MAHEC, UNC-Chapel Hill Celebrate New Interprofessional Academic Health Center

 

 

 

 

 

MAHEC, UNC-Chapel Hill Celebrate New Interprofessional Academic Health Center  

 

UNC Health Sciences at MAHEC expands health science education in Western North Carolina

 

 

(Asheville, N.C. ­– October 17, 2018) — The Mountain Area Health Education Center and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill will celebrate the construction of a new academic health center building on MAHEC’s Biltmore campus with a special ceremony on Tuesday, Oct. 23 at 5:30 p.m. (see further details at the bottom).

 

UNC Health Sciences at MAHEC seeks to address health care worker shortages and improve education across a number of health science fields in Western North Carolina. The UNC Health Sciences at MAHEC building supports an innovative educational partnership between UNC-Chapel Hill and MAHEC and will house UNC School of Medicine’s Asheville campus; a Master of Public Health program led by UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health; MAHEC’s psychiatry residency program and psychiatry outpatient care; and health care research, education and community engagement initiatives at the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy.

 

UNC-Chapel Hill and MAHEC have a shared commitment to address health care workforce shortages in North Carolina. All 16 Western North Carolina counties are considered primary care health professional shortage areas, or areas with too few providers to meet the health care needs of the population. By training health care professionals in Western North Carolina, and placing students in long-term internships across the region, UNC Health Sciences at MAHEC encourages more health providers to practice in Western North Carolina, an initiative that stands to make a significant impact on the region’s economy and access to health care.

 

“Our students and faculty are eager to address North Carolina’s health care needs, and the new programs based at MAHEC will be a significant step forward for improving access to quality interprofessional health care in Western North Carolina,” said Robert Blouin, executive vice chancellor and provost of UNC-Chapel Hill. “We are very appreciative of the generous support from the people of North Carolina that has made UNC Health Sciences at MAHEC a reality.”

 

The establishment of UNC Health Sciences at MAHEC was made possible by the people of North Carolina through 2015 and 2016 state appropriations totaling $8 million in nonrecurring funds for building construction and $18.6 million in recurring funds to support the development of UNC-Chapel Hill’s academic programs to train and expand the health care workforce in medically underserved Western North Carolina.

 

The three-story 37,000-square-foot building will be completed in spring 2019 and includes classrooms and incubator spaces that will bring together family medicine clinicians, pharmacists, public health professionals, researchers, residents, students, UNC-Chapel Hill faculty, and community health partners.

 

“The UNC Health Sciences at MAHEC building will be the hub for the regional campuses of the school of medicine and school of public health,” explained Jeff Heck, chief executive officer of MAHEC. “This academic health center and our strong regional partnerships will serve as a national model for rural health care transformation.”

 

UNC Health Sciences at MAHEC Special Ceremony

  • Begins at 5:30 p.m. on October 23 at the MAHEC Biltmore campus
  • 121 Hendersonville Road, Asheville, N.C. 28803
  • Dignitaries and guest speakers at the ceremony will include:
    • Robert Blouin, executive vice chancellor and provost of UNC-Chapel Hill
    • William Roper, dean of the UNC School of Medicine, vice chancellor for medical affairs and chief executive officer of UNC Health Care
    • Jeff Heck, chief executive officer of MAHEC
    • William Hathaway, MAHEC board member and senior vice president and chief medical officer of Mission Hospital
    • Stephen Kimmel, a Western North Carolinian and graduate of the UNC School of Medicine’s Asheville campus and MAHEC family medicine residency program who is now practicing in North Carolina’s Yancey and Mitchell counties
  • Remarks will be followed by guided tours of the recently completed MAHEC Simulation Center, a state-of-the-art medical and surgical training facility that supports health science education and health care professionals from across Western North Carolina

 

On-site contacts:

  • Michelle Morgan, MAHEC, 828-257-4442 or 828-777-5149
  • Jennifer Maurer, MAHEC, 828-257-4445 or 828-782-0142

 

 

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About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

UNC-Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 111 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties.

 

About the Mountain Area Health Education Center

MAHEC was established in 1974 and is a leader in healthcare, education and innovation. Located in Asheville, MAHEC serves a 16-county region in Western North Carolina. It is the largest Area Health Education Center in North Carolina, which evolved to address national and state concerns with the supply, retention and quality of health professionals. MAHEC’s mission is to train the next generation of healthcare professionals for Western North Carolina through quality healthcare, innovative education, and best practice models that can be replicated nationally.

 

UNC-Chapel Hill university communications: Audrey Smith, 919-445-8555, audrey.smith@unc.edu

MAHEC communications: Jennifer Maurer, 828-257-4445, jennifer.maurer@mahec.net

 

UNC-Chapel Hill announces $2 million initiative to help students and families affected by Hurricane Florence

UNC-Chapel Hill announces $2 million initiative to help students and families affected by Hurricane Florence

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— Sept. 27, 2018) – The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill today announced a $2 million Florence Student Emergency Fund to provide support to students faced with unexpected financial hardships following Hurricane Florence. The fund is part of a broader relief effort to assist students and families who were affected by the hurricane.

 

Chancellor Carol L. Folt outlined the new student support and relief initiative at the UNC-Chapel Hill Board of Trustees meeting. The University will provide $1 million for the initiative from the University’s trademark licensing revenue and income from UNC Student Stores, in addition to funding that the University has already committed to need-based scholarships. The additional $1 million will be raised through a philanthropic match. The campus and the community can donate at giving.unc.edu/gift/relief.

 

“Today we are sending a clear message to our students who were affected by the devastation of Hurricane Florence and their families: We are here for you,” said Folt. “Recovering from a storm like Hurricane Florence takes time and resources. Carolina is a generous, caring community and many who were spared the fury of Florence have asked how they can help students whose families are still suffering in its aftermath. We’re grateful to be able to create this fund to support our fellow Tar Heels in their time of need.”

 

Carolina students who are experiencing financial hardship due to Hurricane Florence and wish to take advantage of the new fund should contact the Student Success Hub in Room 2416 at the Carolina Union or send an email to florence@unc.edu. The Hub contains specially trained teams who will work with students to develop individualized plans to meet their needs. The fund is open to all enrolled UNC-Chapel Hill students, including undergraduate, graduate, and professional students.

 

“During times like this, we really see Tar Heels come together and do what they can to support each other,” said Vice Provost for Enrollment and Undergraduate Admissions Steve Farmer. “We’ve heard from so many people in the community who want to contribute, and this fund is just one way to connect people who want to help those who need it most.”

 

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About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 111 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s nearly 330,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and 149 countries. More than 169,000 live in North Carolina.

 

 

University Communications: Media Relations, (919) 445-8555, mediarelations@unc.edu

New study finds link between teenage drinking and high-grade prostate cancer later in life

New study finds link between teenage drinking and high-grade prostate cancer later in life

 

Study participants who drank heavily early in life were three times more likely

 to be diagnosed with an aggressive form of prostate cancer

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— August 23, 2018) – A new study out of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill has found a link between early-life alcohol consumption and aggressive, high-grade prostate cancer. The study also found that heavy cumulative alcohol consumption over the course of a man’s life had a similar association with this type of prostate cancer.

 

The research was published in the journal Cancer Prevention Research on August 23.

 

“There’s been relatively little progress in identifying risk factors for prostate cancer,” said Emma Allott, senior author for the study. “Other hormonally regulated cancers, like breast cancer, already have a known association with alcohol use. But the role that alcohol consumption may have in the development of prostate cancer, especially over the life course, isn’t as well understood, so it remains an important area of study.”

 

Allott led the research, along with her collaborators, while she was an assistant professor of nutrition in the Gillings School of Global Public Health at UNC-Chapel Hill. Allott has since joined Queen’s University Belfast as a lecturer in molecular cancer epidemiology at the Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology.

 

The team of researchers evaluated survey data obtained from 650 men at the time of prostate biopsy. Men who reported consuming more than seven alcoholic drinks weekly as teenagers between the ages of 15 and 19 were three times more likely to be diagnosed with high-grade prostate cancer compared with men who reported no alcohol use during these years. Men who had seven or more alcoholic beverages a week throughout each decade of life were also three times more likely to be diagnosed with high-grade prostate cancer at the time of biopsy.

 

Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed non-skin cancer in U.S. men and the second leading cause of male cancer deaths. The prostate develops rapidly during puberty and, as a result, scientists have hypothesized that boys may be more susceptible to cancer-causing substances during their adolescent years.

 

“We think that prostate cancer develops over the course of many years or even decades, so studies like ours are working toward a clearer understanding not only of what the specific risk factors are, but how they may affect prostate biology at different stages of life,” said Allott.

 

Not all prostate cancers are high-grade, or the clinically significant, aggressive form of prostate cancer that grows quickly and can potentially lead to death. The researchers sought to investigate the potential relationship between early-life alcohol consumption and high-grade, prostate cancer, believing that it’s most important to identify risk factors for the aggressive form of the cancer. The researchers did not find an association between alcohol use and other less aggressive forms of prostate cancer.

 

Allott and her team evaluated survey data from a group of racially diverse men, ages 49-89 years, undergoing prostate biopsy at the Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center between 2007 and 2018. Men completed a survey to assess the average number of alcoholic beverages consumed weekly during each decade of life, categorizing this as zero, one to six, or seven or more drinks each week to determine age-specific and cumulative lifetime alcohol intake.

 

The research was limited by its reliance on men’s recall of their historic alcohol intake. This could have resulted in biased responses, although the majority of men reported their alcohol intake prior to knowing their biopsy results. Additional research is needed to determine the risk factors for prostate cancer.

 

Allott’s research collaborators included Jamie Michael, Amanda De Hoedt and Charlotte Bailey of Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Lauren Howard of Duke Cancer Institute, Sarah Markt and Lorelei Mucci of Harvard University, and Stephen Freedland of Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center and Cedars-Sinai Medical Center.

 

The research was funded by the American Institute for Cancer Research, the Irish Cancer Society and the National Institutes of Health.

 

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About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 111 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s nearly 330,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and 149 countries. More than 169,000 live in North Carolina.

 

University Communications: Audrey Smith, (919) 445-8555, audrey.smith@unc.edu

 

Carolina welcomes 5,095 new undergraduate students to campus

Carolina welcomes 5,095 new undergraduate students to campus

Fall 2018 first-year class includes record number of first-generation college students

 

(Note: The following statistics are preliminary and will not be final until after Sept. 4, 2018, the University’s official enrollment reporting date.)

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— Aug. 17, 2018) – The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is welcoming 4,295 first-year students and 800 transfer students to campus as classes begin this fall. The first-year class includes the highest numbers of first-generation college students and students from North Carolina’s rural counties since the University began collecting this data 15 years ago. The University received a record 43,472 first-year applications this year, the 13th consecutive year in which applications have increased.

 

Among first-year North Carolinians, 40 percent are enrolling from a rural county, up from 35 percent last year. Among all first-year students, 21 percent will be the first in their families to graduate from a four-year college or university, up from 17 percent last year. The Carolina Covenant, which offers eligible low-income students the opportunity to graduate debt-free, is welcoming 669 new first-year and transfer students, 13 percent of all enrolling students.

 

The new students are extraordinarily well-prepared academically and also contribute outside the classroom:

  • Among new transfer students, the average GPA at their previous colleges was 3.7 on a 4.0 scale.
  • 45 percent of new first-year students ranked within the top 10 students in their high school class, and 78 percent ranked within the top 10 percent.
  • 93 percent of new first-year students have taken five or more Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate or college-level courses while in high school.
  • 52 percent of all incoming students held a paying job during the school year; 58 percent had daily responsibilities within their families; 67 percent competed in a sport; and 88 percent participated in community service.

“Carolina will once again grow stronger through the addition of another outstanding class,” said Stephen Farmer, vice provost for enrollment and undergraduate admissions. “All of these students have earned their places at Carolina, and each of them deserves to be here. As accomplished as they already are, we’re confident they’ll make each other better. We’re grateful they’ve chosen to join our community, and we’re excited to support and encourage them as they find success on campus, across our state and in the wider world.”

 

Enrolling students were admitted to Carolina through a thorough process that considered each candidate individually and holistically. Admissions officers read applications one by one, doing their best to understand students in the context of their families, schools, and communities, and to assess their capacity both to thrive at Carolina and to contribute to the education of their classmates.

 

In addition to offering outstanding academics, extensive student aid, and tuition and fees that are among the lowest in the nation, the University recruited admitted students by reaching out to them in innovative and individualized ways. The Black Student Movement connected admitted students with current students through one-on-one video calls and events. The Office of Undergraduate Admissions hosted on-campus breakfasts that welcomed more than 1,500 admitted first-generation college students and their families to Chapel Hill. Members of the admissions office traveled across the state to share meals with students and their families and to discuss academic opportunities at Carolina. The University Office for Diversity and Inclusion hosted spring programs for admitted students, many of whom had previously visited Carolina through the office’s longstanding and successful Project Uplift program.

 

The incoming class will join students already on campus who are engaging in scholarship and research – Carolina conducts more than $1 billion in sponsored research each year – positioning themselves for success after graduation. Based on responses to an annual survey by University Career Services, 97 percent of Carolina students go on to jobs in their preferred fields or continue their education within six months of receiving their bachelor’s degrees.

 

Among enrolling first-year students who indicated an intended major on their application, 55 percent said that they hope to major in science, technology, engineering or mathematics; 26 percent indicated an interest in professional programs including business, public health and media and journalism; and 18 percent expressed interest in the humanities, fine arts or social sciences. In addition:

  • 96 percent said they hope to receive, during their time at Carolina, the experience of engaging with a broad range of ideas, perspectives and visions that differ from their own;
  • 95 percent said they want their understanding to be broadened and refined through discussion and dialogue with classmates and professors who differ from themselves;
  • 96 percent said they want to work with classmates who have different perspectives and different approaches to solving problems;
  • 96 percent said they want to get better at leading, serving and working with people from different backgrounds; and
  • 96 percent said they want to deepen their appreciation, respect and empathy for other people.

The following statistics are highlights from the Fall 2018 incoming class:

 

FIRST-YEAR STUDENTS

Demographics

First-year students come from:

  • 97 North Carolina counties, including 40 percent from rural counties in the state as defined by the UNC System.
  • 43 states and the District of Columbia
  • 38 countries

Of the incoming first-year class:

  • 1,398 North Carolina students are from rural counties
  • 62 percent are female and 38 percent are male
  • 235 students are international students
  • 264 students have a military affiliation
  • 890 students will be the first in their families to earn a bachelor’s degree
  • 12 percent identify themselves as Black or African American
  • 9 percent identify themselves as Hispanic or Latino
  • 18 percent identify themselves as Asian
  • 3 percent identify themselves as American Indian or Alaska Native

Academic credentials

  • 45 percent ranked within top 10 students in their high school class
  • 78 percent ranked within the top 10 percent
  • On the SAT, the middle 50 percent of students scored between 1290 and 1470
  • On the ACT, the middle 50 percent of students scored between 29 and 33
  • 93 percent of enrolling students have taken five or more Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate or dual enrollment courses
  • Their top five intended majors are biology, business, computer science, psychology and biomedical and health sciences engineering

Extracurricular achievements

  • 90 percent participated in community service
  • 69 percent played a sport
  • 66 percent contributed to a cause they believe in
  • 58 percent assumed daily family responsibilities
  • 55 percent traveled outside their home country
  • 50 percent held a paying job during the school year
  • 47 percent held a position as president of their class or a club
  • 46 percent participated in religious or faith-based communities
  • 33 percent participated in student government
  • 31 percent conducted research outside the classroom
  • 20 percent founded an organization or started a business or non-profit
  • 19 percent participated in orchestra or band

Admission

For Fall 2018 first-year admission, the University received 43,472 applications – 6 percent more than last year. The overall admit rate fell from 24 percent to 22 percent this year, and the North Carolina admit rate fell from 46 percent to 41 percent.

The incoming class includes 265 students from one of the 75 partner high schools served by the Carolina College Advising Corps, a public service of the University that seeks to increase college-going rates among low-income, first-generation college and other underrepresented students.

 

Applied / Admitted 

Applied Admitted
North Carolina 13,909 5,690
Out-of-state 29,563 3,829
Total** 43,472 9,519

 

 

TRANSFER STUDENTS

Approximately 43 percent of the enrolling transfer class is transferring from a North Carolina community college. Incoming transfer students range in age from 16 to 56 and have an average college GPA of 3.7.

The transfer class includes 79 students who come to Carolina from partner community colleges served by the Carolina Student Transfer Excellence Program, or C-STEP. The program is designed to enable community college students to transfer to and graduate from UNC-Chapel Hill, and partners with 11 community colleges across the state. C-STEP students represent 10 percent of all enrolling transfer students.

 

Applied / Admitted 

Applied Admitted
North Carolina 1,826 710
Out-of-state 1,624 524
Total** 3,490 1,234

 

Aid and scholarships

Among all new first-year and transfer students:

  • 43 percent of the incoming class will receive need-based aid, primarily in the form of grants and scholarships.
  • 669 students (12 percent of the incoming first-year class) are Carolina Covenant Scholars.

(Note: All aid statistics are preliminary and subject to revision.)

 

Military

Among all new undergraduates:

  • 364 enrolling first-year and transfer students indicated an affiliation with the U.S. armed forces, primarily as dependents or spouses of a military member who served or is serving.
  • 25 are currently serving.
  • 34 have previously served in the U.S. armed forces.

(Note: Some students qualify for multiple categories, i.e., many who served are also dependents.)

(**These numbers reflect residency information at the time of application.)

 

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About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 111 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s nearly 330,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and 149 countries. More than 169,000 live in North Carolina.

 

University Communications contact: Kate Luck, (919) 445-8360 kate.luck@unc.edu

Chancellor Carol L. Folt and Chair Dale Jenkins Announce Search Committee for Successor to William L. Roper, MD, MPH

Media contact:
Audrey Smith, (919) 445-8555

audrey.smith@unc.edu

 

Chancellor Carol L. Folt and Chair Dale Jenkins Announce Search Committee for Successor to William L. Roper, MD, MPH

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— Aug. 2, 2018) – A newly appointed committee will conduct a national search to recommend a successor to Dr. William L. Roper, who announced in May that he would step down as CEO of UNC Health Care, Dean of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine and Vice Chancellor for Medical Affairs in May 2019.

 

UNC-Chapel Hill Chancellor Carol L. Folt and UNC Health Care Board of Directors Chair Dale Jenkins have named Robert A. Blouin, Executive Vice Chancellor and Provost of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, as chair, and Charles D. Owen, vice chair of the UNC Health Care Board of Directors, as vice chair for the search committee.

 

Folt and Jenkins have appointed the following individuals to the search committee:

  • Aisha Amuda, student, UNC School of Medicine
  • Jack Bailey, President, U.S. Pharmaceuticals, GlaxoSmithKline
  • Dr. George Hadley Callaway, member, UNC Health Care System Board of Directors
  • Haywood Cochrane, chair, UNC-Chapel Hill Board of Trustees
  • Honorable Mandy Cohen, MD, secretary, North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services
  • Amy Higgins, system vice president, Strategic Planning and Network Development, UNC Health Care
  • Terry Magnuson, vice chancellor for research, UNC-Chapel Hill
  • Dr. Cristen Page, chair, Department of Family Medicine, UNC School of Medicine
  • Randy Ramsey, vice chair, UNC Board of Governors
  • David Routh, vice chancellor for university development, UNC-Chapel Hill

 

The search committee will hold its first organizational meeting from 9 to 11 a.m. on Tuesday, Aug. 7, at the Center for School Leadership Development, Room 276. The committee will be charged with advancing two or more names to the UNC Health Care Board of Directors and the UNC-Chapel Hill Board of Trustees for approval, after which Folt will forward the names to UNC System President Margaret Spellings. She, in turn, will recommend one candidate to the UNC Board of Governors for their approval.

 

“I am confident that a worthy successor to Dr. Roper can be identified to lead both UNC Health Care and the UNC School of Medicine into the future,” said Spellings. “This position will require a candidate who is knowledgeable about the operations of a premier medical school as well as a world-class hospital system – both of which positively affects North Carolinians across the state.”

 

“Given the strength and reputation of our medical school and health care system, we expect that this will be a highly sought-after position,” Folt said. “I’m grateful that such a strong group of individuals have agreed to serve on the search committee and look forward to working with them in identifying a candidate for this position who will enhance healthcare offerings for all North Carolinians.”

 

“We hope to move quickly to identify a successor and ensure a smooth leadership transition,” Jenkins said. “As North Carolina’s health care system this is a vital role for the health of the citizens of our state.”

 

UNC Health Care and the UNC-Chapel Hill School of Medicine are among the premier academic medical centers in the country. With annual revenues of $5 billion, UNC Health Care owns or manages 11 hospitals and health care systems across the state, employing 30,000 individuals who serve North Carolinians from all 100 counties.  At the foundation of UNC Health Care, the School of Medicine is comprised of 19 clinical departments and 11 basic science departments, employing approximately 1,700 faculty in nationally ranked programs, with a research portfolio that has increased by more than 50 percent since 2014 to $441 million last year.

 

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About the University of North Carolina System
The University of North Carolina System enrolls more than 230,000 students at 17 institutions including all 16 of the state’s public universities, as well as the nation’s first public residential high school for academically gifted students, N.C. School of Science and Mathematics. The UNC System is among the strongest and most diverse higher education systems in the nation, with over $1.5 billion in research expenditures, a wide array of HBCUs, liberal arts institutions, comprehensive universities, and R-1 research institutions. Its institutions support two medical schools and a teaching hospital, two law schools, a veterinary school, a school of pharmacy, 11 nursing programs, 15 schools of education, five schools of engineering and a renowned arts conservatory. The North Carolina Arboretum, UNC Press, and the UNC Center for Public Television, with its 12-station broadcast network, are also all UNC System affiliate organizations.

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 111 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 330,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and 149 countries. More than 169,000 live in North Carolina.

 

About UNC Health Care
UNC Health Care is an integrated health care system comprised of UNC Medical Center and its provider network, UNC Faculty Physicians, UNC Physicians Network, the clinical patient care programs of the UNC School of Medicine. Additional hospital entities and health care systems include UNC REX Healthcare, Chatham Hospital, Johnston Health, Pardee Hospital, High Point Regional Health, Caldwell Memorial, Nash Health Care, Wayne Memorial, UNC Lenoir Health Care and UNC Rockingham Health Care.

 

 

Carolina Student Transfer Excellence Program expands to Southwestern Community College

Carolina Student Transfer Excellence Program expands to Southwestern Community College

Partnership will increase the number of low- and moderate-income students transferring to and graduating from Carolina

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— July 20, 2018) – The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s Carolina Student Transfer Excellence Program (C-STEP) and Southwestern Community College (SCC) in Sylva are partnering to increase the number of students transferring to and graduating from UNC-Chapel Hill. SCC will be the 11th community college to partner with C-STEP and Carolina.

 

Through C-STEP, low- and moderate-income high school and community college students who enroll in one of the program’s partner colleges are guaranteed admission to Carolina if they are first admitted to and successfully complete the community college portion of the program with at least a 3.2 GPA.

 

“Every day we have the chance to see our students grow and challenge themselves as they build successful lives,” said Dr. Don Thomas, Southwestern Community College president. “The launch of C-STEP at Southwestern Community College will create even more opportunities for our students, their families and our community.”

 

Now in its 12th year, C-STEP was launched with the support of the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation in an effort to enable more community college students to transfer to and graduate from Carolina. Almost 800 transfer students enter UNC-Chapel Hill each year, about 33 percent from North Carolina community colleges.

 

“North Carolina community college transfer students are an amazing group of scholars,” said Rebecca Egbert, C-STEP program director. “Working with Southwestern Community College students as they prepare to come to Carolina and once they’ve arrived in Chapel Hill will be a privilege. These students enrich our campus with their experience, diligence and intelligence.”

 

Students who participate in C-STEP agree to earn an appropriate associate degree at their partner community college and participate actively in the program, which offers students special events, advising and transition and support services both at their home college and at

Carolina. The program also provides transition and support services once students have enrolled at Carolina and are pursuing bachelor’s degrees.

 

The communities surrounding SCC include the Qualla Boundary, home to the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians (EBCI). Members of ECBI participate in many SCC programs and have partnered with SCC and Western Carolina University to develop the Oconaluftee Institute of Cultural Arts on the Qualla Boundary, where students come to study and preserve the artistic traditions of the ECBI community.

 

“Education is a priority for the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians and generations of tribal leaders have worked toward that goal,” said Richard Sneed, principal chief of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians. “By collaborating with C-STEP and Southwestern Community College, our students will benefit for years to come.”

 

C-STEP currently serves almost 845 students; 652 of those have already enrolled at Carolina and 482 have graduated. The remaining students are expected to enroll after completing their community college courses. As of 2018, the average C-STEP graduate GPA is 3.0 and the overall graduation rate is 81 percent.

 

Current C-STEP partners include: Alamance Community College, Cape Fear Community College, Carteret Community College, Central Carolina Community College, Craven Community College, Durham Technical Community College, Fayetteville Technical Community College, Robeson Community College, Sandhills Community College and Wake Technical Community College.

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill



The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 111 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s nearly 330,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and 149 countries. More than 169,000 live in North Carolina.

 

University Communications: Kate Luck, (919) 445-8360, kate.luck@unc.edu

 

UNC-Chapel Hill researchers fight against current Ebola outbreak

For immediate use

 

UNC-Chapel Hill researchers fight against the current Ebola outbreak

 

New drugs needed to fight the current Ebola outbreak and other emerging diseases

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C. – July 5, 2018) – Research conducted at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is aiding the fight against the deadly Ebola virus outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo that has been declared “largely contained” by the World Health Organization. Carolina researchers are providing on-the-ground care to Ebola patients, continuing to monitor Ebola survivors from the 2014 outbreak to learn more about the virus, and tested the experimental drug remdesivir that has been provided to the government of Congo for emergency treatment of patients infected with Ebola.

 

Ebola virus’ fatality rate for humans is around 50 percent. The world’s population is now highly mobile and the threat of diseases like Ebola quickly spreading across the globe is a major public health concern. A better understanding of emerging viruses and effective new antiviral drugs are both urgently needed to rapidly respond to Ebola outbreaks and other emerging pandemic threats.

 

Drs. William Fischer II and David Wohl of UNC-Chapel Hill’s School of Medicine have been studying Ebola survivors in Liberia since 2014, establishing a cohort to learn more about treatment of acute infection, lingering clinical complications and viral persistence. Fischer is also the co-lead and Wohl is an investigator for an ongoing National Institutes of Health-funded study of remdesivir, a new experimental antiviral drug, in men who have evidence of Ebola virus in their semen.

 

Additionally, Carolina researchers were involved in testing remdesivir. Remdesivir is an investigative new drug created by Gilead Sciences Inc. and tested in the lab of Ralph Baric, professor of epidemiology in the Gillings School of Global Public Health at UNC-Chapel Hill. It is thought to work by blocking a key enzyme that viruses need for replication. As part of a clinical development program, remdesivir has been given to more than 100 people to date.

 

Baric is a world-renowned coronavirus expert who has pioneered rapid response approaches for the study of emerging viruses and the development of therapeutics. Baric’s team provided its vast biological knowledge and specialized state-of-the-art Biosafety Level 3 laboratories required for testing remdesivir against highly pathogenic emerging coronaviruses, which Gilead needed to prepare this drug for clinical trial. Baric and his team discovered that remdesivir works in the lab against severe acute respiratory syndrome, Middle East respiratory syndrome and all coronaviruses they have tested against to date.

 

“Our collaboration with Gilead represents a new paradigm for developing robust rapid response solutions to control newly emerging diseases, like Ebola, MERS and other highly pathogenic viruses,” said Baric.

 

Remdesivir has not been proven safe or effective and is not approved by the Food and Drug Administration or any other regulatory body worldwide for commercial use. The FDA has approved it for compassionate use – treatment of seriously ill patients when no approved treatments are available. In May 2018, remdesivir was cleared by the health ministry of the Democratic Republic of Congo for use during the current Ebola outbreak in the country and Gilead provided 360 doses of the drug.

 

Carolina physicians have also provided on-the-ground patient care during Ebola outbreaks. Fischer has been involved in the response to each Ebola outbreak since 2014 and has been in Congo since mid-May, providing direct care to Ebola patients.

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 111 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 323,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and 149 countries. More than 169,000 live in North Carolina.

 

University Communications: Audrey Smith, (919) 445-8555, mediarelations@unc.edu

 

Three volunteers join leadership of UNC-Chapel Hill’s most ambitious fundraising campaign in University history

For immediate use

 

Three volunteers join leadership of UNC-Chapel Hill’s most ambitious

fundraising campaign in University history

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— June 26, 2018) –The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill announced three additional volunteer co-chairs of For All Kind: the Campaign for Carolina, the University’s historic fundraising drive that aims to raise $4.25 billion by Dec. 31, 2022. As members of the Campaign Steering Committee, these three co-chairs will join the campaign’s top leadership for one of the largest fundraisers ever for a public university.

 

The newly minted co-chairs are:

  • Vicki Craver of Riverside, Connecticut: now a community leader, Craver is a former bond trader whose career included serving as vice president in Goldman Sachs’ fixed-income division. She graduated from Carolina in 1992 with a bachelor’s degree in chemistry and went on to earn a Master of Business Administration at Dartmouth College. Her service to the University includes chairing the board of the College of Arts & Sciences Foundation. 
  • Jennifer Halsey Evans of San Francisco, California: a strategic advisor and investor in high-growth medical technology companies, Evans was also a Morehead Scholar at UNC-Chapel Hill. She graduated in 1994 with undergraduate degrees in political science and communications. She is a professor of the practice leading an honors seminar on entrepreneurship in Silicon Valley for UNC-Chapel Hill’s department of economics and serves on the board of the Morehead-Cain Scholarship Fund. 
  • Austin Stephens of Atlanta, Georgia: a managing director of the Private Banking and Investment Group at Merrill Lynch, Stephens received his bachelor’s degree in history from Carolina in 1997. In addition to serving as co-chair, his work on the campaign includes chairing the Next Generation Committee, a strategy group comprised primarily of alumni in their 30s and 40s who represent the University’s philanthropic future.

 

“We are so fortunate to have these three accomplished alumni serve on our campaign leadership team,” said Chancellor Carol L. Folt. “Their commitment of time and energy attests to their abiding love for Carolina, and their vision and expertise will guide us moving forward in this campaign.”

 

Craver, Evans and Stephens will join seven current Campaign Steering Committee members: Barbara Rosser Hyde of Memphis, Tennessee; Roger L. Perry Sr. of Chapel Hill; John L. Townsend III of Greenwich, Connecticut; Julia Sprunt Grumbles of Chapel Hill; W. Lowry Caudill (Lowry) of Durham, North Carolina; John G. B. Ellison Jr. of Greensboro, North Carolina; and Michael D. Kennedy of Atlanta, Georgia.

 

For All Kind: the Campaign for Carolina supports the Blueprint for Next, the University’s overall strategic plan built on two core strategies: “of the public, for the public,” and “innovation made fundamental.” As of June 11, the campaign secured $2.1 billion in donor contributions.

 

Photos of the three additional campaign co-chairs can be found here and downloaded using the password: campaign.

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill



The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 111 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 323,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and 149 countries. More than 169,000 live in North Carolina.

 

University Communications: Carly Miller, (919) 445-8555, mediarelations@unc.edu

New members chosen for UNC-Chapel Hill Board of Visitors

For immediate use

 

New members chosen for UNC-Chapel Hill Board of Visitors

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— June 11, 2018) – Today the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill announced the new appointment of select alumni and friends to serve one of the most active volunteer organizations at Carolina: the UNC Board of Visitors. The Board of Trustees elects a new class of members each year as fourth-year members complete their terms. The 54 new board members, appointed on May 31, will begin their terms on July 1, 2018.

 

As ambassadors of Carolina, approximately 175 Board of Visitors members inform their communities about on-going work and issues important to the University. In turn, the members share feedback from those communities with the University’s administration. These volunteers actively assist the Board of Trustees and Chancellor Carol L. Folt in student recruitment, government relations, marketing and fundraising. Members also volunteer their time and professional experience as a resource to students who seek guidance ahead of entering the workforce.

 

Sallie Glover of Raleigh will serve as chair of the Board of Visitors and Reyna Walters-Morgan of Raleigh will serve as vice chair.

 

The new members are listed below, alphabetically by North Carolina county and by locations outside of North Carolina.

 

North Carolina
Cabarrus: Paul Newton of Mount Pleasant

 

Carteret: Maxine Brown-Davis of Cedar Point

 

Davidson: Charles Broadwell of Denton

 

Durham: Paul Wright of Durham

 

Forsyth: Susan Mann of Winston-Salem

 

Guilford: Fleming Edwards of Greensboro

 

Lee: Robert Reives of Sanford

 

Mecklenburg: Omid Ahdieh, Kevin Griffin, Christian Robinson, Burnet Tucker, Dan Warren, Agnes Weisiger and Don Williams of Charlotte

 

New Hanover: Lindsey Walter of Wilmington

 

Onslow: Michael Surles of Jacksonville

 

Orange: Olive Greenwald of Efland; Jennifer McCafferty, Houston Summers, Roger Werner and Paige Zinn of Chapel Hill

 

Pitt: Robert Kemp, Suzanne Pecheles and Henry Louis Stephenson III of Greenville

 

Stokes: Kyle Hall of King

 

Wake: Priscilla Maynor of Holly Springs; Jim Blaine, Martin Boney, David Bull, Bart Goodson, Joshua Kmiec, Merrill Mason, Timothy McNeill and Samuel Sugg of Raleigh

 

Wayne: Garrett Strickland of Mount Olive

 

Alaska

Bill Murdock of Kodiak

 

California

Kimberley Kwok of San Francisco; Kristen McGuiness of Newport Beach

 

District of Columbia

Chris Riddick

 

Florida

Whitney Cohen of St. Petersburg

 

Georgia

Ruth Fowler of Dunwoody; Kevin Salvadori of Alpharetta; and Tony Kearney and Robert Turner of Atlanta

 

Illinois

Ward McNally of Chicago

 

Nevada

Frank Andrews of Las Vegas

 

New Jersey

Michael Bradshaw of Pennington

 

New York

Alec Guettel of Mount Kisco; Philip Yates of West Harrison; Kathryn Randolph and George Webster of New York

 

South Carolina

Robert Temple of Greenville

 

Virginia

Latta Chapman of Alexandria; Daryl Davis of Stafford

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill



The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 111 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 323,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and 149 countries. More than 169,000 live in North Carolina.

 

University Communications: Carly Miller, (919) 445-8555, mediarelations@unc.edu

Ackland Art Museum at UNC-Chapel Hill hosts “The Outwin: American Portraiture Today”     

For immediate use

Amy Sherald, American, born 1973: Miss Everything (Unsuppressed Deliverance), 2013. Oil on canvas, 54 x 43-1/8 in., 2013. Frances and Burton Reifler © Amy Sherald.

Ackland Art Museum at UNC-Chapel Hill hosts
“The Outwin: American Portraiture Today”   

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— May 31, 2018) – The Ackland Art Museum at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill will host “The Outwin: American Portraiture Today” on view from the Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery from June 1 through Aug. 26. The Ackland is the fourth and final stop and is the only Southeast location chosen to host the exhibition. A preview of the exhibition can be seen here.The selected finalists for the 2016 Outwin Boochever Portrait Competition finalists included in “The Outwin: American Portraiture Today” present a turning point in the advancement of American contemporary portraiture.

 

First-prize winner of the 2016 Outwin Boochever Portrait Competition Amy Sherald became the first woman to win the competition for her oil on canvas titled “Miss Everything (Unsuppressed Deliverance)” (2013). Former first lady Michelle Obama selected Sherald to create her official portrait for the National Portrait Gallery’s permanent collection, revealed in February 2018. Sherald and Moss will also participate in a public discussion on June 1 at 6:30 p.m. about modern portraiture in the age of the selfie and digitized personhood.

 

“We are thrilled to welcome “The Outwin” as the Museum’s major summer exhibition,” said Katie Ziglar, director of the Ackland Art Museum. “From the breadth of artistic medium to the diverse representations of participants and their subjects, this show reflects the Ackland’s commitment to providing experiences that spark insight into ourselves, each other, and the world.”

 

“The Outwin” is the latest art experience offered by the Ackland, a partner in the university’s Arts Everywhere initiative, which strives to make art accessible to the campus and wider community. Arts Everywhere is a signature initiative of the University’s $4.25 billion fundraising campaign, the Campaign for Carolina. Since January 2017 the Ackland has secured gifts valued at $69.2 million, including several Rembrandt drawings, paintings and prints by Joan Mitchell and a 1971 oil and charcoal on paper by Willem de Kooning. These gifts, among others, increased the Ackland’s growth by more than 500 percent over the prior four years, bolstering the museum’s position as the preeminent public university art museum in the country.

 

The Outwin: American Portraiture Today

Open June 1 – August 26, 2018

Ackland Art Museum

101 South Columbia St.

Chapel Hill, N.C.

 

Museum hours are Wednesday through Saturday 10 a.m. – 5 p.m., and Sundays 1 p.m. – 5 p.m. More information is available at ackland.org.

 

Discussion with artist Amy Sherald

Friday, June 1, 6:30 p.m.

Artist Amy Sherald and curator Dorothy Moss will host a public discussion

Sonja Haynes Stone Center for Black Culture and History

150 South Road

Chapel Hill, N.C.

 

This exhibition has been organized by the Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery, Washington, D.C. The competition and exhibition have been made possible by generous support from the Virginia Outwin Boochever Portrait Competition Endowment.

 

The Ackland presentation of this exhibition has been made possible by generous support from The Caldwell Family Fund for the Ackland Art Museum, The Seymour and Carol Levin Foundation, and Cathy and Hunter Allen.

 

-Carolina-

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill



The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 111 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 323,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and 149 countries. More than 169,000 live in North Carolina.

 

About the Ackland Art Museum

Featuring a year-round calendar of special exhibitions and dynamic public programs, the Ackland Art Museum on UNC-Chapel Hill’s historic campus is a local museum with a global outlook that bridges campus and community. Admission to the Ackland is free and accessible to all. The Ackland’s holdings include more than 18,000 works of art. The collection spans all cultures and time periods, showcasing the breadth of human creativity. A vital teaching resource, the museum’s mission is the art of understanding. Visitors can connect with the complexity and beauty of the wider world by getting close to art – the familiar, the unexpected, the challenging. The Ackland Art Museum is located at 101 South Columbia St. on the UNC-Chapel Hill campus. Museum hours are Wednesday through Saturday 10 a.m. – 5 p.m., and Sundays 1 p.m. – 5 p.m. The museum is open until 9 p.m. for Chapel Hill-Carrboro’s 2nd Friday ArtWalk. More information is available at ackland.org.

 

University Communications: Carly Miller, (919) 445-8555, mediarelations@unc.edu

Ackland Art Museum: Audrey Shore, (919) 843-3676, audrey.shore@unc.edu

 

Image: Amy Sherald, American, born 1973: Miss Everything (Unsuppressed Deliverance), 2013. Oil on canvas, 54 x 43-1/8 in., 2013. Frances and Burton Reifler © Amy Sherald.