University of North Carolina System names A. Wesley Burks, M.D. CEO of UNC Health Care and UNC-Chapel Hill Medical School Dean

        

 

News Release

Media contacts:
Audrey Smith, (919) 962-8596                                      Phil Bridges, (984) 974-1152
audrey.smith@unc.edu                                              phil.bridges@unchealth.unc.edu

 

University of North Carolina System names A. Wesley Burks, M.D.  CEO of UNC Health Care and

UNC-Chapel Hill Medical School Dean


Dr. Burks tapped to lead growth efforts in education, research, and clinical care

for North Carolina’s health system

 

(CHAPEL HILL, N.C.  – Dec. 14, 2018) ­– Dr. A. Wesley Burks, who has served as executive dean for the UNC School of Medicine and as a member of UNC Health Care’s senior leadership team, has been named CEO of UNC Health Care, Dean of the UNC School of Medicine, and Vice Chancellor for Medical Affairs at UNC-Chapel Hill.

 

Burks succeeds Dr. Bill Roper who announced his retirement last May and was appointed in October to serve as interim president of the UNC System beginning in mid-January. He will begin his new role on Jan. 15.

Burks’ name was presented by President Margaret Spellings to the Board of Governors for a vote following unanimous votes by the UNC Health Care Board of Directors and the UNC-Chapel Hill Board of Trustees.

 

“Dr. Burks is the right person to lead UNC Health Care and UNC School of Medicine at a time of tremendous and unprecedented change in the health care industry,” said Spellings. “Having served as executive dean and member of UNC Health Care’s senior leadership team, he is uniquely positioned to immediately develop and execute a strategy that leads our health care system and School of Medicine into the future.”

 

“It is the highest honor to serve these amazing institutions as CEO and Dean,” said Burks. “I look forward to working with many people, especially our talented team, to develop and communicate a strategic vision and long-term goals for the institution, while strengthening our national and international standing. I am humbled and appreciative of the confidence placed in me by the Board of Governors, Board of Trustees and UNC Health Care Board of Directors.”

 

“No greater service can be rendered to the citizens of North Carolina than having the opportunity to receive quality, accessible and affordable health care. It is also our responsibility to teach the next generation of health care professionals while we continue our research that is changing the future of medicine. That is a huge responsibility, and having worked closely with Wesley for years I know he will lead the UNC School of Medicine and UNC Health Care forward.” said UNC-Chapel Hill Chancellor Carol L. Folt. “A world-renowned researcher who has dedicated his professional life to finding new cures for the most deadly diseases, Wesley embraces compassionate care outcomes that change the lives of patients and their families. Thanks to his focus on education, there are thousands of caring physicians and clinicians providing the best, affordable care across our state, nation and world.”

 

Dr. Burks has spent over 30 years taking care of patients, conducting research, helping to educate trainees, and leading institutions. He joined UNC in 2011 as physician-in-chief of the North Carolina Children’s Hospital and was named chair of the department of pediatrics in 2012. In 2015, he was named executive dean of the University of North Carolina School of Medicine. Prior to serving at UNC, Burks worked at Duke University Medical Center and Arkansas Children’s Hospital. He is a well-published and renowned researcher in the field of pediatric allergy and immunology.  Burks led a research team that was recently published in the New England Journal of Medicine for the world’s first treatment for potentially fatal peanut allergies.

 

“I could not be more pleased at the appointment of Dr. Burks to lead our health care system and school of medicine,” stated Charlie Owen, chair of UNC Health Care Board of Directors. “Wesley is a tremendous leader and visionary with the perfect combination of business acumen, researcher and educator to advance our institutions.

 

Burks resides in Chapel Hill with his wife, Jan. They have three children and four grandchildren.

 

Photo of Burks:  http://news.unchealthcare.org/photo-library/leadership/wesley-burks/view

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 74 bachelor’s, 104 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools including the College of Arts & Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s nearly 330,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, US Territories and 162 countries. Almost 178,000 live in North Carolina.

 

About UNC Health Care

UNC Health Care is an integrated health care system comprised of UNC Hospitals and its provider network, UNC Faculty Physicians, UNC Physicians Network, and the clinical patient care programs of the UNC School of Medicine. Additional hospital entities and health care systems include UNC REX Healthcare, Chatham Hospital, Johnston Health, Pardee Hospital, Caldwell UNC Memorial, Nash UNC Health Care, Wayne UNC Memorial, UNC Lenoir Health Care and UNC Rockingham Health Care.

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UNC-Chapel Hill experts available to discuss 2018-2019 flu topics

UNC-Chapel Hill experts available to discuss 2018-2019 flu topics

 

Last year’s influenza season was the worst in nearly a decade and it’s too soon to say how severe the 2018-2019 season will be. UNC-Chapel Hill infectious disease researchers are available to discuss a wide range of topics, including infection rates in North Carolina and the United States, tips for preventing the flu, at-risk populations, facts and myths about the flu vaccine, the need for a universal flu vaccine, and pediatric flu concerns.

 

If you’d like to speak with an expert, call (919) 445-8555 or email mediarelations@unc.edu.

 

 

Flu Basics

 

Dr. Emily Ciccone is an infectious diseases fellow in the UNC School of Medicine’s Division of Infectious Diseases and a former pediatrics resident. She can discuss symptoms of the flu in children and adults as well as diagnostic testing for the flu and other viral respiratory illnesses.

 

 

 

Dr. Claire Farel is an assistant professor of medicine in the UNC School of Medicine’s Division of Infectious Diseases and the medical director of the Infectious Diseases Clinic at N.C. Memorial Hospital. She can discuss symptoms of the flu in adults and ways to prevent the flu, including vaccination and proper hand hygiene.

 

 

 

Dr. David Weber is a professor of epidemiology in the UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health and a professor of pediatrics and medicine in the UNC School of Medicine’s Division of Infectious Diseases and Department of Pediatrics. He can discuss various clinical aspects and epidemiology of the flu, such as complications arising from infections, current rates of infection in North Carolina and the United States, and which age populations are at high risk of getting the flu and becoming severely ill.

 

 

Pediatric Flu

 

Dr. Martha Perry is a professor of pediatrics in the UNC School of Medicine. She can discuss pediatric flu concerns, including why children get sick more often than adults, why children who are sick with the flu may take longer than adults to recover and the importance of vaccinating children against the flu.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Flu Prevention and Behaviors

 

Dr. Allison Aiello is a professor of epidemiology and leads the social epidemiology program in the UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health. Aiello is currently a member of a working group of leading experts for The World Health Organization to help develop guidance on nonpharmaceutical public health measures for mitigating the impact of pandemic influenza. She can discuss methods for preventing the flu through behavior change and non-pharmaceutical interventions, such as hand washing, isolation, quarantine and school closings. She can also discuss technologies for tracking flu in the community setting and outbreaks.

 

 

Vaccination

 

Dr. Noel Brewer is a professor of health behavior at the UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health. He is a decision scientist whose research focuses on how people make risky health decisions. He can discuss the reasons why people don’t get vaccinated and interventions that effectively increase uptake.

 

 

 

 

Dr. Macary Marciniak is a clinical associate professor in the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy. She is an immunizing pharmacist and a national trainer for student pharmacists and pharmacists regarding vaccine administration. She can discuss myths and facts about flu vaccine, and flu vaccine provision in pharmacy settings. She can also discuss tips to prevent the flu.

 

 

 

Dr. Tim Sheahan is an assistant professor of epidemiology at the UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health where he focuses on the development of therapeutics for emerging viruses like influenza, SARS and Middle East respiratory syndrome. He can discuss flu vaccine development and effectiveness. He can also discuss the need for a universal vaccine and antiviral drugs, and the current status of these drugs, including the new antiviral Xofluza.

 

 

 

P: (919) 445-8555  |  E: mediarelations@unc.edu

124 students at UNC-Chapel Hill inducted into Phi Beta Kappa

For immediate use

 

124 students at UNC-Chapel Hill inducted into Phi Beta Kappa

Phi Beta Kappa is the nation’s oldest and most honored college honorary society

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— Dec. 5, 2018) – Phi Beta Kappa, the nation’s oldest and most honored college honorary society, has inducted 124 University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill students as new members.

 

Phi Beta Kappa membership is open to undergraduates in the college and professional degree programs who meet stringent eligibility requirements. Less than 1 percent of all college students qualify.

 

A student who has completed 75 hours of course work in the liberal arts and sciences with a GPA of 3.85 or better (on a 4-point scale) is eligible for membership. Also eligible is any student who has completed 105 hours of course work in the liberal arts and sciences with a 3.75 GPA.

 

Phi Beta Kappa has 286 chapters nationwide. UNC-Chapel Hill’s chapter, Alpha of North Carolina, was founded in 1904 and is the oldest of seven chapters in the state. Each year, Phi Beta Kappa chapters and alumni associations across the country raise and distribute more than $1 million in awards, scholarships and prizes benefiting high schools and college students.

 

Phi Beta Kappa officers at Carolina for 2018-2019 are students Katherine Gora Combs, president; Pooja Joshi, vice president; and Christiana Cornea, recording secretary. James L. Leloudis, professor of history, Peter T. Grauer associate dean for Honors Carolina and director of the James M. Johnston Center for Undergraduate Excellence, is chapter executive secretary and faculty advisor.

 

The recent induction ceremony featured a keynote address by Buck Goldstein, University Entrepreneur in Residence and professor of the practice in the economics department. New members received certificates and Phi Beta Kappa keys, the organization’s symbol.

 

Listed below are 123 inductees, 95 of whom are from North Carolina. The names appear below in alphabetical order by North Carolina county, then by state and country. All study in the College of Arts and Sciences except where otherwise noted. One student chose not to be listed.

 

Alamance County

  • Samuel Sumner Lowe, a junior with a computer science major and cognitive science and music minors, son of Ed Lowe and Beth Lowe of Elon.
  • Megan Elizabeth Miller, a junior with an environmental health sciences major and a geography minor, daughter of Lisa Miller and Dr. Mark Miller of Elon.

 

Alexander County

  • Robert Andrew West, a senior with a statistics and analytics major and music and mathematics minors, son of Eric West and Tammy West of Taylorsville.

 

Ashe County

  • Emily Suzanne Long, a senior with biology and English majors and a medicine, literature and culture minor, daughter of Tim Long and Sandy Long of Jefferson.

 

Buncombe County

  • Casey Aurora DeMarco, a senior with a human development and family studies major, daughter of Gordon DeMarco and Jill DeMarco of Arden.
  • Brooke Noel Fisher, a senior with journalism and global studies majors and a Chinese minor, daughter of Rick Fisher and Brenda Fisher of Weaverville.
  • Nicholas Clayton Konz, a junior with physics and mathematics majors, son of Dr. Jeffrey Konz and Dr. Louly Peacock of Asheville.

 

Cabarrus County

  • Nicole Katherine Ashburn, a senior with a psychology major and neuroscience and biology minors, daughter of Randy Ashburn and June Ashburn of Concord.
  • William Michael Alexander Yoder, a senior with English and history majors, son of Michael Yoder and Christina Yoder of Concord.

Cleveland County

  • Timothy Warren Hartman, a senior with chemistry and Hispanic linguistics majors, of Shelby.

 

Cumberland County

  • Kathy Chan, a senior with a nutrition major and chemistry and Asian studies minors, daughter of Dr. Tat Chan and Maggie Chan of Fayetteville.
  • Clara Marcelle Shirley Schwamm, a senior with information science and Germanic and Slavic languages and literatures majors and a mathematics minor, daughter of Alice Ann Campbell and John Campbell of Hope Mills.

 

Dare County

  • Madeline Brigid Bailey, a May 2018 graduate with a psychology major, of Kill Devil Hills.
  • Caelan Johannes Dick, a senior with economics and political science majors and a public policy minor, son of Ingrid Schmedtje and David Dick of Salvo.

 

Durham County

  • Nancy Kitterman, a senior with a political science major and philosophy, politics and economics and social and economic justice minors, of Durham.
  • Kailey Madison Morgan, a senior with English and political science majors and a creative writing minor, daughter of Tonya Morgan and Lafmin Morgan of Durham.
  • Kevin James Parham, a May 2018 graduate with health policy and management and Asian studies majors and a chemistry minor, son of Kenneth Parham Jr. and Susan Parham of Hillsborough.

 

Forsyth County

  • Danielle Leanne Bruce, a senior with human development and family studies and global studies majors, daughter of Robert Bruce and Christina Bruce of Winston-Salem.
  • Sophie Gentle Capshaw-Mack, a senior with a philosophy major, daughter of Teri Capshaw of Washington, DC.
  • Bethany Kristin Cole, a senior with economics and public policy majors, daughter of Melissa Cole and Brian Cole of Winston-Salem.
  • Emma Grace Gillett, a senior with history and English majors, daughter of Sarah Gillett and Andrew Gillett of Winston-Salem.
  • Kacey Dale Rigsby, a senior with English and Spanish majors and a creative writing minor, of Clemmons.
  • Ashley Nicole Smith, a junior with a computer science major and Hispanic studies and biology minors, daughter of Clare Smith and Lindsey Smith of Clemmons.

 

Guilford County

  • Tricia Celeste Bacon, a senior with a computer science major and mathematics and music minors, of Summerfield.
  • Angelica Mae Ford, a senior with human development and family studies and psychology majors and a women’s and gender studies minor, daughter of Sylvia Ford and John Ford of Kernersville.
  • Lily Hong Lou, a junior with a computer science major and an entrepreneurship minor, of Greensboro.
  • Kimberly Mara Oliver, a senior with history and anthropology majors and an American Indian and indigenous studies minor, of Greensboro.
  • Jessica Rose Whalen, a senior with psychology and anthropology majors and a Hispanic studies minor, daughter of Theresa Whalen and Richard Whalen of Greensboro.

 

Harnett County

  • Elizabeth Reaves Houston, a senior with a chemistry major and a medicine, literature and culture minor, daughter of Dr. Paige Houston and Keith Houston of Dunn.

 

Henderson County

  • Mary Margaret McKenzie, a senior with Arab cultures and French and Francophone studies majors, daughter of Susan McKenzie of Hendersonville and Kenneth McKenzie of Monroe, LA.
  • Sylvia Ann Ward, a senior with English and psychology majors, daughter of Dr. Robert Ward and Sally Ward of Hendersonville.

 

Johnston County

  • Melanie Amber Langness, a senior with a political science major and art history and public policy minors, of McGee’s Crossroads.
  • Lily Zhang, a May 2018 graduate with applied mathematics and computer science majors and a statistics and analytics minor, daughter of Dr. Max Zhang and Dr. Qin Lu of Clayton.

 

Mecklenburg County

  • Marc David Brunton, a senior with public policy and English majors and a creative writing minor, son of Jacqueline Brunton of Charlotte and Stephen Brunton of Palm Springs, CA.
  • Kevin Edward Gauch, a junior with economics and history majors and a philosophy, politics and economics minor, son of Thomas Gauch and Cathleen Gauch of Charlotte.
  • Hope McCleese Gehle, a senior with a biology major and social and economic justice and chemistry minors, daughter of Janice Rea and David Gehle.
  • Catherine Lee Gill, a senior with economics and statistics and analytics majors, daughter of Thold Gill and Ruth Ellen Gill of Charlotte.
  • Brenee Ansleigh Goforth, a May 2018 graduate with a political science major and a philosophy, politics and economics minor, of Mint Hill.
  • Linda Marie Henry, a junior with a biomedical and health sciences engineering major and chemistry and German minors, daughter of Frank Henry and Anette Henry of Charlotte.
  • Danny Ly, a senior with statistics and analytics and economics majors, son of Hanh Ly and Buoi Ta of Charlotte.
  • Andrew Ward Maxwell, a junior with a health policy and management major and business administration and Spanish for the health professions minors, son of Robin Maxwell and John Maxwell of Charlotte.
  • Casey Nora Rothrock, a senior with a history major and a cognitive science minor, of Charlotte.
  • Alexander James Roupas, a senior with a biomedical and health sciences engineering major and chemistry and music minors, son of Donna Roupas and Anastasi Roupas of Charlotte.
  • Gray McCracken Smith, a senior with computer science and information science majors, son of Eric Smith and Sally Smith of Charlotte.

 

Moore County

  • Loc Gia Ho, a senior with a philosophy major, son of Yen Nguyen of Aberdeen.

 

Nash County

  • Nicholas Kenneth Chamberlain, a senior with a biology major and computer science and chemistry minors, son of Dr. Matthew Chamberlain and Lori Chamberlain of Rocky Mount.

 

New Hanover County

  • Abby Marie Phelps, a senior with an environmental science major and a German minor, of Wilmington.
  • Katherine Mae Spencer, a senior with a biology major and a chemistry minor, daughter of Lynn Spencer and Terry Spencer of Wilmington.

 

Orange County

  • Vikram Aikat, a junior with computer science and quantitative biology majors and a chemistry minor, son of Dr. Deb Aikat and Dr. Jay Aikat of Chapel Hill.
  • Thomas Alexander Elliott, a senior with political science and contemporary European studies majors and a German minor, son of John Elliott of Montreal, Quebec, and Joanneke de Cock of Chapel Hill.
  • Matthew Louis Gilleskie, a senior with a biostatistics major and a chemistry minor, of Chapel Hill.
  • Emma Giusto, a senior with political science and economics majors and a public policy minor, daughter of Sharon Carlson of Pittsboro.
  • Emily Goldstein, a May 2018 graduate with a geography major and city and regional planning and public policy minors, daughter of Phil Goldstein and Donna Goldstein of Chapel Hill.
  • Samuel Nielsen, a junior with economics and computer science majors, son of Martha Diehl of Chapel Hill and the late Dr. Francois Nielsen.
  • Daniel Stratton, a senior with a computer science major and an entrepreneurship minor, son of Marianne Chan and Timothy Stratton of Chapel Hill.

 

Pitt County

  • Larry Yang, a senior with a biology major and chemistry and neuroscience minors, of Greenville.

 

Randolph County

  • Matthew Scott Queen, a senior with economics and political science majors, son of Scott Queen and LouAnn Queen of Asheboro.

 

Rowan County

  • Abraham Louis Post, a senior with computer science and political science majors and an information science minor, son of Jonathan Post and Libby Post of Salisbury.

 

Rutherford County

  • Allyson Marie Yelton, a senior with psychology and Hispanic literatures and cultures majors and a geography minor, daughter of Dr. David Yelton and Denise Yelton of Rutherfordton.

 

Stanly County

  • Sarah Elizabeth Krug, a May 2017 graduate with media and journalism and anthropology majors, of Albemarle.

 

Surry County

  • Mary Beth Browne, a senior with political science and peace, war and defense majors and an environmental studies minor, daughter of Charles Browne and Lu Ann Browne of Mount Airy.

 

Union County

  • William Hunt Cachine, a junior with applied mathematics and economics majors and a computer science minor, son of Jeffrey Cachine and Michelle Cachine of Waxhaw.
  • Erin Marie Danford, a senior with an environmental science major and a geography minor, of Waxhaw.
  • Om Vinayak Dave, a senior with a nutrition major and a chemistry minor, son of Brinda Dave and Vinayak Dave.
  • Meredith Grace Emery, a junior with a studio art major and a geography minor, daughter of Angela Emery and David Emery of Waxhaw.
  • Mariah Caroline Harrelson, a senior with public policy and political science majors and a philosophy, politics and economics minor, daughter of Calvin Harrelson and Margaret Harrelson of Charlotte.
  • Emily Ruth Hazlett, a senior with a Hispanic linguistics major and a biology minor, daughter of Ted Hazlett and Carolyn Hazlett of Monroe.
  • Lee-Ann Mai Nguyen, a senior with a biomedical and health sciences engineering major and a Spanish for the health professions minor, daughter of Tuan Nguyen and Lieu Nguyen of Weddington.
  • Adam Joseph Sommers, a senior with a chemistry major and a history minor, of Weddington.

 

Wake County

  • Anne Meredith Bennett, a junior with American studies and music majors, daughter of Dr. Betsy Bennett and Dr. Brian Bennett of Raleigh.
  • Caroline Elizabeth Butler, a senior with a biology major and Spanish for the health professions and chemistry minors, daughter of Andrew Butler and Sarah Butler of Apex.
  • Corwin A. Carr, a junior with statistics and analytics and chemistry majors and a computer science minor, son of Alexander Carr and Elizabeth Carr of Raleigh.
  • Samveg Arpan Desai, a senior with a biostatistics major and chemistry and mathematics minors, son of Arpan Desai and Trupti Desai of Raleigh.
  • Shivani Desai, a senior with a biology major and chemistry and medical anthropology minors, daughter of Himansu Desai and Manisha Desai of Wake Forest.
  • Justin Lee Do, a junior with information science and computer science majors and a philosophy, politics and economics minor, son of Minh Do and Tina Lee of Raleigh.
  • Jake Matthew Evans, a senior with a chemistry major and a computer science minor, son of John Evans and Mary Evans of Willow Spring.
  • Alec Jennings Fischbein, a senior with contemporary European studies and political science majors, son of Gary Fischbein and Carole Fischbein of Cary.
  • Morgan Jean Goetz, a senior with a biomedical and health sciences engineering major, daughter of Andrew Goetz and Cathy Goetz of Cary.
  • Isabelle Hirschy, a senior with political science and peace, war and defense majors and a social and economic justice minor, daughter of Stephanie Hirschy and Bradford Hirschy of Cary.
  • Alexandra Howland Hitson, a senior with economics and French majors, daughter of Dr. Molly Leavitt of Raleigh.
  • Alex Jose, a senior with physics and mathematics majors, son of Jose Chandy and Lynda Jose of Cary.
  • Alexander Quinn Shiu-Kei Kan, a junior with computer science and statistics and analytics majors and a cognitive science minor, son of Victor Kan and Etta Kan of Morrisville.
  • Richard Vu Le, a senior with computer science and information science majors, son of Colette Le and Khai Le of Raleigh.
  • Brennan Lewis, a senior with public policy and women’s and gender studies majors, daughter of Sera Lewis and Chad Lewis of Apex.
  • Sabrina Corin Madrigal, a senior with a biology major and a chemistry minor, daughter of Kimberly Patrey and John Patrey of Raleigh.
  • Tanner Lane Morgan, a senior with political science and history majors, son of Kelly Morgan and Jennifer Petty.
  • Kyra Coates Mulder, a senior with biostatistics and computer science majors, daughter of Curtis Mulder and Rachel Elliott of Raleigh.
  • David Near, a senior with a biology major and chemistry and history minors, son of Joseph Near and Dianne Near of Holly Springs.
  • Jackson Arthur Oakley, a senior with a global studies major and a Spanish for the professions minor, son of Bryan Oakley and Elaine Oakley of Raleigh.
  • Lily Caroline Rashid, a senior with an exercise and sport science major, daughter of Irfan Rashid and Michelle Rashid of Cary.
  • Zachary Michael Ripberger, a senior with an exercise and sport science major and business administration and Hispanic studies minors, son of Michael Ripberger and Wendy Ripberger of Cary.
  • Cody Bray Staples, a senior with psychology and religious studies majors, of Wendell.
  • Alyssa Jenna Tan, a junior with a biostatistics major and Spanish for the health professions and chemistry minors, daughter of Aldin Tan and Carmela Soraya Flores-Tan of Cary.
  • Dylan Jude Tastet, a senior with computer science and information science majors, son of Sylvia Tastet and Lance Tastet of Apex.
  • Sarah Nicole Wotus, a senior with a biostatistics major and an environmental science and studies minor, daughter of Cindy Wotus and Jeffrey Wotus of Apex.

 

California

  • John Ezra Miles Rawitsch, a senior with a geography major and an urban studies and planning minor, of Los Angeles.
  • Lauren Julia Weisel, a May 2018 graduate with an exercise and sport science major and chemistry and biology minors, daughter of Catherine Weisel and Gregory Weisel of Carlsbad.

 

Connecticut

  • Madison Rackear, a senior with a biochemistry major, daughter of Kathleen Rackear of Fairfield and Robert Rackear of Stratford.
  • Caitlin Young, a senior with political science and economics majors and a business administration minor, daughter of Michael Young and Kathleen Young of Southington.

 

Florida

  • Brooke Rose Bekoff, a senior with political science and history majors, daughter of Nelson Bekoff and Valerie Bekoff of Boca Raton.
  • Claudia Teresa Malone, a senior with sociology and management and society majors, of Fort Lauderdale.
  • Lauren Elizabeth Shumpert, a senior with a sociology major and women’s and gender studies and social and economic justice minors, daughter of Holly Shumpert and Scott Shumpert of Pensacola.
  • Grace Darby Tan, a senior with a biology major and chemistry and environmental science and studies minors, daughter of Dr. Thomas Tan and Toni Tan of Pensacola.

 

Georgia

  • Jamie Patricia DeCicco, a senior with a psychology major and biology and chemistry minors, daughter of Christine DeCicco and Daniel DeCicco of Fayetteville.

 

Illinois

  • Evan M. Thompson, a senior with psychology and piano performance majors, of Chicago.

 

Maryland

  • Caroline Gladd, a junior with business administration and political science majors, daughter of Holly Gladd and Paul Gladd of Potomac.
  • Henry He, a senior with an economics major and a business administration minor, of North Potomac.
  • Genevieve India Victoria Molyneaux, a senior with economics and political science majors and an environmental science and studies minor, daughter of Dr. Elizabeth Molyneaux and Robert Molyneaux of Gaithersburg.

 

New Jersey

  • Thomas Ross Marshall, a junior with physics and music performance majors, of Manalapan.
  • Adesh Ranganna, a senior with nutrition and public policy majors and a chemistry minor, son of Suresh Ranganna and Anuradha Ranganna of Marlboro.

 

New York

  • Mia Gabrielle DeMarco, a senior with a biology major and a chemistry minor, daughter of Wendy DeMarco and David DeMarco of Schenectady.

 

Ohio

  • Allison Anne Carter, a senior with biology and women’s and gender studies majors and a chemistry minor, daughter of William Carter and Elizabeth Carter of Loveland.

 

South Carolina

  • Matthew Bleakley Ballance, a senior with archaeology and history majors and a geological sciences minor, son of Dr. Julia Ballance and Kevin Ballance of Columbia.
  • Michala Sterling Patterson, a junior with biology and global studies majors and a medicine, literature and culture minor, daughter of Micheal Patterson and Teresa Patterson.
  • Seth Daniel Pinosky, a May 2018 graduate with a biology major and a chemistry minor, son of Karen Pinosky and Mark Pinosky of Mount Pleasant.
  • Julia Cristine Whitten, a senior with English and Spanish majors, daughter of Robert Whitten and Onelia Madden of Summerville.

 

Texas

  • Benjamin Scott Walzel, a senior with business administration and biology majors, of Dallas.

 

Virginia

  • Sarah Ann Burk, a senior with English and political science majors and an advertising and public relations minor, daughter of Teresa Ipock Burk of Kinston, NC, and Ted Burk of Stockholm, Sweden.
  • Malik Savoy McNeil Jabati, a senior with economics and computer science majors and a philosophy, politics and economics minor, son of Keith Jabati and Myra Compton-Jabati of Alexandria.
  • Rachel Louise Tyeryar, a senior with economics and global studies majors and an Arabic minor, daughter of Jennifer Tyeryar of Haymarket and David Tyeryar of Raleigh, NC.

 

Washington

  • Abby Jean Bergman, a senior with biology and music majors, of Kirkland.

 

West Virginia

  • Noah Mancuso, a senior with chemistry and global health majors and a biology minor, son of Paul Mancuso Jr. and Janet Mancuso.

 

China

  • Yunfei Wang, a junior with biology and psychology majors and a chemistry minor, son of Dr. Bo Wu and Dr. Mingxing Wang of Matthews, NC.

 

 

 

-Carolina-

 

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 74 bachelor’s, 104 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools including the College of Arts & Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s nearly 330,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, US Territories and 162 countries. Almost 178,000 live in North Carolina.

 

Phi Beta Kappa contact: Jason Clemmons, (919) 843-7756, jason@unc.edu

University Communications: Media Relations, (919) 445-8555, mediarelations@unc.edu

 

Winston B. Crisp, UNC School of Law alumnus and former vice chancellor for student affairs, to speak at winter Commencement

For immediate use

 

Winston B. Crisp, UNC School of Law alumnus and former vice chancellor for student affairs, to speak at winter Commencement

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— Nov. 13, 2018) – Winston B. Crisp, former University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill vice chancellor for student affairs, will deliver the University’s 2018 winter Commencement address on Sunday, Dec. 16, 2 p.m., in the Dean E. Smith Center.

 

Crisp joined student affairs at UNC-Chapel Hill in 2005 as assistant vice chancellor. In 2010, he was named vice chancellor and remained in that role until October 2018 when he retired from the University after 26 years of service. During his time at Carolina, Crisp became an integral part of the student experience, serving thousands of students and families. In the 2016-2017 academic year, student affairs conducted more than 1,200 workshops and events, employed nearly 1,500 students and supported approximately 780 student organizations.

 

“When we think about Carolina, it is because of people like Winston who leave personal and lasting Tar Heel footprints on our campus and in our hearts. He cares so deeply and gives so completely, and no one ever forgets their first Vice Crispy hug,” said Chancellor Carol L. Folt. “Winston always placed students at the center of our discussions as he worked to create student success and belonging in our Carolina Community. I was honored to have him as a most trusted advisor and friend. He is the right speaker to address a new generation of Carolina leaders who are beginning their personal journeys of service that will leave a mark on our state, nation and world.”

 

In March 2018, Crisp led the effort to convene a Mental Health Task Force at the University to assess the scope of mental health care needs for students and to provide recommendations to the administration and Board of Trustees about policies and programs related to mental health care. Crisp also co-chaired the Chancellor’s Task Force on UNC-Chapel Hill History, working with colleagues to tell the full, complete and accurate history of the University.

 

“I am humbled by the opportunity to be this year’s winter Commencement speaker and consider it an honor and privilege,” said Crisp. “I am looking forward to it tremendously.”

 

A 1989 graduate of Johnson C. Smith University in Charlotte, Crisp arrived at UNC-Chapel Hill that same year to attend the UNC School of Law. Upon graduation, he became the law school’s first full-time assistant dean for student affairs and the first associate dean for student services.  In those positions, he played a key role in strengthening coordination among the academic program, financial management, outreach and student support areas.

 

For more information on winter Commencement, visit http://commencement.unc.edu/.

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 74 bachelor’s, 104 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools including the College of Arts & Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s nearly 330,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, US Territories and 162 countries. Almost 178,000 live in North Carolina.

 

 

University Communications: Media Relations, (919) 445-8555, mediarelations@unc.edu

 

Blue Cross NC, UNC-Chapel Hill Collaborate to Expand Rural Primary Care

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Blue Cross NC, UNC-Chapel Hill Collaborate to Expand Rural Primary Care

 

 Blue Cross NC to invest $800,000 in new UNC-Chapel Hill program that improves access to care, education and employment opportunities throughout Rockingham County  

 

(Durham, N.C. – Nov. 8, 2018) — Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina (Blue Cross NC) and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill today announced the UNC School of Medicine’s new Primary Care Rural Advancement Program to address a need for better access to healthcare in Rockingham County. Made possible by an $800,000 investment from Blue Cross NC, the program will increase patient-centered primary care and recruit more residents to enter health care professions in the county and the neighboring area.

 

Along with UNC Health Care’s purchase of the former Morehead Memorial Hospital (now UNC Rockingham Health Care) in Rockingham County last year, the program will help prepare the region to expand its ability to provide health care in the rural community.

 

“We want people to have access to high-quality primary care no matter where in North Carolina they call home,” said Dr. Patrick Conway, President and CEO of Blue Cross NC. “This investment will help make sure primary care physicians get the resources, education, and training they need to practice in rural communities.”

 

The North Carolina General Assembly is supporting the program with additional funding to augment Blue Cross NC’s investment. The 2016 Rockingham County Community Health Assessment Report states that the county has the lowest rate of primary care physicians per 10,000 residents at 4.7, compared to neighboring counties and to the state average of 7.6.[1] It can be challenging to work as a health care provider in rural communities, largely because of limited access to resources like specialized medical and social services. The Primary Care Rural Advancement Program will incorporate multidisciplinary opportunities for students pursuing medicine, nursing, pharmacy and other health professions to better prepare them for practicing in rural communities. The program will also support current Rockingham County providers as they strengthen primary care access, implementing care models that include both behavioral and physical health.

 

“Thanks to this generous gift from Blue Cross North Carolina, and support from the General Assembly, we will be able to enhance patient-centered primary care services in Rockingham County,” said Cristy Page, MD, MPH, Chair of UNC Family Medicine. “The funding will help us work with the community to better understand its health care needs, while developing a collaborative approach to meeting those needs with our local community partners. We aim to build a training pipeline for primary care and to work with practices to improve quality of care, through initiatives like making tele-behavioral health available in the community through the UNC Physician’s Network. We will continue to meet with key stakeholders in the design and implementation of these next steps, and we appreciate the opportunity to make a difference in Rockingham County.”

 

In January, the former Morehead Memorial Hospital was renamed UNC Rockingham Health Care, following its purchase by UNC Health Care. Since then, the hospital has expanded services such as oncology, added new medical providers and continues to look at ways to better serve residents of the county and surrounding area.

 

“I would like to thank Blue Cross North Carolina and UNC-Chapel Hill for joining the General Assembly in this significant investment in Rockingham County,” said Senate Leader Phil Berger. “Access to high-quality healthcare in our rural communities is a constant struggle, and this program will not only increase that access, but will also train and prepare future generations of healthcare workers, ensuring that access continues.”

 

The investment is part of Blue Cross NC’s larger commitment to contribute $50 million toward community health initiatives in 2018 and is partially funded through $40 million in tax savings generated through the recently passed Tax Cuts and Jobs Act. At UNC-Chapel Hill, Blue Cross NC’s investment will support For All Kind: the Campaign for Carolina, the university’s historic $4.25 billion fundraising campaign. It is inspired by the Blueprint for Next, Carolina’s overall strategic framework built on two core strategies: “of the public, for the public,” and “innovation made fundamental.”

                                                           

About Blue Cross NC

Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina improves the health and well-being of our customers and communities by providing innovative health care products, services and information to more than 3.89 million members, including approximately 1 million served on behalf of other Blue Plans. Since 1933, we have worked to make North Carolina a better place to live through our support of community organizations, programs and events that promote good health. We have been recognized as one of the World’s Most Ethical Companies by Ethisphere Institute every year since 2012. Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina is an independent licensee of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association. Visit Blue Cross online at bluecrossnc.com. All other marks are the property of their respective owners.

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 74 bachelor’s, 104 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools including the College of Arts & Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s nearly 330,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, US Territories and 162 countries. Almost 178,000 live in North Carolina.

 

###

 

University Communications: Carly Miller, (919) 445-8555, mediarelations@unc.edu

Office of University Development: Kim Elenez, (919) 962-1628, kelenez@email.unc.edu

 

[1] Rockingham County Community Health Assessment

UNC-Chapel Hill announces $21M gift to support media and journalism, medicine and athletics

For immediate use

 

UNC-Chapel Hill announces $21M gift to support media and journalism, medicine and athletics

 

Largest-ever gift to School of Media and Journalism will fund new Curtis Media Center

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C. – Nov. 2, 2018) – Today the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill announced a $21.275 million gift from the Curtis Foundation, thanks to the generosity of Barbara and Don Curtis. The donation includes $10 million for the largest gift ever made to the UNC School of Media and Journalism, in part to build a new state-of-the-art media center to bring the forefront of the media world to Carolina students. Additional funding will create immersive extracurricular learning opportunities for students, and support the pursuit of service and excellence in both medicine and athletics.

 

“From his first days at Carolina, Don Curtis has dedicated his life to pioneering work in broadcast journalism,” said Chancellor Carol L. Folt. “With the largest gift in the School of Media and Journalism’s history, the Curtis family is passing on his legacy to the next generation of journalists, creating spaces for innovation and collaboration among our students and faculty. Their generosity and commitment to Carolina, from athletics fields to the hospital and classrooms, is remarkable. This gift will keep us at the cutting edge.”

 

The gift to the School of Media and Journalism will support efforts to help students gain a foothold in a rapidly changing industry. Eight million dollars will fund the construction of the Curtis Media Center, a flexible space that brings together students and faculty in a collaborative environment around emerging technology. By eliminating both literal and figurative barriers in a state-of-the-art environment, the Curtis Media Center will challenge students to learn and practice their craft while working in teams. The adaptable teaching and production facilities will prepare students to lead the industry into a new era by immersing them in experiences to develop critical thinking, creativity and collaborative skills with the latest technology at their fingertips. The center will serve students and faculty from across campus as well as those in the School of Media and Journalism. Plans for the building will require approval from the UNC-Chapel Hill Board of Trustees prior to construction. The building is expected be completed within the next four years at a site yet to be finalized.

 

The remaining $2 million to the School of Media and Journalism expands the existing Don and Barbara Curtis Excellence Fund for Extracurricular Activities and establishes a new fund to support programs within the school. The Curtises started the extracurricular fund in 2003 to encourage and support learning experiences outside of the classroom without the worry of cost. In the 2017-18 academic year alone, the fund allowed 43 students to gain real-world, hands-on experience critical to thriving in their chosen industry.

 

“These gifts are as much for the state of North Carolina as for the University,” said Don Curtis. “For all my life, the University of North Carolina has been the primary driver of progress and change. As a result, North Carolina can hold its head high as a national leader. I can think of no better investment than in medical research and the media to ensure that this progress continues and to see that North Carolina can provide the proper leadership for the future.”

 

“The Curtis family’s long-running generosity and dedication to our school has created life-changing experiences for countless students by funding immersive learning activities outside of the classroom,” said Susan King, dean of the School of Media and Journalism. “This gift is visionary and transformational for our school and this campus. It speaks to our values of collaboration, innovation and transparency as a public institution with a responsibility to engage with issues and inform citizens.”

 

Three million dollars will support the ongoing work of the UNC School of Medicine and UNC Hospitals to improve the health and well-being of North Carolinians through patient care, education and research. The UNC Athletics department will also receive $3 million to support ventures to be determined at a later date. As part of the Curtis Foundation’s $21.275 million gift, $5.275 million will fund future endeavors to be determined at a later time.

 

“The Curtis Family is a generous and engaged partner of UNC Medicine, sharing our commitment to excellent clinical care, leading-edge research and training physicians who will serve in North Carolina and beyond,” said Dr. Bill Roper, dean of the UNC School of Medicine and CEO of the UNC Health Care System. “For many years, the Curtises have funded important initiatives at the UNC Children’s Hospital, the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center and in cardiovascular medicine. Thank you, Don, Barbara and Donna. We are honored by your new investment in UNC medicine.”

 

“The Curtises have long been dedicated champions of Carolina Athletics – cheering on our students during competitions while also supporting them behind the scenes,’’ said UNC director of Athletics Bubba Cunningham. “Barbara, Don and Donna believe wholeheartedly in our mission to educate and inspire through athletics, and they, in turn, have inspired us with their generosity and commitment to our University. We appreciate their gift and their investment in the future of our broad-based program and our students.”

 

The Curtis Foundation’s gift supports the most ambitious university fundraising campaign in the Southeast and in Carolina history, For All Kind: the Campaign for Carolina. On Oct. 6, 2017, Carolina announced its goal to raise $4.25 billion by Dec. 31, 2022. The Campaign for Carolina secured $2.23 billion by the end of fiscal year 2018, exceeding half of its dollar goal ahead of schedule. The Campaign for Carolina is inspired by the Blueprint for Next, the University’s overall strategic plan built on two core strategies: “of the public, for the public,” and “innovation made fundamental.”

 

A record-breaking fiscal year 2018 raised $617 million in commitments, marking the first time Carolina has ever topped $600 million in commitments. The University exceeded fiscal year 2017’s $543.3 million by 14 percent.

 

Don Curtis of Raleigh, North Carolina, established The Curtis Foundation in 1979. A 1963 UNC alumnus and chairman and CEO of the Curtis Media Group, Don Curtis is a former member of the UNC-Chapel Hill Board of Trustees and a 2005 recipient of the William Richardson Davie Award—the board’s highest honor recognizing extraordinary service to the University or society. Don also served as chair of the UNC General Alumni Association from 2011-2012. Together Don and Barbara Curtis are former members of the UNC Lineberger Board of Visitors and founded the UNC Children’s Hospital Radio-thon which has raised tens of millions of dollars since 1998. In 2006 Carolina renamed the auditorium in Memorial Hall as the Beasley-Curtis Auditorium to honor the Curtis’ contribution in renovating the dedicated space for the arts on campus.

 

Barbara Curtis is a member of The Medical Foundation of North Carolina Inc. board and the UNC Cardiovascular Board of Advisors. Barbara and daughter Donna McClatchey also serve as foundation trustees. Donna Curtis graduated from Carolina in 1993 from the School of Media and Journalism. She also serves on the Carolina Women’s Leadership Council.

 

– Carolina –

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 74 bachelor’s, 104 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools including the College of Arts & Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s nearly 330,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, US Territories and 162 countries. Almost 178,000 live in North Carolina.

 

University Communications: Carly Miller, (919) 445-8555, mediarelations@unc.edu

Office of University Development: Kim Elenez, (919) 962-1628, kelenez@email.unc.edu

Former patient donates $10 million to further blood cancer research at UNC Lineberger

Former patient donates $10 million to further blood cancer research at UNC Lineberger

 

The donor’s gift advances research of deadly leukemia, lymphoma and myeloma cancers

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— Oct. 29, 2018) – A former patient of the North Carolina Cancer Hospital and a two-time alumnus of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is showing his gratitude to the center that helped him heal. A $10 million gift from Etteinne “ET” and W. G. Champion “Champ” Mitchell of New Bern, North Carolina, will create a new fund supporting ground-breaking research in blood cancer at UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, including lymphoma, leukemia and myeloma research.

 

“The Mitchells’ amazing generosity accelerates UNC Lineberger’s research to help thousands afflicted by blood cancer,” said Chancellor Carol L. Folt. “Lineberger is working on a range of laboratory and clinical trials – which are already showing great promise – to break the code into a complex cancer that is challenging to cure. Inspired by Champ’s life-saving personal experience with our medical team, their support advances investigations into the underlying cellular mechanisms of blood cancer that can benefit thousands of people.”

 

Nearly every three minutes, one person in the United States is diagnosed with blood cancer. In 2015, Champ Mitchell was one of those individuals. Mitchell was treated for stage 4 Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma at North Carolina Cancer Hospital, the clinical home of UNC Lineberger. Dr. Thomas C. Shea, the John William Pope Distinguished Professor in Cancer Research, led a team of clinicians that developed a treatment approach that put Mitchell’s lymphoma into remission. The care he received at the North Carolina Cancer Hospital inspired the Mitchells to create the Champ and ET Mitchell Fund for Blood Cancer Research. This fund will accelerate research, ultimately improving the lives of future patients.

 

“Every day, 151 fellow North Carolinians learn they’re facing a daunting battle against a deadly disease. And I know from personal experience, it’s not a fight you can or should do alone,” said Champ Mitchell. “Between the support of my family and an innovative, caring team of physicians and researchers led by Dr. Shea at the North Carolina Cancer Hospital and UNC Lineberger, we fought my battle together. Today, my battle is won, but so many others need partners to fight with them. ET and I believe our gift can help the UNC Lineberger team bring all of us closer to a cure than ever before.”

 

The American Cancer Society estimates that blood cancers will cause more than 58,000 deaths in the U.S. in 2018 alone. The Mitchells’ gift will further current and future research conducted by Dr. Shea and other UNC Lineberger faculty and teams that translate fundamental knowledge into new avenues of therapy for one of the deadliest forms of cancer. For example, as co-director of UNC Lineberger’s Bone Marrow Transplant and Cellular Therapy Program, Dr. Shea leads a research team that is studying how to reduce the risk of cancer relapse in patients following a bone or stem cell transplant.

 

UNC Lineberger is one of only a select few academic medical centers in the U.S. with the facilities, technology and personnel to develop, produce and deliver cellular immunotherapy. Cellular immunotherapy is a highly promising field of cancer research and care that involves genetically engineering a patient’s immune cells to recognize and fight the patient’s cancer.

 

Others on the UNC Lineberger team have already developed a robust portfolio of clinical trials focused on advancing cellular and other forms of immunotherapy for Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma, acute lymphoblastic leukemias and multiple myeloma.

 

“This is an exceptionally generous and visionary gift from Champ and ET,” said Bill Roper, dean of the UNC School of Medicine and CEO of UNC Health Care. “Every day researchers across UNC are working together to make strides in developing new treatment options for patients fighting cancer. Thanks to the Mitchells’ leadership we will continue to accelerate our efforts to end cancers of the blood and ensure that North Carolinians have access to the most promising therapies available.”

 

“Champ and ET Mitchell have made an investment that will greatly advance our ability to conduct laboratory and clinical investigations into the underlying mechanisms that make blood cancers so challenging to cure,” said Dr. H. Shelton Earp, director of UNC Lineberger. “Our cellular immunotherapy studies have had notable success in treating some blood cancers, but these are a complex group of cancers that likely will require a number of treatment options – many of which have not yet been discovered. This gift will jump-start innovation and discovery.”

 

Champ Mitchell earned undergraduate and law degrees at UNC-Chapel Hill and is now a retired lawyer and business executive whose career included serving as CEO of Network Solutions. ET Mitchell, also retired, graduated from the University of the South and served two decades as a military intelligence officer.

 

The Mitchells’ gift supports For All Kind: the Campaign for Carolina. The University’s historic $4.25 billion fundraising campaign is inspired by the Blueprint for Next, Carolina’s overall strategic framework built on two core strategies: “of the public, for the public,” and “innovation made fundamental.”

 

-Carolina-

 

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 74 bachelor’s, 104 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools including the College of Arts & Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s nearly 330,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, US Territories and 162 countries. Almost 178,000 live in North Carolina.

 

About the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center

The University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center in Chapel Hill holds the distinction of being one of only 49 National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer centers in the country, and it is the only public comprehensive cancer center in North Carolina. UNC Lineberger faculty conduct research that spans the spectrum from the laboratory to the bedside to the community with the goal of understanding the causes of cancer at the genetic and environmental levels, identifying approaches to improve the prevention and early detection of cancer, and translating scientific findings into pioneering and innovative treatments.

 

 

University Communications: Audrey Smith, (919) 445-8555, mediarelations@unc.edu

 

 

UNC-Chapel Hill and Deerfield Management announce the creation of Pinnacle Hill to accelerate the discovery of new medicines

              

 

 

UNC-Chapel Hill and Deerfield Management announce the creation of Pinnacle Hill to accelerate the discovery of new medicines

 

Deerfield Management commits up to $65 million to support the development of novel therapeutics at UNC-Chapel Hill

 

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C. and New York, N.Y. – October 22, 2018) – The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and Deerfield Management have entered into a partnership to create Pinnacle Hill, LLC., a company seeking to discover new medicines to address the significant unmet medical needs of our times. Deerfield has committed $65 million of targeted funding and to provide drug development expertise in support of promising new drug research across a wide range of therapeutic areas.

 

The partnership will be formally launched at an event hosted by the University and Deerfield Management on October 30 at 3:30 pm at the Carolina Club on the UNC-Chapel Hill campus. (Event details are at the bottom of the release.)

 

“This is a very exciting new partnership between UNC-Chapel Hill and Deerfield Management. In creating a new company, Pinnacle Hill, we are bringing together the best of academia and industry to accelerate innovative drug research,” said Chancellor Carol L. Folt. “By investing in our faculty’s early stage research, this partnership advances our commitment to improving the health and well-being of people around the world.”

 

Research and development conducted at Pinnacle Hill will be supported by funding, expert drug development guidance, experienced project management oversight, and business strategy.  These efforts will serve to improve and accelerate the product development process and allow founding scientists to concentrate on their research.

 

Pinnacle Hill will focus on drug research projects that are approved and directed by a joint steering committee comprised of members from UNC-Chapel Hill and Deerfield leadership teams. Each selected project has the potential to receive funding to support investigational new drug enabling studies. The inaugural UNC members of the joint committee will be:

– Terry Magnuson, UNC-Chapel Hill’s vice chancellor for research and the Sarah Graham Kenan professor of genetics

– Dr. Dhiren Thakker, distinguished professor and interim dean of the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy and interim director of the Eshelman Institute for Innovation

– Dr. Blossom Damania, the Boshamer Distinguished professor of microbiology and immunology and vice dean for research in the UNC School of Medicine

 

“UNC-Chapel Hill’s world-class scientists, research centers and institutes, including the Eshelman Institute for Innovation, have enabled a culture of innovation with a focus on the patient and novel discoveries. This will play a critical role in our collaboration to help solve problems, discover new technologies and hopefully save lives,” stated James Flynn, managing partner of Deerfield Management.

 

Projects selected for support through Pinnacle Hill will receive a complete development plan with funding to support further research across the UNC-Chapel Hill campus. UNC-Chapel Hill’s Eshelman School of Pharmacy and School of Medicine, as well as institutes like the Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center and the Eshelman Institute for Innovation have drug discovery teams and core resources to support the development of new therapies to treat a wide variety of unmet medical needs. Deerfield may make additional capital investments in successful projects. Profits from successful projects, if any, will be shared by Deerfield and UNC-Chapel Hill.

 

“UNC-Chapel Hill is home to some of the world’s most innovative and life-changing research,” said Robert Blouin, executive vice chancellor and provost of UNC-Chapel Hill. “The new partnership between UNC-Chapel Hill and Deerfield Management gives us an exciting opportunity to accelerate drug discovery research at the University and advance new therapies that have the potential to improve health in North Carolina and beyond.”

 

Oct. 12, 2018 marked the 225th anniversary of the University’s founding. Carolina has a rich tradition as a public research university, conducts more than $1 billion in research activity annually and is the eleventh largest U.S. university in research volume and annual expenditures. The collaboration between the University and Deerfield will provide crucial support to accelerate early-stage research that could improve human health worldwide.

 

Pinnacle Hill launch event

  • Begins at 3:30 p.m. on October 30 at The Carolina Club
  • 150 Stadium Drive, Chapel Hill, N.C.
  • Dignitaries and guest speakers at the ceremony will include:
    • Carol L. Folt, chancellor of UNC-Chapel Hill
    • Robert Blouin, executive vice chancellor and provost of UNC-Chapel Hill
    • James Flynn, managing partner of Deerfield Management
    • Peter Steelman, partner of Deerfield Management
  • Remarks will be followed by a reception.

 

On-site contact: Audrey Smith: (919) 801-1936

 

###

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 74 bachelor’s, 104 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools including the College of Arts & Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s nearly 330,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, US Territories and 162 countries. Almost 178,000 live in North Carolina.

 

About Deerfield
Deerfield is an investment management firm committed to advancing healthcare through investment, information and philanthropy.

For more information, please visit www.deerfield.com

 

University Communications: Audrey Smith, (919) 445-8555, audrey.smith@unc.edu

Deerfield Management Company Communications: Karen Heidelberger, (212) 551-1600, karenh@deerfield.com

 

 

MAHEC, UNC-Chapel Hill Celebrate New Interprofessional Academic Health Center

 

 

 

 

 

MAHEC, UNC-Chapel Hill Celebrate New Interprofessional Academic Health Center  

 

UNC Health Sciences at MAHEC expands health science education in Western North Carolina

 

 

(Asheville, N.C. ­– October 17, 2018) — The Mountain Area Health Education Center and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill will celebrate the construction of a new academic health center building on MAHEC’s Biltmore campus with a special ceremony on Tuesday, Oct. 23 at 5:30 p.m. (see further details at the bottom).

 

UNC Health Sciences at MAHEC seeks to address health care worker shortages and improve education across a number of health science fields in Western North Carolina. The UNC Health Sciences at MAHEC building supports an innovative educational partnership between UNC-Chapel Hill and MAHEC and will house UNC School of Medicine’s Asheville campus; a Master of Public Health program led by UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health; MAHEC’s psychiatry residency program and psychiatry outpatient care; and health care research, education and community engagement initiatives at the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy.

 

UNC-Chapel Hill and MAHEC have a shared commitment to address health care workforce shortages in North Carolina. All 16 Western North Carolina counties are considered primary care health professional shortage areas, or areas with too few providers to meet the health care needs of the population. By training health care professionals in Western North Carolina, and placing students in long-term internships across the region, UNC Health Sciences at MAHEC encourages more health providers to practice in Western North Carolina, an initiative that stands to make a significant impact on the region’s economy and access to health care.

 

“Our students and faculty are eager to address North Carolina’s health care needs, and the new programs based at MAHEC will be a significant step forward for improving access to quality interprofessional health care in Western North Carolina,” said Robert Blouin, executive vice chancellor and provost of UNC-Chapel Hill. “We are very appreciative of the generous support from the people of North Carolina that has made UNC Health Sciences at MAHEC a reality.”

 

The establishment of UNC Health Sciences at MAHEC was made possible by the people of North Carolina through 2015 and 2016 state appropriations totaling $8 million in nonrecurring funds for building construction and $18.6 million in recurring funds to support the development of UNC-Chapel Hill’s academic programs to train and expand the health care workforce in medically underserved Western North Carolina.

 

The three-story 37,000-square-foot building will be completed in spring 2019 and includes classrooms and incubator spaces that will bring together family medicine clinicians, pharmacists, public health professionals, researchers, residents, students, UNC-Chapel Hill faculty, and community health partners.

 

“The UNC Health Sciences at MAHEC building will be the hub for the regional campuses of the school of medicine and school of public health,” explained Jeff Heck, chief executive officer of MAHEC. “This academic health center and our strong regional partnerships will serve as a national model for rural health care transformation.”

 

UNC Health Sciences at MAHEC Special Ceremony

  • Begins at 5:30 p.m. on October 23 at the MAHEC Biltmore campus
  • 121 Hendersonville Road, Asheville, N.C. 28803
  • Dignitaries and guest speakers at the ceremony will include:
    • Robert Blouin, executive vice chancellor and provost of UNC-Chapel Hill
    • William Roper, dean of the UNC School of Medicine, vice chancellor for medical affairs and chief executive officer of UNC Health Care
    • Jeff Heck, chief executive officer of MAHEC
    • William Hathaway, MAHEC board member and senior vice president and chief medical officer of Mission Hospital
    • Stephen Kimmel, a Western North Carolinian and graduate of the UNC School of Medicine’s Asheville campus and MAHEC family medicine residency program who is now practicing in North Carolina’s Yancey and Mitchell counties
  • Remarks will be followed by guided tours of the recently completed MAHEC Simulation Center, a state-of-the-art medical and surgical training facility that supports health science education and health care professionals from across Western North Carolina

 

On-site contacts:

  • Michelle Morgan, MAHEC, 828-257-4442 or 828-777-5149
  • Jennifer Maurer, MAHEC, 828-257-4445 or 828-782-0142

 

 

###

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

UNC-Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 111 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties.

 

About the Mountain Area Health Education Center

MAHEC was established in 1974 and is a leader in healthcare, education and innovation. Located in Asheville, MAHEC serves a 16-county region in Western North Carolina. It is the largest Area Health Education Center in North Carolina, which evolved to address national and state concerns with the supply, retention and quality of health professionals. MAHEC’s mission is to train the next generation of healthcare professionals for Western North Carolina through quality healthcare, innovative education, and best practice models that can be replicated nationally.

 

UNC-Chapel Hill university communications: Audrey Smith, 919-445-8555, audrey.smith@unc.edu

MAHEC communications: Jennifer Maurer, 828-257-4445, jennifer.maurer@mahec.net

 

$10M gift to UNC-Chapel Hill will broaden global reach, scholarship and opportunity

For immediate use

 

$10M gift to UNC-Chapel Hill will broaden global reach, scholarship and opportunity

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C. – Oct. 4, 2018) – A $10 million gift from alumni Bill and Anne Harrison of Greenwich, Connecticut, to the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill will strengthen the University’s global programs and presence. The generous gift from the Harrisons will endow two new senior-level leadership positions and support the strategic priorities of UNC Global, which incorporates many of the centralized programs and services that support Carolina’s global mission.

 

A search is already underway for a new full-time chief global officer and vice provost for global affairs who will report to the executive vice chancellor and provost. In September, the University announced the hiring of a new associate provost for global affairs, Raymond Farrow, who will serve as the chief operating officer and executive director of UNC Global and will serve as interim chief global officer until a vice provost is named.

 

“I am so grateful for Bill and Anne’s steadfast commitment to Carolina and all those who study and work here. They have done so much for our community, and this tremendous gift reflects their support and belief in Carolina’s global mission,” said Chancellor Carol L. Folt. “Their loving generosity will help us integrate global thinking across our campus and guarantee that every student graduates with the skills they need to serve our world.”

 

In Jan. 2017, the UNC-Chapel Hill Board of Trustees endorsed The Blueprint for Next, a strategic framework and vision for the growth of the University. The plan included a “global mindset” as a fundamental imperative for the campus. In conjunction, Chancellor Folt reviewed UNC’s global programs and strategy, and a Global Leadership Taskforce (2016-2018) — on which Bill Harrison served as a Steering Committee member — guided the development of a new global road map. This ambitious vision will require a robust operational infrastructure, including a full-time leadership team that is fully prepared to advance UNC’s global mission and oversee its growing global enterprise.

 

Provost Bob Blouin said, “It is critically important to have fully dedicated leadership for UNC Global. With a full-time vice provost for global affairs and chief global officer in place, UNC Global will be well positioned to advance the University’s global priorities. This gift will help UNC attract the very best candidates for this leadership role and demonstrate the university’s commitment to preeminence as a global university in service to North Carolina, the nation and the world.”

 

Bill Harrison is a 1966 Carolina graduate and retired chairman and CEO of JPMorgan Chase & Co. Anne Harrison is a 1978 Carolina graduate who earned her bachelor of arts degree in English.

 

“Anne and I have been fortunate in life and we wanted to give back to an institution that has been so important to us,” said Bill Harrison. “Furthermore, having worked in a large, global organization for my entire career, I am a strong believer that a great university needs to have outstanding global capabilities and a mission to prepare its students to compete in the global world we all live in.”

 

The $10 million gift continues the Harrisons’ long record of supporting global initiatives at Carolina. In 2007, Bill Harrison chaired the Global Leadership Circle, which developed the University’s first comprehensive global road map. In 2009, Bill and Anne Harrison made a $1 million gift creating the University’s Global Research Institute to generate knowledge solving real-world problems, such as water quality and the impact of globalization on North Carolina’s economy.

 

In the 2018 Academic Rankings of World Universities, UNC-Chapel Hill is 30th among 500 top universities, up from 52nd in 2003. Global has become central to Carolina’s teaching, research and service mission.

 

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About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 111 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s nearly 330,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and 149 countries. More than 169,000 live in North Carolina.

 

University Communications: Media Relations, (919) 445-8555, mediarelations@unc.edu