 

I hope you will join us as we connect our past with our future and strengthen the relationships that bind us in common purpose.

$10M gift to UNC-Chapel Hill will broaden global reach, scholarship and opportunity

For immediate use

 

$10M gift to UNC-Chapel Hill will broaden global reach, scholarship and opportunity

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C. – Oct. 4, 2018) – A $10 million gift from alumni Bill and Anne Harrison of Greenwich, Connecticut, to the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill will strengthen the University’s global programs and presence. The generous gift from the Harrisons will endow two new senior-level leadership positions and support the strategic priorities of UNC Global, which incorporates many of the centralized programs and services that support Carolina’s global mission.

 

A search is already underway for a new full-time chief global officer and vice provost for global affairs who will report to the executive vice chancellor and provost. In September, the University announced the hiring of a new associate provost for global affairs, Raymond Farrow, who will serve as the chief operating officer and executive director of UNC Global and will serve as interim chief global officer until a vice provost is named.

 

“I am so grateful for Bill and Anne’s steadfast commitment to Carolina and all those who study and work here. They have done so much for our community, and this tremendous gift reflects their support and belief in Carolina’s global mission,” said Chancellor Carol L. Folt. “Their loving generosity will help us integrate global thinking across our campus and guarantee that every student graduates with the skills they need to serve our world.”

 

In Jan. 2017, the UNC-Chapel Hill Board of Trustees endorsed The Blueprint for Next, a strategic framework and vision for the growth of the University. The plan included a “global mindset” as a fundamental imperative for the campus. In conjunction, Chancellor Folt reviewed UNC’s global programs and strategy, and a Global Leadership Taskforce (2016-2018) — on which Bill Harrison served as a Steering Committee member — guided the development of a new global road map. This ambitious vision will require a robust operational infrastructure, including a full-time leadership team that is fully prepared to advance UNC’s global mission and oversee its growing global enterprise.

 

Provost Bob Blouin said, “It is critically important to have fully dedicated leadership for UNC Global. With a full-time vice provost for global affairs and chief global officer in place, UNC Global will be well positioned to advance the University’s global priorities. This gift will help UNC attract the very best candidates for this leadership role and demonstrate the university’s commitment to preeminence as a global university in service to North Carolina, the nation and the world.”

 

Bill Harrison is a 1966 Carolina graduate and retired chairman and CEO of JPMorgan Chase & Co. Anne Harrison is a 1978 Carolina graduate who earned her bachelor of arts degree in English.

 

“Anne and I have been fortunate in life and we wanted to give back to an institution that has been so important to us,” said Bill Harrison. “Furthermore, having worked in a large, global organization for my entire career, I am a strong believer that a great university needs to have outstanding global capabilities and a mission to prepare its students to compete in the global world we all live in.”

 

The $10 million gift continues the Harrisons’ long record of supporting global initiatives at Carolina. In 2007, Bill Harrison chaired the Global Leadership Circle, which developed the University’s first comprehensive global road map. In 2009, Bill and Anne Harrison made a $1 million gift creating the University’s Global Research Institute to generate knowledge solving real-world problems, such as water quality and the impact of globalization on North Carolina’s economy.

 

In the 2018 Academic Rankings of World Universities, UNC-Chapel Hill is 30th among 500 top universities, up from 52nd in 2003. Global has become central to Carolina’s teaching, research and service mission.

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 111 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s nearly 330,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and 149 countries. More than 169,000 live in North Carolina.

 

University Communications: Media Relations, (919) 445-8555, mediarelations@unc.edu

 

 

Nearly $1 million grant from SunTrust Foundation to NCGrowth will help economically challenged communities in the Carolinas hire locally

For immediate use

 

Nearly $1 million grant from SunTrust Foundation to NCGrowth will help economically challenged communities in the Carolinas hire locally

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C. – Aug. 2, 2018) – The SunTrust Foundation will give a nearly $1 million grant to NCGrowth, an affiliated center of the Frank Hawkins Kenan Institute of Private Enterprise, to help create new jobs and stimulate transformative development in three high-potential communities in the Carolinas. These business incubators will help startup companies hire local workers in an effort to address issues such as unemployment, underemployment, low wages and significant poverty.

 

NCGrowth, an affiliated center of UNC Kenan-Flagler Business School’s Kenan Institute of Private Enterprise, will use the $950,000 grant to launch SmartUp programs in Elizabeth City, North Carolina, and North Charleston, South Carolina. There are plans to select a third location in the Carolinas in the coming months. The SmartUp program from NCGrowth works to create jobs with equitable opportunities in rural and economically challenged communities in the Carolinas.

 

“Through SmartUp, as in all of NCGrowth’s work, we are seeking to radically transform how communities view their role in economic development, from being passengers to becoming drivers,” said Mark Little, executive director of the Kenan Institute.

 

The SmartUp programs in each selected region will partner with up to 10 businesses that span a range of industries and maturity levels. The selected businesses will also reflect local gender, ethnicity and socioeconomic demographics. Together, the SmartUp teams and businesses will strive to create more jobs for local workers through financial and marketing analysis, redesign of manufacturing workflows and more. SmartUp also will partner with existing organizations, such as local development offices, universities, businesses and churches to create a support network for local job creation in these communities.

 

“The SmartUp initiative fits perfectly with our commitment to entrepreneurism and helping small businesses gain financial confidence and smart growth,” said Stan Little, president of the SunTrust Foundation. “The program has potential to drive broader economic development by replicating its innovative approach in other communities that need assistance.”

 

To maximize the opportunity for transformative development, the businesses selected to work with NCGrowth staff and community partners will develop and complete a high-impact project critical to sustainable growth and regional success. SmartUp will also work to integrate the community in that growth through semiannual workshops and showcases that are open to the public.

 

“By eliminating the expense of physical space, along with being rooted in an academic institution and engaging a broad base of existing local collaborators, we can keep the cost of the program low to ensure it is accessible to more communities,” said LaChaun Banks, associate director of NCGrowth.

 

The grant counts toward For All Kind: the Campaign for Carolina, the University’s historic fundraising drive that aims to raise $4.25 billion by Dec. 31, 2022. The campaign supports the Blueprint for Next, the University’s overall strategic plan built on two core strategies: “of the public, for the public” and “innovation made fundamental.”

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 111 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s nearly 330,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and 149 countries. More than 169,000 live in North Carolina.

 

About NCGrowth

NCGrowth, an affiliated center of the Frank Hawkins Kenan Institute of Private Enterprise, helps businesses and communities create good jobs and equitable opportunities for their people. In partnership with other universities and community organizations, NCGrowth provides technical assistance to businesses and governments on economic development and entrepreneurship projects. Since 2012, NCGrowth has helped to create over 400 jobs and worked with more than 60 clients.

 

About the SunTrust Foundation

The SunTrust Foundation is dedicated to SunTrust Bank’s purpose of Lighting the Way to Financial Well-Being by engaging organizations to advance financial confidence. Grants and activities focus primarily on financial empowerment, but also include education, health and human services, civic improvement and cultural growth. The SunTrust Foundation supports American Red Cross disaster relief efforts and contributes as a United Way Global Corporate Leader. Established in 2008, the SunTrust Foundation has proudly provided grants totaling more than $128 million throughout the United States.

 

University Communications: Media Relations, (919) 445-8555, mediarelations@unc.edu

Frank Hawkins Kenan Institute of Private Enterprise: MacKenzie Babb, (919) 843-6021, MacKenzie_Babb@kenan-flagler.unc.edu

SunTrust Foundation: Audria Belton, (404) 813-3664, Audria.Belton@SunTrust.com

Carolina Performing Arts drives community collaboration, artistic creation with grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation

For immediate use

 

Carolina Performing Arts drives community collaboration, artistic creation with grant from
The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— July 13, 2018) – A $1.5 million grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to Carolina Performing Arts at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill will fund a new initiative for community co-creation. As the largest grant Mellon has invested in Carolina Performing Arts to date, this funding makes a transformative vision of community engagement possible: collaborative creation in the arts that is informed by faculty research and driven by students.

 

The Creative Futures initiative will feature a series of multi-year artistic projects that engage artists, communities, faculty and students in co-creative partnerships. These partnerships will empower communities to express their creativity and channel relevant issues. Creative Futures will enrich university teaching and learning as Carolina Performing Arts pioneers a new model for commissioning art.

 

“The ideas outlined in this grant are the distillation of a philosophical shift at our organization, affirming the idea that joining the arts, scholarship and community can be a driver of powerful change,” said Emil Kang, Carolina Performing Arts executive and artistic director. “We are grateful to the Mellon Foundation for this partnership in helping us continue to imagine new goals and realize them.”

 

Four artists, versed in artistic collaboration and social practice, will be selected as Creative Futures team organizers. Artists will work with faculty engaged in community-based research and local partners to identify relevant issues. Faculty and students complete the creative triangles by adding scholarship, learning and co-curricular partnerships. Undergraduate students will have the opportunity to earn service-learning course credit during their involvement with Creative Futures. The co-creative teams will explore diverse themes drawn from the communities such as gentrification, free speech, women’s empowerment and community health.

 

“While the projects that grow out of these collaborations might not all be performance-based, they will all be participatory, collaborative and community-based,” said Kang.

 

The grant also includes funding for graduate assistants, a project director and undergraduate experiences stemming from the initiative. The CURRENT ArtSpace + Studio, which opened in February 2018, will serve as the artistic and community home for Creative Futures.

 

“The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation is pleased to support Carolina Performing Arts’ visionary approach,” said Mellon Foundation Senior Program Officer Dianne Harris. “With this experiment in co-creation, Carolina Performing Arts will empower communities through opportunities for collective self-expression, enrich faculty research and teaching, deepen undergraduate investment in local communities, create bridges between the campus and its surrounding community, and test a new working prototype for creative and performing artists.”

 

Since 2011, the Mellon Foundation has invested $4.69 million in Carolina Performing Arts. In 2012, the Mellon Foundation funded Carolina Performing Arts’ Arts@TheCore initiative to make the arts an integral part of the educational experience. In 2016, the Mellon Foundation granted $1 million for the DisTIL, Discovery Through Iterative Learning, Fellowship program creating opportunities for visiting artists to collaborate with Carolina faculty and community over multiple semesters.

 

Carolina Performing Arts is one of the campuswide partners in the University’s Arts Everywhere initiative. With the belief that the arts are an essential tool for learning and engaging communities, the Arts Everywhere initiative launched in 2016 with a mission to embed the arts into daily life at Carolina. Arts Everywhere is also a Signature Initiative of the University’s historic $4.25 billion fundraising campaign, For All Kind: the Campaign for Carolina.

 

Information about participating artists and the call for community involvement in Creative Futures is expected to be announced in spring of 2019.

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill



The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 111 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 323,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and 149 countries. More than 169,000 live in North Carolina.

 

About Carolina Performing Arts

The core of the mission at Carolina Performing Arts is to curate and present exceptional arts experiences that inspire and provoke our local and global community. Carolina Performing Arts nurtures artists and the development of new works. It challenges and inspires audiences with experiences to foster opportunities for discovery, thought and important social discourse. Carolina Performing Arts solidifies the bonds between the arts and academics through work that integrates the arts into the life of the University and its students.

 

University Communications: Carly Miller, (919) 445-8555, mediarelations@unc.edu

Carolina Performing Arts: Christina Rodriguez, (919) 962-6222, crodrig@unc.edu

University Development Marketing: Kim Elenez, (919) 962-1628, kelenez@unc.edu

Unparalleled mosaics discovered by UNC-Chapel Hill archaeologist and team provide new clues on life in an ancient Galilean Jewish village

News Release

 

For immediate use

The Spies Panel

 

Unparalleled mosaics discovered by UNC-Chapel Hill archaeologist and team provide new clues on life in an ancient Galilean Jewish village

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— July 9, 2018) — Recent discoveries by a team of specialists and students at Huqoq in Israel’s Galilee, led by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill professor Jodi Magness, shed new light on the life and culture of an ancient Jewish village. The discoveries indicate villagers flourished under early fifth century Christian rule, contradicting a widespread view that Jewish settlement in the region declined during that period. The large size and elaborate interior decoration of the Huqoq synagogue point to an unexpected level of prosperity.

 

“The mosaics decorating the floor of the Huqoq synagogue revolutionize our understanding of Judaism in this period,” said Magness. “Ancient Jewish art is often thought to be aniconic, or lacking images. But these mosaics, colorful and filled with figured scenes, attest to a rich visual culture as well as to the dynamism and diversity of Judaism in the Late Roman and Byzantine periods.”

 

The first mosaics in the Huqoq synagogue were discovered by Magness’ team in 2012. Since then, Magness, director of the Huqoq excavations and Kenan Distinguished Professor of Early Judaism in the department of religious studies in Carolina’s College of Arts & Sciences, assisted by Shua Kisilevitz of the Israel Antiquities Authority and Tel Aviv University have uncovered additional mosaics every summer. This year, the team’s specialists and students focused their efforts on a series of mosaic panels in the north aisle. Magness said this series is part of the richest, most diverse collection of mosaics ever found in an ancient synagogue.

 

Along the north aisle, mosaics are divided into two rows of panels containing figures and objects with Hebrew inscriptions. One panel labeled “a pole between two” depicts a biblical scene from Numbers 13:23. The images show two spies sent by Moses to explore Canaan carrying a pole with a cluster of grapes. Another panel referencing Isaiah 11:6 includes the inscription “a small child shall lead them.” The panel shows a youth leading an animal on a rope. A fragmentary Hebrew inscription concluding with the phrase “Amen selah,” meaning “Amen forever,” was uncovered at the north end of the east aisle.

 

During this eighth dig, the team also continued to expose a rare discovery in ancient synagogues: columns covered in colorful, painted plaster still intact after nearly 1,600 years.

 

The mosaics have been removed from the site for conservation and the excavated areas have been backfilled. Excavations are scheduled to continue in the summer of 2019. Additional information and updates can be found at the project’s website: www.huqoq.org.

 

Mosaics uncovered by this project include:

  • 2012: Samson and the foxes
  • 2013: Samson carrying the gate of Gaza on his shoulders
  • 2013, 2014 and 2015: a Hebrew inscription surrounded by human figures, animals and mythological creatures including cupids; and the first non-biblical story ever found decorating an ancient synagogue — perhaps the legendary meeting between Alexander the Great and the Jewish high priest
  • 2016: Noah’s Ark; the parting of the Red Sea showing Pharaoh’s soldiers being swallowed by giant fish
  • 2017: a Helios-zodiac cycle; Jonah being swallowed by three successive fish; the building of the Tower of Babel

 

An image of the most recent discovery, images from past digs and video from this summer’s excavation may be downloaded here using password huqoq.

 

Photo/Video credit: Jim Haberman.

 

Sponsors of the project include UNC-Chapel Hill, Baylor University, Brigham Young University and the University of Toronto. Students and staff from Carolina and the consortium schools participated in the dig. Financial support for the 2018 season was also provided by the Friends of Heritage Preservation, the National Geographic Society, the William R. Kenan Jr. Charitable Trust and the Carolina Center for Jewish Studies.

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill



The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 111 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 323,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and 149 countries. More than 169,000 live in North Carolina.

 

University Communications: Carly Miller, (919) 445-8555, mediarelations@unc.edu

College of Arts and Sciences contact: Kim Spurr, (919) 962-4093, spurrk@email.unc.edu

 

Three volunteers join leadership of UNC-Chapel Hill’s most ambitious fundraising campaign in University history

For immediate use

 

Three volunteers join leadership of UNC-Chapel Hill’s most ambitious

fundraising campaign in University history

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— June 26, 2018) –The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill announced three additional volunteer co-chairs of For All Kind: the Campaign for Carolina, the University’s historic fundraising drive that aims to raise $4.25 billion by Dec. 31, 2022. As members of the Campaign Steering Committee, these three co-chairs will join the campaign’s top leadership for one of the largest fundraisers ever for a public university.

 

The newly minted co-chairs are:

  • Vicki Craver of Riverside, Connecticut: now a community leader, Craver is a former bond trader whose career included serving as vice president in Goldman Sachs’ fixed-income division. She graduated from Carolina in 1992 with a bachelor’s degree in chemistry and went on to earn a Master of Business Administration at Dartmouth College. Her service to the University includes chairing the board of the College of Arts & Sciences Foundation. 
  • Jennifer Halsey Evans of San Francisco, California: a strategic advisor and investor in high-growth medical technology companies, Evans was also a Morehead Scholar at UNC-Chapel Hill. She graduated in 1994 with undergraduate degrees in political science and communications. She is a professor of the practice leading an honors seminar on entrepreneurship in Silicon Valley for UNC-Chapel Hill’s department of economics and serves on the board of the Morehead-Cain Scholarship Fund. 
  • Austin Stephens of Atlanta, Georgia: a managing director of the Private Banking and Investment Group at Merrill Lynch, Stephens received his bachelor’s degree in history from Carolina in 1997. In addition to serving as co-chair, his work on the campaign includes chairing the Next Generation Committee, a strategy group comprised primarily of alumni in their 30s and 40s who represent the University’s philanthropic future.

 

“We are so fortunate to have these three accomplished alumni serve on our campaign leadership team,” said Chancellor Carol L. Folt. “Their commitment of time and energy attests to their abiding love for Carolina, and their vision and expertise will guide us moving forward in this campaign.”

 

Craver, Evans and Stephens will join seven current Campaign Steering Committee members: Barbara Rosser Hyde of Memphis, Tennessee; Roger L. Perry Sr. of Chapel Hill; John L. Townsend III of Greenwich, Connecticut; Julia Sprunt Grumbles of Chapel Hill; W. Lowry Caudill (Lowry) of Durham, North Carolina; John G. B. Ellison Jr. of Greensboro, North Carolina; and Michael D. Kennedy of Atlanta, Georgia.

 

For All Kind: the Campaign for Carolina supports the Blueprint for Next, the University’s overall strategic plan built on two core strategies: “of the public, for the public,” and “innovation made fundamental.” As of June 11, the campaign secured $2.1 billion in donor contributions.

 

Photos of the three additional campaign co-chairs can be found here and downloaded using the password: campaign.

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill



The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 111 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 323,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and 149 countries. More than 169,000 live in North Carolina.

 

University Communications: Carly Miller, (919) 445-8555, mediarelations@unc.edu

New members chosen for UNC-Chapel Hill Board of Visitors

For immediate use

 

New members chosen for UNC-Chapel Hill Board of Visitors

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— June 11, 2018) – Today the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill announced the new appointment of select alumni and friends to serve one of the most active volunteer organizations at Carolina: the UNC Board of Visitors. The Board of Trustees elects a new class of members each year as fourth-year members complete their terms. The 54 new board members, appointed on May 31, will begin their terms on July 1, 2018.

 

As ambassadors of Carolina, approximately 175 Board of Visitors members inform their communities about on-going work and issues important to the University. In turn, the members share feedback from those communities with the University’s administration. These volunteers actively assist the Board of Trustees and Chancellor Carol L. Folt in student recruitment, government relations, marketing and fundraising. Members also volunteer their time and professional experience as a resource to students who seek guidance ahead of entering the workforce.

 

Sallie Glover of Raleigh will serve as chair of the Board of Visitors and Reyna Walters-Morgan of Raleigh will serve as vice chair.

 

The new members are listed below, alphabetically by North Carolina county and by locations outside of North Carolina.

 

North Carolina
Cabarrus: Paul Newton of Mount Pleasant

 

Carteret: Maxine Brown-Davis of Cedar Point

 

Davidson: Charles Broadwell of Denton

 

Durham: Paul Wright of Durham

 

Forsyth: Susan Mann of Winston-Salem

 

Guilford: Fleming Edwards of Greensboro

 

Lee: Robert Reives of Sanford

 

Mecklenburg: Omid Ahdieh, Kevin Griffin, Christian Robinson, Burnet Tucker, Dan Warren, Agnes Weisiger and Don Williams of Charlotte

 

New Hanover: Lindsey Walter of Wilmington

 

Onslow: Michael Surles of Jacksonville

 

Orange: Olive Greenwald of Efland; Jennifer McCafferty, Houston Summers, Roger Werner and Paige Zinn of Chapel Hill

 

Pitt: Robert Kemp, Suzanne Pecheles and Henry Louis Stephenson III of Greenville

 

Stokes: Kyle Hall of King

 

Wake: Priscilla Maynor of Holly Springs; Jim Blaine, Martin Boney, David Bull, Bart Goodson, Joshua Kmiec, Merrill Mason, Timothy McNeill and Samuel Sugg of Raleigh

 

Wayne: Garrett Strickland of Mount Olive

 

Alaska

Bill Murdock of Kodiak

 

California

Kimberley Kwok of San Francisco; Kristen McGuiness of Newport Beach

 

District of Columbia

Chris Riddick

 

Florida

Whitney Cohen of St. Petersburg

 

Georgia

Ruth Fowler of Dunwoody; Kevin Salvadori of Alpharetta; and Tony Kearney and Robert Turner of Atlanta

 

Illinois

Ward McNally of Chicago

 

Nevada

Frank Andrews of Las Vegas

 

New Jersey

Michael Bradshaw of Pennington

 

New York

Alec Guettel of Mount Kisco; Philip Yates of West Harrison; Kathryn Randolph and George Webster of New York

 

South Carolina

Robert Temple of Greenville

 

Virginia

Latta Chapman of Alexandria; Daryl Davis of Stafford

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill



The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 111 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 323,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and 149 countries. More than 169,000 live in North Carolina.

 

University Communications: Carly Miller, (919) 445-8555, mediarelations@unc.edu

Ackland Art Museum at UNC-Chapel Hill hosts “The Outwin: American Portraiture Today”     

For immediate use

Amy Sherald, American, born 1973: Miss Everything (Unsuppressed Deliverance), 2013. Oil on canvas, 54 x 43-1/8 in., 2013. Frances and Burton Reifler © Amy Sherald.

Ackland Art Museum at UNC-Chapel Hill hosts
“The Outwin: American Portraiture Today”   

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— May 31, 2018) – The Ackland Art Museum at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill will host “The Outwin: American Portraiture Today” on view from the Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery from June 1 through Aug. 26. The Ackland is the fourth and final stop and is the only Southeast location chosen to host the exhibition. A preview of the exhibition can be seen here.The selected finalists for the 2016 Outwin Boochever Portrait Competition finalists included in “The Outwin: American Portraiture Today” present a turning point in the advancement of American contemporary portraiture.

 

First-prize winner of the 2016 Outwin Boochever Portrait Competition Amy Sherald became the first woman to win the competition for her oil on canvas titled “Miss Everything (Unsuppressed Deliverance)” (2013). Former first lady Michelle Obama selected Sherald to create her official portrait for the National Portrait Gallery’s permanent collection, revealed in February 2018. Sherald and Moss will also participate in a public discussion on June 1 at 6:30 p.m. about modern portraiture in the age of the selfie and digitized personhood.

 

“We are thrilled to welcome “The Outwin” as the Museum’s major summer exhibition,” said Katie Ziglar, director of the Ackland Art Museum. “From the breadth of artistic medium to the diverse representations of participants and their subjects, this show reflects the Ackland’s commitment to providing experiences that spark insight into ourselves, each other, and the world.”

 

“The Outwin” is the latest art experience offered by the Ackland, a partner in the university’s Arts Everywhere initiative, which strives to make art accessible to the campus and wider community. Arts Everywhere is a signature initiative of the University’s $4.25 billion fundraising campaign, the Campaign for Carolina. Since January 2017 the Ackland has secured gifts valued at $69.2 million, including several Rembrandt drawings, paintings and prints by Joan Mitchell and a 1971 oil and charcoal on paper by Willem de Kooning. These gifts, among others, increased the Ackland’s growth by more than 500 percent over the prior four years, bolstering the museum’s position as the preeminent public university art museum in the country.

 

The Outwin: American Portraiture Today

Open June 1 – August 26, 2018

Ackland Art Museum

101 South Columbia St.

Chapel Hill, N.C.

 

Museum hours are Wednesday through Saturday 10 a.m. – 5 p.m., and Sundays 1 p.m. – 5 p.m. More information is available at ackland.org.

 

Discussion with artist Amy Sherald

Friday, June 1, 6:30 p.m.

Artist Amy Sherald and curator Dorothy Moss will host a public discussion

Sonja Haynes Stone Center for Black Culture and History

150 South Road

Chapel Hill, N.C.

 

This exhibition has been organized by the Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery, Washington, D.C. The competition and exhibition have been made possible by generous support from the Virginia Outwin Boochever Portrait Competition Endowment.

 

The Ackland presentation of this exhibition has been made possible by generous support from The Caldwell Family Fund for the Ackland Art Museum, The Seymour and Carol Levin Foundation, and Cathy and Hunter Allen.

 

-Carolina-

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill



The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 111 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 323,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and 149 countries. More than 169,000 live in North Carolina.

 

About the Ackland Art Museum

Featuring a year-round calendar of special exhibitions and dynamic public programs, the Ackland Art Museum on UNC-Chapel Hill’s historic campus is a local museum with a global outlook that bridges campus and community. Admission to the Ackland is free and accessible to all. The Ackland’s holdings include more than 18,000 works of art. The collection spans all cultures and time periods, showcasing the breadth of human creativity. A vital teaching resource, the museum’s mission is the art of understanding. Visitors can connect with the complexity and beauty of the wider world by getting close to art – the familiar, the unexpected, the challenging. The Ackland Art Museum is located at 101 South Columbia St. on the UNC-Chapel Hill campus. Museum hours are Wednesday through Saturday 10 a.m. – 5 p.m., and Sundays 1 p.m. – 5 p.m. The museum is open until 9 p.m. for Chapel Hill-Carrboro’s 2nd Friday ArtWalk. More information is available at ackland.org.

 

University Communications: Carly Miller, (919) 445-8555, mediarelations@unc.edu

Ackland Art Museum: Audrey Shore, (919) 843-3676, audrey.shore@unc.edu

 

Image: Amy Sherald, American, born 1973: Miss Everything (Unsuppressed Deliverance), 2013. Oil on canvas, 54 x 43-1/8 in., 2013. Frances and Burton Reifler © Amy Sherald.

 

Carolina Performing Arts announces 2018-2019 Season

News Release

 

 For immediate use

 

Carolina Performing Arts announces 2018-2019 Season

Nearly 40 performances and immersive installations in multiple venues explore

community, co-creation and citizenship

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— May 24, 2018) – Cutting-edge performances and interactive art from across the world find a home at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill during Carolina Performing Arts’ 14th season. The season’s theme, “You Are Everything,” combines new works, returning artists, plastic bags formed into grocery items, an Arabic language town hall and more for a dynamic season of connection and collaboration. In addition to performances slated for Memorial Hall and Moeser Auditorium, CURRENT ArtSpace + Studio will also host its first full season of installations and immersive art experiences.

The upcoming season at CPA explores how a community of strangers formed during performance can move beyond the theater walls and how questions asked and answered during a performance can propel social change. The 2018-2019 season at CPA offers opportunities to engage with visiting artists, promote engaged citizenship and collaborate with local creative partners.

 

“Now in our 14th year, we are a very different program from when we began,” said Emil Kang, CPA’s Executive and Artistic Director. “With the opening of CURRENT, we’ve witnessed powerful connections inspired by immersive and collaborative arts experiences taking place there. Our new season features themes of community and co-creation because we want to change, fundamentally, the nature of our relationship with everyone who comes through our doors—no matter the venue.”

 

CPA’s first event of the season is “Stories on Citizenship,” a public meal and gathering at CURRENT on Sept. 8. The flexible art space opened in February 2018 to break down barriers and foster a community connection through art. Members of the Carolina and Chapel Hill communities are invited to share a meal as local non-profit organizations use storytelling, song and more to convey how a sense of belonging and connection weave into their work. For more details on the event and RSVP information, visit currentunc.org/whats-on/.

 

“In this moment, many people are moved in new and urgent ways to explore their own civic responsibility,” said Amy Russell, director of programming. “At CPA, we believe that artists can be expert citizens engaging our own creativity and compassion and leading us to imagine new and better futures for everyone.”

 

On Sept. 14, CPA’s performance season kicks off with a public block party and two performances at different venues. Robin Frohardt’s “Plastic Bag Store” installation, created with plastic products collected from the community, will open to the public free of charge from 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. at CURRENT. No tickets are required for visitors to enjoy live music, interactive activities, a voter registration drive and local food trucks in the early evening on Memorial Hall’s front portico. At 8 p.m. Neko Case (with opener Thao of the Get Down Stay Down) will perform at Memorial Hall for ticketholders. For more information on purchasing tickets and other opportunities to experience “Plastic Bag Store,” visit carolinaperformingarts.org.

 

Other upcoming highlights of the 2018-2019 CPA season include:

  • Egyptian political satirist Bassem Youssef hosting an Arabic language town hall after his performance of “The Joke is Mightier than the Sword.”
  • Toshi Reagon, singer/songwriter and CPA Mellon Foundation DisTIL Fellow, brings together faculty, students, artists and Triangle collaborators in addition to a performance with her band BIGLovely.
  • The new music collective wild Up will perform “Future Folk” in Moeser Auditorium and then embark on a short residency during which they will create a piece of new music with students and community members. The piece will premiere at “We the People,” presented at CURRENT at the end of the week.
  • Interactive performances by DJ Kid Koala: one, an experience where participants become part of a turntable orchestra conducted by Kid Koala, and the other, a lively celebration where children create robot costumes and hit the dance floor as Kid Koala spins tracks for them.
  • DisTIL Fellow for 2018-20 Abigail Washburn will perform with husband and fellow banjo player Béla Fleck in an exploration of storytelling, song and performance.
  • Performers returning to CPA through the season include Branford Marsalis, Carrie Mae Weems, Buddy Guy, Dorrance Dance, Orchestre Révolutionnaire et Romantique, Compagnie Marie Chouinard, Steep Canyon Rangers, Brooklyn Rider, Mitsuko Uchida (performing with Mahler Chamber Orchestra), Batsheva Dance Company, Youssou N’Dour, and others.

 

Single tickets and new subscription packages for the general public are available on June 13, 2018. Ticket sales for 2017-18 subscribers, UNC staff/faculty and students begin June 6. UNC students are eligible for $10 tickets to all CPA performances (including CURRENT). Staff/faculty receive a fifteen percent discount on tickets and an additional five percent discount on subscriptions. For full performance listing, event details, pricing and venue information visit carolinaperformingarts.org.

 

-Carolina-

 

About Carolina Performing Arts

The core of the mission at Carolina Performing Arts (CPA) is to curate and present exceptional arts experiences that inspire and provoke our community — from UNC to across the globe. Therefore, we nurture artists and the development of new works; challenge and inspire our audiences with experiences that foster opportunities for discovery, thought and important social discourse; and solidify the bonds between the arts and academics through work that integrates the arts into the life of the University and its students.

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 111 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 323,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and 149 countries. More than 169,000 live in North Carolina.

 

University Communications contact: Carly Miller, (919) 445-8555, mediarelations@unc.edu

Carolina Performing Arts contact: Christina Rodriguez, (919) 962-6222, crodrig@unc.edu

 

UNC-Chapel Hill receives $10 million commitment from Pope Foundation to advance core areas of excellence and service

For immediate use

 

 

UNC-Chapel Hill receives $10 million commitment from Pope Foundation to advance core areas of excellence and service

 

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C. – April 23, 2018) Today, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill announced a $10 million commitment from the John William Pope Foundation to support a combination of core areas where Carolina excels: cancer research, multidisciplinary and innovative thinking, excellence in sport and being of and serving the state’s citizens.

 

The gift supports For All Kind: the Campaign for Carolina, the most ambitious fundraising campaign in the University’s history. On Oct. 6, 2017, Carolina launched the second largest fundraiser for a public university in the nation. With a goal of $4.25 billion by Dec. 31, 2022, the Campaign for Carolina is inspired by the Blueprint for Next, the University’s overall strategic plan built on two core strategies: “of the public, for the public,” and “innovation made fundamental.”

 

“I am so grateful for this wonderful gift from the Pope Foundation,” said Chancellor Carol L. Folt. “They are providing much needed support in critical areas from growing educational programs to fighting disease to supporting our student-athletes. Taken together, this gift will touch our students and faculty, promoting their success, leadership and impact in North Carolina and beyond.”

 

“The foundation supports the challenge to give back to UNC’s ‘strategic triad’ of teaching, research and public service,” said Art Pope, Pope Foundation chairman and a Carolina alumnus. “When Chapel Hill and other state institutions of higher education succeed at their core missions, we all succeed. My family and I are honored to contribute to that success — to achieve the Lux et Libertas, the ‘Light and Liberty,’ that graces the University’s seal. We encourage other North Carolinians to do the same.”

 

The commitment announced today will provide:

  • $5 million to the Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center to establish the John William Pope “Tomorrow’s Best Hope” Endowed Fellowship Fund. The fund will generate nearly $250,000 each year for competitively awarded fellowships to recruit, educate and train future oncologists and cancer researchers to reduce cancer’s burden in the state and beyond. Lineberger is one of only 49 National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer centers in the U.S., and the only public comprehensive cancer center in North Carolina. 
  • $3.75 million to the Philosophy, Politics and Economics (PPE) Program in the College of Arts & Sciences to support hiring two new faculty positions and two visiting assistant professorships. The gift will also fund a lecture series to bring prominent speakers to campus to discuss public issues from a philosophical, political and economic perspective. The funds will help the college’s efforts to elevate one of the most popular and fastest-growing academic minors to a major. The PPE Program develops students’ analytical skills to see issues from the perspective of all three of the core disciplines. 
  • $1 million to track-and-field scholarships in the Department of Athletics to create two in-state scholarships, one male and one female. It will be the program’s 16th scholarship in men’s track and field and 14th scholarship in women’s track and field. Carolina’s track-and-field program has won 37 ACC team championships and 30 NCAA event championships. 
  • $250,000 to the UNC Horizons Program to conduct a follow-up study with up to 125 women and their children enrolled in the program. The data from that study will help other states and countries model their programs helping women and children break the cycle of addiction and poverty. The funds will also eliminate a barrier to successful completion of the Horizons program by ensuring child care services for women undergoing treatment. UNC Horizons provides an outreach service to the state to treat pregnant and parenting women with substance use disorders. In 2016-17, the program enrolled 266 women, with 77 percent employed by the time they graduated.

With this latest commitment, the Pope Foundation and family members have more than doubled their lifetime giving to Carolina. Past gifts include a $1.3 million gift in 2014 to fund cancer research and treatment and a $2 million gift in 2006 for Carolina athletics’ football program and other areas on campus.

 

Additional quotes from university leaders:

“Thank you to the Pope Foundation for this generous gift, which will allow us to recruit the best and brightest oncologists and cancer researchers to Chapel Hill where they will join our outstanding researchers in the development of new cancer therapies. The impact of this work will be felt by our patients here in Chapel Hill, and cancer patients around the world.”
– Dr. William L. Roper, CEO of UNC Health Care, dean of the School of Medicine and vice chancellor for medical affairs at UNC-Chapel Hill

 

“I am proud of this program for its interdisciplinary approach to learning and its emphasis on helping students develop transferable skills that prepare them for a wide variety of careers.”
– Kevin Guskiewicz, dean of the College of Arts & Sciences

 

“Carolina has a long history of excellence in track and field, and this generous gift from the Pope Foundation will add to that tradition. It will enable us to recruit the very best student-athletes in the sport, and it will help us continue to compete at the highest level.”
– Bubba Cunningham, UNC-Chapel Hill director of athletics

 

“This generous gift will provide the needed systematic outcome and cost effectiveness data to unlock the potential for the Horizons model to help women and children in North Carolina and across the country.”
– Dr. Hendrée Jones, UNC Horizons executive director and professor of obstetrics and gynecology

 

-Carolina-

 

About the John William Pope Foundation

Founded in 1986 and located in Raleigh, the Pope Foundation makes grants to advance individual freedom, personal responsibility and encourage opportunity for all North Carolinians. The Pope Foundation’s lifetime giving totals more than $145 million directed to over 400 nonprofits.  The Pope Foundation receives its support from the Pope family, owner and operator of the Henderson-based Variety Wholesalers, Inc.

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 111 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 322,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and 165 countries. More than 175,000 live in North Carolina.

 

University Communications Contact: Carly Swain, (919) 445-8555, mediarelations@unc.edu