UNC-Chapel Hill student Scott Emmons named Churchill Scholar

For immediate use

 

 

UNC-Chapel Hill student Scott Emmons named Churchill Scholar

Emmons is the University’s 18th Churchill Scholar

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C. – Jan. 14, 2019) – Scott Emmons, a fourth-year student at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, has been named a recipient of the prestigious Churchill Scholarship, a research-focused award that provides funding to outstanding American students for a year of master’s degree study in science, mathematics and engineering at Churchill College, based at the University of Cambridge in England.

 

Emmons is one of only 16 students and recent graduates selected for the award this year, which not only requires exemplary academic achievement but also seeks those with proven talent in research, extensive laboratory experience and personal activities outside of academic pursuits, especially in music, athletics and social service. He is Carolina’s 18th Churchill Scholar.

 

Emmons, 22, is a senior from Bloomington, Indiana, majoring in computer science and mathematics in the College of Arts & Sciences. He is a Robertson Scholar, a Goldwater Scholar and an Honors Carolina student.

 

At Carolina, Emmons has focused on unsupervised machine learning in the field of network science, leveraging mathematics to enable users to guide community detection algorithms. Collaborating with researchers at Duke through the Robertson Scholars Leadership Program, he has also developed artificial intelligence algorithms for robotic motion planning.

 

Emmons has dedicated his summers to volunteer teaching. He has taught mathematics to middle school students in the Mississippi Delta at the Sunflower County Freedom Project and he has mentored students in mathematics, physics and computer science in Tamil Nadu, India, at the Shanti Bhavan Children’s Project.

 

At Cambridge, Emmons plans to study how to align machine intelligence with human values. His long-term goal is for society to realize the extraordinarily beneficial opportunities of machine intelligence such as safe, efficient transportation and effective, low-cost medical care while overcoming their associated challenges.

 

“Scott is one of the most admirable and prolific students I’ve encountered at UNC-Chapel Hill. He has already published four papers in peer-reviewed journals and is poised to become a leader at the intersection of mathematics, computer science and the ethics of artificial intelligence in the future. The UNC-Chapel Hill community can be very proud to be represented by Scott as a Churchill Scholar,” said Inger Brodey, director of Carolina’s Office of Distinguished Scholarships.

 

The Churchill Scholarship started in 1963 with three awards and has since grown to an average of 14 awards. The scholarship was set up at the request of Sir Winston Churchill in order to fulfill his vision of U.S.-U.K. scientific exchange with the goal of advancing science and technology on both sides of the Atlantic, helping to ensure our future prosperity and security. There have now been approximately 500 Churchill Scholars.

 

-Carolina-

 

Photo of Emmons: https://bit.ly/2M54Qtz

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 74 bachelor’s, 104 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools including the College of Arts & Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s nearly 330,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, US Territories and 162 countries. Almost 178,000 live in North Carolina.

 

Office of Distinguished Scholarships contacts: Inger Brodey, (919) 843-0965, brodey@email.unc.edu, and Sarah George, (919) 843-7757, georgese@email.unc.edu

 

University Communications: Media Relations, (919) 445-8555, mediarelations@unc.edu

 

UNC-Chapel Hill to expand community college partnership and enhance STEM mentorship with $1.1 million award from the North Carolina GlaxoSmithKline Foundation

UNC-Chapel Hill to expand community college partnership and enhance STEM mentorship with $1.1 million award from the North Carolina GlaxoSmithKline Foundation

Funds will establish a new STEM program for transfer students and expand C-STEP to two more community colleges

 

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C. – Jan. 11, 2019) – As part of its mission to provide a high-quality education to North Carolinians of all backgrounds, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is expanding its partnership with the state’s community colleges, bringing its signature Carolina Student Transfer Excellence Program to Guilford Technical Community College and Central Piedmont Community College, and launching a new component, Pathways to STEM Success, to support students entering the STEM workforce.  The expansion is made possible by a $1.13 million grant from the North Carolina GlaxoSmithKline Foundation.

 

Because many low- and moderate-income students pursuing higher education begin at community colleges, the University launched C-STEP in 2006 to enable more community college students to transfer to and graduate from Carolina. Through C-STEP, Carolina identifies high-achieving high school seniors and community college students whose household incomes fall at or below 300 percent of the federal poverty guidelines and guarantees entry to Carolina following the completion of an associate degree with cumulative grade-point averages of at least 3.2 at a partner community college.  GTCC and CPCC are the latest colleges to join 11 other partner schools.

 

“As a community college transfer student myself, C-STEP is particularly meaningful to me,” said Chancellor Carol L. Folt. “I have witnessed how C-STEP provides opportunities for our students to pursue higher education and advance their dreams while enriching the university experience for everyone around them.  I am excited to see how Pathways to STEM Success will build upon C-STEP’s achievements over the past 12 years and encourage more students to pursue STEM careers.”

 

The new Pathways to STEM Success initiative will build upon C-STEP’s existing advising programs and leverage Carolina’s leadership in training the next generation of STEM and health professionals. Students will receive field-specific mentoring to prepare them for graduate study or careers in STEM and health professions, and have opportunities for immersive experiences, such as summer internships and lab assistantships.  Upon graduation, these students will be designated North Carolina GlaxoSmithKline Foundation C-STEP STEM Scholars and will wear a distinguishing cord with their gowns at commencement.  Jobs in STEM fields are expected to grow 13 percent between 2017 and 2027, with 2.4 million of those jobs going unfilled in 2018.

 

“Central Piedmont Community College is thrilled to partner with UNC-Chapel Hill’s C-STEP program as it launches Pathways to STEM Success,” said Janael Yowell, director of transfer student services at CPCC. “We see so much potential for our students as this investment will help them transfer to Carolina and become successful professionals in STEM fields.”

 

“Our students are certainly looking for careers where they can be successful, but they’re also interested in giving back to their communities,” said Dr. Beth Pitonzo, senior vice president of instruction at GTCC. “This partnership with Carolina and the foundation will help our students fulfill both those goals and create benefits for the entire state.”

 

Once enrolled in C-STEP, the program provides transition and support services, such as dedicated academic advising from community college all the way to and through UNC-Chapel Hill as well as mentoring and networking opportunities and special seminars. Nationally, more than 80 percent of community college students intend to earn at least a bachelor’s degree. Yet, only about 25 percent actually transfer, and only 17 percent complete a bachelor’s degree. C-STEP students earn their bachelor’s degree at a rate of 85.5 percent. Almost 800 transfer students enter UNC-Chapel Hill each year, with about 44 percent transferring from North Carolina community colleges.

 

“The North Carolina GlaxoSmithKline Foundation aims to make a difference in the lives of North Carolinians through the advancement of math, science and health education,” Margaret Dardess, foundation president said. “The C-STEP program helps us achieve our objective by helping STEM students to reach their potential and find new careers in science. We are especially pleased that this grant honors our late board colleague Phail Wynn and his life-long passion for C-STEP at Durham Tech. We are proud to support the C-STEP staff and students with this grant.”

 

UNC-Chapel Hill consistently ranks at the top of the list for best value in public higher education, reflecting the University’s commitment to opening access to a high-quality, affordable education to well-qualified students from all backgrounds. UNC-Chapel Hill is one of the few public flagships to practice need-blind admissions and proudly meets 100 percent of the documented need of undergraduates qualifying for need-based aid who apply on time. Carolina meets more than two-thirds of that need with grants and scholarships and the average debt of graduating students is 22 percent below the national average. Fourteen percent of the Class of 2022 qualified for the Carolina Covenant, the University’s commitment to debt-free financial aid for its neediest students. More than 700 students are designated as Covenant Scholars each year.

 

The North Carolina GlaxoSmithKline Foundation grant supports For All Kind: the Campaign for Carolina, UNC-Chapel Hill’s historic fundraising drive that aims to raise $4.25 billion by Dec. 31, 2022. The campaign supports the Blueprint for Next, the University’s overall strategic framework built on two core strategies: “of the public, for the public” and “innovation made fundamental.”

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 74 bachelor’s, 104 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools including the College of Arts & Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s nearly 330,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, US Territories and 162 countries. Almost 178,000 live in North Carolina.

 

About the North Carolina GlaxoSmithKline Foundation

The North Carolina GlaxoSmithKline Foundation is an independent self-funding 501(c)3 nonprofit organization supporting activities that help meet the educational and health needs of today’s society and future generations. Since 1986, the foundation has supported programs in North Carolina that help advance science, health and education. Over more than 30 years, the foundation has awarded more than $75 million in grants and pays approximately $3 million in grants each year to North Carolina nonprofit organizations.

 

 

University Communications: Kate Luck, (919) 445-8555, mediarelations@unc.edu

New internship program at UNC-Chapel Hill prepares students for environmental careers with training, funding

New internship program at UNC-Chapel Hill prepares students for environmental careers with training, funding

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— Jan. 8, 2019) –  A new endowed internship program at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s Institute for the Environment will put students one step closer to environmental science careers. A $1 million gift from Pavel Molchanov of Charlotte will match students with hands-on professional summer internships and help fund the experience.

 

A $1 million gift from Pavel Molchanov, an expert in energy sector analysis, will endow the Pavel Molchanov Scholars Program. The program will create a partnership between the UNC Institute for the Environment and selected environmental small businesses, non-profit organizations and government institutions in North Carolina, South Carolina and Virginia. Each year, up to 10 undergraduate students will be matched with an environmental internship at one of the partner organizations where students can supplement their academic work with experiential, professional training. Molchanov Scholars will receive a $5,000 stipend to support their summer experience.

 

“This generous gift allows us to invest in the next generation of leaders in the environmental realm by funding transformational professional experiences for Carolina undergraduates,” said Michael Piehler, director of the UNC Institute for the Environment. “We are grateful to Mr. Molchanov for his generosity and commitment to preparing students for environmental careers.”

 

The UNC Institute for the Environment seeks to meet major environmental challenges by developing collaborations among diverse academic fields, public and private partners, and an informed and committed community. Undergraduate students in any interdisciplinary degree program who want to understand and solve complex environmental issues can apply for the Molchanov scholarship. The inaugural class of Molchanov Scholars is expected to be announced in March 2019. Additional information on the program and how to apply for the scholarship will be made available online.

 

“Thinking back to my college days, internships were the experiences that prepared me best for what I am doing currently,” said Molchanov. “I am delighted to support UNC undergraduates who want to gain first-hand exposure to environmental careers, an important and dynamic field.”

 

Molchanov is a senior vice president and equity research analyst at Raymond James & Associates. He joined the firm in 2003 and has since been working as part of the Energy Group, researching oil and gas, renewables and clean technology. Molchanov also serves as a member of the advisory board at Cool Effect, an environmental project-funding charity. Molchanov discovered his passion for studying energy and natural resources while at Duke University, where he graduated cum laude in 2003 with a Bachelor of Science degree in economics. He was born in Moscow, and grew up in Charlotte.

 

Molchanov’s gift supports For All Kind: the Campaign for Carolina. The University’s historic $4.25 billion fundraising campaign is inspired by the Blueprint for Next, Carolina’s overall strategic framework built on two core strategies: “of the public, for the public,” and “innovation made fundamental.”

 

A photo of Molchanov may be downloaded at this link using the password media.

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 74 bachelor’s, 104 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools including the College of Arts & Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s nearly 330,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, US Territories and 162 countries. Almost 178,000 live in North Carolina.

 

University Communications: Audrey Smith, (919) 445-8555, mediarelations@unc.edu

UNC Institute for the Environment: Emily Williams, (919) 962-0965, emilywilliams@unc.edu

 

University of North Carolina System names A. Wesley Burks, M.D. CEO of UNC Health Care and UNC-Chapel Hill Medical School Dean

        

 

News Release

Media contacts:
Audrey Smith, (919) 962-8596                                      Phil Bridges, (984) 974-1152
audrey.smith@unc.edu                                              phil.bridges@unchealth.unc.edu

 

University of North Carolina System names A. Wesley Burks, M.D.  CEO of UNC Health Care and

UNC-Chapel Hill Medical School Dean


Dr. Burks tapped to lead growth efforts in education, research, and clinical care

for North Carolina’s health system

 

(CHAPEL HILL, N.C.  – Dec. 14, 2018) ­– Dr. A. Wesley Burks, who has served as executive dean for the UNC School of Medicine and as a member of UNC Health Care’s senior leadership team, has been named CEO of UNC Health Care, Dean of the UNC School of Medicine, and Vice Chancellor for Medical Affairs at UNC-Chapel Hill.

 

Burks succeeds Dr. Bill Roper who announced his retirement last May and was appointed in October to serve as interim president of the UNC System beginning in mid-January. He will begin his new role on Jan. 15.

Burks’ name was presented by President Margaret Spellings to the Board of Governors for a vote following unanimous votes by the UNC Health Care Board of Directors and the UNC-Chapel Hill Board of Trustees.

 

“Dr. Burks is the right person to lead UNC Health Care and UNC School of Medicine at a time of tremendous and unprecedented change in the health care industry,” said Spellings. “Having served as executive dean and member of UNC Health Care’s senior leadership team, he is uniquely positioned to immediately develop and execute a strategy that leads our health care system and School of Medicine into the future.”

 

“It is the highest honor to serve these amazing institutions as CEO and Dean,” said Burks. “I look forward to working with many people, especially our talented team, to develop and communicate a strategic vision and long-term goals for the institution, while strengthening our national and international standing. I am humbled and appreciative of the confidence placed in me by the Board of Governors, Board of Trustees and UNC Health Care Board of Directors.”

 

“No greater service can be rendered to the citizens of North Carolina than having the opportunity to receive quality, accessible and affordable health care. It is also our responsibility to teach the next generation of health care professionals while we continue our research that is changing the future of medicine. That is a huge responsibility, and having worked closely with Wesley for years I know he will lead the UNC School of Medicine and UNC Health Care forward.” said UNC-Chapel Hill Chancellor Carol L. Folt. “A world-renowned researcher who has dedicated his professional life to finding new cures for the most deadly diseases, Wesley embraces compassionate care outcomes that change the lives of patients and their families. Thanks to his focus on education, there are thousands of caring physicians and clinicians providing the best, affordable care across our state, nation and world.”

 

Dr. Burks has spent over 30 years taking care of patients, conducting research, helping to educate trainees, and leading institutions. He joined UNC in 2011 as physician-in-chief of the North Carolina Children’s Hospital and was named chair of the department of pediatrics in 2012. In 2015, he was named executive dean of the University of North Carolina School of Medicine. Prior to serving at UNC, Burks worked at Duke University Medical Center and Arkansas Children’s Hospital. He is a well-published and renowned researcher in the field of pediatric allergy and immunology.  Burks led a research team that was recently published in the New England Journal of Medicine for the world’s first treatment for potentially fatal peanut allergies.

 

“I could not be more pleased at the appointment of Dr. Burks to lead our health care system and school of medicine,” stated Charlie Owen, chair of UNC Health Care Board of Directors. “Wesley is a tremendous leader and visionary with the perfect combination of business acumen, researcher and educator to advance our institutions.

 

Burks resides in Chapel Hill with his wife, Jan. They have three children and four grandchildren.

 

Photo of Burks:  http://news.unchealthcare.org/photo-library/leadership/wesley-burks/view

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 74 bachelor’s, 104 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools including the College of Arts & Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s nearly 330,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, US Territories and 162 countries. Almost 178,000 live in North Carolina.

 

About UNC Health Care

UNC Health Care is an integrated health care system comprised of UNC Hospitals and its provider network, UNC Faculty Physicians, UNC Physicians Network, and the clinical patient care programs of the UNC School of Medicine. Additional hospital entities and health care systems include UNC REX Healthcare, Chatham Hospital, Johnston Health, Pardee Hospital, Caldwell UNC Memorial, Nash UNC Health Care, Wayne UNC Memorial, UNC Lenoir Health Care and UNC Rockingham Health Care.

# # # #

 

 

UNC-Chapel Hill experts available to discuss 2018-2019 flu topics

UNC-Chapel Hill experts available to discuss 2018-2019 flu topics

 

Last year’s influenza season was the worst in nearly a decade and it’s too soon to say how severe the 2018-2019 season will be. UNC-Chapel Hill infectious disease researchers are available to discuss a wide range of topics, including infection rates in North Carolina and the United States, tips for preventing the flu, at-risk populations, facts and myths about the flu vaccine, the need for a universal flu vaccine, and pediatric flu concerns.

 

If you’d like to speak with an expert, call (919) 445-8555 or email mediarelations@unc.edu.

 

 

Flu Basics

 

Dr. Emily Ciccone is an infectious diseases fellow in the UNC School of Medicine’s Division of Infectious Diseases and a former pediatrics resident. She can discuss symptoms of the flu in children and adults as well as diagnostic testing for the flu and other viral respiratory illnesses.

 

 

 

Dr. Claire Farel is an assistant professor of medicine in the UNC School of Medicine’s Division of Infectious Diseases and the medical director of the Infectious Diseases Clinic at N.C. Memorial Hospital. She can discuss symptoms of the flu in adults and ways to prevent the flu, including vaccination and proper hand hygiene.

 

 

 

Dr. David Weber is a professor of epidemiology in the UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health and a professor of pediatrics and medicine in the UNC School of Medicine’s Division of Infectious Diseases and Department of Pediatrics. He can discuss various clinical aspects and epidemiology of the flu, such as complications arising from infections, current rates of infection in North Carolina and the United States, and which age populations are at high risk of getting the flu and becoming severely ill.

 

 

Pediatric Flu

 

Dr. Martha Perry is a professor of pediatrics in the UNC School of Medicine. She can discuss pediatric flu concerns, including why children get sick more often than adults, why children who are sick with the flu may take longer than adults to recover and the importance of vaccinating children against the flu.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Flu Prevention and Behaviors

 

Dr. Allison Aiello is a professor of epidemiology and leads the social epidemiology program in the UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health. Aiello is currently a member of a working group of leading experts for The World Health Organization to help develop guidance on nonpharmaceutical public health measures for mitigating the impact of pandemic influenza. She can discuss methods for preventing the flu through behavior change and non-pharmaceutical interventions, such as hand washing, isolation, quarantine and school closings. She can also discuss technologies for tracking flu in the community setting and outbreaks.

 

 

Vaccination

 

Dr. Noel Brewer is a professor of health behavior at the UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health. He is a decision scientist whose research focuses on how people make risky health decisions. He can discuss the reasons why people don’t get vaccinated and interventions that effectively increase uptake.

 

 

 

 

Dr. Macary Marciniak is a clinical associate professor in the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy. She is an immunizing pharmacist and a national trainer for student pharmacists and pharmacists regarding vaccine administration. She can discuss myths and facts about flu vaccine, and flu vaccine provision in pharmacy settings. She can also discuss tips to prevent the flu.

 

 

 

Dr. Tim Sheahan is an assistant professor of epidemiology at the UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health where he focuses on the development of therapeutics for emerging viruses like influenza, SARS and Middle East respiratory syndrome. He can discuss flu vaccine development and effectiveness. He can also discuss the need for a universal vaccine and antiviral drugs, and the current status of these drugs, including the new antiviral Xofluza.

 

 

 

P: (919) 445-8555  |  E: mediarelations@unc.edu

UNC-Chapel Hill alumnae Emily Venturi and Alice Huang named Schwarzman Scholars

News Release

 

For immediate use

 

UNC-Chapel Hill alumnae Emily Venturi and Alice Huang named Schwarzman Scholars

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— Dec. 7, 2018) – Emily Venturi, a 2018 graduate of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and Alice Huang, a 2016 graduate, have been selected for the Schwarzman Scholars program, an elite China-based scholarship modeled after the Rhodes Scholarship, founded by Blackstone co-founder and CEO Stephen A. Schwarzman.

 

Venturi and Huang were two of about 140 Schwarzman Scholars chosen in November from around the world for the fourth cohort of Schwarzman Scholars. They are the sixth and seventh Schwarzman Scholars from UNC-Chapel Hill. This innovative master’s degree program supports study at China’s prestigious Tsinghua University and bridges the academic and professional worlds to educate students about leadership and China’s expanding role in the world.

 

“Being named a Schwarzman scholar is an exceptional achievement. This scholarship is also a passport to international studies and new experiences for these two amazingly talented graduates,” said Chancellor Carol L Folt. “Thanks to the Schwarzman opportunity, Emily will continue her insightful work in the area of refugee protection, and Alice will take her studies in development economics to the next level. I know we will read about their successes in the years to come.”

 

Venturi, 23, from Trieste, Italy, is the daughter of Vittorio Venturi and Tracy Katherine Stannard and is the first Italian woman to be awarded the scholarship. She graduated from the United World College in 2014. Venturi graduated from Carolina in May 2018 with highest distinction, majoring in political science and economics.

 

Venturi came to UNC-Chapel Hill as a Morehead-Cain Scholar, becoming a member of Honors Carolina and a scholar with the Buckley Public Service Program, which combines a substantial and sustained commitment to public service with structured training and reflection on that service. Venturi currently works in the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees in the Division of Resilience and Solutions. She is also a research assistant for UNC-Chapel Hill’s political science department, studying European Union integration and multi-level governance. While at Carolina, Venturi was senior editor for “The Internationalist,” UNC-Chapel Hill’s undergraduate research journal for international affairs.

 

“I feel humbled and thrilled for the opportunity to spend a year in Beijing as a Schwarzman Scholar—I couldn’t imagine a more exciting community for my graduate studies,” Venturi said. “Understanding China’s strategic influence in forced displacement crises is going to be key for the future of the field and I’m looking forward to this new challenge at Tsinghua University. I’m beyond thankful for the support that I received at Carolina to develop the lifelong friendships, academic interests and mentorship relationships that all really make a difference.”

 

Venturi’s commitment to innovative approaches to refugee protection stems from her work in impact-investing for refugee integration in Armenia, her research in migration’s role in EU development policy in Senegal and her teaching of an undergraduate seminar in comparative legal studies in the United States. Emily plans to use her time at Tsinghua University studying how China’s global role will strengthen cooperation and solutions in forced displacement crises. Ultimately, Venturi plans to continue her work to mobilize international stakeholders for the protection and integration of displaced people worldwide.

 

“It only takes a short conversation with Emily to see that she is a very unusual person. She is perhaps the most internationally minded person I have met at UNC-Chapel Hill,” said Dr. Inger Brodey, director of Carolina’s Office of Distinguished Scholarships. “Emily is remarkable for her hands-on research experience around the world, as well as in her ease in working with foreign ambassadors and their staffs in Senegal, Rome and Brussels. She will be a natural to the kind of high-level networking that the Schwarzman community offers and will be an important force in establishing better structures for immigration and displaced peoples.”

 

Huang, 24, from Chapel Hill, is the daughter of Weishi Huang and Qinghong Yang. She graduated from the North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics in 2012. She graduated from the UNC-Chapel Hill in 2016 with a bachelor’s degree with highest distinction in economics and mathematics. Huang currently works in New York City as an associate analyst and research assistant for NERO Economic Consulting.

 

“I’m excited and deeply grateful to have been named a Schwarzman Scholar,” said Huang. “I’m thankful to friends, family and mentors along the way who have not only fostered my interest in international development, but have also, over the years, helped me embrace my Chinese-American heritage. I’m excited to embark on this personally and professionally transformative experience!”

 

At UNC-Chapel Hill, Huang was an Honors Carolina student and a Morehead-Cain Scholar. Huang served as the executive director of Students for Students International, which promotes education and provides sustainable educational resources for exceptional students in the developing world. She also worked as a student consultant for Oxford Microfinance Initiative in Oxford, England, and was a summer research assistant at Peking University China Center for Health Economics Research in Beijing, China. During her senior year at UNC-Chapel Hill, Huang was awarded a Fulbright Scholarship to teach English as a Foreign Language in Kolkata, India. Huang also completed an honors thesis about the impact of the Great Chinese Famine on health outcomes.

 

Huang plans to pursue a career in development economics, using the Schwarzman Scholarship to converse with China’s development practitioners and entrepreneurs to exchange best practices from the field and to learn about policy and negotiations in a Chinese context. She hopes to work for a strategy consulting firm that specializes in global development and to oversee a collaborative development agenda between the U.S., China and other global leaders.

 

“The Schwarzman selection committee foresees that with her academic expertise and exceptional experience in England and India, as well as China, Alice will be in an excellent position to shape international development policies in the coming decades,” said Brodey. “A Schwarzman Scholarship will enable her to do so from a perspective enriched by the Chinese experts that she will meet during her time at Tsinghua University.”

 

The worldwide competition attracted 2,887 applicants for approximately 140 Schwarzman Scholarships. The Schwarzman Scholars program is the first scholarship created to respond to the geopolitical landscape of the 21st century by giving students the opportunity to develop leadership skills and professional networks through a one-year master’s degree at Tsinghua University in Beijing, China. Immersed in the culture of Beijing, the scholars are surrounded by an international community of thinkers, innovators and senior leaders in business, politics and society. In this environment of intellectual engagement, professional development and cultural exchange, they pursue their academic disciplines, travel, build their leadership capacities and develop a better understanding of China.

-Carolina-

Photo of Venturi: https://bit.ly/2riVwZt

Photo of Huang: https://bit.ly/2zEF2PU

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 74 bachelor’s, 104 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools including the College of Arts & Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s nearly 330,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, US Territories and 162 countries. Almost 178,000 live in North Carolina.

 

Office of Distinguished Scholarships contacts: Inger Brodey, (919) 843-0965, brodey@email.unc.edu and Sarah George, (919) 843-7757, georgese@email.unc.edu 

 

 

University Communications: Media Relations, (919) 445-8555, mediarelations@unc.edu

 

UNC-Chapel Hill student Maggie Hilderbran named Marshall Scholar

News Release

 

For immediate use

 

 

UNC-Chapel Hill student Maggie Hilderbran named Marshall Scholar

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— Dec. 6, 2018) – Maggie Hilderbran, a fourth-year undergraduate student at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, has been named a recipient of the Marshall Scholarship, a graduate studies scholarship to study at up to two United Kingdom institutions, in any field of study.

 

Maggie is one of 40 Americans selected for the one- and two-year awards, which provide university fees, cost of living expenses, annual book grants, thesis grant, research and daily travel grants and fares to and from the United States, an average award of £35,000 per year. She is Carolina’s 18th Marshall Scholar, and was one of only 32 recipients of the two-year Marshall award.

 

“I’m honored to have been selected for a Marshall Scholarship,” Hilderbran said. “It’s thrilling to know that for the next two years I’ll have the opportunity to dig deeper into my fields of study, work closely with others who share my academic interests, and experience Scottish and English culture. I especially appreciate the support I’ve received from my professors and from the Office of Distinguished Scholarships, which helped me realize this dream. I’m excited to have the honor of representing Carolina in the UK for the next two years.”

 

Hilderbran, 22, is the daughter of Gregory and Carole Hilderbran, and is from Asheville, North Carolina. She is a 2015 graduate of Carolina Day School and plans to graduate from Carolina this May with a double major in physics (with a concentration in astrophysics) and religious studies, along with a minor in history.

 

“Faculty, students and staff who know Maggie see how her clear sense of what she wants to do with her life inspires her work. Thanks to her amazing academic, scientific and community building skills, I know she will make the most of this Marshall Scholarship opportunity,” said Chancellor Carol L. Folt. “Beyond excelling in the classroom and the lab, Maggie is a student leader and mentor who also gives back through community service. With her keen ability to explain complex science to non-scientists, she will advance the world’s understanding of the importance of international space missions and research.”

 

A Carolina Scholar and Honors Carolina student with a near-perfect GPA, Hilderbran is also a Phi Beta Kappa member and the recipient of North Carolina Space Grants for undergraduate research and scholarship. She is currently writing her senior honors thesis based on her research at UNC-Chapel Hill’s Astrophysical Fluid Dynamics Lab.

 

In her sophomore year, Hilderbran was the managing editor and a founding member of “UNC JOURney,” Carolina’s first interdisciplinary undergraduate research journal. She is an ambassador for the UNC-Chapel Hill Office of Undergraduate Research, promoting research on campus through information sessions and student mentoring. Hilderbran has also spent five summers as a camp counselor at Camp Illahee in Brevard, North Carolina.

 

While in England, Hilderbran plans to pursue two master’s of science degrees, one in science and religion at University of Edinburgh and another in space exploration systems at University of Leicester. Professionally, she aspires to perform astrophysics research for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, where she has twice served as an intern.

 

“Maggie has an unusual strength of character and enormous energy, is mature and self-aware, and is a brilliant community builder who has left her mark on the UNC-Chapel Hill campus in more ways than one,” said Inger Brodey, director of Carolina’s Office of Distinguished Scholarships. “She is poised to become a scientist who knows how to talk to non-scientists, bridging an important gap in our current society, and serving an important role as a spokesperson for NASA and international space research.”

 

The Marshall Scholarships were founded in 1953 and finance the opportunity for young Americans of outstanding ability to study for a degree in the United Kingdom. Approximately 40 Marshall Scholarships are awarded annually and cover study in any discipline at graduate level at a UK university: up to 32 recipients can receive the two-year award and up to eight recipients can receive the one-year award.

 

The Marshall Scholarships honor the ideals of the Marshall Plan and are named after U.S. Secretary of State George C. Marshall. Applicants who “have the potential to excel as scholars, leaders and contributors to improved UK-US understanding” are highly desired by Marshall Scholarships selectors.

 

-Carolina-

 

Photo of Hilderbran: https://bit.ly/2zOXUvR

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 74 bachelor’s, 104 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools including the College of Arts & Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s nearly 330,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, US Territories and 162 countries. Almost 178,000 live in North Carolina.

 

Office of Distinguished Scholarships contacts: Inger Brodey, (919) 843-0965, brodey@email.unc.edu and Sarah George, (919) 843-7757, georgese@email.unc.edu

 

University Communications: Media Relations, (919) 445-8555, mediarelations@unc.edu

 

 

124 students at UNC-Chapel Hill inducted into Phi Beta Kappa

For immediate use

 

124 students at UNC-Chapel Hill inducted into Phi Beta Kappa

Phi Beta Kappa is the nation’s oldest and most honored college honorary society

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— Dec. 5, 2018) – Phi Beta Kappa, the nation’s oldest and most honored college honorary society, has inducted 124 University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill students as new members.

 

Phi Beta Kappa membership is open to undergraduates in the college and professional degree programs who meet stringent eligibility requirements. Less than 1 percent of all college students qualify.

 

A student who has completed 75 hours of course work in the liberal arts and sciences with a GPA of 3.85 or better (on a 4-point scale) is eligible for membership. Also eligible is any student who has completed 105 hours of course work in the liberal arts and sciences with a 3.75 GPA.

 

Phi Beta Kappa has 286 chapters nationwide. UNC-Chapel Hill’s chapter, Alpha of North Carolina, was founded in 1904 and is the oldest of seven chapters in the state. Each year, Phi Beta Kappa chapters and alumni associations across the country raise and distribute more than $1 million in awards, scholarships and prizes benefiting high schools and college students.

 

Phi Beta Kappa officers at Carolina for 2018-2019 are students Katherine Gora Combs, president; Pooja Joshi, vice president; and Christiana Cornea, recording secretary. James L. Leloudis, professor of history, Peter T. Grauer associate dean for Honors Carolina and director of the James M. Johnston Center for Undergraduate Excellence, is chapter executive secretary and faculty advisor.

 

The recent induction ceremony featured a keynote address by Buck Goldstein, University Entrepreneur in Residence and professor of the practice in the economics department. New members received certificates and Phi Beta Kappa keys, the organization’s symbol.

 

Listed below are 123 inductees, 95 of whom are from North Carolina. The names appear below in alphabetical order by North Carolina county, then by state and country. All study in the College of Arts and Sciences except where otherwise noted. One student chose not to be listed.

 

Alamance County

  • Samuel Sumner Lowe, a junior with a computer science major and cognitive science and music minors, son of Ed Lowe and Beth Lowe of Elon.
  • Megan Elizabeth Miller, a junior with an environmental health sciences major and a geography minor, daughter of Lisa Miller and Dr. Mark Miller of Elon.

 

Alexander County

  • Robert Andrew West, a senior with a statistics and analytics major and music and mathematics minors, son of Eric West and Tammy West of Taylorsville.

 

Ashe County

  • Emily Suzanne Long, a senior with biology and English majors and a medicine, literature and culture minor, daughter of Tim Long and Sandy Long of Jefferson.

 

Buncombe County

  • Casey Aurora DeMarco, a senior with a human development and family studies major, daughter of Gordon DeMarco and Jill DeMarco of Arden.
  • Brooke Noel Fisher, a senior with journalism and global studies majors and a Chinese minor, daughter of Rick Fisher and Brenda Fisher of Weaverville.
  • Nicholas Clayton Konz, a junior with physics and mathematics majors, son of Dr. Jeffrey Konz and Dr. Louly Peacock of Asheville.

 

Cabarrus County

  • Nicole Katherine Ashburn, a senior with a psychology major and neuroscience and biology minors, daughter of Randy Ashburn and June Ashburn of Concord.
  • William Michael Alexander Yoder, a senior with English and history majors, son of Michael Yoder and Christina Yoder of Concord.

Cleveland County

  • Timothy Warren Hartman, a senior with chemistry and Hispanic linguistics majors, of Shelby.

 

Cumberland County

  • Kathy Chan, a senior with a nutrition major and chemistry and Asian studies minors, daughter of Dr. Tat Chan and Maggie Chan of Fayetteville.
  • Clara Marcelle Shirley Schwamm, a senior with information science and Germanic and Slavic languages and literatures majors and a mathematics minor, daughter of Alice Ann Campbell and John Campbell of Hope Mills.

 

Dare County

  • Madeline Brigid Bailey, a May 2018 graduate with a psychology major, of Kill Devil Hills.
  • Caelan Johannes Dick, a senior with economics and political science majors and a public policy minor, son of Ingrid Schmedtje and David Dick of Salvo.

 

Durham County

  • Nancy Kitterman, a senior with a political science major and philosophy, politics and economics and social and economic justice minors, of Durham.
  • Kailey Madison Morgan, a senior with English and political science majors and a creative writing minor, daughter of Tonya Morgan and Lafmin Morgan of Durham.
  • Kevin James Parham, a May 2018 graduate with health policy and management and Asian studies majors and a chemistry minor, son of Kenneth Parham Jr. and Susan Parham of Hillsborough.

 

Forsyth County

  • Danielle Leanne Bruce, a senior with human development and family studies and global studies majors, daughter of Robert Bruce and Christina Bruce of Winston-Salem.
  • Sophie Gentle Capshaw-Mack, a senior with a philosophy major, daughter of Teri Capshaw of Washington, DC.
  • Bethany Kristin Cole, a senior with economics and public policy majors, daughter of Melissa Cole and Brian Cole of Winston-Salem.
  • Emma Grace Gillett, a senior with history and English majors, daughter of Sarah Gillett and Andrew Gillett of Winston-Salem.
  • Kacey Dale Rigsby, a senior with English and Spanish majors and a creative writing minor, of Clemmons.
  • Ashley Nicole Smith, a junior with a computer science major and Hispanic studies and biology minors, daughter of Clare Smith and Lindsey Smith of Clemmons.

 

Guilford County

  • Tricia Celeste Bacon, a senior with a computer science major and mathematics and music minors, of Summerfield.
  • Angelica Mae Ford, a senior with human development and family studies and psychology majors and a women’s and gender studies minor, daughter of Sylvia Ford and John Ford of Kernersville.
  • Lily Hong Lou, a junior with a computer science major and an entrepreneurship minor, of Greensboro.
  • Kimberly Mara Oliver, a senior with history and anthropology majors and an American Indian and indigenous studies minor, of Greensboro.
  • Jessica Rose Whalen, a senior with psychology and anthropology majors and a Hispanic studies minor, daughter of Theresa Whalen and Richard Whalen of Greensboro.

 

Harnett County

  • Elizabeth Reaves Houston, a senior with a chemistry major and a medicine, literature and culture minor, daughter of Dr. Paige Houston and Keith Houston of Dunn.

 

Henderson County

  • Mary Margaret McKenzie, a senior with Arab cultures and French and Francophone studies majors, daughter of Susan McKenzie of Hendersonville and Kenneth McKenzie of Monroe, LA.
  • Sylvia Ann Ward, a senior with English and psychology majors, daughter of Dr. Robert Ward and Sally Ward of Hendersonville.

 

Johnston County

  • Melanie Amber Langness, a senior with a political science major and art history and public policy minors, of McGee’s Crossroads.
  • Lily Zhang, a May 2018 graduate with applied mathematics and computer science majors and a statistics and analytics minor, daughter of Dr. Max Zhang and Dr. Qin Lu of Clayton.

 

Mecklenburg County

  • Marc David Brunton, a senior with public policy and English majors and a creative writing minor, son of Jacqueline Brunton of Charlotte and Stephen Brunton of Palm Springs, CA.
  • Kevin Edward Gauch, a junior with economics and history majors and a philosophy, politics and economics minor, son of Thomas Gauch and Cathleen Gauch of Charlotte.
  • Hope McCleese Gehle, a senior with a biology major and social and economic justice and chemistry minors, daughter of Janice Rea and David Gehle.
  • Catherine Lee Gill, a senior with economics and statistics and analytics majors, daughter of Thold Gill and Ruth Ellen Gill of Charlotte.
  • Brenee Ansleigh Goforth, a May 2018 graduate with a political science major and a philosophy, politics and economics minor, of Mint Hill.
  • Linda Marie Henry, a junior with a biomedical and health sciences engineering major and chemistry and German minors, daughter of Frank Henry and Anette Henry of Charlotte.
  • Danny Ly, a senior with statistics and analytics and economics majors, son of Hanh Ly and Buoi Ta of Charlotte.
  • Andrew Ward Maxwell, a junior with a health policy and management major and business administration and Spanish for the health professions minors, son of Robin Maxwell and John Maxwell of Charlotte.
  • Casey Nora Rothrock, a senior with a history major and a cognitive science minor, of Charlotte.
  • Alexander James Roupas, a senior with a biomedical and health sciences engineering major and chemistry and music minors, son of Donna Roupas and Anastasi Roupas of Charlotte.
  • Gray McCracken Smith, a senior with computer science and information science majors, son of Eric Smith and Sally Smith of Charlotte.

 

Moore County

  • Loc Gia Ho, a senior with a philosophy major, son of Yen Nguyen of Aberdeen.

 

Nash County

  • Nicholas Kenneth Chamberlain, a senior with a biology major and computer science and chemistry minors, son of Dr. Matthew Chamberlain and Lori Chamberlain of Rocky Mount.

 

New Hanover County

  • Abby Marie Phelps, a senior with an environmental science major and a German minor, of Wilmington.
  • Katherine Mae Spencer, a senior with a biology major and a chemistry minor, daughter of Lynn Spencer and Terry Spencer of Wilmington.

 

Orange County

  • Vikram Aikat, a junior with computer science and quantitative biology majors and a chemistry minor, son of Dr. Deb Aikat and Dr. Jay Aikat of Chapel Hill.
  • Thomas Alexander Elliott, a senior with political science and contemporary European studies majors and a German minor, son of John Elliott of Montreal, Quebec, and Joanneke de Cock of Chapel Hill.
  • Matthew Louis Gilleskie, a senior with a biostatistics major and a chemistry minor, of Chapel Hill.
  • Emma Giusto, a senior with political science and economics majors and a public policy minor, daughter of Sharon Carlson of Pittsboro.
  • Emily Goldstein, a May 2018 graduate with a geography major and city and regional planning and public policy minors, daughter of Phil Goldstein and Donna Goldstein of Chapel Hill.
  • Samuel Nielsen, a junior with economics and computer science majors, son of Martha Diehl of Chapel Hill and the late Dr. Francois Nielsen.
  • Daniel Stratton, a senior with a computer science major and an entrepreneurship minor, son of Marianne Chan and Timothy Stratton of Chapel Hill.

 

Pitt County

  • Larry Yang, a senior with a biology major and chemistry and neuroscience minors, of Greenville.

 

Randolph County

  • Matthew Scott Queen, a senior with economics and political science majors, son of Scott Queen and LouAnn Queen of Asheboro.

 

Rowan County

  • Abraham Louis Post, a senior with computer science and political science majors and an information science minor, son of Jonathan Post and Libby Post of Salisbury.

 

Rutherford County

  • Allyson Marie Yelton, a senior with psychology and Hispanic literatures and cultures majors and a geography minor, daughter of Dr. David Yelton and Denise Yelton of Rutherfordton.

 

Stanly County

  • Sarah Elizabeth Krug, a May 2017 graduate with media and journalism and anthropology majors, of Albemarle.

 

Surry County

  • Mary Beth Browne, a senior with political science and peace, war and defense majors and an environmental studies minor, daughter of Charles Browne and Lu Ann Browne of Mount Airy.

 

Union County

  • William Hunt Cachine, a junior with applied mathematics and economics majors and a computer science minor, son of Jeffrey Cachine and Michelle Cachine of Waxhaw.
  • Erin Marie Danford, a senior with an environmental science major and a geography minor, of Waxhaw.
  • Om Vinayak Dave, a senior with a nutrition major and a chemistry minor, son of Brinda Dave and Vinayak Dave.
  • Meredith Grace Emery, a junior with a studio art major and a geography minor, daughter of Angela Emery and David Emery of Waxhaw.
  • Mariah Caroline Harrelson, a senior with public policy and political science majors and a philosophy, politics and economics minor, daughter of Calvin Harrelson and Margaret Harrelson of Charlotte.
  • Emily Ruth Hazlett, a senior with a Hispanic linguistics major and a biology minor, daughter of Ted Hazlett and Carolyn Hazlett of Monroe.
  • Lee-Ann Mai Nguyen, a senior with a biomedical and health sciences engineering major and a Spanish for the health professions minor, daughter of Tuan Nguyen and Lieu Nguyen of Weddington.
  • Adam Joseph Sommers, a senior with a chemistry major and a history minor, of Weddington.

 

Wake County

  • Anne Meredith Bennett, a junior with American studies and music majors, daughter of Dr. Betsy Bennett and Dr. Brian Bennett of Raleigh.
  • Caroline Elizabeth Butler, a senior with a biology major and Spanish for the health professions and chemistry minors, daughter of Andrew Butler and Sarah Butler of Apex.
  • Corwin A. Carr, a junior with statistics and analytics and chemistry majors and a computer science minor, son of Alexander Carr and Elizabeth Carr of Raleigh.
  • Samveg Arpan Desai, a senior with a biostatistics major and chemistry and mathematics minors, son of Arpan Desai and Trupti Desai of Raleigh.
  • Shivani Desai, a senior with a biology major and chemistry and medical anthropology minors, daughter of Himansu Desai and Manisha Desai of Wake Forest.
  • Justin Lee Do, a junior with information science and computer science majors and a philosophy, politics and economics minor, son of Minh Do and Tina Lee of Raleigh.
  • Jake Matthew Evans, a senior with a chemistry major and a computer science minor, son of John Evans and Mary Evans of Willow Spring.
  • Alec Jennings Fischbein, a senior with contemporary European studies and political science majors, son of Gary Fischbein and Carole Fischbein of Cary.
  • Morgan Jean Goetz, a senior with a biomedical and health sciences engineering major, daughter of Andrew Goetz and Cathy Goetz of Cary.
  • Isabelle Hirschy, a senior with political science and peace, war and defense majors and a social and economic justice minor, daughter of Stephanie Hirschy and Bradford Hirschy of Cary.
  • Alexandra Howland Hitson, a senior with economics and French majors, daughter of Dr. Molly Leavitt of Raleigh.
  • Alex Jose, a senior with physics and mathematics majors, son of Jose Chandy and Lynda Jose of Cary.
  • Alexander Quinn Shiu-Kei Kan, a junior with computer science and statistics and analytics majors and a cognitive science minor, son of Victor Kan and Etta Kan of Morrisville.
  • Richard Vu Le, a senior with computer science and information science majors, son of Colette Le and Khai Le of Raleigh.
  • Brennan Lewis, a senior with public policy and women’s and gender studies majors, daughter of Sera Lewis and Chad Lewis of Apex.
  • Sabrina Corin Madrigal, a senior with a biology major and a chemistry minor, daughter of Kimberly Patrey and John Patrey of Raleigh.
  • Tanner Lane Morgan, a senior with political science and history majors, son of Kelly Morgan and Jennifer Petty.
  • Kyra Coates Mulder, a senior with biostatistics and computer science majors, daughter of Curtis Mulder and Rachel Elliott of Raleigh.
  • David Near, a senior with a biology major and chemistry and history minors, son of Joseph Near and Dianne Near of Holly Springs.
  • Jackson Arthur Oakley, a senior with a global studies major and a Spanish for the professions minor, son of Bryan Oakley and Elaine Oakley of Raleigh.
  • Lily Caroline Rashid, a senior with an exercise and sport science major, daughter of Irfan Rashid and Michelle Rashid of Cary.
  • Zachary Michael Ripberger, a senior with an exercise and sport science major and business administration and Hispanic studies minors, son of Michael Ripberger and Wendy Ripberger of Cary.
  • Cody Bray Staples, a senior with psychology and religious studies majors, of Wendell.
  • Alyssa Jenna Tan, a junior with a biostatistics major and Spanish for the health professions and chemistry minors, daughter of Aldin Tan and Carmela Soraya Flores-Tan of Cary.
  • Dylan Jude Tastet, a senior with computer science and information science majors, son of Sylvia Tastet and Lance Tastet of Apex.
  • Sarah Nicole Wotus, a senior with a biostatistics major and an environmental science and studies minor, daughter of Cindy Wotus and Jeffrey Wotus of Apex.

 

California

  • John Ezra Miles Rawitsch, a senior with a geography major and an urban studies and planning minor, of Los Angeles.
  • Lauren Julia Weisel, a May 2018 graduate with an exercise and sport science major and chemistry and biology minors, daughter of Catherine Weisel and Gregory Weisel of Carlsbad.

 

Connecticut

  • Madison Rackear, a senior with a biochemistry major, daughter of Kathleen Rackear of Fairfield and Robert Rackear of Stratford.
  • Caitlin Young, a senior with political science and economics majors and a business administration minor, daughter of Michael Young and Kathleen Young of Southington.

 

Florida

  • Brooke Rose Bekoff, a senior with political science and history majors, daughter of Nelson Bekoff and Valerie Bekoff of Boca Raton.
  • Claudia Teresa Malone, a senior with sociology and management and society majors, of Fort Lauderdale.
  • Lauren Elizabeth Shumpert, a senior with a sociology major and women’s and gender studies and social and economic justice minors, daughter of Holly Shumpert and Scott Shumpert of Pensacola.
  • Grace Darby Tan, a senior with a biology major and chemistry and environmental science and studies minors, daughter of Dr. Thomas Tan and Toni Tan of Pensacola.

 

Georgia

  • Jamie Patricia DeCicco, a senior with a psychology major and biology and chemistry minors, daughter of Christine DeCicco and Daniel DeCicco of Fayetteville.

 

Illinois

  • Evan M. Thompson, a senior with psychology and piano performance majors, of Chicago.

 

Maryland

  • Caroline Gladd, a junior with business administration and political science majors, daughter of Holly Gladd and Paul Gladd of Potomac.
  • Henry He, a senior with an economics major and a business administration minor, of North Potomac.
  • Genevieve India Victoria Molyneaux, a senior with economics and political science majors and an environmental science and studies minor, daughter of Dr. Elizabeth Molyneaux and Robert Molyneaux of Gaithersburg.

 

New Jersey

  • Thomas Ross Marshall, a junior with physics and music performance majors, of Manalapan.
  • Adesh Ranganna, a senior with nutrition and public policy majors and a chemistry minor, son of Suresh Ranganna and Anuradha Ranganna of Marlboro.

 

New York

  • Mia Gabrielle DeMarco, a senior with a biology major and a chemistry minor, daughter of Wendy DeMarco and David DeMarco of Schenectady.

 

Ohio

  • Allison Anne Carter, a senior with biology and women’s and gender studies majors and a chemistry minor, daughter of William Carter and Elizabeth Carter of Loveland.

 

South Carolina

  • Matthew Bleakley Ballance, a senior with archaeology and history majors and a geological sciences minor, son of Dr. Julia Ballance and Kevin Ballance of Columbia.
  • Michala Sterling Patterson, a junior with biology and global studies majors and a medicine, literature and culture minor, daughter of Micheal Patterson and Teresa Patterson.
  • Seth Daniel Pinosky, a May 2018 graduate with a biology major and a chemistry minor, son of Karen Pinosky and Mark Pinosky of Mount Pleasant.
  • Julia Cristine Whitten, a senior with English and Spanish majors, daughter of Robert Whitten and Onelia Madden of Summerville.

 

Texas

  • Benjamin Scott Walzel, a senior with business administration and biology majors, of Dallas.

 

Virginia

  • Sarah Ann Burk, a senior with English and political science majors and an advertising and public relations minor, daughter of Teresa Ipock Burk of Kinston, NC, and Ted Burk of Stockholm, Sweden.
  • Malik Savoy McNeil Jabati, a senior with economics and computer science majors and a philosophy, politics and economics minor, son of Keith Jabati and Myra Compton-Jabati of Alexandria.
  • Rachel Louise Tyeryar, a senior with economics and global studies majors and an Arabic minor, daughter of Jennifer Tyeryar of Haymarket and David Tyeryar of Raleigh, NC.

 

Washington

  • Abby Jean Bergman, a senior with biology and music majors, of Kirkland.

 

West Virginia

  • Noah Mancuso, a senior with chemistry and global health majors and a biology minor, son of Paul Mancuso Jr. and Janet Mancuso.

 

China

  • Yunfei Wang, a junior with biology and psychology majors and a chemistry minor, son of Dr. Bo Wu and Dr. Mingxing Wang of Matthews, NC.

 

 

 

-Carolina-

 

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 74 bachelor’s, 104 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools including the College of Arts & Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s nearly 330,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, US Territories and 162 countries. Almost 178,000 live in North Carolina.

 

Phi Beta Kappa contact: Jason Clemmons, (919) 843-7756, jason@unc.edu

University Communications: Media Relations, (919) 445-8555, mediarelations@unc.edu

 

UNC-Chapel Hill trustees honor four dedicated partners of the University with prestigious William Richardson Davie Awards

News Release

 

For immediate use

 

UNC-Chapel Hill trustees honor four dedicated partners of the University with prestigious William Richardson Davie Awards

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C. – Nov. 16, 2018) – On Wednesday, Nov. 14, Chancellor Carol L. Folt and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Board of Trustees presented the board’s highest honor to four individuals who exemplify dedication, commitment and service to the University. The four recipients of the 2018 William Richardson Davie Award are Munroe Cobey of Chapel Hill, James Peacock of Chapel Hill, Kay Massey Weatherspoon of Charlotte and Leonard Wood of Atlanta, Georgia.

 

Established by the trustees in 1984, the William Richardson Davie Award is named for the Revolutionary War hero who introduced and won passage of a 1789 bill in the General Assembly to charter the University of North Carolina. Named for the man considered the father of UNC-Chapel Hill, the William Richardson Davie Award recognizes extraordinary service to the University or society.

 

  • Munroe Cobey of Chapel Hill serves on the board of directors for both the UNC College of Arts & Sciences Foundation and the Educational Foundation. Cobey served on advisory boards for Carolina Performing Arts and the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center. Cobey and his wife, Becky, made instrumental gifts to the Educational Foundation, North Carolina Botanical Garden and UNC Children’s Hospital. They also established the Cobey First Year Seminars Course Development Fund, which supports course enhancement grants and graduate student support in the College of Arts & Sciences. Cobey earned a bachelor’s degree in communications from Carolina in 1974 and met his wife Becky, class of 1975, while at Carolina.
  • James Peacock of Chapel Hill is a respected academic whose research has shaped Carolina and the understanding of global relations. He was instrumental in founding World View, a UNC-Chapel Hill public service program that prepares K-12 and community college educators to bring a global perspective into their classrooms. Peacock’s Carolina honors include the Thomas Jefferson Award, the C. Knox Massey Distinguished Service Award and the Johnson Award for Excellence in Teaching. He served as chair for the Anthropology department, Chair of the Faculty and director of the UNC Center for International Studies. A fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, Peacock received the Franz Boas Award of the American Anthropological Association, for which he also served as president, and the Citizen of the World bestowed by the International Affairs Council. Peacock retired from teaching at Carolina in 2015. He earned a bachelor’s degree in psychology at Duke University in 1959 and went on to earn a doctorate in social anthropology from Harvard University.
  • Kay Massey Weatherspoon of Charlotte has championed public schools, both K-12 and higher education, her entire adult life. Weatherspoon and her husband, Van, have established multiple endowed professorships to support continued world-class and potentially life-saving research at Carolina. With her brother Knox Jr., father and family, the Weatherspoons established the Massey-Weatherspoon Fund in 1984 to support the Massey Awards and Carolina Seminars. Massey Awards recognize Carolina employees for unusual, meritorious or superior contributions to the University. The Carolina Seminars lecture series gives students the opportunity to learn from influencers and thought leaders. Weatherspoon served on the Hollins University Board of Trustees and received the Hollins Medal, her alma mater’s equivalent to the Davie Award. She graduated with honors from Hollins University with a degree in Spanish in 1954. Weatherspoon married her high school sweetheart and UNC-Chapel Hill alumnus, class of 1974, Van Weatherspoon.
  • Leonard Wood of Atlanta, Georgia dedicated his life to pursuing his passion and giving back to the community. Wood currently serves on the board of Chapel Hill Foundation Real Estate Holdings, Inc. which acquires, manages and develops real estate on behalf of UNC-Chapel Hill. In 2007, Wood founded the Wood Center for Real Estate Studies at UNC’s Kenan-Flagler Business School and continues to serve as chairman of the advisory board. His career of developing apartment housing across the country includes founding Wood Partners and GLJ Partners. Wood Partners was the largest builder of multifamily homes in the United States in 2004. He is a former governor, trustee and chairman of the Multi-Family Council of the Urban Land Institute. Wood earned a bachelor’s of science degree from North Carolina State University and went on to earn an MBA from UNC-Chapel Hill in 1972.

 

Photos of the four recently named Davie Award recipients can be found here and downloaded using the password davie.

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of the American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in the U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 110 master’s, 64 doctorate and 7 professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research, and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 322,000 alumni live in all 50 states and 165 counties. More than 175,000 live in North Carolina.

 

University Communications: Carly Miller, (919) 445-8555, mediarelations@unc.edu

University Development: Kim Elenez, (919) 962-1628, kelenez@email.unc.edu

Winston B. Crisp, UNC School of Law alumnus and former vice chancellor for student affairs, to speak at winter Commencement

For immediate use

 

Winston B. Crisp, UNC School of Law alumnus and former vice chancellor for student affairs, to speak at winter Commencement

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— Nov. 13, 2018) – Winston B. Crisp, former University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill vice chancellor for student affairs, will deliver the University’s 2018 winter Commencement address on Sunday, Dec. 16, 2 p.m., in the Dean E. Smith Center.

 

Crisp joined student affairs at UNC-Chapel Hill in 2005 as assistant vice chancellor. In 2010, he was named vice chancellor and remained in that role until October 2018 when he retired from the University after 26 years of service. During his time at Carolina, Crisp became an integral part of the student experience, serving thousands of students and families. In the 2016-2017 academic year, student affairs conducted more than 1,200 workshops and events, employed nearly 1,500 students and supported approximately 780 student organizations.

 

“When we think about Carolina, it is because of people like Winston who leave personal and lasting Tar Heel footprints on our campus and in our hearts. He cares so deeply and gives so completely, and no one ever forgets their first Vice Crispy hug,” said Chancellor Carol L. Folt. “Winston always placed students at the center of our discussions as he worked to create student success and belonging in our Carolina Community. I was honored to have him as a most trusted advisor and friend. He is the right speaker to address a new generation of Carolina leaders who are beginning their personal journeys of service that will leave a mark on our state, nation and world.”

 

In March 2018, Crisp led the effort to convene a Mental Health Task Force at the University to assess the scope of mental health care needs for students and to provide recommendations to the administration and Board of Trustees about policies and programs related to mental health care. Crisp also co-chaired the Chancellor’s Task Force on UNC-Chapel Hill History, working with colleagues to tell the full, complete and accurate history of the University.

 

“I am humbled by the opportunity to be this year’s winter Commencement speaker and consider it an honor and privilege,” said Crisp. “I am looking forward to it tremendously.”

 

A 1989 graduate of Johnson C. Smith University in Charlotte, Crisp arrived at UNC-Chapel Hill that same year to attend the UNC School of Law. Upon graduation, he became the law school’s first full-time assistant dean for student affairs and the first associate dean for student services.  In those positions, he played a key role in strengthening coordination among the academic program, financial management, outreach and student support areas.

 

For more information on winter Commencement, visit http://commencement.unc.edu/.

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 74 bachelor’s, 104 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools including the College of Arts & Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s nearly 330,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, US Territories and 162 countries. Almost 178,000 live in North Carolina.

 

 

University Communications: Media Relations, (919) 445-8555, mediarelations@unc.edu