Vaccines save 20 million lives, $350 billion in poor countries since 2001

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Vaccines save 20 million lives, $350 billion in poor countries since 2001

 

(CHAPEL HILL, N.C. — September 1, 2017) — Vaccination efforts made in the world’s poorest countries since 2001 will have prevented 20 million deaths and saved $350 billion in health-care costs by 2020, according to a new study from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. In addition, the researchers put the broader economic and social value of saving these lives and preventing disabilities at $820 billion.

 

Researchers led by Sachiko Ozawa, Ph.D., an associate professor at the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy, studied the economic impact of Gavi, the global vaccine alliance launched in 2000 to provide vaccines to children in the world’s poorest countries. Gavi support has contributed to the immunization of 580 million children, and it has operated primarily in the 73 countries covered by the team’s analysis, which was published in the Bulletin of the World Health Organization.

 

“Vaccination is generally regarded to be one of the most cost–effective interventions in public health,” Ozawa said. “Decision-makers need to appreciate the full potential economic benefits that are likely to result from the introduction and sustained use of any vaccine or vaccination program.”

 

Researchers looked at both short- and long-term costs that could be saved preventing illness. The costs – expressed in 2010 U.S. dollars – include averted treatment, transportation costs, productivity losses of caregivers and productivity losses due to disability and death. They used the value-of-a-life-year method to estimate the broader economic and social value of living longer, in better health, as a result of immunization.

 

“Our examination of the broader economic and social value of vaccines illustrates the substantial gains associated with vaccination,” she said. “Unlike previous estimates that only examine the averted costs of treatment, our estimates of the broader economic and social value of vaccines reflect the intrinsic value that people place on living longer and healthier lives.”

 

Each of the Gavi-supported countries in the study will have avoided an average of $5 million in treatment costs per year just as a result of these 10 vaccines. The vaccines will have prevented an estimated 20 million deaths, 500 million cases of illness, 9 million cases of long-term disability and 960 million years of disability by 2020. The value of preserved productivity, quality of life and other broad economic and social benefits for all 73 study countries is estimated to reach $820 billion by 2020, the researchers calculated.

 

The team used health-impact models to estimate the numbers of cases of illness, deaths and disability-adjusted life-years averted by achieving forecasted coverages for vaccination against hepatitis B, human papillomavirus, Japanese encephalitis, measles, rotavirus, rubella, yellow fever and three strains of bacteria that cause pneumonia and meningitis. The researchers found that vaccinating against hepatitis B, measles, and haemophilus influenzae type b and streptococcus pneumoniae — two bacteria that cause pneumonia and meningitis — provided the greatest economic benefits.

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 111 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 318,000 alumni live in all 50 states and 157 countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

Office of University Communications contact: Jeni Cook, (919) 962-2091, jeni.cook@unc.edu

 

 

 

 

 

NFL grant funds international research on the role of active rehabilitation strategies in concussion management

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NFL grant funds international research on the role of active rehabilitation strategies in concussion management

 

Led by scientists at UNC-Chapel Hill and the Medical College of Wisconsin, research will involve international collaborations and diverse participants — high school, college and professional athletes — across a variety of sports.

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C. – Wednesday, June 14, 2017) – The NFL will fund a $2.6 million international study on the role of active rehabilitation strategies in concussion management, led by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the Medical College of Wisconsin.

 

The project was identified as a priority at the NFL’s International Professional Sports Concussion Research Think Tank, where medical representatives of many of the world’s leading sports leagues convened to share best medical practices and protocols and collaborate on ways to advance science through research.

 

The study, one of the first of its kind, will examine the efficacy of two clinically supervised management strategies, including both the international concussion return-to-play protocol and early therapeutic interventions on concussions.

 

Professional athletes from the Canadian Football League and New Zealand Rugby, as well as amateur athletes from American and Canadian colleges and universities and Wisconsin high schools, will be included in the study. The research will cover a variety of sports, including football, rugby, soccer, lacrosse, basketball and ice hockey. The three-year study will enroll more than 200 concussed athletes, both male and female.

 

“Player health and safety is a high priority for the CFL,” said Kevin McDonald, the league’s vice-president, Football Operations and Player Safety. “This research on concussion management is innovative and important, and our participation is consistent with our commitment to advance player health and safety initiatives.”

 

New Zealand Rugby’s Medical Director Ian Murphy is also very supportive of the research.

 

“Concussion is a significant issue in our game, and we believe that through multi-sport collaboration on research projects like this, we can take steps to ensure that our respective games are as safe as possible for all those who play them,” Murphy said.

 

“Currently there’s little information available about the most effective strategies to manage and treat concussion,” said Johna Register-Mihalik, the co-principal investigator at UNC, assistant professor of exercise and sport science in the College of Arts & Sciences and faculty member of the Matthew Gfeller Sport-Related Traumatic Brain Injury Research Center and the Injury Prevention Research Center. “We want to see how early, clinically guided activity could benefit recovery from concussion.”

 

“A major goal of the study is not only to find out what works best in terms of rehabilitative strategies for concussion, but to also determine the real-world application of these approaches and return-to-play strategies,” added Michael McCrea, the co-principal investigator at the Medical College of Wisconsin. McCrea is director of the Brain Injury Research Program and a professor of neurosurgery and neurology.

 

“What help do clinicians need to implement these types of management strategies, and do the athletes find them beneficial? Concussions affect each individual differently,” he said. “Most of all, we want to maximize the translational impact of this study for athletes and clinicians.”

 

United States colleges and universities included in the study are Catawba College, Elon University, Lynchburg College and North Carolina Central University. Canadian universities include the University of Alberta and York University.

 

Other members of the UNC-Chapel Hill investigative team include co-principal investigator Kevin Guskiewicz (dean of the College of Arts & Sciences, Kenan Distinguished Professor of Exercise and Sport Science and co-director of the Gfeller Center), Stephen Marshall (Injury Prevention Research Center and epidemiology), Jason Mihalik (exercise and sport science and Matthew Gfeller Sport-Related TBI Research Center), Shabbar Ranapurwala (Injury Prevention Research Center and epidemiology), Karen McCulloch (division of physical therapy) and Paula Gildner (project manager, Injury Prevention Research Center). UNC undergraduate and graduate students are also involved in the research.

 

U.S high schools included in the study are Arrowhead High School, Mukwonago High School, Waukesha South High School, Waukesha West High School, Waukesha North High School and Kettle Moraine High School, all in Wisconsin.

 

In addition to McCrea, members of the MCW investigative team include Jennifer Hill (program manager, Brain Injury Research Program), Lin Nelsen (assistant professor of neurosurgery, Brain Injury Research Program) and Anna Klotz (research assistant, Brain Injury Research Program.)

 

–Carolina —

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 113 master’s, 68 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty – including two Nobel laureates – staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 308,000 alumni live in all 50 states and 150 countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

College of Arts & Sciences contact: Kim Spurr, (919) 962–4093, spurrk@email.unc.edu

Office of University Communications contact: Media Relations, (919) 962–8596, mediarelations@unc.edu

 

 

 

UNC-Chapel Hill experts available to discuss hurricane season, which begins today, June 1

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UNC-Chapel Hill experts available to discuss hurricane season, which begins today, June 1

 

Faculty and researchers can provide insight on storm impact in the US and North Carolina in preparation for new season

 

Hurricane season officially begins today, June 1. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill researchers and faculty are available to provide insight on storm surge and flooding, water quality, beach erosion and other storm-related issues, which can help communities prepare for the upcoming season.

 

Carolina experts are also available to discuss recovery-related research in the wake of Hurricane Matthew, which slammed into 50 counties across North Carolina in 2016. Over the past nine months, 11 different research teams mounted projects on topics from buy-out programs to coastal resilience. This interactive map breaks down how UNC-Chapel Hill researchers are helping develop plans and guide policy for future storms.

 

If you would like to schedule an interview with one of our experts contact our media relations team at mediarelations@unc.edu or call our media line at (919) 445-8555.

 

Rick Luettich is the director for UNC Institute for Marine Sciences in Morehead City, North Carolina and a leading global expert on storm surge. He is on the front lines when it comes to predicting a storm’s potential impact, and is one of the lead developers of ADCIRC, a system of computer programs used to predict storm surge and flooding. These prediction models are updated every few hours – the most recent model can be found here. Agencies including FEMA, NOAA, US Army Corps of Engineers, and NC DEM use Luettich’s model to assess risk, for design protection and to make decisions during storm events. Luettich can discuss coastal risk, protection and forecasting storms.

 

Luettich’s research and ADCIRC model has also been used to design protection systems around New Orleans following Hurricane Katrina and also New York and New Jersey following Hurricane Sandy. He is also the lead investigator of the Department of Homeland Security’s Coastal Resilience Center. In 2017 the National Weather Service will be running ADCIRC during hurricanes.

 

 

Rachel Noble is a distinguished professor at the UNC Institute for Marine Sciences. Her research focuses on public health issues surrounding water quality including stormwater, drinking water and extreme conditions like those following a tropical storm or hurricane event. Her current work highlights the use of rapid tests to protect public health from waterborne diseases. Noble can discuss how to protect human health by better understanding pathogens and the risk they pose to the public, particularly after storm events.

 

 

Noble’s research and rapid method tests have been utilized on both coasts and the Great Lakes to accurately protect public health. She is currently working with US EPA on the implementation of methods to rapidly test E. coli at beaches. She is actively working with municipal wastewater agencies in California, North Carolina, Virginia, and Maryland on improved approaches to protect the public from contamination events in a more timely manner.

 

 

 Carter Smith is a doctoral student at the UNC Institute for Marine Sciences. She studies the benefits of living shorelines, an alternative to seawalls, as a solution to combat erosion and property loss during storms. Living shorelines are both more cost effective than seawalls in the long-term, and are ecologically more sustainable. Smith can discuss how homeowners and property managers can better protect coastal properties from hurricanes.

 

 

 

 

Justin Ridge is a doctoral student at the UNC Institute for Marine Sciences. Working with Institute’s Coastal Geology Lab, in partnership with Duke Marine Lab, he uses drones and other new technologies to monitor coastal environments experiencing changes caused by storms. Ridge can discuss how using drones in coastal environments provides faster, more cost effective information on storm impacts. These data are useful for community planning in light of the increasing number of storms affecting our coasts. 

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 113 master’s, 68 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 318,000 alumni live in all 50 states and 157 countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

UNC-Chapel Hill selects “How Does It Feel To Be A Problem” for 2017 summer reading

UNC-Chapel Hill selects “How Does it Feel to be a Problem?” for 2017 summer reading

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C. – May 4, 2017) – “How Does it Feel to be a Problem?,” which introduces readers to young men and women who are navigating college, family and finding purpose as they face stereotypes or clichés tied to their ethnicities, is the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s 2017 selection for its Carolina Summer Reading Program.

 

An eight-person panel consisting of faculty members, staff and students selected critically-acclaimed author Moustafa Bayoumi’s 2008 book, which explores deeper discussions of identity and a concept of otherness in an account of how young Arab- and Muslim-Americans are forging paths for themselves in modern America.

 

Rita Balaban, senior lecturer of economics and chair of the committee, said this book uses the portraits of young adults to humanize familiar themes that incoming students can relate to “leading to thought-provoking discussions as it increases our awareness of our fellow neighbor’s struggle to just BE.”

 

“This book justifiably rose to the top of the list because of the light it shines on ethnic differences and how people are treated. One cannot help but wonder, could this happen to me?,” said Balaban. “Bayoumi points out in the preface that the issues facing young Arab-Americans post 9/11 are not new and at many points in America’s history, various other groups have faced similar situations. While most of the incoming students this year were toddlers on September 11th, 2001, they live in a society greatly impacted by those events which they cannot recall first hand.”

 

First-year and transfer students who enroll at UNC-Chapel Hill this fall are encouraged to read the book this summer and participate in small group discussions during the Week of Welcome before fall 2017 semester classes begin.

 

Bayoumi will be on campus to give a lecture about the book on Wednesday, Sept. 6, 2017 at 6 pm in Memorial Hall.

 

The Carolina Summer Reading Program, now in its 19th year, aims to stimulate critical thinking outside the classroom and give new students a shared experience. Students are encouraged to come to their own conclusions about the book and will participate in the Summer Reading discussion groups that serve as an academic icebreaker.

 

“How Does it Feel to be a Problem?” is available at the Bull’s Head Bookshop in UNC Student Stores at a discounted price of $13.60.

 

This book has been selected for various group reading and discussions at other colleges and universities across the country, including UNC-Charlotte, University of South Carolina and Northern Kentucky University.

 

Past selections for the Carolina Summer Reading Program include: “The Shallows: What the Internet is Doing to our Brains” by Nicholas G. Carr, “Absolutely American: Four Years at West Point” by David Lipsky, and “Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End” by Atul Gawande.

 

For more information, visit the Carolina Summer Reading website.

 

-Carolina-

Photo Link:

https://unc.photoshelter.com/galleries/C00005vwcu89jLJ4/G00007YEsIzoGQ4o/Carolina-Summer-Reading

Photo credit: Neville Elder

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 110 master’s, 64 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s 317,000-plus alumni live in all 50 states and 156 other countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

UNC-Chapel Hill Office of University Communications: mediarelations@unc.edu, (919) 962-4515

Southern Historical Collection receives $877,000 from Andrew W. Mellon Foundation

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Southern Historical Collection receives $877,000 from Andrew W. Mellon Foundation

 

Grant will for develop models for communities to tell their own stories

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— April 25, 2017) – The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill has received an $877,000 grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, which will allow the Southern Historical Collection (SHC) at the Wilson Special Collections Library to further develop its transformative model for “community-driven archives.” In addition to several community archiving projects, the SHC will also develop and share training and educational materials in this emerging area of practice.

 

Activities for the three-year grant, “Building a Model for All Users: Transforming Archive Collections through Community-Driven Archives,” will begin immediately.

 

Community-driven archives are created through partnerships between a community that wishes to document and preserve its own history and an archival repository. In many cases, these are stories of marginalized communities that past generations of historians and archivists did not consider significant enough to record or preserve.

 

“These projects let us reach communities where people tell us, ‘I didn’t think anyone cared about our history,’” said SHC Director Bryan Giemza.

 

Giemza thinks having the community direct archiving activities with support from an archivist can foster trust and understanding. At the same time, establishing a more complete historical record benefits everyone who seeks to understand the past and the present.

 

“It’s a very democratic process that places the owners of the story at the center of documentary efforts. We are grateful to the Mellon Foundation for supporting work that leads to dialogue, truth and even reconciliation, by creating opportunities for Americans to learn from and about one another,” said Giemza.

 

As part of the grant, the SHC will hire a full-time Community Archivist and advance or complete four community archiving projects currently underway:

 

 

The SHC will develop a web-based resource to connect researchers with potential community archives projects. Additionally, the SHC will use the grant to share the information about its processes so other archives and communities can replicate them. This includes innovations such as the “Archivist in a Backpack,” which contains starter materials and instructions, protective document sleeves, a microphone and activity suggestions. It will also hold a publishing workshop so participants can reflect on and create a record of their own experiences.

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 110 master’s, 64 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s 317,000-plus alumni live in all 50 states and 156 other countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

Libraries contact: Judy Panitch, (919) 843-3619, panitch@email.unc.edu

UNC-Chapel Hill Communications contact: MC VanGraafeiland, (919) 962-7090, mc.vangraafeiland@unc.edu

Morehead Planetarium to host UNC Science Expo as part of the North Carolina Science Festival

 

(CHAPEL HILL, NC– April 20, 2017) –  Morehead Planetarium will host the annual UNC Science Expo on Saturday.  The signature event of the North Carolina Science Festival (NCSF) showcases the wonders of science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) and is a partnership between Morehead Planetarium and Science Center, the University of North Carolina and the Town of Chapel Hill.

 

A free, family-friendly event, the Expo offers more than 100 exhibits with hands-on experiments, science demonstrations, laboratory tours and stage entertainment. New activities for 2017 include tours of Ackland Art Museum and Coker Arboretum, a Kid’s Zone, with small science and giant games, and in the spirit of the Tar Heel 10 Miler and Four Mile Fun Run, the first ever Zero K for kids. See how slow kids can go as they “freeze” in place, just like molecules do at absolute zero.

 

No registration is required. A food truck rodeo will be on-site for lunch, snacks and drinks. A map of the expo is attached.

 

Saturday, April 22

11 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Cameron Avenue

UNC-CH Campus

 

Media Parking: Parking is free on Stadium Drive, in the Cobb parking deck, and the Nash, Park Place and Bell Tower parking lots. Paid parking is available at metered street spaces or at the Rosemary Street parking decks. On Skipper Bowles Drive near the Dean Smith Center, a free U bus runs to campus.

 

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 113 master’s, 68 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty – including two Nobel laureates – staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 308,000 alumni live in all 50 states and 150 countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

About the North Carolina Science Festival

The North Carolina Science Festival presented by Biogen was founded in 2010 and is the first statewide science festival in the United States. Each spring, the Festival offers hundreds of events that celebrate the economic, educational and cultural impact of science throughout North Carolina. The Festival was founded and is produced by Morehead Planetarium and Science Center (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill). The 2017 Festival runs April 7-23 with “Art and Design” as the theme. Burroughs Wellcome Fund is a Diamond Champion sponsor. Platinum sponsors are Duke Energy, N.C. GlaxoSmithKline Foundation and Google. Gold sponsors are UTC Aerospace and SAS. Bronze sponsors are UNC Healthcare, PSNC Energy, NC Electric Cooperative, Syngenta and Novozymes. For more information about the North Carolina Science Festival, visit www.ncsciencefestival.org.

 

Morehead Planetarium contact: Molly Molpus, (919) 843-7952, molly.molpus@unc.edu

UNC-Chapel Hill launches University-wide initiative to integrate the arts, learning and public service with Arts Everywhere Day, on April 7

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IMG_3096 copy

 

UNC-Chapel Hill launches University-wide initiative to integrate the arts, learning and public service with Arts Everywhere Day, on April 7

 

First annual campus arts celebration to feature more than 50 performances and installations by 40 partners across 20 campus sites

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.—April 4, 2017) – Media are invited to join University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Chancellor Carol L. Folt and Special Assistant to the Chancellor for the Arts Emil Kang at 1 p.m. on April 7 on a tour of diverse student and professional arts experiences during Arts Everywhere Day, the official launch of Carolina’s groundbreaking Arts Everywhere initiative.

 

Converting the campus into a creative hub, Arts Everywhere Day will engage the University community with diverse arts experiences and opportunities for creative expression. Along with professional installations, student and departmental work will be on view and more than 50 pop-up performances by student arts groups are scheduled. Creative, hands-on activities will also take place at The Pit, Polk Place and Rams Head Plaza.

 

With the belief that the arts are an essential tool for learning and engaging communities, Folt created Arts Everywhere to revolutionize academics and enhance public service at Carolina. Kang will drive this long-term strategic initiative to invest in sustained creative practice, live arts experiences and arts learning, with the goal of making Carolina a leader in transforming the 21st century liberal arts education.

 

Chancellor Folt and Emil Kang will join students at 1 p.m. to paint the Arts Everywhere mural wall. Media are invited to cover and are encouraged to join them as they tour a variety of installations, exhibits and performances across campus. Both will be available for questions at the completion of the tour.

 

Friday, April 7

1 p.m. ET

Mural Wall, The Pit (in front of UNC Student Stores)

207 South Rd.

UNC-Chapel Hill campus

 

Media unable to complete the full tour are encouraged to cover campus activities on their own. The program of events kicks off at 12 p.m. and includes:

 

  • Arts Everywhere Mural Wall – Designed by the UNC Arts Ambassadors, in collaboration with the Undergraduate Art Association, the wall will feature outlines of figures representing Carolina students and community members. The campus community is invited to fill in portions of the outlined design with paints that will be provided.
  • Campus Keys – Ten pianos (nine painted by students), installed at outdoor locations across campus, will be played by student art groups and music students during class changes (12:05 p.m., 1:10 p.m., 2:15 p.m. and 3:20 p.m.). The pianos will remain on campus though April 12 and will be open for anyone to play.
  • Capstone event for Maker-in-Residence – Carolina Maker-in-Residence Donovan Zimmerman, of Paperhand Puppet Intervention, will showcase his mask work with Carolina students at the Murray Hall Makerspace. The event will culmintate with a presentation of these larger-than-life pieces at 3:30 p.m. at Historic Playmakers Theater.
  • Dumpster Monster – This unique installation by Carolina Performing Arts DisTIL Fellow Robin Frohardt on Polk Place sends a poignant message about the inordinate amount of waste that humanity contributes to the earth.
  • Los Trompos – A large-scale interactive outdoor installation by Mexican designers Héctor Esrawe and Ignacio Cadena. “Los Trompos” is inspired by spinning tops and will be on view at the Ackland Art Museum, Rams Head Plaza and the Campus Y courtyard through Sept. 17.
  • Snake Pendulum demonstrations – Designed and built by students and faculty of the physics and math departments, this kinetic sculpture, on view in front of Phillips Hall, will demonstrate tension, phase and simple harmonic motion, as well as the creativity inherent in both disciplines.
  • Evening lectures and performances – The day will close with a keynote speech by Nigerian novelist Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s at the Fifth Annual Global Africana Conference and evening performances by Kenan Theater Company, UNC Opera and UNC Baroque Ensemble and PlayMakers Repertory Company.

 

Media Check-In: Media must check-in at The Pit no earlier than 12:40 p.m. MC VanGraafeiland (Cell: 646-345-2802) will be the on-site contact.

 

Media Parking: A limited number of spaces will be available for press in lots near the Frank Porter Graham Student Union. Contact MC VanGraafeiland (mc.vangraafeiland@unc.edu) by 3 p.m. on Thursday, April 6 to reserve parking.

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill



The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 110 master’s, 64 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s 317,000-plus alumni live in all 50 states and 156 other countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

Arts Everywhere contact: Rachel Ash, (919) 843-9088, rachel_ash@unc.edu

Communications and Public Affairs contact: MC VanGraafeiland, (919) 962-7090, mc.vangraafeiland@unc.edu

Media invited to join UNC-Chapel Hill for Hill Hall ribbon cutting ceremony

Not for publication

 

Media invited to join UNC-Chapel Hill for Hill Hall ribbon cutting ceremony

 

110-year-old music and performance arts building is reopening after extensive 18-month renovation

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C. – Feb. 6, 2017) – The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill will celebrate the reopening of Hill Hall, home to Carolina’s music department, following an extensive 18-month, $15 million renovation. This is a private event; however, media are invited to attend.

 

The renovations add air conditioning for the first time to the building, which was built in 1907.  Other upgrades include a climate control system, state-of-the-art acoustical treatments, a professional-grade stage, and equipment and piano lift.

 

These upgrades will transform Hill Hall, which has hosted guests such as Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Joan Baez and Yo-Yo Ma, into an innovative performance and practice space for students. The addition of recording facilities will allow students, faculty and guests to record performances and create new opportunities to partner with Carolina Performing Arts.  An enhanced backstage area with updated dressing rooms and storage, improved lighting and modernized administrative and teaching spaces adjacent to the rotunda will complete the renovations.

 

Additionally, the performance space will be named the James and Susan Moeser Auditorium in honor of the former chancellor and his wife, who are organists and teachers at Carolina.

 

The renovations are made possible thanks to a $5 million gift from the William R. Kenan Jr. Charitable Trust. The Office of the Provost provided an additional $5 million. The College of Arts and Sciences raised the balance through private gifts. The renovation used no state-appropriated funding.

 

Wednesday, Feb. 8

3:30 p.m.

James and Susan Moeser Auditorium

Hill Hall

145 E. Cameron Ave

Chapel Hill, North Carolina

 

Media Check-In: Media must check in no earlier than 3:15 p.m. at the entrance of Hill Hall. Kate Luck (479-629-6334, kate.luck@unc.edu) will be the on-site contact.

 

Media Parking: Parking is very limited. Media are encouraged to use the parking deck located between Rosemary Street and Columbia Street.

 

— Carolina —

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 110 master’s, 64 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty – including two Nobel laureates – staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s 317,000-plus alumni live in all 50 states and 156 other countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

UNC University Communications contact: Kate Luck, (919) 445-8360, kate.luck@unc.edu