UNC-Chapel Hill Graduate Programs Ranked Among “Best Graduate Schools”

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UNC-Chapel Hill Graduate Programs Ranked Among “Best Graduate Schools”

U.S. News & World Report ranked UNC School of Medicine first for its primary care program

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— March 20, 2018) – University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill graduate programs received high rankings as part of U.S. News & World Report’s 2019 “Best Graduate Schools.” Among the rankings, the UNC School of Medicine is first for its primary care program, following a second-place ranking last year.

 

U.S. News ranks business, education, engineering, law, nursing and medical programs annually, while various disciplines and specialties in the sciences, social sciences, humanities and other areas, are only ranked periodically.

 

This year, U.S. News ranked doctoral programs in criminology and criminal justice; master’s degree programs in social work, public affairs and related specialty areas; and doctoral programs in the sciences, specifically in biological sciences, chemistry, computer science, earth sciences, mathematics, physics and statistics.

 

The following are the complete UNC-Chapel Hill rankings and specialty listings. A comprehensive list of all rankings and data can be found here.

 

School of Medicine

Overall

  • Primary Care, 1st
  • Research, tied for 23rd

 

Specialty area

  • Obstetrics & Gynecology, 14th

 

School of Nursing

Overall

  • Master’s Degree, tied for 14th
  • Doctor of Nursing Practice, tied for 13th

 

Specialty areas

  • Nursing Administration, tied for 12th
  • Nurse Practitioner: Family, tied for 12th
  • Nurse Practitioner: Psychiatric/Mental Health, Across the Lifespan, tied for 9th

 

School of Social Work

Overall

  • Tied for 5th

 

Kenan-Flagler Business School

Overall

  • 19th

 

Specialty areas

  • Accounting, 11th
  • Executive MBA, 16th
  • Finance, 29th
  • Management, tied for 20th
  • Marketing, tied for 15th

 

School of Law

Overall

  •  45th

 

Specialty area

  • Legal Writing, tied for 12th

 

School of Education

Overall

  • Tied for 30th

 

Specialty areas

  • Administration/Supervision, tied for 14th
  • Curriculum/Instruction, 17th
  • Secondary Education, 14th
  • Special Education, tied for 11th

 

Public Affairs

Overall

  • Tied for 23rd

 

Specialty areas

  • Environmental Policy and Management, 14th
  • Local Government Management, 3rd
  • Public Finance and Budgeting, tied for 20th
  • Public Management and Leadership, tied for 15th
  • Public Policy Analysis, tied for 32nd

 

  • Carolina has programs and specialty areas within several units based in the School of Government, the College of Arts and Sciences and the Gillings School of Global Public Health with master’s degree programs that are ranked by U.S. News as part of a public affairs category.

 

Sciences

  • Biology, tied for 33rd
  • Biostatistics, tied for 8th
  • Chemistry, tied for 15th
  • Analytical Chemistry, 2nd
  • Inorganic Chemistry, 10th
  • Computer Science, tied for 25th
  • Earth Sciences, tied for 54th
  • Mathematics, tied for 34th
  • Physics, tied for 47th
  • Statistics, 19th

  

Methodology: U.S. News first ranked graduate programs in 1987 and has done so annually since 1990. Each year it ranks professional programs in business, education, engineering, law, nursing and medicine. Those rankings are based on two types of data: expert opinion on program excellence and statistical indicators that measure the quality of a school’s faculty, research and students. Its periodic rankings of additional disciplines and specialties in the sciences, social sciences, humanities and other areas are based solely on the ratings of peer academic experts, including deans, program directors and faculty.

 

The data come from statistical surveys sent to administrators at more than 1,970 graduate programs and from reputation surveys sent to more than 16,500 academics and professionals in the disciplines. Surveys for the 2019 rankings were conducted during the fall of 2017 and in early 2018.

 

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About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 111 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 322,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and 165 countries. More than 175,000 live in North Carolina.

 

University Communications: Jeni Cook, (919) 962-2091, jeni.cook@unc.edu

 

U.S. News & World Report contactEducation-PR@usnews.com

 

UNC-Chapel Hill startups deliver economic boost to North Carolina communities

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UNC-Chapel Hill startups deliver economic boost to North Carolina communities

 

Carolina startups and social ventures generate $10 billion in annual revenue toward state and global economies; create more than 8,000 jobs in North Carolina and 63,000 worldwide

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— Aug. 15, 2017) – The economic value created by startups connected with the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is on the rise, according to a biannual report on Carolina’s commercial and social ventures.

 

The mid-year analysis shows upward trends in how the University’s startup companies and social ventures are growing across North Carolina, creating new jobs that contribute to the changing workforce and bringing revenue to local and global communities. It includes ventures founded by faculty, staff and students during their time at UNC-Chapel Hill or within three years of graduating from or leaving the University.

 

As of June 2017, data on UNC-affiliated ventures show:

 

  • A 26 percent increase in the total number of ventures (475 compared to 378) since June 2016, with 75 percent of the total ventures launched (358 of 475 ventures) still active.
  • 85 percent of active ventures (306 of 358 ventures) are headquartered across 16 North Carolina counties, an 8 percent increase from the 283 UNC-affiliated ventures based in North Carolina at this time in 2016.
  • 99 percent of the $10 billion in annual revenue earned by the ventures comes from those headquartered in North Carolina.
  • 63,914 people are employed by these ventures, and 8,090 of these employees are located in North Carolina.

 

“Faculty, students and alumni of UNC-Chapel Hill are highly successful at not only incubating novel ideas, discoveries and technologies in classrooms, studios and labs, but also taking their innovations to market as commercial startup companies or social ventures,” said Judith Cone, vice chancellor for innovation, entrepreneurship and economic development. “Because the large majority of these companies establish themselves in North Carolina, they make a significant economic impact for the state by providing jobs and generating revenue in local communities. At the same time, these companies make a human impact that is global in scale through new advances that include bio-medical therapies for serious diseases, technological breakthroughs and social endeavors that improve the lives of many citizens in North Carolina and beyond.”

 

The economic impact analysis is conducted by Innovate Carolina, a meta-group of more than 200 university faculty, staff and student leaders who collaborate to create new connections, identify gaps and strengthen the innovation and entrepreneurial environment on and off campus.

 

A number of Carolina startups made significant advances in 2017, including:

 

G1 Therapeutics, a clinical-stage oncology company in Research Triangle Park with ties to the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, raised approximately $108.6 million in an initial public offering of its stock in May. The company began trading on the NASDAQ Global Market under the ticker symbol “GTHX.”

 

Impulsonic, a 3D audio company that creates true-to-life sounds in virtual reality experiences and games, was acquired by Valve Corporation, a video game and digital distribution company. Impulsonic was founded by students and researchers from Carolina’s computer science department.

 
Falcon Therapeutics is advancing a new approach using tumor-homing cells to treat glioblastoma cancer, the most common form of primary brain cancer and also one of the deadliest. The company recently raised $700,000 in a private equity stock offering, according to a Securities and Exchange Commission filing. It was founded by a professor at the Eshelman School of Pharmacy.

  
410 Medical has developed a novel medical device rapidly infuses life-saving fluids during medical emergencies involving critically-ill patients. It received an investment from the Carolina Angel Network and is the first company to receive funding from Triangle Venture Alliance, a new investment partnership among angel networks from UNC-Chapel Hill, NC State University, Duke University and NC Central University. The company was co-founded by a physician with a clinical faculty appointment in pediatrics at the UNC School of Medicine.

 

Seal the Seasons partners with local farmers and uses technology to flash freeze farm-grown produce at the peak of freshness to sell to consumers 12 months a year. The company, founded by a Carolina student, has raised $750,000 in funding and sells produce at a variety of grocery stores, including Harris Teeter, Lowes Foods, Fresh Market and Whole Foods.

 

Through the support of the Innovate Carolina Network, UNC-Chapel Hill startups are positioned for success as they move through their innovation journey. With a mission to create an environment where innovators thrive, Innovate Carolina provides the right resources and connections that startup companies and ventures need to nurture their ideas.

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 113 master’s, 68 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 318,000 alumni live in all 50 states and 157 countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

About Innovate Carolina

Through the Vice Chancellor’s Office for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Economic Development, Innovate Carolina is UNC-Chapel Hill’s innovation ecosystem that supports the needs of faculty, students, staff, and community members as they translate their unique ideas into practical benefit for the public good. To further cultivate innovation and entrepreneurship within the community, Innovate Carolina provides connections to incubators, accelerators, business services and campus programs, including the 1789 Venture Lab, Launch Chapel Hill, KickStart Venture Services, Technology Commercialization Carolina and CUBE, the social innovation incubator at the UNC Campus Y. Innovate Carolina also partners with the startup investor community through the Carolina Angel Network, Carolina Research Ventures Fund and Blackstone Entrepreneurs Network. Follow Innovate Carolina on Facebook and on Twitter and visit http://innovate.unc.edu/.

 

Office of Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Economic Development contact: Michelle Bolas, (919) 843-6287, michelle.bolas@unc.edu

University Communications contact: MC VanGraafeiland, (919) 962-7090, mc.vangraafeiland@unc.edu

$18 million gift will transform entrepreneurship at UNC-Chapel Hill

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$18 million gift will transform entrepreneurship at UNC-Chapel Hill

 

Shuford family gift will add faculty, internship support to help meet demand for popular minor in the College of Arts & Sciences

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— May 23, 2017) – The family of a fifth-generation North Carolina company has made an $18 million gift to the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s College of Arts & Sciences to more than double the size of Carolina’s nationally recognized undergraduate entrepreneurship program.

 

The gift commitment from the Shuford family of Hickory is the largest single one-time gift by a living individual or family to the college. It will help meet the demand of students who want to enroll in entrepreneurship courses or the minor in entrepreneurship through the addition of faculty. It will also support twice the number of student internships at entrepreneurial firms worldwide and will encourage problem-based learning throughout the college and University.

 

The minor in entrepreneurship will be named the Shuford Program in Entrepreneurship in the family’s honor.

 

“This is an extraordinary gift for our University. We are so grateful to the Shuford family for making possible a major expansion of what is a core pillar of Carolina’s strategic vision for the next decade,” said Chancellor Carol L. Folt. “The new Shuford Program in Entrepreneurship expands our efforts in innovation and entrepreneurship across the College and provides many new interdisciplinary, immersive and experiential learning opportunities for Carolina’s bright students.”

 

The Shuford gift will create three additional entrepreneurs-in-residence and up to four faculty fellows, and will create up to 70 student internships and a lecture series on innovation and entrepreneurship. Funds will also endow the program’s executive director and internship director positions. In partnership with the Shuford Program, the college will provide support for at least three additional full-time faculty members, an entrepreneur-in-residence and an administrative staff position.

 

The Shufords are a fifth-generation Carolina family – Abel Alexander Shuford Jr. was a member of the class of 1900. His great-grandchildren, sibilings Jim Shuford and Stephen Shuford, of Charlotte, and Dorothy Shuford Lanier, of Bedford, New York, also Carolina alumni, made the gift to Carolina. Jim, CEO of STM Industries, received his undergraduate degree from Carolina in 1988 followed by his MBA in 1992; Stephen, CEO of Shurtape Technologies, earned his MBA from Kenan-Flagler Business School in 1997; and Dorothy earned her undergraduate degree from Carolina in 1993.

 

“I think entrepreneurship is a big part of the future of work,” said Jim Shuford. “The skills of entrepreneurial thinking and problem-solving are a natural fit for the liberal arts.”

 

Jim was an English major as an undergraduate at Carolina before returning to earn his MBA. He recognizes that many students who want to launch a business or venture may not have the luxury of additional schooling.

 

“An entrepreneurial education will give Carolina undergraduates a leg up — to find a job, start a company, grow a business, or be a productive member of any organization or enterprise,” he said.

 

Created in 2004, Carolina’s minor in entrepreneurship was the signature program of the Carolina Entrepreneurial Initiative, established with a $3.5 million grant from the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation. The minor has grown exponentially and currently has more than 250 students enrolled. More than 800 students have graduated from Carolina with a minor in entrepreneurship.

 

“The Shuford family’s gift for entrepreneurship is a game-changer,” said Kevin Guskiewicz, dean of the College of Arts & Sciences. “The Shuford Program in Entrepreneurship at Carolina is unique to any entrepreneurship program in the country because rather than teaching only business students how to become more entrepreneurial, it also teaches students of music and art, physics, anthropology, exercise and sport science, sociology and many other disciplines how to work collaboratively with an entrepreneurial mindset.”

 

Students pursuing the minor follow one of nine tracks – artistic, commercial, computer science, design, media, scientific, social, sport or public health – and must complete an internship.

 

In March, The Princeton Review ranked Carolina’s undergraduate entrepreneurship programs 14th in the nation (rankings encompass entrepreneurial offerings at both UNC Kenan-Flagler and the college). In 2015, UNC-Chapel Hill received the Entrepreneurial University Award for excellence in student engagement and curriculum innovation from the Deshpande Foundation.

 

Braden Rawls, an early graduate of the program in entrepreneurship, is now CEO of Vital Plan, an herbal supplement company based in Cary, that she founded with her physician father. The company’s 12 employees include six Carolina alumni.

 

“Growing up in a family of doctors and scientists, I had not been exposed to business as a career path. Through the minor in entrepreneurship, I was able to test it out and discovered I had a true knack for creatively solving problems through business, and it complemented the skills I was developing in the journalism school,” said Rawls. “My thinking has changed ever since, and the minor provided me with training and resources that have led me to become a leader in the Triangle’s B Corp network, a business community focused on maximizing a triple bottom line of people, planet and profit.”

 

Charles Merritt, executive director of the minor in entrepreneurship, described the Shuford family gift as “transformative.”

 

“It will accelerate several key initiatives for the program,” said Merritt, “from adding more entrepreneurs-in-residence and instructors to meeting increasing demand for our courses and providing additional support for our internship and career placement efforts.”

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 113 master’s, 68 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 318,000 alumni live in all 50 states and 157 countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

About Shurtape

Shurtape was created in 1955 as a division of Shuford Mills, a textile firm established in 1880. With more than 800 employees in North Carolina and manufacturing and distribution facilities in eight countries, the company produces adhesive tapes under the Shurtape, Duck, FrogTape, T-Rex and Kip brands.

 

University Communications contact: MC VanGraafeiland, (919) 962-7090, mc.vangraafeiland@unc.edu

Innovate Carolina Roadmap report: UNC-Chapel Hill achieves unprecedented growth in impact from innovation and entrepreneurship

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Innovate Carolina Roadmap report: UNC-Chapel Hill achieves unprecedented growth in impact from innovation and entrepreneurship

 

Roadmap strategy transforms research into practical benefit, accelerates the launch of entrepreneurs and new ventures in North Carolina and beyond

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— May 22, 2017) – The number of innovations, entrepreneurs and ventures developed by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill – and the speed of their creation – is showing unprecedented growth, according to a new report by the Office of Vice Chancellor for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Economic Development.

 

The Innovate Carolina Roadmap reports significant societal and economic benefits to the University, the state of North Carolina and the world thanks to a faster pipeline of ideas and the Innovate Carolina ecosystem, which provides a network for all schools and units to work together to advance important outcomes.

 

“Through focused work and pan-university dedication, Carolina is inspiring, developing and mentoring the next generation of innovators and entrepreneurs,” said Chancellor Carol L. Folt. “I have witnessed students, faculty and staff working together like never before to create new jobs and fields that capture imaginations and help improve our state, nation and world. This perfectly aligns with our commitment to ensure our graduates are prepared to face a certain-uncertain future as part of the Innovation Generation.”

 

The report highlights Carolina’s results and next steps in implementing its innovation and entrepreneurship strategy, which includes applying research to real-world problems, preparing students with a translational mindset and skillset to enhance their career success and creating social and commercial startups.

 

Since the initiation of this strategy in 2010, the Innovate Carolina network has collaborated to:

  • Gain stronger outcomes from the commercialization of research-based intellectual property. In comparing the five-year roadmap period to the prior five years, disclosures of ideas by faculty are up 23 percent, patents issued are up 47 percent, the number of new IP-based startups more than doubled and revenue is up 73 percent.
  • Develop KickStart Venture Services, which has provided $1.8 million in awards to 56 intellectual property-based startups since 2009. These companies then raised $20 million in SBIR/STTR grants and $137 million in total funding.
  • Create the $10 million Carolina Research Ventures Fund in 2015. Managed by Hatteras Venture Partners, there have been three investments in startups that have raised more than $115 million in investment capital.
  • Open Launch Chapel Hill in 2013, an accelerator in downtown Chapel Hill. It has worked with 63 companies that have raised $15 million in investment capital and created more than 1,000 jobs, 250 of which are in Orange County, N.C. Three companies have had successful exits.
  • Launch the Carolina Angel Network, which in only six months has 90 members, triple the projected number.
  • Work across boundaries to jumpstart and strengthen convergent disciplines such as applied physical sciences and biomedical engineering. Makerspaces are now available across campus, with a new residence hall-based space opening this fall.

 

The Innovate Carolina Startups Database was created in 2014 to measure the impact of these social and commercial projects. This comprehensive, longitudinal database, which is also used for research purposes by Carolina faculty, houses detailed data on 418 companies started between 1958 and today. Data analysis since 2015 shows that the total revenue of the companies still in operation is in the billions, and the overwhelming majority of these businesses are headquartered in North Carolina. This includes Quintiles, which was started in 1982 by then UNC-Chapel Hill faculty member Dennis Gillings.

 

The roadmap report also details how UNC’s Board of Trustees, administration, deans, chairs, faculty, staff, students, alumni, parents and the community have partnered to ensure the University is well positioned to help solve some of the biggest challenges facing the world today.

 

“The work of the roadmap became a journey of ideas. Engrained in our DNA is the belief we must remain relevant – not only in preparing our students with a translational mindset and skillset for the workforce, but also to serve our society with forward-thinking ideas,” says Judith Cone, Vice Chancellor for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Economic Development. “Working through the roadmap sparked a sweeping re-invention of the University across many fronts, helping us better serve our fast-changing society.”

 

To accomplish the roadmap’s goals and strategies, Innovate Carolina will continue to systematically work to bring together key groups from across the University and community with different perspectives and experiences.

 

“Over the last five years, leaders have stepped forward from every part of the University, region and state to pilot and prove that this collaborative approach to innovation works,” says Cone. “Now, it’s time to build and expand on these successes.”

 

Click on the following links to view the full report and the executive summary.

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 110 master’s, 64 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s 318,000-plus alumni live in all 50 states and 157 other countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

About Innovate Carolina

Through the Vice Chancellor’s Office for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Economic Development, Innovate Carolina is UNC-Chapel Hill’s innovation ecosystem that supports the needs of faculty, students, staff, and community members as they translate their unique ideas into practical benefit for the public good. Follow Innovate Carolina on Facebook and on Twitter and visit http://innovate.unc.edu/.

 

Office of Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Economic Development contact: Michelle Bolas, at 919.843.6287, michelle.bolas@unc.edu

University Communications contact: MC VanGraafeiland, (919) 962-7090, mc.vangraafeiland@unc.edu

Media invited to cover College of Arts & Sciences major donation announcement on May 23

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Media invited to cover College of Arts & Sciences major donation announcement on May 23

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— May 17, 2017) – Media are invited to join the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill for an announcement of the largest single one-time gift by a living individual or family received by the College of Arts & Sciences. Donated by the family of a fifth-generation North Carolina company, the gift will more than double the size of a nationally recognized undergraduate program within the College and provide invaluable support for additional faculty and student internships.

 

Chancellor Carol L. Folt, Dean of the College of Arts & Sciences Kevin Guskiewicz and the donors, who are from Charlotte/Hickory and Bedford, New York, will participate in the presentation and be available for interviews afterward. University leaders, College of Arts & Sciences administrators and staff and important figures in the business community will also attend. The event will begin promptly at 1 p.m.

 

Tuesday, May 23

1 p.m.

Gardner Hall, courtyard (adjacent to Carroll Hall and Hanes Hall on Polk Place)

UNC-Chapel Hill campus

Chapel Hill, North Carolina

 

Media Check-In: Media must check in at the Gardner Hall tent no earlier than 12:30 p.m. MC VanGraafeiland will be the on-site contact (646-345-2802).

 

Parking: A limited number of spaces will be available for media representatives in lots near Gardner Hall. Contact MC VanGraafeiland (mc.vangraafeiland@unc.edu) by 4 p.m. on Monday, May 22, to reserve parking.

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill



The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 110 master’s, 64 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s 318,000-plus alumni live in all 50 states and 157 other countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

Communications and Public Affairs contact: MC VanGraafeiland, (919) 962-7090, mc.vangraafeiland@unc.edu

 

UNC-Chapel Hill launches Carolina Angel Network; Names Randy Myer managing director

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UNC-Chapel Hill launches Carolina Angel Network; Names Randy Myer managing director

 

Initiative closes early funding gap for startups; campus partnerships cornerstone of effort

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C. – Jan. 3, 2017) – Startups are a crucial part of a dynamic economy, creating innovations and jobs, but they struggle to find funding from investors. The newly launched Carolina Angel Network (CAN), will close this gap by connecting alumni, faculty, students, donors and other members of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill community with promising affiliated, early-stage, private companies to provide advice, networks and funding.

 

Carolina’s Office of the Vice Chancellor for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Economic Development spearheaded the initiative to address early-stage funding gaps for startups and to ensure the most promising innovative ideas make it to the marketplace.

 

A campus-wide effort developed over the last year, the network is also led by the vice chancellor’s office in partnership with Kenan-Flagler Business School and the School of Law, with assistance from the vice chancellors for finance and administration and development. Business and law students will learn how to conduct preliminary due diligence on companies.

 

“We continuously seek ways to bring greater social and economic benefit to the citizens of North Carolina and beyond and nurturing vital new startups is an important part of our entrepreneurial strategies,” said Chancellor Carol L. Folt. “I am very pleased to see this funding vehicle created to address a major roadblock to building successful companies that will create breakthroughs in how we live our lives.”

 

According to the National Bureau of Economic Research, startups backed by angel investors have a greater chance of survival and success, creating more jobs than other startups without this support system. The Center for Venture Research at the University of New Hampshire reports that in 2015 angel investors committed a total of $24.6 billion to U.S. startups.

 

“As we accelerate innovation on campus and beyond, it’s our obligation to connect, support and cultivate our entrepreneurial community,” said Judith Cone, vice chancellor for innovation, entrepreneurship and economic development. “We are thrilled that Carolina Angel Network will serve as a catalyst and channel for empowering innovation and work closely with our other venture service programs, Carolina Kickstart, Launch Chapel Hill, Blackstone Entrepreneurs Network and the Carolina Research Venture Fund.”

 

The new network is positioned for success with oversight from key leaders widely known in the entrepreneurial community. Randy Myer, former entrepreneur, current angel investor and Kenan-Flagler professor, will serve as managing director. With more than 30 years experience as an investor and entrepreneur, he will lead a team that will manage deal flows – from pre-screening deals and performing preliminary due diligence to connecting founders and network members.

 

“The Carolina Angel Network is an amazing opportunity for its members to have a direct impact and influence on the success of UNC-Chapel Hill-affiliated startups,” said Myer. “What better way to harness the power of the entrepreneurial and investment community to vitalize our economy.”

 

Myer will work closely with a board of directors that includes both University and non-University members, including seasoned angel investors Lauren Whitehurst and Brian Bailey. Steve Lerner, an experienced entrepreneur, Carolina alumnus and former trustee, will serve as chair of the board.

 

The network expects to recruit more than 200 members over the next three years. To be considered for membership, applicants must be accredited investors and Carolina alumni, faculty, staff, parents or donors. For a company to be eligible for consideration, the venture must be affiliated with UNC, for-profit, meet minimum criteria and go through an extensive vetting process.

Carolina Angel Network anticipates closing a variety of deals in 2017 and beyond. To learn more visit the website or contact Randy Myer.

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill



The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 110 master’s, 64 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty – including two Nobel laureates – staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s 317,000-plus alumni live in all 50 states and 156 other countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

About the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Economic Development

Through Innovate Carolina, the Vice Chancellor’s works to strengthen UNC’s innovation ecosystem to meet the needs of faculty, students, staff, and community members as they translate their novel ideas into practical benefit for the public good. Follow Innovate Carolina on Facebook and on Twitter.

 

Office of Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Economic Development contact: Michelle Bolas, (919) 843-6287, michelle.bolas@unc.edu

Communications and Public Affairs contact: MC VanGraafeiland, (919) 962-7090, mc.vangraafeiland@unc.edu

Carolina No. 1 in best college value

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big-kiplingers20161

 

Carolina ranked No. 1 in best college value for the 16th time

 

Ranking by Kiplinger’s Personal Finance based on high-quality education and affordability

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— Dec. 15, 2016) – Once again, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is the best value in American public higher education, according to Kiplinger’s Personal Finance. This is the 16th time the nation’s first public university is also first in value.

 

Recognized for upholding academic quality and affordability, Carolina takes the top ranking among public colleges in two categories: Best in-state and best out-of-state value. In the overall ranking of the 300 best-value colleges and universities, UNC-Chapel Hill moves up one spot to 9th.

 

“Providing an excellent and affordable education is a hallmark of our 223-year history,” said Chancellor Carol L. Folt. “Once again being recognized as the best value in American public higher education demonstrates the success of Carolina’s unwavering commitment to making the opportunities that come from attending a leading university available to students without burdening them with excess debt after graduation.”

 

Rounding out the top three for best values in public colleges: The universities of Virginia and California at Berkeley. Taking the top spot in the combined best values list is Swarthmore College, followed by Davidson College and Princeton University.

 

The magazine rankings are based on its definition of value, which is: A quality education at an affordable price. Some of the key measures for quality are: admission rates; the percentage of students who return sophomore year; graduation rates; test scores of incoming freshmen and student-to-faculty ratios. As for the financial measures, the magazine considers overall cost of tuition; the cost of books; room and board; the average percentage of need met by aid and the average debt a student accumulates before graduation.

 

Nationally, 68 percent of students borrow money to pay for college and on average graduate $30,100 in debt. That’s compared to 41 percent of students at UNC-Chapel Hill who borrow money to attend the University. The average amount of debt for those graduating students: $20,127.

 

Currently, 44 percent of students at the University receive financial aid through signature, nationally recognized programs like the Carolina Covenant, which has offered more than 6,000 low-income students who earn admission the chance to graduate debt free. In 2015, 60 percent of seniors graduated with no debt. Another program, Carolina Firsts creates a path of opportunity for the 20 percent of undergraduates who will be the first in their families to graduate from a four-year campus.

 

In 2016, UNC-Chapel Hill’s four-year graduation rate was 82 percent, up 8 percentage points since 2005. The six-year rate was 91.4 percent and rose by more than 5 percentage points.

 

The magazine’s special report on best college values for 2017 and the complete rankings can be found online and also in the February 2017 issue of Kiplinger’s Personal Finance, on newsstands January 3rd.

 

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About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 110 master’s, 64 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty – including two Nobel laureates – staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s 317,000-plus alumni live in all 50 states and 156 other countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

 

UNC Communications and Public Affairs contact: Jeni Cook, (919) 962-2091, jeni.cook@unc.edu

For interviews with Kiplinger’s editors: Kailey McGarvey, 646.695.7046, kailey@rosengrouppr.com

 

Kiplinger’s Personal Finance magazine: http://www.kiplinger.com/

 

Dwayne Pinkney named senior associate vice chancellor for finance and administration

For immediate use

 

 

Dwayne Pinkney named senior associate vice chancellor for finance and administration

 

Pinkney has been secretary of the university since 2014     

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— Dec. 2, 2016) – Dwayne Pinkney has been named the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s chief financial officer and senior associate vice chancellor for finance and administration, starting Dec. 5, 2016.

 

“Dwayne’s wealth of experience in financial and administrative management at Carolina, the UNC system and the state positions him well to help me lead the strategic management of our University’s financial resources,” said Vice Chancellor for Finance and Administration Matt Fajack.

 

Pinkney will serve as the strategic advisor and principal deputy to Fajack. Additionally, he will provide oversight of the University’s financial, budget, and accounting operations and will provide leadership for the division’s shared administrative and business services functions. Pinkney will collaborate with Information Technology Services and other functional divisions to optimize the financial component of ConnectCarolina and improve management reporting. Pinkney will also work closely with campus senior leaders, UNC Health Care Administration, UNC General Administration, and the greater campus community to improve the strategic management of the University’s financial resources.

 

“I am excited for this opportunity to help serve the Carolina campus through strategic leadership of our financial, budget and accounting operations,” said Pinkney. “I have had the opportunity to work with many of the finance staff over the years and have gotten to know the newer members of the team most recently. I feel privileged to have the chance to work with each of them more closely in this new role.”

 

Pinkney most recently served as vice provost for finance and academic planning since 2010 and secretary of the university since 2014. Previously, he served as the assistant vice chancellor for finance and administration and special assistant to the Chancellor for state and local relations. In that role, Pinkney was responsible for the Student Stores and Trademarks Licensing operations, and was the campus’ primary liaison to the state legislature and advised the Chancellor and senior leadership on all matters related to state government affairs and local/municipal government.

 

Prior to joining UNC-Chapel Hill in 2004, Pinkney was an associate vice president for finance at the University of North Carolina General Administration. He also has six years of experience as a fiscal analyst with the North Carolina General Assembly and served a short stint as the deputy secretary for administration with the North Carolina Department of the Secretary of State.

 

Pinkney earned his Ph.D. in political science at UNC-Chapel Hill and his master’s degree in public administration at the University of Pittsburgh. He earned his bachelor’s degree in English and journalism from North Carolina A&T State University.

 

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Photo link: http://bit.ly/2gK1jnb

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 113 master’s, 68 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty – including two Nobel laureates – staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 317,000 alumni live in all 50 states and 150 countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

Communications and Public Affairs contact: Betsy Greer, (919) 962-7250, betsy.greer@unc.edu

 

 

UNC-Chapel Hill trustees honor four with prestigious Davie Awards

For immediate use

 

UNC-Chapel Hill trustees honor four with prestigious Davie Awards

 

The William Richardson Davie Award is the highest honor given by the Board of Trustees

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C. – Nov. 17, 2016) – The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Board of Trustees has presented its highest honor, the William Richardson Davie Award, to four alumni in recognition of their “dedication, commitment, loyalty and service.”

 

During a dinner on Wednesday, Nov. 16, at the Carolina Inn, Chancellor Carol L. Folt and the trustees honored Barbara and Pitt Hyde of Memphis, Tennessee; Teresa Artis Neal of Cary and Robert W. Winston III of Raleigh.

 

Established by the trustees in 1984, the Davie Award is named for the Revolutionary War hero who is considered the father of UNC-Chapel Hill. It recognizes extraordinary service to the University or society.

 

Joseph R. “Pitt” Hyde founded retail auto parts giant AutoZone and co-founded GTx Inc., a biopharmaceutical company that develops and commercializes therapeutics for men’s health conditions. He currently leads Pittco Holdings, an investment portfolio of managed funds, real estate and private equity. Hyde graduated from Carolina with a degree in economics, and after establishing AutoZone, he became the youngest CEO on the New York Stock Exchange. He also served as director of FedEx Corporation, co-founded Memphis Tomorrow, chairs The National Civil Rights Museum executive committee and serves on the Greater Memphis Chamber’s Chairman’s Circle.

 

Barbara Hyde, originally from Atlanta, Georgia, came to Carolina as a Morehead Scholar graduating with degrees in English and religion. While working in Carolina’s development office, she launched the first Parents Fund and established the Morehead Alumni Fund, which supported the Honors Program and endowed the first million-dollar professorship established under the state’s matching grant program. Hyde is co-chair of UNC’s Campaign Steering Committee, which is leading Carolina through a major fundraising campaign expected to launch publicly in fall 2017. She is also a past member of the Board of Trustees, co-founder and co-chair of the Carolina Women’s Leadership Council and a past executive director of the Arts and Sciences Foundation. In Memphis, she helped found the Shelby Farms Park Conservancy and the Women’s Foundation for a Greater Memphis.

 

Teresa Artis Neal, a media attorney for more than 25 years, is legal and strategic counsel to Cary-based Trans World Radio, an international distributor of inspirational and educational content. She also served in leadership capacities at Turner Broadcasting, Art.com and Capitol Broadcasting Company. A Pogue Scholar and North Carolina Fellow, Neal graduated from Carolina with honors in economics and earned a J.D./M.B.A. from Harvard University. She has served on UNC’s Board of Visitors, the General Alumni Association Board and the Carolina Women’s Leadership Council. She is also a past chair of the Alumni Committee on Racial and Ethnic Diversity and continues to encourage diverse alumni to support and raise money for the University.

 

Robert W. Winston III is CEO and owner of Winston Hospitality Inc., a hotel and restaurant- management company. He also founded Winston Hotels Inc. and numerous startups in the hospitality industry and beyond. Winston graduated from Carolina with degrees in economics and political science. He is past chair of the UNC Board of Trustees and a member of the Institute for the Arts and Humanities Board of Advisors, the National Development Council and the Board of Visitors. Winston is also a director of the Research Triangle Foundation and Higher Education Works. His has served the Raleigh Chamber of Commerce, the North Carolina Economic Development Board, the Wake County Convention and Visitors Bureau, and the City of Raleigh Arts Commission.

 

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Photo Links: http://unc.photoshelter.com/gallery/Davie-Awards-2016/G0000eT2Sz2pSuo8/C00005plBUJIuM28

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 113 master’s, 68 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty – including two Nobel laureates – staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 317,000 alumni live in all 50 states and 150 countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

Development contact: Kim Elenez, (919) 962-1628, kelenez@email.unc.edu

UNC Communications contact: MC VanGraafeiland (919) 962-7090, mc.vangraafeiland@unc.edu