MAHEC, UNC-Chapel Hill Celebrate New Interprofessional Academic Health Center

 

 

 

 

 

MAHEC, UNC-Chapel Hill Celebrate New Interprofessional Academic Health Center  

 

UNC Health Sciences at MAHEC expands health science education in Western North Carolina

 

 

(Asheville, N.C. ­– October 17, 2018) — The Mountain Area Health Education Center and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill will celebrate the construction of a new academic health center building on MAHEC’s Biltmore campus with a special ceremony on Tuesday, Oct. 23 at 5:30 p.m. (see further details at the bottom).

 

UNC Health Sciences at MAHEC seeks to address health care worker shortages and improve education across a number of health science fields in Western North Carolina. The UNC Health Sciences at MAHEC building supports an innovative educational partnership between UNC-Chapel Hill and MAHEC and will house UNC School of Medicine’s Asheville campus; a Master of Public Health program led by UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health; MAHEC’s psychiatry residency program and psychiatry outpatient care; and health care research, education and community engagement initiatives at the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy.

 

UNC-Chapel Hill and MAHEC have a shared commitment to address health care workforce shortages in North Carolina. All 16 Western North Carolina counties are considered primary care health professional shortage areas, or areas with too few providers to meet the health care needs of the population. By training health care professionals in Western North Carolina, and placing students in long-term internships across the region, UNC Health Sciences at MAHEC encourages more health providers to practice in Western North Carolina, an initiative that stands to make a significant impact on the region’s economy and access to health care.

 

“Our students and faculty are eager to address North Carolina’s health care needs, and the new programs based at MAHEC will be a significant step forward for improving access to quality interprofessional health care in Western North Carolina,” said Robert Blouin, executive vice chancellor and provost of UNC-Chapel Hill. “We are very appreciative of the generous support from the people of North Carolina that has made UNC Health Sciences at MAHEC a reality.”

 

The establishment of UNC Health Sciences at MAHEC was made possible by the people of North Carolina through 2015 and 2016 state appropriations totaling $8 million in nonrecurring funds for building construction and $18.6 million in recurring funds to support the development of UNC-Chapel Hill’s academic programs to train and expand the health care workforce in medically underserved Western North Carolina.

 

The three-story 37,000-square-foot building will be completed in spring 2019 and includes classrooms and incubator spaces that will bring together family medicine clinicians, pharmacists, public health professionals, researchers, residents, students, UNC-Chapel Hill faculty, and community health partners.

 

“The UNC Health Sciences at MAHEC building will be the hub for the regional campuses of the school of medicine and school of public health,” explained Jeff Heck, chief executive officer of MAHEC. “This academic health center and our strong regional partnerships will serve as a national model for rural health care transformation.”

 

UNC Health Sciences at MAHEC Special Ceremony

  • Begins at 5:30 p.m. on October 23 at the MAHEC Biltmore campus
  • 121 Hendersonville Road, Asheville, N.C. 28803
  • Dignitaries and guest speakers at the ceremony will include:
    • Robert Blouin, executive vice chancellor and provost of UNC-Chapel Hill
    • William Roper, dean of the UNC School of Medicine, vice chancellor for medical affairs and chief executive officer of UNC Health Care
    • Jeff Heck, chief executive officer of MAHEC
    • William Hathaway, MAHEC board member and senior vice president and chief medical officer of Mission Hospital
    • Stephen Kimmel, a Western North Carolinian and graduate of the UNC School of Medicine’s Asheville campus and MAHEC family medicine residency program who is now practicing in North Carolina’s Yancey and Mitchell counties
  • Remarks will be followed by guided tours of the recently completed MAHEC Simulation Center, a state-of-the-art medical and surgical training facility that supports health science education and health care professionals from across Western North Carolina

 

On-site contacts:

  • Michelle Morgan, MAHEC, 828-257-4442 or 828-777-5149
  • Jennifer Maurer, MAHEC, 828-257-4445 or 828-782-0142

 

 

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About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

UNC-Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 111 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties.

 

About the Mountain Area Health Education Center

MAHEC was established in 1974 and is a leader in healthcare, education and innovation. Located in Asheville, MAHEC serves a 16-county region in Western North Carolina. It is the largest Area Health Education Center in North Carolina, which evolved to address national and state concerns with the supply, retention and quality of health professionals. MAHEC’s mission is to train the next generation of healthcare professionals for Western North Carolina through quality healthcare, innovative education, and best practice models that can be replicated nationally.

 

UNC-Chapel Hill university communications: Audrey Smith, 919-445-8555, audrey.smith@unc.edu

MAHEC communications: Jennifer Maurer, 828-257-4445, jennifer.maurer@mahec.net

 

$10M gift to UNC-Chapel Hill will broaden global reach, scholarship and opportunity

For immediate use

 

$10M gift to UNC-Chapel Hill will broaden global reach, scholarship and opportunity

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C. – Oct. 4, 2018) – A $10 million gift from alumni Bill and Anne Harrison of Greenwich, Connecticut, to the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill will strengthen the University’s global programs and presence. The generous gift from the Harrisons will endow two new senior-level leadership positions and support the strategic priorities of UNC Global, which incorporates many of the centralized programs and services that support Carolina’s global mission.

 

A search is already underway for a new full-time chief global officer and vice provost for global affairs who will report to the executive vice chancellor and provost. In September, the University announced the hiring of a new associate provost for global affairs, Raymond Farrow, who will serve as the chief operating officer and executive director of UNC Global and will serve as interim chief global officer until a vice provost is named.

 

“I am so grateful for Bill and Anne’s steadfast commitment to Carolina and all those who study and work here. They have done so much for our community, and this tremendous gift reflects their support and belief in Carolina’s global mission,” said Chancellor Carol L. Folt. “Their loving generosity will help us integrate global thinking across our campus and guarantee that every student graduates with the skills they need to serve our world.”

 

In Jan. 2017, the UNC-Chapel Hill Board of Trustees endorsed The Blueprint for Next, a strategic framework and vision for the growth of the University. The plan included a “global mindset” as a fundamental imperative for the campus. In conjunction, Chancellor Folt reviewed UNC’s global programs and strategy, and a Global Leadership Taskforce (2016-2018) — on which Bill Harrison served as a Steering Committee member — guided the development of a new global road map. This ambitious vision will require a robust operational infrastructure, including a full-time leadership team that is fully prepared to advance UNC’s global mission and oversee its growing global enterprise.

 

Provost Bob Blouin said, “It is critically important to have fully dedicated leadership for UNC Global. With a full-time vice provost for global affairs and chief global officer in place, UNC Global will be well positioned to advance the University’s global priorities. This gift will help UNC attract the very best candidates for this leadership role and demonstrate the university’s commitment to preeminence as a global university in service to North Carolina, the nation and the world.”

 

Bill Harrison is a 1966 Carolina graduate and retired chairman and CEO of JPMorgan Chase & Co. Anne Harrison is a 1978 Carolina graduate who earned her bachelor of arts degree in English.

 

“Anne and I have been fortunate in life and we wanted to give back to an institution that has been so important to us,” said Bill Harrison. “Furthermore, having worked in a large, global organization for my entire career, I am a strong believer that a great university needs to have outstanding global capabilities and a mission to prepare its students to compete in the global world we all live in.”

 

The $10 million gift continues the Harrisons’ long record of supporting global initiatives at Carolina. In 2007, Bill Harrison chaired the Global Leadership Circle, which developed the University’s first comprehensive global road map. In 2009, Bill and Anne Harrison made a $1 million gift creating the University’s Global Research Institute to generate knowledge solving real-world problems, such as water quality and the impact of globalization on North Carolina’s economy.

 

In the 2018 Academic Rankings of World Universities, UNC-Chapel Hill is 30th among 500 top universities, up from 52nd in 2003. Global has become central to Carolina’s teaching, research and service mission.

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 111 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s nearly 330,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and 149 countries. More than 169,000 live in North Carolina.

 

University Communications: Media Relations, (919) 445-8555, mediarelations@unc.edu

 

 

UNC-Chapel Hill ranks fifth among the country’s public universities for 18th consecutive year

NC-Chapel Hill ranks fifth among the country’s public universities for 18th consecutive year

U.S. News & World Report ‘Best Colleges’ list ranks Carolina 30th overall

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C. – Sept. 10, 2018) – The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is again listed as one of the top universities in the country.

 

For the 18th straight year, UNC-Chapel Hill, a public research university dedicated to making its first-class education both accessible and affordable, has placed fifth among national public universities on U.S. News & World Report’s annual “Best Colleges” rankings, published today (Sept. 10) on www.usnews.com. For the 14th consecutive time in “Great Schools, Great Prices,” Carolina was the first national public university, the eighth overall in rankings of national universities for best value.

 

“Our students, faculty and staff’s commitment to excellence is evident in Carolina’s placement among the top five public universities for the 18th consecutive year,” said Chancellor Carol L. Folt. “As we remain steadfast in our mission of serving the public in our state and around the world, we will continue to make a world-class education affordable, conduct ground-breaking research and lead in innovation for the future.”

 

The ranking comes just days after the Wall Street Journal and Times Higher Education ranked Carolina as the best public university for financial value, and the second overall among the top 250 institutions. In addition to being recognized by U.S. News for this commitment, Kiplinger’s Personal Finance magazine has ranked Carolina first 17 times among U.S. public colleges and universities offering stellar academics at a reasonable price.

 

U.S. News & World Report assesses these rankings on over a dozen measures: graduation and retention rates (22 percent); assessment of academic quality by presidents, provosts, deans of admissions and high school counselors (20 percent); faculty resources (20 percent); student excellence (10 percent); financial resources (10 percent); graduation rate performance (8 percent); alumni giving (5 percent) and social mobility (5 percent).

 

The University has a unique commitment to making a Carolina education accessible to deserving students. The University practices need-blind admissions and proudly meets 100 percent of the documented need of undergraduates qualifying for need-based aid who apply on time and meets more than two-thirds of that need with grants and scholarships. Fourteen percent of the Class of 2022 qualified for the Carolina Covenant, and since it began in 2003, more than 6,500 students have benefited. For the 13th consecutive year, Carolina received a record number of first-year applications for fall 2018 – from 43,384 applicants and up 6 percent from last year.

 

Additional U.S. News rankings including UNC-Chapel Hill were as follows:

 

* In the U.S. News & World Report rankings, UNC-Chapel Hill tied at 30th overall for best national university with New York University and University of California-Santa Barbara among both public and private schools.

 

* Listed 40th among national universities in terms of student debt load at graduation, 40 percent of UNC-Chapel Hill students who graduated in 2017 received need-based grants, with an average graduating class indebtedness of $22,214.

 

* A 97 percent average first-year retention rate for the 10th consecutive year and a 91 percent average six-year graduation rate, two percentage points above U.S. News’ prediction.

 

* Fourth-best public university for veterans, tied with UC-Santa Barbara, and listed 10th-best college overall for veterans with New York University and UC-Santa Barbara, highlighting the strong support UNC-Chapel Hill has provided to military students through initiatives that include the UNC Core, a distance-learning program; Green Zone training; Student Veteran Resources and the Warrior Scholar Project.

 

* Only 13 percent of 2017 course sections enrolled 50 or more students.

 

* Third among public universities along with Georgia Tech, UCLA and Michigan and tied for 23nd overall in high school counselors’ top picks with Emory University, Georgia Tech, New York University, Tufts University, UCLA, Michigan, University of Southern California and University of Virginia.

 

* Tied eighth overall and tied for fourth among publics with the University of Virginia for best undergraduate business programs. For specialty areas, Kenan-Flagler Business School tied for fourth in entrepreneurship and was listed fourth for management and fifth for marketing in listings based on programs nominated by business school deans and faculty members that received the most mentions in a 2018 survey.

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill



The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 111 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s nearly 330,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and 149 countries. More than 169,000 live in North Carolina.

 

University Communications: Media Relations, (919) 445-8555, mediarelations@unc.edu

New study finds link between teenage drinking and high-grade prostate cancer later in life

New study finds link between teenage drinking and high-grade prostate cancer later in life

 

Study participants who drank heavily early in life were three times more likely

 to be diagnosed with an aggressive form of prostate cancer

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— August 23, 2018) – A new study out of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill has found a link between early-life alcohol consumption and aggressive, high-grade prostate cancer. The study also found that heavy cumulative alcohol consumption over the course of a man’s life had a similar association with this type of prostate cancer.

 

The research was published in the journal Cancer Prevention Research on August 23.

 

“There’s been relatively little progress in identifying risk factors for prostate cancer,” said Emma Allott, senior author for the study. “Other hormonally regulated cancers, like breast cancer, already have a known association with alcohol use. But the role that alcohol consumption may have in the development of prostate cancer, especially over the life course, isn’t as well understood, so it remains an important area of study.”

 

Allott led the research, along with her collaborators, while she was an assistant professor of nutrition in the Gillings School of Global Public Health at UNC-Chapel Hill. Allott has since joined Queen’s University Belfast as a lecturer in molecular cancer epidemiology at the Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology.

 

The team of researchers evaluated survey data obtained from 650 men at the time of prostate biopsy. Men who reported consuming more than seven alcoholic drinks weekly as teenagers between the ages of 15 and 19 were three times more likely to be diagnosed with high-grade prostate cancer compared with men who reported no alcohol use during these years. Men who had seven or more alcoholic beverages a week throughout each decade of life were also three times more likely to be diagnosed with high-grade prostate cancer at the time of biopsy.

 

Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed non-skin cancer in U.S. men and the second leading cause of male cancer deaths. The prostate develops rapidly during puberty and, as a result, scientists have hypothesized that boys may be more susceptible to cancer-causing substances during their adolescent years.

 

“We think that prostate cancer develops over the course of many years or even decades, so studies like ours are working toward a clearer understanding not only of what the specific risk factors are, but how they may affect prostate biology at different stages of life,” said Allott.

 

Not all prostate cancers are high-grade, or the clinically significant, aggressive form of prostate cancer that grows quickly and can potentially lead to death. The researchers sought to investigate the potential relationship between early-life alcohol consumption and high-grade, prostate cancer, believing that it’s most important to identify risk factors for the aggressive form of the cancer. The researchers did not find an association between alcohol use and other less aggressive forms of prostate cancer.

 

Allott and her team evaluated survey data from a group of racially diverse men, ages 49-89 years, undergoing prostate biopsy at the Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center between 2007 and 2018. Men completed a survey to assess the average number of alcoholic beverages consumed weekly during each decade of life, categorizing this as zero, one to six, or seven or more drinks each week to determine age-specific and cumulative lifetime alcohol intake.

 

The research was limited by its reliance on men’s recall of their historic alcohol intake. This could have resulted in biased responses, although the majority of men reported their alcohol intake prior to knowing their biopsy results. Additional research is needed to determine the risk factors for prostate cancer.

 

Allott’s research collaborators included Jamie Michael, Amanda De Hoedt and Charlotte Bailey of Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Lauren Howard of Duke Cancer Institute, Sarah Markt and Lorelei Mucci of Harvard University, and Stephen Freedland of Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center and Cedars-Sinai Medical Center.

 

The research was funded by the American Institute for Cancer Research, the Irish Cancer Society and the National Institutes of Health.

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 111 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s nearly 330,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and 149 countries. More than 169,000 live in North Carolina.

 

University Communications: Audrey Smith, (919) 445-8555, audrey.smith@unc.edu

 

Carolina welcomes 5,095 new undergraduate students to campus

Carolina welcomes 5,095 new undergraduate students to campus

Fall 2018 first-year class includes record number of first-generation college students

 

(Note: The following statistics are preliminary and will not be final until after Sept. 4, 2018, the University’s official enrollment reporting date.)

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— Aug. 17, 2018) – The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is welcoming 4,295 first-year students and 800 transfer students to campus as classes begin this fall. The first-year class includes the highest numbers of first-generation college students and students from North Carolina’s rural counties since the University began collecting this data 15 years ago. The University received a record 43,472 first-year applications this year, the 13th consecutive year in which applications have increased.

 

Among first-year North Carolinians, 40 percent are enrolling from a rural county, up from 35 percent last year. Among all first-year students, 21 percent will be the first in their families to graduate from a four-year college or university, up from 17 percent last year. The Carolina Covenant, which offers eligible low-income students the opportunity to graduate debt-free, is welcoming 669 new first-year and transfer students, 13 percent of all enrolling students.

 

The new students are extraordinarily well-prepared academically and also contribute outside the classroom:

  • Among new transfer students, the average GPA at their previous colleges was 3.7 on a 4.0 scale.
  • 45 percent of new first-year students ranked within the top 10 students in their high school class, and 78 percent ranked within the top 10 percent.
  • 93 percent of new first-year students have taken five or more Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate or college-level courses while in high school.
  • 52 percent of all incoming students held a paying job during the school year; 58 percent had daily responsibilities within their families; 67 percent competed in a sport; and 88 percent participated in community service.

“Carolina will once again grow stronger through the addition of another outstanding class,” said Stephen Farmer, vice provost for enrollment and undergraduate admissions. “All of these students have earned their places at Carolina, and each of them deserves to be here. As accomplished as they already are, we’re confident they’ll make each other better. We’re grateful they’ve chosen to join our community, and we’re excited to support and encourage them as they find success on campus, across our state and in the wider world.”

 

Enrolling students were admitted to Carolina through a thorough process that considered each candidate individually and holistically. Admissions officers read applications one by one, doing their best to understand students in the context of their families, schools, and communities, and to assess their capacity both to thrive at Carolina and to contribute to the education of their classmates.

 

In addition to offering outstanding academics, extensive student aid, and tuition and fees that are among the lowest in the nation, the University recruited admitted students by reaching out to them in innovative and individualized ways. The Black Student Movement connected admitted students with current students through one-on-one video calls and events. The Office of Undergraduate Admissions hosted on-campus breakfasts that welcomed more than 1,500 admitted first-generation college students and their families to Chapel Hill. Members of the admissions office traveled across the state to share meals with students and their families and to discuss academic opportunities at Carolina. The University Office for Diversity and Inclusion hosted spring programs for admitted students, many of whom had previously visited Carolina through the office’s longstanding and successful Project Uplift program.

 

The incoming class will join students already on campus who are engaging in scholarship and research – Carolina conducts more than $1 billion in sponsored research each year – positioning themselves for success after graduation. Based on responses to an annual survey by University Career Services, 97 percent of Carolina students go on to jobs in their preferred fields or continue their education within six months of receiving their bachelor’s degrees.

 

Among enrolling first-year students who indicated an intended major on their application, 55 percent said that they hope to major in science, technology, engineering or mathematics; 26 percent indicated an interest in professional programs including business, public health and media and journalism; and 18 percent expressed interest in the humanities, fine arts or social sciences. In addition:

  • 96 percent said they hope to receive, during their time at Carolina, the experience of engaging with a broad range of ideas, perspectives and visions that differ from their own;
  • 95 percent said they want their understanding to be broadened and refined through discussion and dialogue with classmates and professors who differ from themselves;
  • 96 percent said they want to work with classmates who have different perspectives and different approaches to solving problems;
  • 96 percent said they want to get better at leading, serving and working with people from different backgrounds; and
  • 96 percent said they want to deepen their appreciation, respect and empathy for other people.

The following statistics are highlights from the Fall 2018 incoming class:

 

FIRST-YEAR STUDENTS

Demographics

First-year students come from:

  • 97 North Carolina counties, including 40 percent from rural counties in the state as defined by the UNC System.
  • 43 states and the District of Columbia
  • 38 countries

Of the incoming first-year class:

  • 1,398 North Carolina students are from rural counties
  • 62 percent are female and 38 percent are male
  • 235 students are international students
  • 264 students have a military affiliation
  • 890 students will be the first in their families to earn a bachelor’s degree
  • 12 percent identify themselves as Black or African American
  • 9 percent identify themselves as Hispanic or Latino
  • 18 percent identify themselves as Asian
  • 3 percent identify themselves as American Indian or Alaska Native

Academic credentials

  • 45 percent ranked within top 10 students in their high school class
  • 78 percent ranked within the top 10 percent
  • On the SAT, the middle 50 percent of students scored between 1290 and 1470
  • On the ACT, the middle 50 percent of students scored between 29 and 33
  • 93 percent of enrolling students have taken five or more Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate or dual enrollment courses
  • Their top five intended majors are biology, business, computer science, psychology and biomedical and health sciences engineering

Extracurricular achievements

  • 90 percent participated in community service
  • 69 percent played a sport
  • 66 percent contributed to a cause they believe in
  • 58 percent assumed daily family responsibilities
  • 55 percent traveled outside their home country
  • 50 percent held a paying job during the school year
  • 47 percent held a position as president of their class or a club
  • 46 percent participated in religious or faith-based communities
  • 33 percent participated in student government
  • 31 percent conducted research outside the classroom
  • 20 percent founded an organization or started a business or non-profit
  • 19 percent participated in orchestra or band

Admission

For Fall 2018 first-year admission, the University received 43,472 applications – 6 percent more than last year. The overall admit rate fell from 24 percent to 22 percent this year, and the North Carolina admit rate fell from 46 percent to 41 percent.

The incoming class includes 265 students from one of the 75 partner high schools served by the Carolina College Advising Corps, a public service of the University that seeks to increase college-going rates among low-income, first-generation college and other underrepresented students.

 

Applied / Admitted 

Applied Admitted
North Carolina 13,909 5,690
Out-of-state 29,563 3,829
Total** 43,472 9,519

 

 

TRANSFER STUDENTS

Approximately 43 percent of the enrolling transfer class is transferring from a North Carolina community college. Incoming transfer students range in age from 16 to 56 and have an average college GPA of 3.7.

The transfer class includes 79 students who come to Carolina from partner community colleges served by the Carolina Student Transfer Excellence Program, or C-STEP. The program is designed to enable community college students to transfer to and graduate from UNC-Chapel Hill, and partners with 11 community colleges across the state. C-STEP students represent 10 percent of all enrolling transfer students.

 

Applied / Admitted 

Applied Admitted
North Carolina 1,826 710
Out-of-state 1,624 524
Total** 3,490 1,234

 

Aid and scholarships

Among all new first-year and transfer students:

  • 43 percent of the incoming class will receive need-based aid, primarily in the form of grants and scholarships.
  • 669 students (12 percent of the incoming first-year class) are Carolina Covenant Scholars.

(Note: All aid statistics are preliminary and subject to revision.)

 

Military

Among all new undergraduates:

  • 364 enrolling first-year and transfer students indicated an affiliation with the U.S. armed forces, primarily as dependents or spouses of a military member who served or is serving.
  • 25 are currently serving.
  • 34 have previously served in the U.S. armed forces.

(Note: Some students qualify for multiple categories, i.e., many who served are also dependents.)

(**These numbers reflect residency information at the time of application.)

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 111 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s nearly 330,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and 149 countries. More than 169,000 live in North Carolina.

 

University Communications contact: Kate Luck, (919) 445-8360 kate.luck@unc.edu

Chancellor Carol L. Folt and Chair Dale Jenkins Announce Search Committee for Successor to William L. Roper, MD, MPH

Media contact:
Audrey Smith, (919) 445-8555

audrey.smith@unc.edu

 

Chancellor Carol L. Folt and Chair Dale Jenkins Announce Search Committee for Successor to William L. Roper, MD, MPH

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— Aug. 2, 2018) – A newly appointed committee will conduct a national search to recommend a successor to Dr. William L. Roper, who announced in May that he would step down as CEO of UNC Health Care, Dean of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine and Vice Chancellor for Medical Affairs in May 2019.

 

UNC-Chapel Hill Chancellor Carol L. Folt and UNC Health Care Board of Directors Chair Dale Jenkins have named Robert A. Blouin, Executive Vice Chancellor and Provost of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, as chair, and Charles D. Owen, vice chair of the UNC Health Care Board of Directors, as vice chair for the search committee.

 

Folt and Jenkins have appointed the following individuals to the search committee:

  • Aisha Amuda, student, UNC School of Medicine
  • Jack Bailey, President, U.S. Pharmaceuticals, GlaxoSmithKline
  • Dr. George Hadley Callaway, member, UNC Health Care System Board of Directors
  • Haywood Cochrane, chair, UNC-Chapel Hill Board of Trustees
  • Honorable Mandy Cohen, MD, secretary, North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services
  • Amy Higgins, system vice president, Strategic Planning and Network Development, UNC Health Care
  • Terry Magnuson, vice chancellor for research, UNC-Chapel Hill
  • Dr. Cristen Page, chair, Department of Family Medicine, UNC School of Medicine
  • Randy Ramsey, vice chair, UNC Board of Governors
  • David Routh, vice chancellor for university development, UNC-Chapel Hill

 

The search committee will hold its first organizational meeting from 9 to 11 a.m. on Tuesday, Aug. 7, at the Center for School Leadership Development, Room 276. The committee will be charged with advancing two or more names to the UNC Health Care Board of Directors and the UNC-Chapel Hill Board of Trustees for approval, after which Folt will forward the names to UNC System President Margaret Spellings. She, in turn, will recommend one candidate to the UNC Board of Governors for their approval.

 

“I am confident that a worthy successor to Dr. Roper can be identified to lead both UNC Health Care and the UNC School of Medicine into the future,” said Spellings. “This position will require a candidate who is knowledgeable about the operations of a premier medical school as well as a world-class hospital system – both of which positively affects North Carolinians across the state.”

 

“Given the strength and reputation of our medical school and health care system, we expect that this will be a highly sought-after position,” Folt said. “I’m grateful that such a strong group of individuals have agreed to serve on the search committee and look forward to working with them in identifying a candidate for this position who will enhance healthcare offerings for all North Carolinians.”

 

“We hope to move quickly to identify a successor and ensure a smooth leadership transition,” Jenkins said. “As North Carolina’s health care system this is a vital role for the health of the citizens of our state.”

 

UNC Health Care and the UNC-Chapel Hill School of Medicine are among the premier academic medical centers in the country. With annual revenues of $5 billion, UNC Health Care owns or manages 11 hospitals and health care systems across the state, employing 30,000 individuals who serve North Carolinians from all 100 counties.  At the foundation of UNC Health Care, the School of Medicine is comprised of 19 clinical departments and 11 basic science departments, employing approximately 1,700 faculty in nationally ranked programs, with a research portfolio that has increased by more than 50 percent since 2014 to $441 million last year.

 

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About the University of North Carolina System
The University of North Carolina System enrolls more than 230,000 students at 17 institutions including all 16 of the state’s public universities, as well as the nation’s first public residential high school for academically gifted students, N.C. School of Science and Mathematics. The UNC System is among the strongest and most diverse higher education systems in the nation, with over $1.5 billion in research expenditures, a wide array of HBCUs, liberal arts institutions, comprehensive universities, and R-1 research institutions. Its institutions support two medical schools and a teaching hospital, two law schools, a veterinary school, a school of pharmacy, 11 nursing programs, 15 schools of education, five schools of engineering and a renowned arts conservatory. The North Carolina Arboretum, UNC Press, and the UNC Center for Public Television, with its 12-station broadcast network, are also all UNC System affiliate organizations.

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 111 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 330,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and 149 countries. More than 169,000 live in North Carolina.

 

About UNC Health Care
UNC Health Care is an integrated health care system comprised of UNC Medical Center and its provider network, UNC Faculty Physicians, UNC Physicians Network, the clinical patient care programs of the UNC School of Medicine. Additional hospital entities and health care systems include UNC REX Healthcare, Chatham Hospital, Johnston Health, Pardee Hospital, High Point Regional Health, Caldwell Memorial, Nash Health Care, Wayne Memorial, UNC Lenoir Health Care and UNC Rockingham Health Care.

 

 

Carolina Student Transfer Excellence Program expands to Southwestern Community College

Carolina Student Transfer Excellence Program expands to Southwestern Community College

Partnership will increase the number of low- and moderate-income students transferring to and graduating from Carolina

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— July 20, 2018) – The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s Carolina Student Transfer Excellence Program (C-STEP) and Southwestern Community College (SCC) in Sylva are partnering to increase the number of students transferring to and graduating from UNC-Chapel Hill. SCC will be the 11th community college to partner with C-STEP and Carolina.

 

Through C-STEP, low- and moderate-income high school and community college students who enroll in one of the program’s partner colleges are guaranteed admission to Carolina if they are first admitted to and successfully complete the community college portion of the program with at least a 3.2 GPA.

 

“Every day we have the chance to see our students grow and challenge themselves as they build successful lives,” said Dr. Don Thomas, Southwestern Community College president. “The launch of C-STEP at Southwestern Community College will create even more opportunities for our students, their families and our community.”

 

Now in its 12th year, C-STEP was launched with the support of the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation in an effort to enable more community college students to transfer to and graduate from Carolina. Almost 800 transfer students enter UNC-Chapel Hill each year, about 33 percent from North Carolina community colleges.

 

“North Carolina community college transfer students are an amazing group of scholars,” said Rebecca Egbert, C-STEP program director. “Working with Southwestern Community College students as they prepare to come to Carolina and once they’ve arrived in Chapel Hill will be a privilege. These students enrich our campus with their experience, diligence and intelligence.”

 

Students who participate in C-STEP agree to earn an appropriate associate degree at their partner community college and participate actively in the program, which offers students special events, advising and transition and support services both at their home college and at

Carolina. The program also provides transition and support services once students have enrolled at Carolina and are pursuing bachelor’s degrees.

 

The communities surrounding SCC include the Qualla Boundary, home to the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians (EBCI). Members of ECBI participate in many SCC programs and have partnered with SCC and Western Carolina University to develop the Oconaluftee Institute of Cultural Arts on the Qualla Boundary, where students come to study and preserve the artistic traditions of the ECBI community.

 

“Education is a priority for the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians and generations of tribal leaders have worked toward that goal,” said Richard Sneed, principal chief of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians. “By collaborating with C-STEP and Southwestern Community College, our students will benefit for years to come.”

 

C-STEP currently serves almost 845 students; 652 of those have already enrolled at Carolina and 482 have graduated. The remaining students are expected to enroll after completing their community college courses. As of 2018, the average C-STEP graduate GPA is 3.0 and the overall graduation rate is 81 percent.

 

Current C-STEP partners include: Alamance Community College, Cape Fear Community College, Carteret Community College, Central Carolina Community College, Craven Community College, Durham Technical Community College, Fayetteville Technical Community College, Robeson Community College, Sandhills Community College and Wake Technical Community College.

 

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About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill



The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 111 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s nearly 330,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and 149 countries. More than 169,000 live in North Carolina.

 

University Communications: Kate Luck, (919) 445-8360, kate.luck@unc.edu

 

Olivia Holder named 2018 Yenching Scholar

For immediate release

 

Olivia Holder named 2018 Yenching Scholar

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.—July 18, 2018) – University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill alumna Olivia Holder will join the fourth cohort at the Yenching Academy of Peking University in Beijing, China, as a Yenching scholar. A Yenching Academy scholarship offers a fully funded interdisciplinary master’s degree in China studies. Holder will enter the program in fall 2018 with a concentration in history and archeology. She is Carolina’s first Yenching scholar.

 

Holder, from Greenville, North Carolina, graduated from UNC-Chapel Hill in May 2018 with a bachelor’s degree in history, concentrating on modern European history, with minors in Chinese and comparative literature. Additionally, Holder was awarded a William D. Weir Honors Fellowship in Asian studies to travel to China for intensive language study and a summer internship experience, during which Holder interned for the Beijing Cultural Heritage Protection Center and the LanYuan ChaShi tea house. Holder also interned at Eastern Leaves, a tea company that owns a wild tea plantation, as a student.

 

A Carolina Scholar and member of Phi Beta Kappa, Holder was awarded a Class of 1938 Fellowship to study Chinese tea ritual and a Hogan Fellowship to research tea in London in preparation for her senior honors thesis. Her activities on campus included Honor Court and the Ackland Student Guide program.

 

“I am honored to join the fourth cohort of scholars and take part in a dynamic program that uses a unique, interdisciplinary approach to understanding China and our global world,” said Holder. “At Yenching Academy, each scholar designs her course of study. I plan to design a course of study that discovers the threads that connect China’s history to her present and will weave China’s future.”

 

“Our office just initiated the partnership with the Yenching Academy so that UNC-Chapel Hill can nominate and endorse talented students interested in the broad, interdisciplinary master’s program that Yenching offers. We are delighted that Olivia Holder will be the first representative of this new partnership,” said Professor Inger Brodey, director of the Office of Distinguished Scholarships.

 

The English-taught Yenching Academy program emphasizes interdisciplinary education and studying China’s development from both Chinese and international perspectives. During their twelve-month fellowships, international Yenching scholars complete coursework and a thesis. Scholars design their study experience by choosing one of six academic concentrations that direct their electives and field studies. Complementing academic courses are Chinese language training and career-focused workshops, consultations and seminars.

 

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Photo of Holder: https://bit.ly/2MUMrip

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 111 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 322,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and 165 countries. More than 175,000 live in North Carolina.

 

University Communications: Media Relations, (919) 445-8555, mediarelations@unc.edu

Office of Distinguished Scholarships contacts: Inger Brodey, (919) 843-0965, brodey@email.unc.edu and Maggie Douglas, (919) 843-7757, mdouglas@unc.edu

 

 

Unparalleled mosaics discovered by UNC-Chapel Hill archaeologist and team provide new clues on life in an ancient Galilean Jewish village

News Release

 

For immediate use

The Spies Panel

 

Unparalleled mosaics discovered by UNC-Chapel Hill archaeologist and team provide new clues on life in an ancient Galilean Jewish village

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— July 9, 2018) — Recent discoveries by a team of specialists and students at Huqoq in Israel’s Galilee, led by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill professor Jodi Magness, shed new light on the life and culture of an ancient Jewish village. The discoveries indicate villagers flourished under early fifth century Christian rule, contradicting a widespread view that Jewish settlement in the region declined during that period. The large size and elaborate interior decoration of the Huqoq synagogue point to an unexpected level of prosperity.

 

“The mosaics decorating the floor of the Huqoq synagogue revolutionize our understanding of Judaism in this period,” said Magness. “Ancient Jewish art is often thought to be aniconic, or lacking images. But these mosaics, colorful and filled with figured scenes, attest to a rich visual culture as well as to the dynamism and diversity of Judaism in the Late Roman and Byzantine periods.”

 

The first mosaics in the Huqoq synagogue were discovered by Magness’ team in 2012. Since then, Magness, director of the Huqoq excavations and Kenan Distinguished Professor of Early Judaism in the department of religious studies in Carolina’s College of Arts & Sciences, assisted by Shua Kisilevitz of the Israel Antiquities Authority and Tel Aviv University have uncovered additional mosaics every summer. This year, the team’s specialists and students focused their efforts on a series of mosaic panels in the north aisle. Magness said this series is part of the richest, most diverse collection of mosaics ever found in an ancient synagogue.

 

Along the north aisle, mosaics are divided into two rows of panels containing figures and objects with Hebrew inscriptions. One panel labeled “a pole between two” depicts a biblical scene from Numbers 13:23. The images show two spies sent by Moses to explore Canaan carrying a pole with a cluster of grapes. Another panel referencing Isaiah 11:6 includes the inscription “a small child shall lead them.” The panel shows a youth leading an animal on a rope. A fragmentary Hebrew inscription concluding with the phrase “Amen selah,” meaning “Amen forever,” was uncovered at the north end of the east aisle.

 

During this eighth dig, the team also continued to expose a rare discovery in ancient synagogues: columns covered in colorful, painted plaster still intact after nearly 1,600 years.

 

The mosaics have been removed from the site for conservation and the excavated areas have been backfilled. Excavations are scheduled to continue in the summer of 2019. Additional information and updates can be found at the project’s website: www.huqoq.org.

 

Mosaics uncovered by this project include:

  • 2012: Samson and the foxes
  • 2013: Samson carrying the gate of Gaza on his shoulders
  • 2013, 2014 and 2015: a Hebrew inscription surrounded by human figures, animals and mythological creatures including cupids; and the first non-biblical story ever found decorating an ancient synagogue — perhaps the legendary meeting between Alexander the Great and the Jewish high priest
  • 2016: Noah’s Ark; the parting of the Red Sea showing Pharaoh’s soldiers being swallowed by giant fish
  • 2017: a Helios-zodiac cycle; Jonah being swallowed by three successive fish; the building of the Tower of Babel

 

An image of the most recent discovery, images from past digs and video from this summer’s excavation may be downloaded here using password huqoq.

 

Photo/Video credit: Jim Haberman.

 

Sponsors of the project include UNC-Chapel Hill, Baylor University, Brigham Young University and the University of Toronto. Students and staff from Carolina and the consortium schools participated in the dig. Financial support for the 2018 season was also provided by the Friends of Heritage Preservation, the National Geographic Society, the William R. Kenan Jr. Charitable Trust and the Carolina Center for Jewish Studies.

 

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About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill



The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 111 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 323,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and 149 countries. More than 169,000 live in North Carolina.

 

University Communications: Carly Miller, (919) 445-8555, mediarelations@unc.edu

College of Arts and Sciences contact: Kim Spurr, (919) 962-4093, spurrk@email.unc.edu

 

UNC-Chapel Hill alumnus named 2018 Gates Cambridge Scholar

For immediate release

 

UNC-Chapel Hill alumnus named 2018 Gates Cambridge Scholar

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.—July 5, 2018) – University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill alumnus William McInerney has been awarded a prestigious Gates Cambridge Scholarship, which provides full support for graduate study at the University of Cambridge in England.

 

The Gates Cambridge Scholarship, established by a donation to the University of Cambridge from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation in 2000, supports scholars in a variety of fields with outstanding intellectual ability and the potential to be transformative leaders. The Gates Cambridge program seeks to build a global network of leaders committed to improving the lives of others.

 

McInerney, from Chapel Hill, graduated from Carolina in 2011 with a bachelor’s degree in peace, war and defense. A member of Phi Beta Kappa and Honors Carolina, McInerney researched arts and peace education and discovered the power of poetry in the classroom. He went on to work as a poet and educator, performing and teaching worldwide; a journalist and producer with WUNC-FM, focusing on peace and conflict stories; and executive director of a spoken word poetry and peace education nonprofit in Chapel Hill called Sacrificial Poets.

 

As McInerney began to focus on the problem of men’s violence against women, he returned to UNC-Chapel Hill as an employee to develop and help facilitate the UNC Men’s Project, a men’s violence prevention program for undergraduate and graduate students. In recognition of his work, he was awarded a Rotary Peace Fellowship to study conflict resolution from the University of Bradford in England, earning a master’s degree in 2018.

 

McInerney will take up his Gates Cambridge Scholarship this fall to pursue a Ph.D. in education at Queens’ College of Cambridge. He will continue to research the value of creative educational approaches, specifically spoken word poetry, in men’s violence prevention education.

 

“We are delighted that William McInerney, a talented and deserving educator, will have the opportunity of representing UNC-Chapel Hill as our seventh Gates Cambridge scholar,” said Professor Inger Brodey, director of the Office of Distinguished Scholarships. “William is on the forefront of creative ways to address violence prevention.”

 

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Photo of McInerney: https://bit.ly/2lQB2EM

 

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 111 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 322,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and 165 countries. More than 175,000 live in North Carolina.

 

Office of Distinguished Scholarships contacts: Inger Brodey, (919) 843-0965, brodey@email.unc.edu and Maggie Douglas, (919) 843-7757, mdouglas@unc.edu

 

University Communications: Media Relations, (919) 445-8555, mediarelations@unc.edu