UNC-Chapel Hill experts available to discuss hurricane season, which begins on June 1

UNC-Chapel Hill experts available to discuss hurricane season, which begins on June 1

 

Hurricane season officially begins on June 1. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill researchers and faculty are available to provide insight on storm surge and flooding, water quality, beach erosion and other storm-related issues, which can help communities prepare for the upcoming season.

 

Carolina experts are also available to discuss recovery-related research in the wake of hurricanes, especially Hurricane Matthew, which caused torrential rains, set a new storm tide record and killed at least 28 people in North Carolina in 2016.

 

 

If you’d like to speak with an expert, call (919) 445-8555 or email mediarelations@unc.edu.

 

Rick Luettich is the director of UNC-Chapel Hill Institute of Marine Sciences in Morehead City, North Carolina and the lead investigator of the Department of Homeland Security’s Coastal Resilience Center. He is a leading global expert on storm surge and is on the front lines when it comes to predicting a storm’s potential impact, as co-developer of ADCIRC, a system of computer programs used to predict storm surge and flooding. These prediction models are updated every few hours – the most recent model can be found here. Agencies and organizations including Federal Emergency Management Agency, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Army Corps of Engineers, the U.S. Coast Guard and the emergency operations centers in several coastal states use Luettich’s model to assess risk, for design protection and to make decisions during storm events. He can discuss coastal risk, protection and forecasting storms.

 

Luettich’s research and ADCIRC model has also been used to design protection systems around New Orleans following Hurricane Katrina and around New York and New Jersey following Hurricane Sandy. Most recently ADCIRC provided extensive storm surge and flooding predictions for the major landfalling hurricanes during the 2017 hurricane season.

 

 

Rachel Noble is a distinguished professor at the UNC-Chapel Hill Institute of Marine Sciences. Her research focuses on public health issues surrounding water quality, including stormwater, drinking water and extreme conditions like those following a tropical storm or hurricane event. Her current work highlights the use of rapid tests to protect public health from waterborne diseases. She can discuss how to protect human health by better understanding pathogens and the risk they pose to the public, particularly after storm events.

 

Noble’s research and rapid method tests have been used on both coasts and the Great Lakes to protect public health. She is currently working with the Environmental Protection Agency on the implementation of methods to rapidly test E. coli at beaches. She is actively working with municipal wastewater agencies in California, North Carolina, Virginia, and Maryland on improved approaches to protect the public from contamination events in a more timely manner.

 

 

Hans Paerl is a distinguished professor of marine and environmental sciences at the UNC-Chapel Hill Institute of Marine Sciences. He is a water quality expert, focused on the harmful effects of toxic algae for both people and aquatic ecosystems. He can discuss the long-term impact of these blooms, including excessive nutrient inputs leading to algal blooms and their detrimental effects, including low oxygen (hypoxia), fish kills and toxicity of blooms, including digestive, liver and neurological impacts on human health.

 

Paerl’s recent study demonstrates that over the past 2 decades, tropical cyclones around the globe are increasing in both frequency and intensity. This has led to greater impacts to coastal watersheds including more fish kills, larger algal blooms, and larger low oxygen “dead zones.”

 

 

Carter Smith is a doctoral student at the UNC-Chapel Hill Institute of Marine Sciences. She studies the benefits of living shorelines, an alternative to seawalls, as a solution to combat erosion and property loss during storms. Living shorelines are both more cost effective than seawalls in the long-term and are ecologically more sustainable. She can discuss how homeowners and property managers can better protect coastal properties from hurricanes.

 

 

 

 

Gavin Smith is director of the Department of Homeland Security’s Coastal Resilience Center and a research professor in the department of city and regional planning at UNC-Chapel Hill. He leads the Hurricane Matthew Disaster Recovery and Resilience Initiative, working with federal, state and local leaders on addressing community needs after the 2016 storm. Following Hurricane Katrina, he worked in the Mississippi Office of the Governor and provided policy change recommendations to improve the delivery of post-disaster recovery and reconstruction activities. He also previously served as the assistant director for hazard mitigation for the state of North Carolina. He can discuss the disaster recovery and hazard mitigation process, particularly the role of states.

 

 

P: (919) 445-8555  |  E: mediarelations@unc.edu

 

 

UNC-Chapel Hill experts available to discuss mosquito and tick-borne diseases

UNC-Chapel Hill experts available to discuss mosquito and tick-borne diseases

 

Diseases transmitted by ticks, mosquitoes and fleas – which include Lyme disease, Zika and West Nile virus – have tripled in the U.S., according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. As warmer temperatures lead Americans to spend more time outdoors, it is important that people understand the risks and how to avoid getting bitten by mosquitoes and ticks. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill researchers and physicians are available to discuss the rise in vector-borne diseases, prevention recommendations and treatment options for these diseases, and meat allergies resulting from tick bites.

 

If you’d like to speak with an expert, call (919) 445-8555 or email mediarelations@unc.edu.

 

Dr. Ross Boyce is an infectious diseases fellow with the division of infectious diseases in the UNC School of Medicine. He studies malaria and dengue in East Africa. He can discuss prevention, diagnostics and treatment of vector-borne diseases as well as how climate change is impacting where these illnesses are found. He is currently studying tick-borne diseases in North Carolina.

 

 

 

Dr. Scott Commins is a professor of allergy and immunology in the UNC School of Medicine. He is a leading expert on alpha-gal meat allergy, which is believed to result from tick bites. He sees patients with this condition in the UNC Allergy and Immunology Clinic and he is one of a few experts in the U.S. who are conducting clinical research regarding this poorly understood yet often serious allergy. He is available to discuss alpha-gal.

 

 

 

Dr. Steve Meshnick is a professor of epidemiology in the UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health and a professor of microbiology and immunology in the UNC School of Medicine. He has spent the last 30 years researching tropical infectious diseases. He can discuss malaria, including drug resistance, prevention and pregnancy. He also studies tick-borne diseases and was part of a research team that showed that treating clothing with the long-lasting tick repellent permethrin can protect outdoor workers in North Carolina from ticks.

 

 

Dr. David Weber is a professor of epidemiology in the UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health and a professor of pediatrics and medicine in the UNC School of Medicine’s Division of Infectious Diseases and Department of Pediatrics. He is also a member of UNC Hospitals’ Zika Response Working Group. He can discuss the increase in tick, mosquito and flea-borne diseases in the U.S. and share a clinical perspective on Lyme disease, Zika and other vector-borne diseases, and recommendations for how to protect against insect bites.

 

 

 

P: (919) 445-8555  |  E: mediarelations@unc.edu

 

 

New study finds climate change threatens marine protected areas

For immediate release

 

New study finds climate change threatens marine protected areas

 

Expected levels of ocean warming will transform marine ecosystems worldwide, beginning as early as 2050

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— May 7, 2018) – New research from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and collaborators found that most marine life in marine protected areas will not be able to tolerate warming ocean temperatures caused by greenhouse gas emissions. Marine protected areas have been established as a haven to protect threatened marine life, like polar bears, penguins and coral reefs, from the effects of fishing and other activities like mineral and oil extraction. The study found that with continued “business-as-usual” emissions, the protections currently in place won’t matter, because by 2100, warming and reduced oxygen concentration will make marine protected areas uninhabitable by most species currently residing in those areas.

 

The study, published today in Nature Climate Change, predicts that under the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s Representative Concentration Pathway 8.5 emissions scenario, better known as the “business as usual scenario,” marine protected areas will warm by 2.8 degrees Celsius (or 5 degrees Fahrenheit) by 2100.

 

The study concludes that such rapid and extreme warming would devastate the species and ecosystems currently located in marine protected areas. This could lead to extinctions of some of the world’s most unique animals, loss of biodiversity, and changes in ocean food-webs. It could also have considerable negative impacts on the productivity of fisheries and on tourism revenue. Many of these marine species exist as small populations with low genetic diversity that are vulnerable to environmental change and unlikely to adapt to ocean warming.

 

The study also estimated the year in which marine protected areas in different ecoregions would cross critical thresholds beyond which most species wouldn’t be able to tolerate the change. For many areas in the tropics, this will happen as soon as the mid-21st century.

 

“With warming of this magnitude, we expect to lose many, if not most, animal species from marine protected areas by the turn of the century,” said John Bruno, lead author, marine ecologist, and biology professor in the College of Arts and Sciences at UNC-Chapel Hill. “To avoid the worst outcomes, we need to immediately adopt an emission reduction scenario in which emissions peak within the next two decades and then decrease very significantly, replacing fossil fuels with cleaner energy sources like solar and wind.”

 

Key takeaways include:

 

  • There are 8,236 marine protected areas around the world, although they only cover about 4 percent of the surface of the ocean.
  • The projected warming of 2.8 degrees Celsius (or 5 degrees Fahrenheit) by 2100 would fundamentally disrupt the ecosystems currently located in marine protected areas.
  • Mean sea-surface temperatures within marine protected areas are projected to increase 0.034 degrees Celsius (or 0.061 degrees Fahrenheit) per year.
  • Marine protected areas in the Arctic and Antarctic are projected to warm especially quickly, threatening numerous marine mammals like polar bears and penguins.
  • The marine protected areas at the greatest risk include those in the Arctic and Antarctic, in the northwest Atlantic, and the newly designated no-take reserves off the northern Galápagos islands Darwin and Wolf.

 

“There has been a lot of talk about establishing marine reserves to buy time while we figure out how to confront climate change,” said Rich Aronson, ocean scientist at Florida Institute of Technology and a researcher on the study. “We’re out of time, and the fact is we already know what to do: We have to control greenhouse gas emissions.”

 

The research was conducted in collaboration with researchers at Florida Institute of Technology, Polar Bears International, University of Southampton, Memorial University of Newfoundland, Marine Conservation Institute, NOAA Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory, University of Miami and the National Oceanography Centre.

 

Bruno is available for interviews. Please let us know if you’d like to arrange a time to learn more.

 

The photo below shows the projected warming per year (indicated by the color-coded bar on the right) of the world’s marine protected areas (indicated by the black dots).

 

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 111 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 322,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and 165 countries. More than 175,000 live in North Carolina.

 

University Communications Contact: Audrey Smith, (919) 445-8555, audrey.smith@unc.edu

University releases documents related to faculty grievance

Today Chancellor Carol L. Folt released the following memo. The documents referenced in the memo are included below.

 

 

 

  1. The letter of Provost Robert Blouin to Christopher B. McLaughlin, Chair of the Faculty Grievance Committee, dated November 30, 2017.
  2. The letter of Chancellor Carol L. Folt to Professor Jay Smith dated February 26, 2018.
  3. The letter of Chancellor Carol L. Folt to Board of Trustees Chair Haywood Cochrane dated March 20, 2018.
  4. The decision of the Board of Trustees denying Professor Smith’s appeal dated April 2, 2018.

 

Published May 4, 2018

 

 

North Carolina Policy Collaboratory grants will support GenX research and other emerging environmental contaminants in North Carolina

For immediate use

North Carolina Policy Collaboratory grants will support GenX research and other emerging environmental contaminants in North Carolina

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C. – April 9, 2018) — The North Carolina Policy Collaboratory today announced $430,000 in grants for three research projects to address emerging contaminants in North Carolina, including GenX, a potentially toxic industrial compound that has been detected in the Cape Fear River.

 

“GenX was identified last summer as a potential dangerous contaminant in our state’s drinking water, and these projects will help us to better understand the scope of this issue and how it might be addressed,” said Al Segars, chair of the NC Policy Collaboratory Advisory Board and PNC Distinguished Professor of Strategy and Entrepreneurship and faculty director of the Center for Sustainable Enterprise at UNC Kenan-Flagler Business School. “By funding research that addresses these kinds of timely environmental quality concerns, the Collaboratory is fulfilling its mission of connecting university research to policy in service to North Carolina citizens.”

 

The grants will support the following projects:

  • $300,000 to evaluate emerging contaminants in private wells in North Carolina. The grant will build on an existing study funded by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and led by Jacqueline MacDonald Gibson, associate professor of environmental sciences and engineering at UNC Gillings School of Public Health. Researchers will test the performance of household water filters in removing lead, microbial contaminants, GenX and other perfluoroalkyl compounds. Gibson’s team will also conduct a cost-benefit analysis of interventions for private wells contaminated with lead, GenX and other contaminants.
  • $50,000 for a project led by Matthew Lockett, assistant professor of chemistry at UNC-Chapel Hill, and Marcey Waters, Glen H. Elder Jr. Distinguished Professor, to develop an easy-to-read, qualitative paper test that would indicate if GenX might be present in the water and if additional analysis is necessary. This project is a partnership between the Collaboratory and the UNC Center for Environmental Health and Susceptibility.
  • $80,000 to prioritize research and identify ways to address data and monitoring needs for detection of contaminants across the state. The work will be carried out by a state-wide consortium of university researchers organized by the Collaboratory who are working to identify completed, ongoing and planned research projects on emerging contaminants, including GenX, in North Carolina. The Collaboratory research team will be co-led by Gibson and Detlef Knappe, professor of civil, construction and environmental engineering at North Carolina State University, and is comprised of faculty members from East Carolina University, North Carolina State University, UNC-Chapel Hill, UNC-Charlotte, UNC-Wilmington and Duke University.

-Carolina-

About the North Carolina Policy Collaboratory

The Collaboratory was established in the summer of 2016 by the North Carolina General Assembly for the purposes of facilitating the dissemination of the policy and research expertise of the University of North Carolina for practical use by state and local government. The Collaboratory facilitates and funds research related to the environmental and economic components of the management of the natural resources within North Carolina and of new technologies for habitat, environmental, and water quality improvement. To date the Collaboratory has brought nearly $4 million in research dollars to the UNC System. More information about the Collaboratory can be found at:  https://collaboratory.unc.edu/

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 111 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 322,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and 165 countries. More than 175,000 live in North Carolina.

UNC-Chapel Hill senior selected as James C. Gaither Junior Fellows Program recipient

For immediate release

 

UNC-Chapel Hill senior selected as James C. Gaither Junior Fellows Program recipient

 

Frances Reuland is also an Honors Carolina student and Phi Beta Kappa inductee

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— April 3, 2018) – University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill senior Frances Reuland has been selected for the elite James C. Gaither Junior Fellows Program run by the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. She is UNC-Chapel Hill’s second recipient of this one-year award. The Junior Fellows Program provides substantive work experience at the Carnegie Endowment for students and recent graduates with career interests in international affairs.

 

Reuland, 21, will graduate in May 2018 with a double major in environmental sciences and Hispanic literature and culture and a minor in chemistry. She is the daughter of Daniel Reuland and Paula Paradis from Chapel Hill.

 

“Frances’s extraordinary service to others has ranged from tutoring in our local communities to surveying environmental health conditions in Malawi,” said Chancellor Carol L. Folt. “This is a wonderful opportunity for Frances to expand further her global horizons following her success at Carolina as a student-scholar-athlete. I have no doubt that her climate and energy studies – combined with her dedication to helping people – will contribute to our world’s understanding of significant environmental challenges.”

 

Reuland is one of only 12 fellows selected for the prestigious Junior Fellows Program. She will work full time at the Carnegie Endowment in Washington, D.C., as a paid research assistant to the endowment’s senior associates in the Energy and Climate Program.

 

“I’m honored to become a Junior Fellow at Carnegie and am incredibly excited to learn about and contribute to research on national and international energy and climate issues,” said Reuland. “I’m very grateful for the opportunities and support at UNC-Chapel Hill that have helped me get to this spot.”

 

At Carolina, Reuland was a first-year walk-on to the women’s varsity soccer team. An Honors Carolina student, Phi Beta Kappa inductee and Buckley Public Service Scholar, Reuland won the NCAA Elite 90 Award in 2016, awarded to student athletes with the highest grade-point averages in the NCAA finals. Reuland’s research interests took her to Malawi, where she surveyed environmental health conditions in health care facilities. She earned an Honors Thesis Research Award to support her honors thesis on the same topic. Reuland was a volunteer translator for the Center for Latino Health at UNC Hospitals and a volunteer tutor for the English as a Second Program at Chapel Hill-Carrboro City Schools.

 

“Frances is an impressive scholar-athlete-researcher. We are delighted that she will have this opportunity at the Carnegie Foundation to meet world leaders in energy and climate change, and to learn about how policy decisions can be informed by cutting-edge research,” said Professor Inger Brodey, director of the Office of Distinguished Scholarships. “She will also be in a position to continue her own research on the effects of climate change on water, energy and health care.”

 

The Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, one of the world’s leading think tanks specializing in international affairs, conducts programs of research, discussion, publication and education in international relations and U.S. foreign policy. Each year the endowment offers approximately 10–15 one-year fellowships to uniquely qualified graduating seniors and individuals who have graduated during the past academic year. The program was recently named in honor of Jim Gaither, the former chairman of the Board of Trustees for the Carnegie Endowment. Junior Fellows receive a monthly salary equivalent to $38,000 annually and a generous benefits package.

 

 

-Carolina-

  

Photo of Reuland: https://bit.ly/2GAmkxF

  

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 111 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 322,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and 165 countries. More than 175,000 live in North Carolina.

 

Office of Distinguished Scholarships contacts: Inger Brodey, (919) 843-0965, brodey@email.unc.edu and Maggie Douglas, (919) 843-7757, mdouglas@unc.edu

 

University Communications: Media Relations, (919) 445-8555, mediarelations@unc.edu

 

190 at UNC-Chapel Hill inducted into Phi Beta Kappa

For immediate use

 

190 at UNC-Chapel Hill inducted into Phi Beta Kappa

 

Phi Beta Kappa is the nation’s oldest college honorary society

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— March 22, 2018) – Phi Beta Kappa inducted 190 University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill students as new members. The recent induction ceremony featured a keynote address by William L. Roper, M.D., MPH, dean of the UNC School of Medicine. New members received certificates and Phi Beta Kappa keys, the organization’s symbol.

 

Phi Beta Kappa membership is open to undergraduates in the college and professional degree programs who meet stringent eligibility requirements.

 

A student who has completed 75 hours of course work in the liberal arts and sciences with a GPA of 3.85 or better (on a 4-point scale) is eligible for membership. Also eligible is any student who has completed 105 hours of course work in the liberal arts and sciences with a 3.75 GPA. Grades earned at other universities are not considered. Less than 1 percent of all college students qualify.

 

Past and present Phi Beta Kappa members from across the country have included 17 American presidents, 40 U.S. Supreme Court Justices, more than 130 Nobel Laureates, and numerous artistic, intellectual and political leaders.

 

Phi Beta Kappa has 286 chapters nationwide. UNC-Chapel Hill’s chapter, Alpha of North Carolina, was founded in 1904 and is the oldest of seven chapters in the state. Each year, Phi Beta Kappa chapters and alumni associations across the country raise and distribute more than $1 million in awards, scholarships and prizes benefiting high schools and college students.

 

Phi Beta Kappa officers at UNC-Chapel Hill for 2017-2018 are students Rohanit Singh, president; Elaine Kearney, vice president; and Diana Lopez, recording secretary. James L. Leloudis, history professor, Peter T. Grauer associate dean for Honors Carolina and director of the James M. Johnston Center for Undergraduate Excellence, is chapter executive secretary and faculty advisor.

 

Listed below are 187 inductees, 127 of whom are from North Carolina. The names appear below in alphabetical order by North Carolina county, then by state and country. All study in the College of Arts and Sciences except where otherwise noted. Three students chose not to be listed.

 

 

Alamance County

  • Mary Margaret Evans, a senior with economics and political science majors, daughter of David Evans and Mary Evans of Burlington.
  • Jacob Benjamin Pascual, a junior with psychology and chemistry majors and a music minor, son of Roberto Pascual and Marissa Pascual of Graham.

 

Brunswick County

  • Meg Keeter Fletcher, a senior with linguistics and Hispanic linguistics majors and a Russian language and culture minor, daughter of Lyn Fletcher and Jimmy Fletcher of Shallotte.

 

Buncombe County

  • Duncan Glover Britton, a junior with a computer science major, son of Eugene Britton IV and Dr. Susan Glover of Asheville.
  • Grace Harper Buie, a senior with environmental studies and economics majors, daughter of Billie Buie and Stephen Buie of Asheville.
  • Sarah Elizabeth Gilmour, a senior with religious studies and political science majors, daughter of Monroe Gilmour and Fern Martin of Black Mountain.
  • Emily Peyton Imes, a senior with chemistry and Hispanic literature and cultures majors, daughter of Anne Imes and Jeffrey Imes of Asheville.

 

Burke County

  • Jordan Kathryn Jenkins, a junior with history and political science majors, daughter of Penny Jenkins of Morganton and Ernest Jenkins III of Kings Mountain.

 

Cabarrus County

  • Emily Susan Hollis, a senior with a biology major and medical anthropology and chemistry minors, of Huntersville.
  • Quade Robinson, a senior with Japanese and interdisciplinary studies majors and a Chinese minor, son of Ann Robinson and William Robinson of Midland.
  • Anna Catherine Silver, a junior with biology and chemistry majors and a Spanish for the medical professions minor, daughter of Sherry Silver and Dr. Robert Silver of Concord.
  • Rachel Anne Silver, a junior with psychology and exercise and sport science majors, daughter of Sherry Silver and Dr. Robert Silver of Concord.

 

Carteret County

  • Trevor Thompson Brownlow, a senior with a communication studies major, son of Joy Brownlow and Roy Brownlow of Emerald Isle.
  • Jordan Lynn Stinnett, a senior with English and communication studies majors and a medieval and early modern studies minor, daughter of Jennifer Stinnett and Richard Stinnett of Atlantic.

 

Catawba County

  • Sandy Ellen Alkoutami, a senior with public policy and economics majors and an Islamic and Middle Eastern studies minor, daughter of Ghassn Alkoutami and Rana Alkoutami of Hickory.
  • Danielle Christine Callahan, a senior with history and global studies majors, daughter of Gary Callahan and Janelle Callahan of Newton.
  • Luke Alexander Kessel, a junior with history and peace, war and defense majors and a social and economic justice minor, son of Shelia Kessel and Dr. John Kessel of Hickory.
  • Lukas Pisel, a senior with public policy and economics majors, son of Dr. Gregory Pisel and Angela Pisel of Hickory.

 

Chatham County

  • Kenya Iman Lee, a senior with a public policy major and education and African, African American and diaspora studies minors, daughter of Hoyte Lee and Belissa Lee of Moncure.
  • Samuel Lawrence Mulkern Raines, a junior with biology and chemistry majors, of Chapel Hill.

 

Cumberland County

  • Zachary Boyd, a senior with a peace, war and defense major, son of Carolyn Boyd of Fayetteville.

 

Davidson County

  • Caroline Elizabeth Wooten, a senior with an art history major and anthropology and African studies minors, daughter of David Wooten and Jennifer Wooten of Lexington.

 

Durham County

  • Hope Louise Allen, a senior with an economics major and a statistics and analytics minor, daughter of Julie Allen and Sid Allen Jr. of Durham.
  • Ingrid Grace Kottke, a senior with art history and religious studies majors and a French minor, of Durham.
  • Ryan D. Rowe, a senior with Slavic languages and cultures and music majors, son of Robert Rowe and Brandi Rowe of Durham.
  • Kevin Michael Tillman, a junior with music and German majors, son of Shirley Tillman and Andrew Tillman Jr. of Jacksonville.

 

Forsyth County

  • Ryan Austin Armstrong, a junior with physics and computer science majors, son of Douglas Armstrong and Laura Armstrong of Winston-Salem.
  • Courtney Elizabeth Cash, a senior with biology and music majors and a chemistry minor, daughter of Chris Cash and Pam Cash of Winston-Salem.
  • Leah Gray Hinshaw, a junior with Latin and linguistics majors and a composition, rhetoric and digital literacy minor, daughter of Margaret Hinshaw and Billy Hinshaw Jr. of Clemmons.
  • Katia Maria Dmitrievna Lezine, a junior with an environmental science major and marine science and geography minors, daughter of Marcella Lezine of Winston-Salem and Dmitrii Lezine of Boulder, Colo.
  • Caroline Carswell Ririe, a senior with a business administration major and a music minor, daughter of Dr. Douglas Ririe and Kirsten Ririe of Winston-Salem.
  • Sophie Rupp, a senior with history and Jewish studies majors, daughter of Susan Rupp and Randall Rupp of Winston-Salem.
  • Hudson Duval Spangler, a junior with biology and computer science majors and a chemistry minor, son of Gina Spangler and Vic Spangler of Winston-Salem.
  • Cory Nicole Spencer, a junior with neuroscience and global studies majors and a chemistry minor, daughter of Patricia Spencer and Kerr Spencer of Winston-Salem.

 

Gaston County

  • Sara Rachel Gray, a senior with a global studies major and a Spanish minor, daughter of Charles Gray and Elizabeth Gray of Belmont.

 

Granville County

  • Lawrence Alsthon Guira Bacudio, a senior with a nutrition major and a chemistry minor, of Creedmoor.

 

Guilford County

  • Sabrina Cheung, a senior with a media and journalism major and English and computer science minors, daughter of Win Pang and Charlie Cheung of Greensboro.
  • Jack Henry Crouse, a junior with English and computer science majors and a Hispanic studies minor, of Greensboro.
  • Natalie Michelle Johnson, a senior with global studies and political science majors and an Arabic minor, daughter of Suzanne Johnson and Mitchell Johnson of Greensboro.
  • Catherine Marie Machanic, a junior with public policy and economics majors and a French minor, daughter of Joan Machanic and David Machanic of Greensboro.
  • Kristen Eilis McCain, a junior with business administration and global studies majors and a Korean minor, daughter of Patrick McCain and Elizabeth McCain of Greensboro.
  • Rachel Park, a senior with philosophy and political science majors, daughter of Steve Park and Rebecca Park of Greensboro.
  • Jane Bradford Pearce, a junior with a biology major and chemistry and art history minors, daughter of Jackie Pearce and Ed Pearce of Greensboro.
  • Mary Madison Smith, a senior with psychology and management and society majors and a public policy minor, of Greensboro.

 

Henderson County

  • Emily Elizabeth Hagstrom, a senior with public policy and political science majors and a women’s and gender studies minor, daughter of Kathy Purdy and Eric Hagstrom of Hendersonville.
  • Maliha Zainab Khan, a junior with health policy and management and global studies majors, daughter of Saleem Khan and Nasreen Khan of Hendersonville.

 

Iredell County

  • Sarah Anne Faulk, a senior with public policy and global studies majors and a social and economic justice minor, daughter of Dr. Kellie Faulk and Jeffrey Faulk of Statesville.
  • Kelly Lauren Hughes, a senior with an economics major and an environmental science and studies minor, daughter of Philip Hughes and Nancy Hughes of Mooresville.
  • Hannah Jaggers, a senior with a biology major and chemistry and public policy minors, daughter of Dr. Terri Jaggers and Ronald Jaggers of Mooresville.
  • Clark Alexander Williamson, a senior with an environmental health sciences major and chemistry and biology minors, son of Alice Williamson and Dr. Mark Williamson of Statesville.

 

Lenoir County

  • Tyson Hardy Creech II, a junior with an exercise and sport science major and music and neuroscience minors, son of Hardy Creech and Dana Creech of Kinston.

 

Mecklenburg County

  • Shawn Ahuja, a junior with an exercise and sport science major and a chemistry minor, son of Ann Ahuja and Dr. Jay Ahuja of Charlotte.
  • Jameson Deans Blount, a junior with a biostatistics major and mathematics and medicine, literature and culture minors, son of Jane Blount and Phil Blount of Charlotte.
  • Abigail Ann Drees, a senior with biology and global studies majors and a chemistry minor, daughter of Rachel Drees and Dan Drees of Charlotte.
  • Khushnood Faraz, a junior with biology and chemistry majors and a medicine, literature and culture minor, daughter of Ahmad Faraz and Romana Gul of Charlotte.
  • Ryan Alexander Gibson, a junior with computer science and mathematics majors, son of Richard Gibson and Sharon Gibson of Charlotte.
  • Emily Catherine Jarrett, a senior with global studies and anthropology majors and a creative writing minor, daughter of Kimberly Jarrett and Dr. Steven Jarrett of Charlotte.
  • Esther Lee, a junior with environmental health sciences and classics majors and a chemistry minor, of Charlotte.
  • Frances Lee Mueller, a senior with biology and religious studies majors and a chemistry minor, daughter of Sarah Hyde Mueller and Dr. Joseph Cole Mueller of Charlotte.
  • Alexander Richard Penner, a senior with an exercise and sport science major and a coaching education minor, son of Richard Penner and Kathleen Penner of Charlotte.
  • Kristin Mackenzie Reed, a junior with a biomedical and health sciences engineering major and a studio art minor, daughter of Charles Reed Jr. and Dana Reed of Charlotte.
  • Margaret Anna Williams, a junior with political science and peace, war and defense majors and a German minor, daughter of Thomas Williams and Judyth Williams of Matthews.

 

Montgomery County

  • Katherine Caby Styers, a senior with anthropology and Asian studies majors and a Korean minor, daughter of Phillip Styers and Janie Styers of New London.

 

Moore County

  • Hannah Ruth Carter, a senior with global studies and peace, war and defense majors and a Hispanic studies minor, of Eagle Springs.
  • Alexander Warfield Snyder, a senior with peace, war and defense and political science majors and a public policy minor, son of Anna Fakadej and Robert Snyder of Pinehurst.

 

New Hanover County

  • Peyton Michelle Coleman, a senior with history and political science majors and a medieval and early modern studies minor, daughter of Michelle Coleman and Jeffrey Coleman of Wilmington.
  • Aisling Spencer Henihan, a junior with an art history major and geography and creative writing minors, daughter of Dr. Robert Henihan and Jane Henihan of Wilmington.
  • Kristin Michelle Isbell, a senior with a biology major and chemistry and Spanish for the professions minors, daughter of Toni Isbell and Danny Isbell of Wilmington.
  • Zaid Khatib, a senior with global studies and philosophy majors and a philosophy, politics and economics minor, son of Adel Khatib and Carol Khatib of Raleigh.
  • Zachary Matthew Lee, a junior with German literature and culture and sociology majors and a medieval and early modern studies minor, son of Ann Newton of Wilmington and Byron Lee of Jacksonville.
  • Megan Rose Ogorchock, a junior with a chemistry major and mathematics and biology minors, daughter of Daniel Ogorchock and Patricia Ogorchock of Wilmington.

 

Orange County

  • Agustin Baler, a senior with economics and political science majors and a philosophy, politics and economics minor, son of Dr. Ricardo Baler and Gisel Baler of Chapel Hill.
  • Oscar Quinn Brennwald, a senior with a computer science major, son of Dr. Patrick Brennwald and Dr. Guendalina Brennwald of Chapel Hill.
  • Kevin Lee Chen, a junior with a statistics and analytics major and a computer science minor, son of Fu-lin Chen and Liling Li of Chapel Hill.
  • Christian Jaeger Cook, a junior with biology and English majors and a chemistry minor, son of Dr. Chad Cook and Amy Cook of Chapel Hill.
  • Hannah Rose Frediani, a junior with mathematics and computer science majors and a biology minor, of Carrboro.
  • William Bradley Hamilton, a junior with an environmental science major and a computer science minor, son of Brad Hamilton and Mary Hamilton of Chapel Hill.
  • Margaret Louise Hassel, a junior with women’s and gender studies and economics majors and a geography minor, daughter of Emily Ayscue Hassel and Dr. Bryan Hassel of Chapel Hill.
  • Nell Cyrene Ovitt, a senior with English and religious studies majors, daughter of Laura Williams and James Ovitt.
  • Grace Frances Porter, a senior with psychology and history majors and a French minor, daughter of Greg Porter and Margaret Mary Doherty of Chapel Hill.
  • Corey Landever Risinger, a senior with English and Hispanic literature and cultures majors, daughter of Carolyn Landever and Brad Risinger of Chapel Hill.
  • Mary Alex Staude, a senior with an English major and dramatic art and history minors, of Carrboro.
  • Victoria Gabrielle Whitley, a junior with an applied mathematics major and a women’s and gender studies minor, daughter of John Whitley Jr. and Daun Whitley of Chapel Hill.

 

Pasquotank County

  • Cameron Wesley Pharr, a junior with a chemistry major and a history minor, son of Dr. Tarkten Pharr and Dr. Maria Pharr of Elizabeth City.
  • Adrian Leia Wood, a senior with a biology major and a chemistry minor, daughter of Dr. Angela Wood and Dr. John Wood of Elizabeth City.

 

Pitt County

  • Abigail R. Needell, a senior with a psychology major and biology and medical anthropology minors, daughter of Russell Needell and Dr. Wanda Needell of Greenville.

 

Polk County

  • Morgan Robertson Pratt, a senior with a global studies major and a music minor, son of Amy Pratt and Adrian Pratt of Den Haag, Netherlands.

 

Randolph County

  • Paul Charles Smith, a senior with a dramatic art major and creative writing and geological sciences minors, son of Karen D. Smith and Matthew R. Smith of Asheboro.

 

Rowan County

  • Jackson Woodward Campbell, a junior with dramatic art and communication studies majors, son of Don Campbell and Sarah Campbell of Salisbury.
  • Daniel Keith Winecoff, a junior with biology and music majors and a chemistry minor, son of Susan Winecoff and Todd Winecoff of Salisbury.

 

Union County

  • Adrienne Solange Bonar, a senior with psychology and women’s and gender studies majors, daughter of Ursula Bonar and Dr. Adolphus Bonar of Charlotte.
  • Hannah Lee Dearstyne, a senior with a comparative literature major, daughter of Tammy Dearstyne and David Dearstyne of Matthews.
  • Benjamin Holte Sagmoe, a junior with computer science and mathematics majors and a German minor, son of Jeanette Sagmoe and Todd Sagmoe of Waxhaw.
  • Jeff Z. Yang, a senior with mathematical decision sciences and economics majors, of Waxhaw.

 

Wake County

  • Kevin L. Adington, a junior with environmental science and mathematics majors and a Chinese minor, son of David Adington and Lori Adington of Raleigh.
  • Benjamin Todd Albert, a senior with business administration and economics majors and a public policy minor, son of Lynn Albert and Mark Albert of Cary.
  • Hadley Ashford, a senior with global studies and Spanish majors, daughter of John Ashford and Laura Ashford of Raleigh.
  • Olivia Grace Bane, a senior with public policy and political science majors and a public relations minor, daughter of Warren Bane and Misty Bane of Raleigh.
  • Emmie Banks, a senior with a psychology major, daughter of Linda Banks and Darryl Banks of Wake Forest.
  • Sarah Jacqueline Bass, a senior with an economics major and a social and economic justice minor, daughter of Bonnie Bass and David Bass of Raleigh.
  • Mary Grady Burnette Bell, a senior with history and business administration majors and a media and journalism minor, daughter of Mary Grady Bell and Vic Bell of Raleigh.
  • Sarah Ann Benecky, a senior with anthropology and global studies majors, of Raleigh.
  • Ryder Kendall Best, a senior with statistics and analytics and economics majors and a business administration minor, son of Raymond Best of Garner.
  • Amy Marie Cohen, a junior with global studies and political science majors and a social and economic justice minor, daughter of Mary Cohen and Richard Cohen of Raleigh.
  • Katherine Gora Combs, a junior with biostatistics and music majors and a mathematics minor, daughter of Michele Gora and Dr. Jeffery Combs of Cary.
  • Adelaide Rosalie Cooke, a junior with biology and chemistry majors, of Cary.
  • Christiana Maria Cornea, a junior with biology and chemistry majors and a neuroscience minor, daughter of Emil Cornea and Mihaela Cornea of Cary.
  • Joshua James Dodson, a senior with a public policy major and a music minor, son of Dan Dodson and Daphne Dodson of Cary.
  • Tracy Kim Edwards, a senior with chemistry and religious studies majors and an education minor, daughter of Christine Edwards and Steve Edwards of Apex.
  • Pallavi Gulati, a senior with a business administration major and a history minor, daughter of Dipak Gulati and Dipti Gulati of Cary.
  • Sara T. Hall, a junior with political science and media and journalism majors and a philosophy, politics and economics minor, daughter of Thomas Hall and Karen Hall of Apex.
  • Marwan Ayman Hawari, a junior with biomedical and health sciences engineering and biology majors and a chemistry minor, son of Rana Hawari and Ayman Hawari of Cary.
  • Sanjna Iyengar, a junior with a biomedical and health sciences engineering major and a chemistry minor, daughter of Jyothi Haravu and Nagasimha Haravu of Apex.
  • Gauri Joshi, a senior with health policy and management and biology majors, daughter of Sampada Joshi and Krishna Joshi of Morrisville.
  • Alexander Y. Z. Li, a senior with a chemistry major and a biology minor, son of Nan Jiang and Erkang Zheng of Cary.
  • Lukas Alexander Lyon, a junior with biostatistics and mathematics majors and a chemistry minor, son of Alexander Strotzer and Lorri Lyon of Apex.
  • Lucas Oliver McCallen, a senior with economics and religious studies majors and a business administration minor, of Apex.
  • Rachel Elizabeth McGrath, a senior with political science and global studies majors and a Russian language and culture minor, daughter of Thomas McGrath and Diane McGrath of Cary.
  • John Raymond Mullan, a senior with a statistics and analytics major and an environmental sciences minor, son of Brian Mullan and Katherine Mullan of Raleigh.
  • Grace Elizabeth Nipp, a junior with an environmental health sciences major and chemistry and biology minors, daughter of Laurie Nipp and Carriel Nipp of Raleigh.
  • Brennan William Proudfoot, a senior with a computer science major, son of Lilette Proudfoot and Douglas Proudfoot.
  • Sahana Raghunathan, a senior with health policy and management and chemistry majors, daughter of Ragunathan Srinivasan and Rajalakshmi Padmanabhan of Cary.
  • Ishan Jay Shah, a junior with statistics and analytics and biology majors and a computer science minor, son of Manju Shah and Jay Shah.
  • Katie Sullivan, a senior with a psychology major and neuroscience and public relations minors, daughter of Kay Atchison and Tom Sullivan of Raleigh.
  • Lydia Claire Trogdon, a junior with history and journalism and mass communication majors and a computer science minor, daughter of Mark Trogdon and Renee Trogdon of Raleigh.
  • Anna Kathryn Twiddy, a junior with English and classics majors, daughter of Kathryn Twiddy and Curtis Twiddy of Raleigh.

 

Wayne County

  • Lindsay Ann Player, a senior with a biology major and neuroscience and chemistry minors, daughter of Troy Player and Kim Player of Apex.

 

Alabama

  • Alexander William Peeples, a senior with history and political science majors and an African studies minor, of Daphne.

 

California

  • Kaitlyn Mallie, a senior with a political science major and a social and economic justice minor, daughter of Michael Mallie and Debra Mallie of Pleasanton.
  • Caroline Orleanskaia, a senior with an exercise and sport science major and a neuroscience minor, of Carlsbad.

 

Colorado

  • Jillian Kay Troftgruben, a junior with mathematical decision sciences and computer science majors and an entrepreneurship minor, daughter of Christine Forkner and Jeffery Troftgruben of Aurora.

 

Connecticut

  • Griffin Jack Bell, a senior with a biostatistics major, son of Sharon Bell of Ridgefield and Richard Bell of Fort Lauderdale, Fla.
  • Ryan Silk, a senior with business administration and environmental studies majors, of Stamford.

 

Florida

  • Briana Notterpek Fletcher, a junior with chemistry and biology majors, daughter of Lucia Notterpek and Bradley Fletcher.
  • Jamie Leigh Lebhar, a junior with a biomedical and health sciences engineering major and a chemistry minor, of Naples.
  • Nicholas McKenzie, a junior with a health policy and management major and a chemistry minor, son of Sandy McKenzie and Lance McKenzie.
  • Carlos Antonio Perez-Heydrich, a junior with a biology major and chemistry and neuroscience minors, son of Laura Perez-Heydrich and Eduardo Perez-Heydrich of Miami.
  • Ashley Anne Privette, a junior with a biology major and a chemistry minor, of Apollo Beach.
  • Kailyn Janelle Valido, a junior with a biology major and chemistry and medical anthropology minors, daughter of Dr. Martha Toledo-Valido and Ernesto Valido of Miami.

 

Georgia

  • Amanda L. Brademeyer, a junior with a biochemistry major, daughter of Doug Brademeyer and Kim Brademeyer of Cumming.
  • Kyra Nicole DeKoning, a senior with psychology and political science majors and a global cinema minor, daughter of Michael DeKoning and Allison DeKoning of Alpharetta.
  • Ronak Pipaliya, a junior with business administration and computer science majors, son of Dhiru Pipaliya and Hansa Pipaliya of Duluth.
  • Nicholas McDaniel Teague, a junior with biology and psychology majors and a chemistry minor, son of Dr. Charles Teague and Dr. Richelle Teague of Columbus.

 

Illinois

  • Zane Daniel Kaiser, a junior with a biomedical and health sciences engineering major and a Spanish for the health professions minor, son of Daniel Kaiser and Kimberly Irle of Bartlett.

 

Kansas

  • Joseph Robert Nail, a senior with political science and economics majors and an entrepreneurship minor, son of Christopher Nail and Kerry Nail of Whispering Pines, N.C.

 

Louisiana

  • Nicholas Alfredo Larsen, a senior with a statistics and analytics major, of Shreveport.

 

Maryland

  • Andrea Jacqueline Barnes, a senior with a public policy major and education and Hispanic studies minors, daughter of Sandra Barnes and Travis Barnes of Fort Washington.
  • Isabel Jane Mason, a senior with an English major and chemistry and religious studies minors, of Bethesda.
  • Dhruv Sundar Shankar, a senior with a biomedical and health sciences engineering major and a chemistry minor, son of Kala Shankar and Sundar Shankar of Germantown.

 

Massachusetts

  • Madisyn Ann Hill, a senior with a chemistry major and biology and Hispanic studies minors, daughter of William Hill and Karen Hill of Ware.
  • Mary Kate Elizabeth Nolan, a senior with global studies and communication studies majors and an Italian minor, daughter of Terence Nolan and Elizabeth Wilson of Walpole.
  • Yina Sun, a senior with environmental science and economics majors and a statistics and analytics minor, of Shrewsbury.

 

Minnesota

  • Alex Polydoroff, a senior with anthropology and music majors, of Saint Paul.

 

Missouri

  • Lilian Randolph Heil, a junior with chemistry and physics majors and a neuroscience minor, of St. Louis.
  • Christina Victoria West, a senior with a psychology major and a history minor, daughter of Robert West and Keylah West of St. Louis.

 

Nebraska

  • Bridget Vera Mizener, a sophomore with political science and computer science majors, of Omaha.

 

New Jersey

  • Samuel John Aldous, a senior with a biochemistry major and a French minor, son of Dr. David Aldous and Suzanne Aldous of Concord, Mass.
  • Patrick Graham Archer, a senior with peace, war and defense and political science majors and an education minor, son of James Archer and Denise Archer of Randolph.
  • Angelo Ibrahim Chaia, a senior with chemistry and English majors and a biology minor, son of Antoine Chaia and Lisa Chaia of Scotch Plains.
  • Kaitlin Eileen Sanzone, a senior with a chemistry major and a biology minor, daughter of Dr. John Sanzone and Kyle Sanzone of Montville.

 

New York

  • Brittany Cooper, a junior with a biology major and Hispanic studies and chemistry minors, of New City.
  • Daniel R. Fleszar, a senior with a music major and a politics, philosophy and economics minor, son of Regina Fleszar and George Fleszar.
  • Eric Mai, a senior with an environmental health sciences major and a chemistry minor, son of Harry Mai and Karen Mai.

 

Ohio

  • Hunter Steele Baehren, a senior with political science and economics majors, son of Margaret Baehren of Toledo.
  • Madeline Leigh Watson, a junior with a biology major and Spanish for the medical professions and chemistry minors, daughter of Lori Reiber of Dayton and Mike Watson of Chicago, Ill.

 

Pennsylvania

  • Pragnya Dontu, a junior with a chemistry major and physics and neuroscience minors, daughter of Dr. Vijay Dontu and Dr. Vijaya Tummala of York.
  • Eric Markley, a junior with biomedical and health sciences engineering and applied mathematics majors and a chemistry minor, son of Catherine Markley and Dave Markley of Hummelstown.

 

Rhode Island

  • Eric Qian, a senior with mathematics and statistics and analytics majors and an economics minor, son of Zhenchao Qian and Hong Xia of Providence.

 

South Carolina

  • Travis William Barnett, a junior with computer science and business administration majors, of Mount Pleasant.
  • Grace Suzanne Breazeale, a junior with public policy and economics majors and a chemistry minor, daughter of Ally Breazeale and Ben Breazeale of Irmo.

 

Tennessee

  • Kate Goldenring, a junior with computer science and economics majors, daughter of Jim Goldenring and Colleen Brophy.
  • Kelly Liu, a senior with a nutrition major and a chemistry minor, daughter of Judy Liu of Knoxville.

 

Texas

  • Tate Elizabeth Giddens, a junior with a biology major and a study of Christianity and culture minor, of Dallas.
  • Eva Marie Gonzalez Pena, a senior with business administration and global studies majors and a French minor, daughter of Carlos Gonzalez Pena and Holly Gonzalez Pena of Dallas.
  • Anna Colleen Goodnight, a senior with business administration and economics majors, of Houston.

 

Virginia

  • Rachel Medlin Evans, a senior with a music major, daughter of Annette Medlin of Staunton and Charles Evans of Myrtle Beach, S.C.
  • Franklin Richard Gergoudis, a senior with an environmental health sciences major and biology and chemistry minors, son of Dr. Richard Gergoudis and Elaine Gergoudis of Richmond.
  • Sara Elaine Hudson, a junior with biology and chemistry majors, daughter of Stan Hudson and Joanne Hudson of Burke.
  • Daniel Robert Schwartz, a junior with a music performance major and a modern Hebrew minor, son of Shari Hershkowitz Schwartz and Sid Schwartz of Vienna.

 

West Virginia

  • Lindsay Gayle Jones, a junior with a biology major and a chemistry minor, daughter of Dr. Jeffrey Jones of Wilson, N.C., and Lisa Fawcett of Hurricane.

 

Brazil

  • Andre Bicalho Ceccotti, a senior with an economics major, of Belo Horizonte.

 

China

  • Jie He, a junior with biostatistics and computer science majors, of Chong Qing.
  • Zijin Lin, a senior with a chemistry major and a biology minor, of Chengdu.
  • Jiacheng Liu, a junior with information science and biology majors and a chemistry minor, daughter of Shaohong Liu and Mei Cheng of Guangzhou.
  • Shuhan Xia, a senior with mathematical decision sciences and economics majors, son of Guming Xia and Chunhui Wang of Hangzhou.

 

England

  • Rebekah Claire Cockram, a senior with history and political science majors, daughter of Claire Cockram and James Cockram of Newton Abbot, Devon.

 

Italy

  • Emily Ann Venturi, a senior with political science and economics majors, daughter of Vittorio Venturi and Tracy Stannard of Trieste.

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 111 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 322,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and 165 countries. More than 175,000 live in North Carolina.

 

University Communications: Media Relations, (919) 445-8555, mediarelations@unc.edu

 

Phi Beta Kappa contact: Jason Clemmons, (919) 843-7756, jclem@email.unc.edu

 

Rye Barcott, social entrepreneur, to speak at UNC-Chapel Hill Commencement

For immediate use

 

 

Rye Barcott, social entrepreneur, to speak at UNC-Chapel Hill Commencement

U.S. Marine Corps veteran and co-founder of Carolina for Kibera to give keynote address

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— Feb. 15, 2018) –  Rye Barcott, social entrepreneur and a graduate of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, will deliver the University’s spring Commencement address on May 13 in Kenan Stadium.

 

Before graduating from UNC-Chapel Hill in 2001 on an ROTC scholarship, Barcott co-founded Carolina for Kibera through the Center for Global Initiatives within UNC Global. CFK is a non-governmental organization based in the impoverished Kibera neighborhood of Nairobi, Kenya. Named a Time magazine and Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation “Hero of Global Health,” CFK uses sports and public health initiatives to prevent ethnic and gender violence and to fight poverty.

 

“Rye’s amazing life journey began while he was an undergraduate at Carolina, when he co-founded an acclaimed non-governmental organization, Carolina for Kibera, dedicated to breaking cycles of violence and developing young leaders in Kenya,” said Chancellor Carol L. Folt. “Rye’s out-of-the box thinking and global entrepreneurial work – ranging from creating holistic youth development programs to establishing a clinic treating thousands in collaboration with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, has been recognized by the President of the United States, the World Economic Forum and international philanthropists, and is taught in graduate schools around the world. I know his authenticity and example of selfless service to others, mixed with his personal humility and humor, will inspire the Class of 2018 as they begin their own journeys.”

 

A former captain, Barcott served five years in the U.S. Marine Corps in Bosnia, the Horn of Africa and Iraq. He also wrote “It Happened on the Way to War: A Marine’s Path to Peace,” a book that juxtaposes social entrepreneurship with military service.

 

“What a thrilling honor it is to be this year’s commencement speaker for my beloved alma mater. Service has been part of Carolina’s DNA since 1789, when we were founded as the nation’s first public university,” said Barcott. “I’m grateful for the opportunities I’ve had to serve my country and I can’t wait to be in a sea of Carolina blue in Kenan Stadium with my kids by my side feeling the love.”

 

In 2001 Barcott earned bachelor’s degrees in peace, war and defense and international studies from Carolina. In 2009, he earned master’s degrees in public administration and business administration from Harvard University, where he was a Harvard Center for Public Leadership Social Enterprise Fellow. He then returned to North Carolina and co-founded Double Time Capital, an impact investment firm that played an integral role in helping the state become second in the nation in solar power.

 

Barcott currently serves as co-founder and CEO of With Honor, a new civic organization that is helping elect to Congress a cross-partisan coalition of post-9/11 veterans. With Honor is based in Charlotte, where Barcott lives with his wife, Dr. Tracy Barcott, a 2000 Carolina alumna, and their two children.

 

Folt chose Barcott in consultation with faculty and staff on the University’s Commencement Speaker Selection Committee.

 

Spring Commencement will be held at 9 a.m. in Kenan Stadium. Folt will preside over the ceremony. For more information, visit http://commencement.unc.edu/.

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill



The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 111 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 322,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and 165 countries. More than 175,000 live in North Carolina.

 

University Communications: Jeni Cook, (919) 962-2091, jeni.cook@unc.edu

 

UNC-Chapel Hill experts available to discuss 2018 Winter Olympics

UNC-Chapel Hill experts available to discuss 2018 Winter Olympics

 

With the 2018 Winter Olympic Games approaching, UNC-Chapel Hill experts are available to discuss a variety of Olympic-related topics including historical links in history and the Olympics, athletic training, the consequences of traumatic injury specific to the Winter Games and more. To set up discussions and interviews with these experts, please email mediarelations@unc.edu or call (919) 445-8555.

 

 

Jonathan Jensen is an assistant professor in the Sport Administration program in the College of Arts & Sciences. An expert on sport sponsorship, Jensen can discuss what motivates corporations to sponsor the Olympics and the return on their investment. In February, Jensen will travel to the Olympics to present research at the International Sports Business Symposium at Kangwon University in South Korea. 

 

Anthony Hackney is a professor of exercise physiology and nutrition in the department of exercise and sport science in the College of Arts & Sciences and the department of nutrition in the UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health. Hackney worked with research development programs for the 1998 (Nagano) and 2006 (Turin) Winter Olympics and currently works with Estonian and Finnish Olympic coaches and athletes. He can discuss the physiology of Olympic athletes and impacts of performance enhancing drugs.


Kristen Kucera
is an assistant professor in the department of exercise and sport science in the College of Arts & Sciences and the incoming director of the National Center for Catastrophic Sport Injury Research. As an epidemiologist and certified athletic trainer, Kucera can discuss catastrophic injuries that occur in sport.

 

Claudio Battaglini is a professor of exercise and sport science in the College of Arts & Sciences and researches exercise oncology. Previously, Battaglini coached triathlon, marathon and mountain bike athletes who competed at the 2000 (Sydney), 2004 (Athens) and 2008 (Beijing) Olympics. Battaglini can discuss training methods for high-level athletes and physiology of sports performance.

 

Charlie Tuggle is a senior associate dean and distinguished professor in the School of Media and Journalism. Attending the summer games in 2008 (Beijing) and 2016 (Rio), Tuggle can provide insight on media reporting of the games. His most recent article on winningest athletes and the Olympic medal system can be found here.

 

 

Johna Register-Mihalik is an assistant professor in the department of exercise and sport science in the College of Arts & Sciences and a research scientist at both the Injury Prevention Research Center at UNC-Chapel Hill and the Matthew Gfeller Sport-Related Traumatic Brain Injury Research Center. Register-Mihalik can discuss both the treatment and management related to traumatic brain injuries in addition to the cultural biases around those injuries.

 

Jason Mihalik is an associate professor in the department of exercise and sport science in the College of Arts & Sciences and Co-Director of the Matthew Gfeller Sport-Related Trauma Brain Injury Research Center. Mihalik can discuss the dangers of winter-sport related head traumas and how recent research in concussions and head traumas applies to winter sports.

 


Dr. Christopher Hurt
is an assistant professor of medicine in the UNC School of Medicine’s Division of Infectious Diseases. He can discuss the threat of the flu and similar communicable illnesses in the Olympic village.

 

 

Matthew Andrews is a teaching assistant professor in the history department in the College of Arts & Sciences where he teaches a course titled “The Olympic Games—A Global History,” exploring issues of nationalism, amateurism, and the political meanings of international athletic competitions. Andrews can discuss how sports reflect and affect politics, race/gender identities and social reform movements.

 

P: (919) 445-8555  |  E: mediarelations@unc.edu

 

Carolina sets 13th consecutive record for first-year applications

For immediate use

 

Carolina sets 13th consecutive record for first-year applications

The admitted Class of 2022 was selected from a record-setting 43,384 applicants.

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C. – Feb. 1, 2018) – For the 13th consecutive year, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill received a record number of first-year applications for fall 2018. The 43,384 applications reflect a 6 percent increase over last year.

 

The 25,867 first-year applicants who applied before the early action deadline in October were notified of their admissions decisions on Jan. 26. Admission was offered to 5,125 North Carolina students and 2,742 out-of-state students. The out-of-state students include 454 international students, an increase of 142 over last year. These numbers reflect an admissions rate of 48 percent for North Carolinians and 18 percent for out-of-state students, though this number will change after the second and final round of admissions decisions are made in March.

 

“We are again honored that so many wonderful students have given us the chance to get to know them through their applications,” said Stephen Farmer, vice provost for enrollment and undergraduate admissions. “In reading these applications one by one, we never forget that each one represents an individual, a young person with strengths and challenges, hopes and dreams. We hope they’re drawn to Carolina because they want to live and study alongside classmates who will change their lives for the better and whose lives they will change in return. We’re also sure that our ability to offer a world-class education at an affordable price made a difference to them and to their families.”

 

While first-year application deadlines for fall 2018 have passed, the University will accept transfer applications from students currently enrolled at other institutions through Feb. 15.

 

The University expects to enroll a first-year class of 4,205 and an additional 725 transfer students in the College of Arts & Sciences.

 

UNC-Chapel Hill was recently named the best value in U.S. public higher education by Kiplinger’s Personal Finance magazine. The top ranking reflects the University’s commitment to opening access to a high-quality, affordable education to talented students from all backgrounds. The University is one of the few public flagships to practice need-blind admissions and provide low-debt, full-need student aid.

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 111 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 322,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and 165 countries. More than 175,000 live in North Carolina.

University Communications contact: Kate Luck at kate.luck@unc.edu or 919-445-8360