165 at UNC-Chapel Hill inducted into Phi Beta Kappa

For immediate use

 

165 at UNC-Chapel Hill inducted into Phi Beta Kappa

 

103 inductees are from North Carolina

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— Nov. 9, 2017) – Phi Beta Kappa, the nation’s oldest and most honored college honorary society, has inducted 165 University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill students as new members.

 

The recent induction ceremony featured a keynote address by Martin H. Brinkley, Dean of the UNC-Chapel Hill School of Law and Arch T. Allen Distinguished Professor of Law. New members received certificates and Phi Beta Kappa keys, the organization’s symbol.

 

Phi Beta Kappa membership is open to undergraduates in the college and professional degree programs who meet stringent eligibility requirements.

 

A student who has completed 75 hours of course work in the liberal arts and sciences with a GPA of 3.85 or better (on a 4-point scale) is eligible for membership. Also eligible is any student who has completed 105 hours of course work in the liberal arts and sciences with a 3.75 GPA. Grades earned at other universities are not considered. Less than 1 percent of all college students qualify.

 

Past and present Phi Beta Kappa members from across the country have included 17 American presidents, 40 U.S. Supreme Court Justices and more than 130 Nobel Laureates.

 

Phi Beta Kappa has 286 chapters nationwide. UNC’s chapter, Alpha of North Carolina, was founded in 1904 and is the oldest of seven chapters in the state. Each year, Phi Beta Kappa chapters and alumni associations across the country raise and distribute more than $1 million in awards, scholarships and prizes benefiting high schools and college students.

 

Phi Beta Kappa officers at Carolina for 2017-2018 are students Rohanit Singh, president; Elaine Kearney, vice president; and Diana Lopez, recording secretary. James L. Leloudis, professor of history, Peter T. Grauer associate dean for Honors Carolina, and director of the James M. Johnston Center for Undergraduate Excellence, is chapter executive secretary and faculty advisor.

 

Listed below are 160 inductees, 103 of whom are from North Carolina. The names appear below in alphabetical order by North Carolina county, then by state and country. All study in the College of Arts and Sciences except where otherwise noted. Five students chose not to be listed.

 

 

Avery County

 

  • Charles Fischer Brown, a senior with a music performance major, son of Michael Brown and Susan Brown of Banner Elk.

 

Buncombe County

 

  • Margaret Scott Hilderbran, a junior with astrophysics and religious studies majors, daughter of Gregory Hilderbran and Carole Hilderbran of Asheville.

 

  • Dakota Hunter Koenigsberg, a May 2015 graduate with environmental studies and economics majors and a philosophy minor, of Asheville.

 

  • Samantha Lynn Pagan, a junior with a physics major, daughter of Tammy Sullivan of Weaverville and Juan Pagan of Houston, TX.

 

  • Christine Anne Zimmerman, a senior with an English major and French and studio art minors, daughter of Marjorie Zimmerman and Howard Zimmerman of Arden.

 

Burke County

 

  • Will Joseph Duncan, a senior with an economics major and Chinese and art history minors, son of Rich Duncan and Christine Post-Duncan of Chicago, IL.

 

Cabarrus County

 

  • Leah Baker, a May 2017 graduate with an English major and education and social and economic justice minors, daughter of Dr. Kristin Baker and Dr. Scott Baker of Concord.

 

  • Mallory Renee’ Croley, a senior with a biology major and a chemistry minor, daughter of Jill Croley and Dr. Glitz Croley of Concord.

 

  • Macey Elizabeth Fairchild, a senior with English and American studies majors and a history minor, daughter of Tierney Fairchild and James Fairchild of Harrisburg.

 

  • Alison Nancy Hollis, a senior with a biology major and chemistry and medical anthropology minors, daughter of Judi Hollis and Pete Hollis of Concord.

 

  • Sydra Larab Siddiqui, a senior with biology and religious studies majors and a chemistry minor, daughter of Rashid Siddiqui and Dr. Huma Siddiqui of Concord.

 

Catawba County

 

  • Anna-Kathryn Avonne Hass, a junior with psychology and history majors, daughter of Dr. Andrew Hass and Nicole Hass of Hickory.

 

  • Geoffrey Calvin McGee, a senior with public policy and economics majors and an education minor, son of Carmon McGee and Guy McGee of Black Mountain, NC.

 

  • Morgan Taylor Yapundich, a senior with a biochemistry major, daughter of Dr. Linda Billips and Dr. Robert Yapundich of Hickory.

 

Cumberland County

 

  • Faith Caroline Goldsmith, a senior with peace, war, and defense and Germanic and Slavic languages and literatures majors, daughter of Col. (R) Stu Goldsmith and Ann Goldsmith of Fayetteville.

 

Davie County

 

  • Meredith Anne Ratledge, a senior with an environmental science major and a business minor, of Advance.

 

Durham County

 

  • Emma Astrike-Davis, a senior with a nutrition major and a chemistry minor, daughter of Nancy Astrike and Joan Davis of Durham.

 

  • Emma Grace Crenshaw, a junior with a biostatistics major and medical anthropology and chemistry minors, daughter of Dr. Hugh Crenshaw and Dr. Donna Crenshaw of Durham.

 

  • Averyl Julian Edwards, an August 2017 graduate with Jewish studies and women’s and gender studies majors and a modern Hebrew minor, of Durham.

 

  • Caroline Scott Fowler, a senior with archaeology and anthropology majors, daughter of Sheryl Fowler of Durham.

 

Franklin County

 

  • Anna Elizabeth Dodson, a senior with a health policy and management major and a chemistry minor, daughter of Patricia Dodson and Terry Dodson of Bunn.

 

Gaston County

 

  • Michael Edward Purello, a senior with history and global studies majors, son of Joseph Purello and Sheila Purello.

 

Guilford County

 

  • Chris Chung, a junior with chemistry and mathematical decision sciences majors, son of Dave Chung and Clara Chung of Oak Ridge.

 

  • Cyrus John Fitzpatrick, a senior with exercise and sport science and psychology majors, of Greensboro.

 

  • Jake Ryan Mayer, a junior with computer science and applied mathematics majors and a physics minor, of Oak Ridge.

 

  • Russell Anderson McIntosh, a senior with mathematics and philosophy majors and a physics minor, son of Stan McIntosh and Lisa McIntosh.

 

  • Nishita Tushar Sheth, a junior with nutrition and biology majors and a neuroscience minor, of Jamestown.

 

  • Jacob Ryan Strauss, a junior with a computer science major and a biology minor, son of Dr. Brian Strauss and Andrea Strauss of Oak Ridge.

 

  • William Ross Taylor, a junior with a biomedical engineering major and a chemistry minor, of Greensboro.

 

  • Mary Elizabeth Triplett, a senior with psychology and anthropology majors, daughter of Cynthia Triplett and John Triplett, Jr. of Pleasant Garden.

 

  • Shan Yu, a senior with a biology major and chemistry and neuroscience minors, of High Point.

 

Halifax County

 

  • Patrick Oliver Fiorilli, a senior with a comparative literature major and a creative writing minor, son of Dr. Mario Fiorilli and Mona Fiorilli of Roanoke Rapids.

 

Henderson County

 

  • Seth McKenzie Alexander, a senior with a biology major and a chemistry minor, of Hendersonville.

 

  • Olivia Nicole Thiery, a senior with an exercise and sport science major and studio art and biology minors, daughter of Joel Thiery and Lynn Thiery of Hendersonville.

 

Jackson County

 

  • Rachel Katherine Nixon, a senior with political science and English majors and a politics, philosophy, and economics minor, daughter of Carla Nixon and Dr. Scot Nixon of Sylva.

 

Madison County

 

  • Anna Lynne Zimmerman, a senior with peace, war, and defense and English majors and an Asian studies minor, daughter of Robert Zimmerman and Tamara Ballard of Marshall.

 

Mecklenburg County

 

  • Alexander Bennett, a senior with biology and philosophy majors and a chemistry minor, of Huntersville.

 

  • Nicholas Chilton Blum, a senior with peace, war, and defense and political science majors and a public policy minor, of Charlotte.

 

  • Margaret Mclellan Bryant, a senior with a biology major and chemistry and neuroscience minors, of Charlotte.

 

  • Shouri Gottiparthi, a senior with a health policy and management major and a chemistry minor, son of Venkata Gottiparthi and Kalpana Gottiparthi of Charlotte.

 

  • Jacob Ian Greenblatt, a senior with public policy and political science majors and a social and economic justice minor, of Matthews.

 

  • Theresa Marie Jones, a senior with mathematics and geology majors and a French minor, daughter of Bonnie Likens Jones and George Wesley Jones of Charlotte.

 

  • David William Katibah, a senior with economics and political science majors and a philosophy minor, son of Dr. William Katibah, III and Maria Katibah of Huntersville.

 

  • Margaret Susan Lynch, a senior with a music (piano performance) major and an Hispanic studies minor, daughter of Jay Lynch and Susan Lynch of Charlotte.

 

  • Matthew Charles McKnight, a senior with history and public policy majors, son of Beth McKnight of Charlotte.

 

  • Elizabeth Houston Sheild, a senior with political science and Spanish literature majors and a women’s and gender studies minor, daughter of Susan Elizabeth Sheild (Phi Beta Kappa, Lambda of Virginia) and George Cabell Sheild, Sr. of Charlotte.

 

  • Kristin Grace Weiss, a senior with biology and German literature and culture majors and a chemistry minor, daughter of Richard Weiss of Davidson and Susan Gover of Hillsborough, NC.

 

  • Wilfred Chad Wong, a junior with quantitative biology and biochemistry majors and a computer science minor, son of Mela Chan of Charlotte.

 

  • Sarah Kathryn Yaghoubi, a senior with biology and philosophy majors and a chemistry minor, daughter of Pat Yaghoubi and Habibullah Yaghoubi of Charlotte.

 

Moore County

 

  • Joshua Daniel Barnes, a senior with peace, war, and defense and history majors and a public policy minor, son of Dr. Daniel Barnes and Laura Barnes of West End.

 

New Hanover County

 

  • Sarah Caroline Miller, a senior with a chemistry major and a business administration minor, daughter of Dr. Jon Miller and Diane Miller of Wilmington.

 

  • Brittney Louise Ortiz, a senior with a psychology major and an anthropology minor, daughter of Heather Wall and James Wall of Wilmington.

 

Orange County

 

  • Mike Gaitens Arneson, a May 2017 graduate with an economics major and a business minor, of Chapel Hill.

 

  • Noah Patrick Balamucki, a senior with a music major and a history minor, son of Susan Hollobaugh and Richard Balamucki of Chapel Hill.

 

  • Sarah Jane Brooks, a May 2017 graduate with an economics major and philosophy and business administration minors, daughter of Laura Brooks of Chapel Hill and Martin Brooks of Little River, SC.

 

  • Nathanael Connor Bedingfield Brown, a senior with peace, war, and defense and political science majors and a history minor, son of Thomas Brown and Robin Bedingfield of Hillsborough.

 

  • Veronica Carolyn Jean DaVanzo, a senior with a biology major and a chemistry minor, daughter of Dr. Robert DaVanzo of High Point, NC and Dr. Christie DaVanzo of Greensboro, NC.

 

  • Riley Bingham Foster, a senior with economics and public policy majors and a French minor, of Chapel Hill.

 

  • Ori Erna Hashmonay, a senior with an art history major and German and French minors, daughter of Dr. Ram Hashmonay and Michal Hashmonay of Kiryat Shmona, Israel.

 

  • James Hale Jushchuk, a senior with a computer science major, son of Leslie Bunce, MD of Pittsboro and Michael Jushchuk of Chapel Hill.

 

  • Rachael MinJung Kang, a senior with a psychology major, daughter of Robert Kang and Connie Kang of Chapel Hill.

 

  • Sanam Louise Kavari, a junior with an environmental health sciences major and medical anthropology and chemistry minors, daughter of Emily Xavier of Hillsborough and Masound Kavari of Chapel Hill.

 

  • Nicholas William McHenry, a senior with computer science and economics majors, of Chapel Hill.

 

  • Kayley Peters, a senior with biology and Spanish majors and a chemistry minor, daughter of Mark Peters and Mary Todd Peters of Chapel Hill.

 

  • Ramkumar Rao, a senior with a computer science major, of Chapel Hill.

 

  • Frances Emily Reuland, a senior with environmental science and Hispanic literatures and cultures majors and a chemistry minor, of Chapel Hill.

 

  • Arvind Sivashanmugam, a senior with a biostatistics major and Spanish for the professions and mathematics minors, of Chapel Hill.

 

  • Daniel Lee Stickel, a senior with a biology major and Spanish for the professions and neuroscience minors, son of David Stickel and Julie Stickel of Chapel Hill.

 

  • Claire Elizabeth Weintraub, a senior with economics and Hispanic literature and cultures majors and a public policy minor, daughter of Dr. Jory Weintraub and Julie Haughton.

 

  • Yusheng Zhang, a junior with business administration and global studies majors and a music minor, son of Xiaoyun Shen and Chongben Zhang of Chapel Hill.

 

Pitt County

 

  • Olivia Marie Holder, a senior with a history major and Chinese and comparative literature minors, daughter of Dr. David Holder and Ann Marie Holder of Greenville.

 

  • Violet Simmons Noe, a senior with a nutrition major and Spanish for the medical professions and chemistry minors, daughter of Marna Noe and Marion Noe of Greenville.

 

Polk County

 

  • Bridget Gallagher, a senior with a nutrition major and Spanish for the medical professions and chemistry minors, daughter of Dr. John Gallagher and Jane Gallagher of Columbus.

 

Rockingham County

  • Philip Murray Wilson, a senior with classics and medieval history majors, son of Dr. Ewain Wilson and Laura Wilson of Wilkesboro.

 

Rowan County

 

  • Katelyn Laine Buffett, a senior with a sociology major and an education minor, daughter of Eric Buffett and Lyndy Buffett of Rockwell.

 

Rutherford County

 

  • Michael Ian Hensley, a senior with a history major and a medieval and early modern studies minor, of Rutherfordton.

 

Transylvania County

 

  • Emma Griffith McLeod, a senior with geography and global studies majors, daughter of John McLeod and Beth McLeod of Brevard.

 

Union County

 

  • Lindsey Anne Davis, a senior with psychology and exercise and sport science majors, daughter of Christopher Davis and Tricia Davis of Matthews.

 

  • Lacey Elizabeth Hunter, a senior with history and archaeology majors and a Hispanic studies minor, of Weddington.

 

  • Christina Rayen Kresser, an August 2017 graduate with a biology major and a chemistry minor, daughter of David Kresser and Susan Kresser of Waxhaw.

 

  • Suzanne Michelle McLendon, a senior with a music education major, daughter of Mary McLendon and Woody McLendon of Waxhaw.

 

Wake County

 

  • Katherine Frances Cayton, a senior with history and political science majors and a media and journalism minor, daughter of Verne Ellis Cayton, Jr. and Alison Riopel Cayton of Raleigh.

 

  • Jen-Hsuan Chu, a senior with a biology major and Chinese and music minors, of Cary.

 

  • Elizabeth Ciociola, a senior with a chemistry major and business administration and biology minors, daughter of Catherine Hinkle of Raleigh and Arthur Ciociola of Fort Worth, TX.

 

  • Kennedy Michelle Crawford, a senior with a music major and a dramatic art minor, daughter of Pamela Plummer of Morrisville and Duke Crawford of Hillsborough, NC.

 

  • Sarah Elizabeth Gee, a senior with psychology and global studies majors and a Hispanic studies minor, daughter of Susan Margolis and M. Blen Gee, Jr. of Cary.

 

  • Gabriel Christian Gonzalez, a senior with a biology major and Spanish and chemistry minors, son of Jesus Gonzalez and Louise Gonzalez of Wake Forest.

 

  • Angelica Green, a senior with a psychology major, daughter of James Green and Jacqueline Green of Sanford, NC.

 

  • Hannah Leah Holtzman, a junior with geological sciences and archaeology majors and a mathematics minor, daughter of Adam Holtzman and Maria Holtzman of Raleigh.

 

  • Vishal Iyer, a senior with a biology major and a chemistry minor, of Cary.

 

  • Jacob Alexander Johnson, a May 2017 graduate with an economics major and a business administration minor, son of Douglas Johnson and Willa Burgess of Raleigh.

 

  • Pooja Dhanesh Joshi, a junior with a health policy and management major and entrepreneurship and Asian studies minors, daughter of Dhanesh Joshi and Shivangi Joshi of Cary.

 

  • Farhan Khan, a senior with a psychology major and a chemistry minor, of Raleigh.

 

  • Katherine Anne Kruse, a senior with biology and English majors and a chemistry minor, daughter of Mary Engel and Shawn Kruse of Cary.

 

  • Allison Li-Ping Lim, a senior with business administration and global studies majors, daughter of Timothy Lim and Kathleen Lim of Raleigh.

 

  • Kristen Rita Lospinoso, a senior with a psychology major and chemistry and neuroscience minors, daughter of Mita Lospinoso and Jeff Lospinoso of Cary.

 

  • Christina Elizabeth Miller, a senior with a psychology major and chemistry and biology minors, of Raleigh.

 

  • Elizabeth Nicholls, a senior with a global studies major and Hispanic studies and social and economic justice minors, daughter of Marc Nicholls and Kay Nicholls of Raleigh.

 

  • Nils Erik Persson, a senior with a computer science major, of Cary.

 

  • Addie Marie Rush, a May 2017 graduate with a psychology major and speech & hearing science and education minors, daughter of Greg Rush and Robin Rush of Raleigh.

 

  • Akshay Sankar, a junior with biostatistics and chemistry majors and a computer science minor, of Cary.

 

  • Courtney Schlachter, a senior with linguistics and music majors and a speech and hearing sciences minor, of Cary.

 

  • Lauren Ann Sugarman, a senior with a biology major and chemistry and neuroscience minors, daughter of Neal Sugarman and Denyce Sugarman of Apex.

 

  • Jayson Beck Wisk, a May 2010 graduate with an economics major and a chemistry minor, son of Dr. Joseph Wisk and Carolyn Wisk of Raleigh.

 

Alabama

 

  • Savannah Loehr, a senior with a biology major and neuroscience and chemistry minors, daughter of Leah Loehr and Tim Loehr of Montgomery.

 

Arizona

 

  • Gabrielle Rose Geenen, a senior with a psychology major and philosophy and women’s and gender studies minors, daughter of Daniel Geenen and Lisa Rosenfeld of Chandler.

 

Arkansas

 

  • Gordon Miller Wilbourn, a senior with English and classics majors, son of Penny Wilbourn and Gordon Wilbourn of Little Rock.

 

California

 

  • Brittney M Allyn, an August 2017 graduate with a biology major, daughter of Shelley Allyn and Dale Allyn of Seal Beach.

 

Colorado

 

  • Nicole Elizabeth Affleck, a senior with an environmental studies major and Hispanic studies and urban planning minors, daughter of Jack Affleck and Beth Affleck of Vail.

 

Connecticut

 

  • Caroline Joyce Keough, a May 2017 graduate with an environmental science major and mathematical decision sciences and Italian minors, daughter of Cami Keough and William Keough of Fairfield.

 

Delaware

 

  • Anna Claire McQuillin, a senior with African, African American, and diaspora studies and economics majors and a mathematics minor, daughter of Donna McQuillin and Alan McQuillin of Bear.

 

Florida

 

  • Sundus Alfi, a senior with public policy and economics majors, daughter of Nesreen Alsati of Tampa.

 

  • Stephen Baker, a senior with a psychology major and biology and chemistry minors, of Bradenton.

 

  • Brittany Marie Castellanos, a senior with a chemistry major and biology and Spanish for the medical professions minors, of Miami.

 

  • Khaleelah Lynne Elhajoui, a junior with linguistics and Japanese majors and a biology minor, daughter of Dylan Elhajoui and Anne Elhajoui of Sarasota.

 

  • Julia Marie Fehr, a senior with a chemistry major, of Longwood.

 

  • Rachel Elizabeth Joyner, a junior with a peace, war, and defense major and a philosophy, politics, and economics minor, of Tallahassee.

 

  • Ched Milic, a junior with economics and computer science majors and a business administration minor, of St Petersburg.

 

  • Margaret Eline Player, a senior with political science and peace, war, and defense majors, daughter of Shane Player and Lisa Player of Gulf Breeze.

 

  • Analisa Maria Sorrells, a senior with a public policy major and a media and journalism minor, daughter of Tom Sorrells and Mitra Sorrells of Windermere.

 

Georgia

 

  • Andrew James Bock, a senior with chemistry and French majors and a medical anthropology minor, son of Wendi Bock and Gregory Bock of Dawsonville.

 

  • Margaret Susan Cruser, a senior with a computer science major and a journalism minor, daughter of J. Robb Cruser and Laura Cruser of Alpharetta.

 

  • Kenny Le, a senior with a psychology major and a neuroscience minor, of Norcross.

 

  • Vishnu Ramachandran, a junior with computer science and philosophy majors, son of Swarnamani Ramachandran and Saraswathi Swarnamani of Peachtree Corners.

 

Illinois

 

  • Caroline Rose Stanton, a junior with chemistry and music majors, daughter of Charlotte Stanton and David Stanton, Jr. of Deer Park.

 

Indiana

 

  • Morgan Lane, a senior with a chemistry major and a biology minor, daughter of John Lane and Cindy Mason of Columbus.

 

Iowa

 

  • Nile Foxx Iverson, a senior with media and journalism and biology majors and a chemistry minor, of Iowa City.

 

Maryland

 

  • Leah Balkoski, a senior with comparative literature and religious studies majors and a French minor, of Baltimore.

 

  • Brooks James Knighton, a senior with a biology major and a chemistry minor, son of Michele Knighton and James Knighton of Catonsville.

 

  • Boateng Appiah Kubi, a May 2017 graduate with a biology major and philosophy and chemistry minors, son of Anthony Kubi and Naomi Kubi of Bowie.

 

Minnesota

 

  • Claire McBride Drysdale, a senior with biology and studio art majors, daughter of Julie Drysdale and Michael Drysdale of Golden Valley.

 

  • Lauren Groffsky, a May 2017 graduate with Hispanic literature and culture and Latin American studies majors, daughter of Jeffrey Groffsky and Natalie Wu.

 

Missouri

 

  • Eric Hanlin Lee, a senior with an economics major and a philosophy, politics, and economics minor, of St. Louis.

 

New Jersey

 

  • Madison Rihga Schaper, a senior with an English major and writing for the screen and stage and creative writing minors, daughter of Sheila Donohue and Todd Schaper of Metuchen.

 

  • Amanda Ruth Witwer, a senior with public policy and sociology majors, daughter of Rhonda Witwer of Clinton.

 

New York

 

  • Jimmy Chin, a senior with economics and Asian studies majors and a philosophy minor, son of Irene Lee of Chapel Hill, NC.

 

  • Kristen Michelle Marino, a senior with media and journalism and psychology majors, daughter of Dr. Mary Marino and Dr. Michael Marino.

 

  • Carolyn Jean Mistele, a senior with an exercise and sport science major and a neuroscience minor, daughter of Katherine Mistele and William Mistele, Jr. of New City.

 

  • Matthew Shear, a senior with peace, war, and defense and psychology majors and an Arabic minor, of Ardsley.

 

Oklahoma

 

  • Lauren Alexandra Moore, a May 2017 graduate with business administration and dramatic art majors, daughter of Hal Moore and Tonya Moore of Norman.

 

Pennsylvania

 

  • Adam Loeser, a senior with a chemistry major and a Spanish for the professions minor, son of Dr. Linda Malisan and Dr. Glen Loeser of Ambler.

 

  • Samantha Paisley, a senior with journalism and political science majors, daughter of Ian Paisley and Tess Dove of Perryville, MD.

 

  • Alexander Matthew Payne, a senior with biology and chemistry majors and a history minor, son of Susan Payne and Brett Payne of Downingtown.

 

  • Angela Lee Zhang, a senior with psychology and biology majors, daughter of Bin Zhang and Ping Lee of Pittsburgh.

 

Rhode Island

 

  • Camille M Oswald, a May 2017 graduate with dramatic arts and women’s and gender studies majors, daughter of Mindy Oswald and James Oswald of Barrington.

 

  • Magdalena Rainey, a senior with a nutrition major and chemistry and biology minors, of Barrington.

 

South Carolina

 

  • Rossi Akim Anastopoulo, a May 2017 graduate with global studies and sports and social issues majors, of Charleston.

 

Tennessee

 

  • David Isaac Doochin, a senior with linguistics and history majors, son of Lawrence Doochin and Janice Doochin of Franklin.

 

  • Gabrielle Blue Nair, a senior with political science and philosophy majors, daughter of Katy Burke-Nair and Brent Nair of Memphis.

 

Texas

 

  • Shelby Victoria Anderson, a senior with psychology and chemistry majors, daughter of Craig Anderson and Pamalla Anderson of Dallas.

 

Utah

 

  • Tony Hong Liu, a May 2017 graduate with a geography major and religious studies and anthropology minors, of Salt Lake City.

 

  • Isabel Margaret Romano, a senior with business administration and public policy majors, daughter of Bridget Romano and Rich Romano of Salt Lake City.


Virginia

 

  • Anita Amin, a junior with health policy and management and biology majors, of Arlington.

 

  • Allyson Sloan Barkley, a senior with global studies and Hispanic literature and cultures majors, daughter of Dr. Carolyn Dalldorf and James Barkley of Charlottesville.

 

  • Anna DeLancey Phares, a senior with a global studies major and chemistry and Hispanic studies minors, of Richmond.

 

Washington

 

  • Stenn Hollis Monson, a junior with economics and history majors and a business administration minor, son of Gregory Monson and Chalky Monson of Ephrata.

 

West Virginia

 

  • Jamie Austin Rose, a junior with chemistry and biology majors, son of Todd Rose and Rachel Rose of Beckley.

 

Canada

 

  • Renuka Rachel Koilpillai, a senior with sociology and psychology majors and a public policy minor, daughter of Dr. Chris Koilpillai and Prof. Anuradha Koilpillai of Halifax, Nova Scotia.

 

Costa Rica

 

  • Christopher Lee Brenes, a senior with computer science and economics majors, son of Margarita Brenes of San Pedro, San José and Robert Lee of Chapel Hill, NC.

 

Vietnam

 

  • My Linh H Luu, a senior with a comparative literature major and a creative writing minor, daughter of Dr. Doanh Luu and Thi Ngoc Mai Hoang of Hanoi.

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 111 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 322,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and 165 countries. More than 175,000 live in North Carolina.

 

University Communications contact: Jeni Cook, (919) 445-8555, mediarelations@unc.edu

Phi Beta Kappa contact: Jason Clemmons, (919) 843-7756, jclem@email.unc.edu

 

 

UNC Experts available to discuss the opioid epidemic and diverse impacts

 

UNC-Chapel Hill researchers and faculty members are among those on the leading edge of research on the opioid crisis in the United States. They can discuss a variety of topics such as patient-centered outcomes, policy development, treatment programs and opioid treatment in rural settings.

 

 

If you’d like to speak with an expert, call (919) 445-8555 or email mediarelations@unc.edu.

 

Dr. Hendrée Jones is the executive director of UNC Horizons, a comprehensive drug treatment program for pregnant and parenting women. She is a professor in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology and an adjunct professor in the Department of Psychology at UNC-Chapel Hill. Dr. Jones can discuss opioid use disorder, comprehensive treatment programs for mothers and their children, neonatal abstinence syndrome and the benefits of medication assisted treatment.

 

 

Dr. Nabarun Dasgupta is a senior research scientist with the UNC Injury Prevention Center and UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy. Dr. Dasgupta is one of the primary architects of “Project Lazarus,” an initiative to put naloxone (the emergency opioid overdose medication) kits across North Carolina.  His work made the project both functional and adaptable for diverse communities. He can discuss how the opioid epidemic evolved in the United States, ideal methods for addressing the health-care delivery system and the science behind an overdose. He can also discuss how racial bias plays into and perpetuates the opioid crisis.

 

 

Dr. Kim Sanders is a clinical assistant professor in the Division of Practice Advancement and Clinical Education at the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy and an assistant professor in the Department of Dental Ecology at the UNC School of Dentistry. Dr. Sanders can discuss opioid prescribing trends in dentistry, balancing the pain management dilemma and opioid-related deaths county-by-county in North Carolina. She can also discuss the North Carolina Controlled Substance Reporting system and the use of prescription drug monitoring programs.

 

 

Dr. Tim Ives is a professor of pharmacy and adjunct professor of medicine at the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy and directs the Chronic Pain Program in the Division of General Medicine and Clinical Epidemiology at the UNC School of Medicine. Dr. Ives can discuss both chronic pain management and substance misuse. He can also discuss North Carolina House Bill 243 – Strengthen Opioid Misuse Prevention, the (STOP) Act, and specifically how it can impact dental practices.

 

 

Dr. Lauren Brinkley-Rubinstein is an assistant professor in the Department of Social Medicine in the UNC School of Medicine, as well as a core faculty member in the UNC Center for Health Equity Research. Her expertise is in medication assisted treatment for individuals who have been incarcerated or those who are currently involved in the justice system. Dr. Brinkley-Rubinstein also has knowledge relevant to rising overdose rates, naloxone distribution (and usage) and the development of statewide strategic initiatives to stem addiction, opioid use and overdose.

 

 

P: (919) 445-8555  |  E: mediarelations@unc.edu

 

Message from Chancellor Carol L. Folt on NCAA decision

Dear Carolina Community,

 

Today, we received the decision from the NCAA’s Committee on Infractions in our case resulting from academic irregularities that ended more than six years ago.

 

The hearing panel found no NCAA bylaw violations by the University; you may read its decision here. We believe this is the correct—and fair—outcome.

 

I am grateful that this case has been decided and the University can continue to focus on delivering the best possible education to our students. We wish to thank the NCAA staff and the Committee on Infractions for their work and time during the joint investigation and hearing process.

 

Carolina long ago publicly accepted responsibility for what happened in the past. One of the highest priorities of this administration has been to resolve this issue by following the facts, understanding what occurred, and taking every opportunity to make our University stronger. We have been open and transparent in everything we have done, as documented on our Carolina Commitment website.

 

The resolution of this case is part of a comprehensive effort working with administrators, faculty and staff across campus and with the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges, our accrediting agency, to fully address these issues.

 

Strong collaboration with our faculty was critical to developing the more than 70 groundbreaking reforms and initiatives, including in the areas of academic advising and academic oversight. I believe we have done everything possible to correct and move beyond the past academic irregularities and have established very robust processes to prevent them from recurring. We continue to devote extraordinary resources to monitoring and refining these reforms and initiatives that already had such a profound impact on our University.

 

I want to thank our dedicated students, and especially our student-athletes, who have shown so much passion and drive in the classroom and in competition while all of these things that had nothing to do with them were addressed. Carolina is proud of the accomplishments of our coaches and faculty and their commitment to our students and our campus. We are very grateful for the loyal support of our alumni and friends.

 

Carolina is in a better place, and we continue to focus on deserving your trust and ensuring integrity in everything we do. We are as resolute as we have ever been to our commitment to excellence, guided by our historic mission to serve the people in our state and beyond.

 

Sincerely,

 

Carol L. Folt
Chancellor

 

Published Oct. 13, 2017

Vaccines save 20 million lives, $350 billion in poor countries since 2001

For immediate use

 

 

Vaccines save 20 million lives, $350 billion in poor countries since 2001

 

(CHAPEL HILL, N.C. — September 1, 2017) — Vaccination efforts made in the world’s poorest countries since 2001 will have prevented 20 million deaths and saved $350 billion in health-care costs by 2020, according to a new study from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. In addition, the researchers put the broader economic and social value of saving these lives and preventing disabilities at $820 billion.

 

Researchers led by Sachiko Ozawa, Ph.D., an associate professor at the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy, studied the economic impact of Gavi, the global vaccine alliance launched in 2000 to provide vaccines to children in the world’s poorest countries. Gavi support has contributed to the immunization of 580 million children, and it has operated primarily in the 73 countries covered by the team’s analysis, which was published in the Bulletin of the World Health Organization.

 

“Vaccination is generally regarded to be one of the most cost–effective interventions in public health,” Ozawa said. “Decision-makers need to appreciate the full potential economic benefits that are likely to result from the introduction and sustained use of any vaccine or vaccination program.”

 

Researchers looked at both short- and long-term costs that could be saved preventing illness. The costs – expressed in 2010 U.S. dollars – include averted treatment, transportation costs, productivity losses of caregivers and productivity losses due to disability and death. They used the value-of-a-life-year method to estimate the broader economic and social value of living longer, in better health, as a result of immunization.

 

“Our examination of the broader economic and social value of vaccines illustrates the substantial gains associated with vaccination,” she said. “Unlike previous estimates that only examine the averted costs of treatment, our estimates of the broader economic and social value of vaccines reflect the intrinsic value that people place on living longer and healthier lives.”

 

Each of the Gavi-supported countries in the study will have avoided an average of $5 million in treatment costs per year just as a result of these 10 vaccines. The vaccines will have prevented an estimated 20 million deaths, 500 million cases of illness, 9 million cases of long-term disability and 960 million years of disability by 2020. The value of preserved productivity, quality of life and other broad economic and social benefits for all 73 study countries is estimated to reach $820 billion by 2020, the researchers calculated.

 

The team used health-impact models to estimate the numbers of cases of illness, deaths and disability-adjusted life-years averted by achieving forecasted coverages for vaccination against hepatitis B, human papillomavirus, Japanese encephalitis, measles, rotavirus, rubella, yellow fever and three strains of bacteria that cause pneumonia and meningitis. The researchers found that vaccinating against hepatitis B, measles, and haemophilus influenzae type b and streptococcus pneumoniae — two bacteria that cause pneumonia and meningitis — provided the greatest economic benefits.

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 111 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 318,000 alumni live in all 50 states and 157 countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

Office of University Communications contact: Jeni Cook, (919) 962-2091, jeni.cook@unc.edu

 

 

 

 

 

NFL grant funds international research on the role of active rehabilitation strategies in concussion management

For immediate use

 

NFL grant funds international research on the role of active rehabilitation strategies in concussion management

 

Led by scientists at UNC-Chapel Hill and the Medical College of Wisconsin, research will involve international collaborations and diverse participants — high school, college and professional athletes — across a variety of sports.

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C. – Wednesday, June 14, 2017) – The NFL will fund a $2.6 million international study on the role of active rehabilitation strategies in concussion management, led by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the Medical College of Wisconsin.

 

The project was identified as a priority at the NFL’s International Professional Sports Concussion Research Think Tank, where medical representatives of many of the world’s leading sports leagues convened to share best medical practices and protocols and collaborate on ways to advance science through research.

 

The study, one of the first of its kind, will examine the efficacy of two clinically supervised management strategies, including both the international concussion return-to-play protocol and early therapeutic interventions on concussions.

 

Professional athletes from the Canadian Football League and New Zealand Rugby, as well as amateur athletes from American and Canadian colleges and universities and Wisconsin high schools, will be included in the study. The research will cover a variety of sports, including football, rugby, soccer, lacrosse, basketball and ice hockey. The three-year study will enroll more than 200 concussed athletes, both male and female.

 

“Player health and safety is a high priority for the CFL,” said Kevin McDonald, the league’s vice-president, Football Operations and Player Safety. “This research on concussion management is innovative and important, and our participation is consistent with our commitment to advance player health and safety initiatives.”

 

New Zealand Rugby’s Medical Director Ian Murphy is also very supportive of the research.

 

“Concussion is a significant issue in our game, and we believe that through multi-sport collaboration on research projects like this, we can take steps to ensure that our respective games are as safe as possible for all those who play them,” Murphy said.

 

“Currently there’s little information available about the most effective strategies to manage and treat concussion,” said Johna Register-Mihalik, the co-principal investigator at UNC, assistant professor of exercise and sport science in the College of Arts & Sciences and faculty member of the Matthew Gfeller Sport-Related Traumatic Brain Injury Research Center and the Injury Prevention Research Center. “We want to see how early, clinically guided activity could benefit recovery from concussion.”

 

“A major goal of the study is not only to find out what works best in terms of rehabilitative strategies for concussion, but to also determine the real-world application of these approaches and return-to-play strategies,” added Michael McCrea, the co-principal investigator at the Medical College of Wisconsin. McCrea is director of the Brain Injury Research Program and a professor of neurosurgery and neurology.

 

“What help do clinicians need to implement these types of management strategies, and do the athletes find them beneficial? Concussions affect each individual differently,” he said. “Most of all, we want to maximize the translational impact of this study for athletes and clinicians.”

 

United States colleges and universities included in the study are Catawba College, Elon University, Lynchburg College and North Carolina Central University. Canadian universities include the University of Alberta and York University.

 

Other members of the UNC-Chapel Hill investigative team include co-principal investigator Kevin Guskiewicz (dean of the College of Arts & Sciences, Kenan Distinguished Professor of Exercise and Sport Science and co-director of the Gfeller Center), Stephen Marshall (Injury Prevention Research Center and epidemiology), Jason Mihalik (exercise and sport science and Matthew Gfeller Sport-Related TBI Research Center), Shabbar Ranapurwala (Injury Prevention Research Center and epidemiology), Karen McCulloch (division of physical therapy) and Paula Gildner (project manager, Injury Prevention Research Center). UNC undergraduate and graduate students are also involved in the research.

 

U.S high schools included in the study are Arrowhead High School, Mukwonago High School, Waukesha South High School, Waukesha West High School, Waukesha North High School and Kettle Moraine High School, all in Wisconsin.

 

In addition to McCrea, members of the MCW investigative team include Jennifer Hill (program manager, Brain Injury Research Program), Lin Nelsen (assistant professor of neurosurgery, Brain Injury Research Program) and Anna Klotz (research assistant, Brain Injury Research Program.)

 

–Carolina —

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 113 master’s, 68 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty – including two Nobel laureates – staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 308,000 alumni live in all 50 states and 150 countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

College of Arts & Sciences contact: Kim Spurr, (919) 962–4093, spurrk@email.unc.edu

Office of University Communications contact: Media Relations, (919) 962–8596, mediarelations@unc.edu

 

 

 

UNC-Chapel Hill experts available to discuss hurricane season, which begins today, June 1

For immediate use

 

UNC-Chapel Hill experts available to discuss hurricane season, which begins today, June 1

 

Faculty and researchers can provide insight on storm impact in the US and North Carolina in preparation for new season

 

Hurricane season officially begins today, June 1. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill researchers and faculty are available to provide insight on storm surge and flooding, water quality, beach erosion and other storm-related issues, which can help communities prepare for the upcoming season.

 

Carolina experts are also available to discuss recovery-related research in the wake of Hurricane Matthew, which slammed into 50 counties across North Carolina in 2016. Over the past nine months, 11 different research teams mounted projects on topics from buy-out programs to coastal resilience. This interactive map breaks down how UNC-Chapel Hill researchers are helping develop plans and guide policy for future storms.

 

If you would like to schedule an interview with one of our experts contact our media relations team at mediarelations@unc.edu or call our media line at (919) 445-8555.

 

Rick Luettich is the director for UNC Institute for Marine Sciences in Morehead City, North Carolina and a leading global expert on storm surge. He is on the front lines when it comes to predicting a storm’s potential impact, and is one of the lead developers of ADCIRC, a system of computer programs used to predict storm surge and flooding. These prediction models are updated every few hours – the most recent model can be found here. Agencies including FEMA, NOAA, US Army Corps of Engineers, and NC DEM use Luettich’s model to assess risk, for design protection and to make decisions during storm events. Luettich can discuss coastal risk, protection and forecasting storms.

 

Luettich’s research and ADCIRC model has also been used to design protection systems around New Orleans following Hurricane Katrina and also New York and New Jersey following Hurricane Sandy. He is also the lead investigator of the Department of Homeland Security’s Coastal Resilience Center. In 2017 the National Weather Service will be running ADCIRC during hurricanes.

 

 

Rachel Noble is a distinguished professor at the UNC Institute for Marine Sciences. Her research focuses on public health issues surrounding water quality including stormwater, drinking water and extreme conditions like those following a tropical storm or hurricane event. Her current work highlights the use of rapid tests to protect public health from waterborne diseases. Noble can discuss how to protect human health by better understanding pathogens and the risk they pose to the public, particularly after storm events.

 

 

Noble’s research and rapid method tests have been utilized on both coasts and the Great Lakes to accurately protect public health. She is currently working with US EPA on the implementation of methods to rapidly test E. coli at beaches. She is actively working with municipal wastewater agencies in California, North Carolina, Virginia, and Maryland on improved approaches to protect the public from contamination events in a more timely manner.

 

 

 Carter Smith is a doctoral student at the UNC Institute for Marine Sciences. She studies the benefits of living shorelines, an alternative to seawalls, as a solution to combat erosion and property loss during storms. Living shorelines are both more cost effective than seawalls in the long-term, and are ecologically more sustainable. Smith can discuss how homeowners and property managers can better protect coastal properties from hurricanes.

 

 

 

 

Justin Ridge is a doctoral student at the UNC Institute for Marine Sciences. Working with Institute’s Coastal Geology Lab, in partnership with Duke Marine Lab, he uses drones and other new technologies to monitor coastal environments experiencing changes caused by storms. Ridge can discuss how using drones in coastal environments provides faster, more cost effective information on storm impacts. These data are useful for community planning in light of the increasing number of storms affecting our coasts. 

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 113 master’s, 68 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 318,000 alumni live in all 50 states and 157 countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

UNC-Chapel Hill selects “How Does It Feel To Be A Problem” for 2017 summer reading

UNC-Chapel Hill selects “How Does it Feel to be a Problem?” for 2017 summer reading

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C. – May 4, 2017) – “How Does it Feel to be a Problem?,” which introduces readers to young men and women who are navigating college, family and finding purpose as they face stereotypes or clichés tied to their ethnicities, is the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s 2017 selection for its Carolina Summer Reading Program.

 

An eight-person panel consisting of faculty members, staff and students selected critically-acclaimed author Moustafa Bayoumi’s 2008 book, which explores deeper discussions of identity and a concept of otherness in an account of how young Arab- and Muslim-Americans are forging paths for themselves in modern America.

 

Rita Balaban, senior lecturer of economics and chair of the committee, said this book uses the portraits of young adults to humanize familiar themes that incoming students can relate to “leading to thought-provoking discussions as it increases our awareness of our fellow neighbor’s struggle to just BE.”

 

“This book justifiably rose to the top of the list because of the light it shines on ethnic differences and how people are treated. One cannot help but wonder, could this happen to me?,” said Balaban. “Bayoumi points out in the preface that the issues facing young Arab-Americans post 9/11 are not new and at many points in America’s history, various other groups have faced similar situations. While most of the incoming students this year were toddlers on September 11th, 2001, they live in a society greatly impacted by those events which they cannot recall first hand.”

 

First-year and transfer students who enroll at UNC-Chapel Hill this fall are encouraged to read the book this summer and participate in small group discussions during the Week of Welcome before fall 2017 semester classes begin.

 

Bayoumi will be on campus to give a lecture about the book on Wednesday, Sept. 6, 2017 at 6 pm in Memorial Hall.

 

The Carolina Summer Reading Program, now in its 19th year, aims to stimulate critical thinking outside the classroom and give new students a shared experience. Students are encouraged to come to their own conclusions about the book and will participate in the Summer Reading discussion groups that serve as an academic icebreaker.

 

“How Does it Feel to be a Problem?” is available at the Bull’s Head Bookshop in UNC Student Stores at a discounted price of $13.60.

 

This book has been selected for various group reading and discussions at other colleges and universities across the country, including UNC-Charlotte, University of South Carolina and Northern Kentucky University.

 

Past selections for the Carolina Summer Reading Program include: “The Shallows: What the Internet is Doing to our Brains” by Nicholas G. Carr, “Absolutely American: Four Years at West Point” by David Lipsky, and “Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End” by Atul Gawande.

 

For more information, visit the Carolina Summer Reading website.

 

-Carolina-

Photo Link:

https://unc.photoshelter.com/galleries/C00005vwcu89jLJ4/G00007YEsIzoGQ4o/Carolina-Summer-Reading

Photo credit: Neville Elder

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 110 master’s, 64 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s 317,000-plus alumni live in all 50 states and 156 other countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

UNC-Chapel Hill Office of University Communications: mediarelations@unc.edu, (919) 962-4515

Southern Historical Collection receives $877,000 from Andrew W. Mellon Foundation

For immediate use

 

Southern Historical Collection receives $877,000 from Andrew W. Mellon Foundation

 

Grant will for develop models for communities to tell their own stories

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— April 25, 2017) – The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill has received an $877,000 grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, which will allow the Southern Historical Collection (SHC) at the Wilson Special Collections Library to further develop its transformative model for “community-driven archives.” In addition to several community archiving projects, the SHC will also develop and share training and educational materials in this emerging area of practice.

 

Activities for the three-year grant, “Building a Model for All Users: Transforming Archive Collections through Community-Driven Archives,” will begin immediately.

 

Community-driven archives are created through partnerships between a community that wishes to document and preserve its own history and an archival repository. In many cases, these are stories of marginalized communities that past generations of historians and archivists did not consider significant enough to record or preserve.

 

“These projects let us reach communities where people tell us, ‘I didn’t think anyone cared about our history,’” said SHC Director Bryan Giemza.

 

Giemza thinks having the community direct archiving activities with support from an archivist can foster trust and understanding. At the same time, establishing a more complete historical record benefits everyone who seeks to understand the past and the present.

 

“It’s a very democratic process that places the owners of the story at the center of documentary efforts. We are grateful to the Mellon Foundation for supporting work that leads to dialogue, truth and even reconciliation, by creating opportunities for Americans to learn from and about one another,” said Giemza.

 

As part of the grant, the SHC will hire a full-time Community Archivist and advance or complete four community archiving projects currently underway:

 

 

The SHC will develop a web-based resource to connect researchers with potential community archives projects. Additionally, the SHC will use the grant to share the information about its processes so other archives and communities can replicate them. This includes innovations such as the “Archivist in a Backpack,” which contains starter materials and instructions, protective document sleeves, a microphone and activity suggestions. It will also hold a publishing workshop so participants can reflect on and create a record of their own experiences.

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 110 master’s, 64 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s 317,000-plus alumni live in all 50 states and 156 other countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

Libraries contact: Judy Panitch, (919) 843-3619, panitch@email.unc.edu

UNC-Chapel Hill Communications contact: MC VanGraafeiland, (919) 962-7090, mc.vangraafeiland@unc.edu