Carolina welcomes 5,095 new undergraduate students to campus

Carolina welcomes 5,095 new undergraduate students to campus

Fall 2018 first-year class includes record number of first-generation college students

 

(Note: The following statistics are preliminary and will not be final until after Sept. 4, 2018, the University’s official enrollment reporting date.)

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— Aug. 17, 2018) – The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is welcoming 4,295 first-year students and 800 transfer students to campus as classes begin this fall. The first-year class includes the highest numbers of first-generation college students and students from North Carolina’s rural counties since the University began collecting this data 15 years ago. The University received a record 43,472 first-year applications this year, the 13th consecutive year in which applications have increased.

 

Among first-year North Carolinians, 40 percent are enrolling from a rural county, up from 35 percent last year. Among all first-year students, 21 percent will be the first in their families to graduate from a four-year college or university, up from 17 percent last year. The Carolina Covenant, which offers eligible low-income students the opportunity to graduate debt-free, is welcoming 669 new first-year and transfer students, 13 percent of all enrolling students.

 

The new students are extraordinarily well-prepared academically and also contribute outside the classroom:

  • Among new transfer students, the average GPA at their previous colleges was 3.7 on a 4.0 scale.
  • 45 percent of new first-year students ranked within the top 10 students in their high school class, and 78 percent ranked within the top 10 percent.
  • 93 percent of new first-year students have taken five or more Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate or college-level courses while in high school.
  • 52 percent of all incoming students held a paying job during the school year; 58 percent had daily responsibilities within their families; 67 percent competed in a sport; and 88 percent participated in community service.

“Carolina will once again grow stronger through the addition of another outstanding class,” said Stephen Farmer, vice provost for enrollment and undergraduate admissions. “All of these students have earned their places at Carolina, and each of them deserves to be here. As accomplished as they already are, we’re confident they’ll make each other better. We’re grateful they’ve chosen to join our community, and we’re excited to support and encourage them as they find success on campus, across our state and in the wider world.”

 

Enrolling students were admitted to Carolina through a thorough process that considered each candidate individually and holistically. Admissions officers read applications one by one, doing their best to understand students in the context of their families, schools, and communities, and to assess their capacity both to thrive at Carolina and to contribute to the education of their classmates.

 

In addition to offering outstanding academics, extensive student aid, and tuition and fees that are among the lowest in the nation, the University recruited admitted students by reaching out to them in innovative and individualized ways. The Black Student Movement connected admitted students with current students through one-on-one video calls and events. The Office of Undergraduate Admissions hosted on-campus breakfasts that welcomed more than 1,500 admitted first-generation college students and their families to Chapel Hill. Members of the admissions office traveled across the state to share meals with students and their families and to discuss academic opportunities at Carolina. The University Office for Diversity and Inclusion hosted spring programs for admitted students, many of whom had previously visited Carolina through the office’s longstanding and successful Project Uplift program.

 

The incoming class will join students already on campus who are engaging in scholarship and research – Carolina conducts more than $1 billion in sponsored research each year – positioning themselves for success after graduation. Based on responses to an annual survey by University Career Services, 97 percent of Carolina students go on to jobs in their preferred fields or continue their education within six months of receiving their bachelor’s degrees.

 

Among enrolling first-year students who indicated an intended major on their application, 55 percent said that they hope to major in science, technology, engineering or mathematics; 26 percent indicated an interest in professional programs including business, public health and media and journalism; and 18 percent expressed interest in the humanities, fine arts or social sciences. In addition:

  • 96 percent said they hope to receive, during their time at Carolina, the experience of engaging with a broad range of ideas, perspectives and visions that differ from their own;
  • 95 percent said they want their understanding to be broadened and refined through discussion and dialogue with classmates and professors who differ from themselves;
  • 96 percent said they want to work with classmates who have different perspectives and different approaches to solving problems;
  • 96 percent said they want to get better at leading, serving and working with people from different backgrounds; and
  • 96 percent said they want to deepen their appreciation, respect and empathy for other people.

The following statistics are highlights from the Fall 2018 incoming class:

 

FIRST-YEAR STUDENTS

Demographics

First-year students come from:

  • 97 North Carolina counties, including 40 percent from rural counties in the state as defined by the UNC System.
  • 43 states and the District of Columbia
  • 38 countries

Of the incoming first-year class:

  • 1,398 North Carolina students are from rural counties
  • 62 percent are female and 38 percent are male
  • 235 students are international students
  • 264 students have a military affiliation
  • 890 students will be the first in their families to earn a bachelor’s degree
  • 12 percent identify themselves as Black or African American
  • 9 percent identify themselves as Hispanic or Latino
  • 18 percent identify themselves as Asian
  • 3 percent identify themselves as American Indian or Alaska Native

Academic credentials

  • 45 percent ranked within top 10 students in their high school class
  • 78 percent ranked within the top 10 percent
  • On the SAT, the middle 50 percent of students scored between 1290 and 1470
  • On the ACT, the middle 50 percent of students scored between 29 and 33
  • 93 percent of enrolling students have taken five or more Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate or dual enrollment courses
  • Their top five intended majors are biology, business, computer science, psychology and biomedical and health sciences engineering

Extracurricular achievements

  • 90 percent participated in community service
  • 69 percent played a sport
  • 66 percent contributed to a cause they believe in
  • 58 percent assumed daily family responsibilities
  • 55 percent traveled outside their home country
  • 50 percent held a paying job during the school year
  • 47 percent held a position as president of their class or a club
  • 46 percent participated in religious or faith-based communities
  • 33 percent participated in student government
  • 31 percent conducted research outside the classroom
  • 20 percent founded an organization or started a business or non-profit
  • 19 percent participated in orchestra or band

Admission

For Fall 2018 first-year admission, the University received 43,472 applications – 6 percent more than last year. The overall admit rate fell from 24 percent to 22 percent this year, and the North Carolina admit rate fell from 46 percent to 41 percent.

The incoming class includes 265 students from one of the 75 partner high schools served by the Carolina College Advising Corps, a public service of the University that seeks to increase college-going rates among low-income, first-generation college and other underrepresented students.

 

Applied / Admitted 

Applied Admitted
North Carolina 13,909 5,690
Out-of-state 29,563 3,829
Total** 43,472 9,519

 

 

TRANSFER STUDENTS

Approximately 43 percent of the enrolling transfer class is transferring from a North Carolina community college. Incoming transfer students range in age from 16 to 56 and have an average college GPA of 3.7.

The transfer class includes 79 students who come to Carolina from partner community colleges served by the Carolina Student Transfer Excellence Program, or C-STEP. The program is designed to enable community college students to transfer to and graduate from UNC-Chapel Hill, and partners with 11 community colleges across the state. C-STEP students represent 10 percent of all enrolling transfer students.

 

Applied / Admitted 

Applied Admitted
North Carolina 1,826 710
Out-of-state 1,624 524
Total** 3,490 1,234

 

Aid and scholarships

Among all new first-year and transfer students:

  • 43 percent of the incoming class will receive need-based aid, primarily in the form of grants and scholarships.
  • 669 students (12 percent of the incoming first-year class) are Carolina Covenant Scholars.

(Note: All aid statistics are preliminary and subject to revision.)

 

Military

Among all new undergraduates:

  • 364 enrolling first-year and transfer students indicated an affiliation with the U.S. armed forces, primarily as dependents or spouses of a military member who served or is serving.
  • 25 are currently serving.
  • 34 have previously served in the U.S. armed forces.

(Note: Some students qualify for multiple categories, i.e., many who served are also dependents.)

(**These numbers reflect residency information at the time of application.)

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 111 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s nearly 330,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and 149 countries. More than 169,000 live in North Carolina.

 

University Communications contact: Kate Luck, (919) 445-8360 kate.luck@unc.edu

Nearly $1 million grant from SunTrust Foundation to NCGrowth will help economically challenged communities in the Carolinas hire locally

For immediate use

 

Nearly $1 million grant from SunTrust Foundation to NCGrowth will help economically challenged communities in the Carolinas hire locally

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C. – Aug. 2, 2018) – The SunTrust Foundation will give a nearly $1 million grant to NCGrowth, an affiliated center of the Frank Hawkins Kenan Institute of Private Enterprise, to help create new jobs and stimulate transformative development in three high-potential communities in the Carolinas. These business incubators will help startup companies hire local workers in an effort to address issues such as unemployment, underemployment, low wages and significant poverty.

 

NCGrowth, an affiliated center of UNC Kenan-Flagler Business School’s Kenan Institute of Private Enterprise, will use the $950,000 grant to launch SmartUp programs in Elizabeth City, North Carolina, and North Charleston, South Carolina. There are plans to select a third location in the Carolinas in the coming months. The SmartUp program from NCGrowth works to create jobs with equitable opportunities in rural and economically challenged communities in the Carolinas.

 

“Through SmartUp, as in all of NCGrowth’s work, we are seeking to radically transform how communities view their role in economic development, from being passengers to becoming drivers,” said Mark Little, executive director of the Kenan Institute.

 

The SmartUp programs in each selected region will partner with up to 10 businesses that span a range of industries and maturity levels. The selected businesses will also reflect local gender, ethnicity and socioeconomic demographics. Together, the SmartUp teams and businesses will strive to create more jobs for local workers through financial and marketing analysis, redesign of manufacturing workflows and more. SmartUp also will partner with existing organizations, such as local development offices, universities, businesses and churches to create a support network for local job creation in these communities.

 

“The SmartUp initiative fits perfectly with our commitment to entrepreneurism and helping small businesses gain financial confidence and smart growth,” said Stan Little, president of the SunTrust Foundation. “The program has potential to drive broader economic development by replicating its innovative approach in other communities that need assistance.”

 

To maximize the opportunity for transformative development, the businesses selected to work with NCGrowth staff and community partners will develop and complete a high-impact project critical to sustainable growth and regional success. SmartUp will also work to integrate the community in that growth through semiannual workshops and showcases that are open to the public.

 

“By eliminating the expense of physical space, along with being rooted in an academic institution and engaging a broad base of existing local collaborators, we can keep the cost of the program low to ensure it is accessible to more communities,” said LaChaun Banks, associate director of NCGrowth.

 

The grant counts toward For All Kind: the Campaign for Carolina, the University’s historic fundraising drive that aims to raise $4.25 billion by Dec. 31, 2022. The campaign supports the Blueprint for Next, the University’s overall strategic plan built on two core strategies: “of the public, for the public” and “innovation made fundamental.”

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 111 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s nearly 330,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and 149 countries. More than 169,000 live in North Carolina.

 

About NCGrowth

NCGrowth, an affiliated center of the Frank Hawkins Kenan Institute of Private Enterprise, helps businesses and communities create good jobs and equitable opportunities for their people. In partnership with other universities and community organizations, NCGrowth provides technical assistance to businesses and governments on economic development and entrepreneurship projects. Since 2012, NCGrowth has helped to create over 400 jobs and worked with more than 60 clients.

 

About the SunTrust Foundation

The SunTrust Foundation is dedicated to SunTrust Bank’s purpose of Lighting the Way to Financial Well-Being by engaging organizations to advance financial confidence. Grants and activities focus primarily on financial empowerment, but also include education, health and human services, civic improvement and cultural growth. The SunTrust Foundation supports American Red Cross disaster relief efforts and contributes as a United Way Global Corporate Leader. Established in 2008, the SunTrust Foundation has proudly provided grants totaling more than $128 million throughout the United States.

 

University Communications: Media Relations, (919) 445-8555, mediarelations@unc.edu

Frank Hawkins Kenan Institute of Private Enterprise: MacKenzie Babb, (919) 843-6021, MacKenzie_Babb@kenan-flagler.unc.edu

SunTrust Foundation: Audria Belton, (404) 813-3664, Audria.Belton@SunTrust.com

Carolina Student Transfer Excellence Program expands to Southwestern Community College

Carolina Student Transfer Excellence Program expands to Southwestern Community College

Partnership will increase the number of low- and moderate-income students transferring to and graduating from Carolina

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— July 20, 2018) – The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s Carolina Student Transfer Excellence Program (C-STEP) and Southwestern Community College (SCC) in Sylva are partnering to increase the number of students transferring to and graduating from UNC-Chapel Hill. SCC will be the 11th community college to partner with C-STEP and Carolina.

 

Through C-STEP, low- and moderate-income high school and community college students who enroll in one of the program’s partner colleges are guaranteed admission to Carolina if they are first admitted to and successfully complete the community college portion of the program with at least a 3.2 GPA.

 

“Every day we have the chance to see our students grow and challenge themselves as they build successful lives,” said Dr. Don Thomas, Southwestern Community College president. “The launch of C-STEP at Southwestern Community College will create even more opportunities for our students, their families and our community.”

 

Now in its 12th year, C-STEP was launched with the support of the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation in an effort to enable more community college students to transfer to and graduate from Carolina. Almost 800 transfer students enter UNC-Chapel Hill each year, about 33 percent from North Carolina community colleges.

 

“North Carolina community college transfer students are an amazing group of scholars,” said Rebecca Egbert, C-STEP program director. “Working with Southwestern Community College students as they prepare to come to Carolina and once they’ve arrived in Chapel Hill will be a privilege. These students enrich our campus with their experience, diligence and intelligence.”

 

Students who participate in C-STEP agree to earn an appropriate associate degree at their partner community college and participate actively in the program, which offers students special events, advising and transition and support services both at their home college and at

Carolina. The program also provides transition and support services once students have enrolled at Carolina and are pursuing bachelor’s degrees.

 

The communities surrounding SCC include the Qualla Boundary, home to the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians (EBCI). Members of ECBI participate in many SCC programs and have partnered with SCC and Western Carolina University to develop the Oconaluftee Institute of Cultural Arts on the Qualla Boundary, where students come to study and preserve the artistic traditions of the ECBI community.

 

“Education is a priority for the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians and generations of tribal leaders have worked toward that goal,” said Richard Sneed, principal chief of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians. “By collaborating with C-STEP and Southwestern Community College, our students will benefit for years to come.”

 

C-STEP currently serves almost 845 students; 652 of those have already enrolled at Carolina and 482 have graduated. The remaining students are expected to enroll after completing their community college courses. As of 2018, the average C-STEP graduate GPA is 3.0 and the overall graduation rate is 81 percent.

 

Current C-STEP partners include: Alamance Community College, Cape Fear Community College, Carteret Community College, Central Carolina Community College, Craven Community College, Durham Technical Community College, Fayetteville Technical Community College, Robeson Community College, Sandhills Community College and Wake Technical Community College.

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill



The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 111 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s nearly 330,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and 149 countries. More than 169,000 live in North Carolina.

 

University Communications: Kate Luck, (919) 445-8360, kate.luck@unc.edu

 

Unparalleled mosaics discovered by UNC-Chapel Hill archaeologist and team provide new clues on life in an ancient Galilean Jewish village

News Release

 

For immediate use

The Spies Panel

 

Unparalleled mosaics discovered by UNC-Chapel Hill archaeologist and team provide new clues on life in an ancient Galilean Jewish village

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— July 9, 2018) — Recent discoveries by a team of specialists and students at Huqoq in Israel’s Galilee, led by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill professor Jodi Magness, shed new light on the life and culture of an ancient Jewish village. The discoveries indicate villagers flourished under early fifth century Christian rule, contradicting a widespread view that Jewish settlement in the region declined during that period. The large size and elaborate interior decoration of the Huqoq synagogue point to an unexpected level of prosperity.

 

“The mosaics decorating the floor of the Huqoq synagogue revolutionize our understanding of Judaism in this period,” said Magness. “Ancient Jewish art is often thought to be aniconic, or lacking images. But these mosaics, colorful and filled with figured scenes, attest to a rich visual culture as well as to the dynamism and diversity of Judaism in the Late Roman and Byzantine periods.”

 

The first mosaics in the Huqoq synagogue were discovered by Magness’ team in 2012. Since then, Magness, director of the Huqoq excavations and Kenan Distinguished Professor of Early Judaism in the department of religious studies in Carolina’s College of Arts & Sciences, assisted by Shua Kisilevitz of the Israel Antiquities Authority and Tel Aviv University have uncovered additional mosaics every summer. This year, the team’s specialists and students focused their efforts on a series of mosaic panels in the north aisle. Magness said this series is part of the richest, most diverse collection of mosaics ever found in an ancient synagogue.

 

Along the north aisle, mosaics are divided into two rows of panels containing figures and objects with Hebrew inscriptions. One panel labeled “a pole between two” depicts a biblical scene from Numbers 13:23. The images show two spies sent by Moses to explore Canaan carrying a pole with a cluster of grapes. Another panel referencing Isaiah 11:6 includes the inscription “a small child shall lead them.” The panel shows a youth leading an animal on a rope. A fragmentary Hebrew inscription concluding with the phrase “Amen selah,” meaning “Amen forever,” was uncovered at the north end of the east aisle.

 

During this eighth dig, the team also continued to expose a rare discovery in ancient synagogues: columns covered in colorful, painted plaster still intact after nearly 1,600 years.

 

The mosaics have been removed from the site for conservation and the excavated areas have been backfilled. Excavations are scheduled to continue in the summer of 2019. Additional information and updates can be found at the project’s website: www.huqoq.org.

 

Mosaics uncovered by this project include:

  • 2012: Samson and the foxes
  • 2013: Samson carrying the gate of Gaza on his shoulders
  • 2013, 2014 and 2015: a Hebrew inscription surrounded by human figures, animals and mythological creatures including cupids; and the first non-biblical story ever found decorating an ancient synagogue — perhaps the legendary meeting between Alexander the Great and the Jewish high priest
  • 2016: Noah’s Ark; the parting of the Red Sea showing Pharaoh’s soldiers being swallowed by giant fish
  • 2017: a Helios-zodiac cycle; Jonah being swallowed by three successive fish; the building of the Tower of Babel

 

An image of the most recent discovery, images from past digs and video from this summer’s excavation may be downloaded here using password huqoq.

 

Photo/Video credit: Jim Haberman.

 

Sponsors of the project include UNC-Chapel Hill, Baylor University, Brigham Young University and the University of Toronto. Students and staff from Carolina and the consortium schools participated in the dig. Financial support for the 2018 season was also provided by the Friends of Heritage Preservation, the National Geographic Society, the William R. Kenan Jr. Charitable Trust and the Carolina Center for Jewish Studies.

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill



The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 111 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 323,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and 149 countries. More than 169,000 live in North Carolina.

 

University Communications: Carly Miller, (919) 445-8555, mediarelations@unc.edu

College of Arts and Sciences contact: Kim Spurr, (919) 962-4093, spurrk@email.unc.edu

 

UNC-Chapel Hill School of Law receives a $1.53 million gift for new entrepreneurship program

For immediate use

 

UNC-Chapel Hill School of Law receives a $1.53 million gift for new entrepreneurship program

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C. — June 18, 2018) – What does it take to be an entrepreneur? It takes drive, ambition, patience and persistence to identify a need and create a business to fill that need. It also takes access to legal resources.

 

The William R. Kenan, Jr. Charitable Trust recognizes that early-stage legal counsel is critical to the success of new for-profit and nonprofit ventures. To ensure that these ventures have access to legal counsel, the Kenan Trust has made a $1.53 million gift to support the establishment of a clinical entrepreneurship program at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s School of Law. The program will provide rigorous, hands-on training for the next generation of public-spirited lawyers while also filling gaps in North Carolina’s entrepreneurship ecosystem. In addition to the Kenan Trust, the North Carolina General Assembly has appropriated $465,000 in recurring funds to support the program.

 

“We are thrilled and inspired by the investment in the education of Carolina students that the Kenan Trust and the people of North Carolina, through their representatives, are making,” said Martin H. Brinkley, dean and Arch T. Allen Distinguished Professor at UNC School of Law.  “Clinical education geared toward organizational clients, and the business and social entrepreneurs who establish them, is important to large numbers of our students. The new entrepreneurship program will help Carolina Law embrace its mission by fulfilling dual goals of teaching and service. With this generous gift from the Kenan Trust and additional support from the state, we will be able to provide an invaluable experiential learning opportunity for approximately 30 students a year while serving several times that number of for-profit and nonprofit entrepreneurial ventures each year.”

 

The new program will serve business and social enterprise entrepreneurs on the campuses of UNC-Chapel Hill and North Carolina State University, in partnership with UNC Kenan-Flagler Business School, NC State University’s Poole College of Management, as well as the innovation and entrepreneurship infrastructures on both campuses. The UNC School of Law also intends to identify one or more economic incubators in underserved parts of North Carolina that the entrepreneurship program can support.

 

In addition to providing educational opportunities for law students, the program will fill the one consistent gap across all startup settings: a lack of access to legal counsel. Legal advice for early-stage businesses and nonprofits, which typically have limited resources, is hard to find. In an effort to control costs, too many entrepreneurs never consult a lawyer and come to regret it. Failing to consult competent counsel exposes a new business or nonprofit organization to a variety of risks. For clients of the program these risks will be lowered, giving them a greater chance of thriving and expanding. In the end, students, startup businesses, communities and the state’s economy will end up benefiting.

 

The state recognized the benefits of the proposed program, appreciated the Kenan Trust gift and chose to show its support through a $465,000 appropriation.  “Connecting the world-class legal community at Carolina with business professionals in the startup economy is a win-win approach to higher education that will prepare law students to succeed and provide valuable legal resources for emerging companies in our state’s rapidly growing economy,” said House Speaker Tim Moore.

 

The program is expected to kick off in the 2019-2020 academic year. An official name will be determined during the planning process with input from current students.

 

“The Kenan Trust has always focused on the needs of the communities it serves and education is the foundation,” said Douglas Zinn, executive director of the William R. Kenan Jr. Charitable Trust. “We recognize that student education doesn’t just happen in the classroom and we are excited to support the entrepreneurship program that will train law students while strengthening North Carolina communities and the state’s economy.”

 

Funding will support three interwoven legal clinics at UNC School of Law: a for-profit ventures clinic, an intellectual property clinic and Carolina Law’s existing Community Development Law Clinic, which is a longstanding, highly successful nonprofit social entrepreneurship clinic. Each clinic, supervised by a full-time member of the law school faculty, will train eight to 10 law students per semester. Students will counsel business founders on the advantages and disadvantages of various business entity structures, form appropriate entities, draft organizational documents, capture and license intellectual property assets, and seek tax-exempt status for community based nonprofit organizations.

North Carolina is consistently ranked as one of the nation’s top five places to start a new business. Because of the rich and thriving entrepreneurial culture of the Research Triangle Park area of North Carolina and the business schools and entrepreneurial initiatives at local universities, the institute will serve a pipeline of clients from potential partners across the state.

 

“This gift and challenge from the Kenan Charitable Trust will catapult UNC School of Law onto the cutting edge of legal education. From my own experience representing clients in mergers and acquisitions and startups, there is a great need for legal advice at the earliest stages,” said Larry Robbins, partner at Wyrick Robbins Yates & Ponton LLP. “My hat is off to the Kenan Trust and the North Carolina General Assembly for recognizing this need for an entrepreneurship institute and for funding it.”

 

The gift from the Kenan Trust supports For All Kind: The Campaign for Carolina, the most ambitious fundraising campaign in the University’s history. The gift also reinforces UNC School of Law’s commitment to train lawyer-leaders to address the issues and questions of today’s dynamic, ever-evolving industries, particularly in areas of growth and influence in North Carolina and beyond.

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 111 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 323,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and 149 countries. More than 169,00 live in North Carolina.

 

University Communications: Media Relations, (919) 445-8555, mediarelations@unc.edu

 

UNC School of Law Contact: Amy Barefoot Graedon, (919) 843-7148, abarefoot@unc.edu

Two UNC-Chapel Hill graduates selected as Pickering Fellows

For immediate release

 

 

Two UNC-Chapel Hill graduates selected as Pickering Fellows

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— June 11, 2018) – Valli (Sindhu) Chidambaram and Hannah Clager, two University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill alumni, were selected as 2018 Thomas R. Pickering Graduate Foreign Affairs Fellows. Recipients of the Pickering Fellowship receive two years of financial support and professional development to prepare them for a career in the U.S. Foreign Service. Fellows also complete a domestic internship at the U.S. Department of State in Washington, D.C., and an overseas internship at a U.S. embassy.

 

Managed and funded by the U.S. Department of State, consideration is given to qualified applicants who have displayed outstanding leadership skills and academic achievement. The fellowship aims to support those historically underrepresented in the U.S. Foreign Service, including women, minority groups and students with financial need.

 

Chidambaram, from Rockville, Maryland, graduated in May 2018 with a bachelor’s degree in global studies concentrating in global health and environment and double minors in Spanish for the professions and medical anthropology. With a grant from the Carolina Asia Center, she studied abroad in Singapore, Malaysia and Japan. Then, as part of the Honors Semester in Cape Town program, she conducted burns research at the Red Cross War Memorial Children’s Hospital. Sindhu has interned with both U.S. Agency for International Development Indonesia and the U.N. Foundation’s Global Alliance For Clean Cookstoves.

 

At UNC-Chapel Hill, she has worked as the arts and culture senior writer for the student newspaper The Daily Tar Heel, volunteered at the Compass Center for Women and Families and mentored Latinx high school students through the Scholars’ Latino Initiative. Chidambaram will pursue her master’s degree in international development studies at the Elliott School of International Affairs at George Washington University this fall. She ultimately hopes to work as a management or public diplomacy officer.

 

Hannah Clager, from Lake Worth, Florida, will attend Harvard University this fall to pursue her master’s degree in Middle Eastern Studies. Her studies will focus on U.S. foreign policy in the Middle East and North Africa; human rights and refugee affairs; and cultural diplomacy in the region. Clager earned her bachelor’s degree in 2013 with a major in art history and a minor in African studies. At UNC-Chapel Hill, she completed her art history honors thesis on the 2012 Dakar Biennale after seven months of fieldwork in Dakar, Senegal. She worked as a full-time paralegal for close to three years and then spent 14 months in Morocco as a Fulbright Student Researcher beginning in 2016, where she studied Arabic and completed a case study of the new Mohammed VI Modern and Contemporary Art Museum in Rabat.

 

“Both Hannah and Sindhu have worked very hard for these opportunities, are eminently qualified, and will increase the diversity of the U.S. Department of State. Receiving the Pickering is a great honor. UNC-Chapel Hill is proud to have these representatives working in U.S. foreign affairs,” said Professor Inger Brodey, director of the Office of Distinguished Scholarships.

 

 

-Carolina-

 

  

Photo of Chidambaram: https://bit.ly/2x5hfK5

Photo of Clager: https://bit.ly/2xgjV7Z

 

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 111 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 322,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and 165 countries. More than 175,000 live in North Carolina.

 

Office of Distinguished Scholarships contacts: Inger Brodey, (919) 843-0965, brodey@email.unc.edu and Maggie Douglas, (919) 843-7757, mdouglas@unc.edu

 

University Communications: Media Relations, (919) 445-8555, mediarelations@unc.edu

 

 

Ackland Art Museum at UNC-Chapel Hill hosts “The Outwin: American Portraiture Today”     

For immediate use

Amy Sherald, American, born 1973: Miss Everything (Unsuppressed Deliverance), 2013. Oil on canvas, 54 x 43-1/8 in., 2013. Frances and Burton Reifler © Amy Sherald.

Ackland Art Museum at UNC-Chapel Hill hosts
“The Outwin: American Portraiture Today”   

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— May 31, 2018) – The Ackland Art Museum at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill will host “The Outwin: American Portraiture Today” on view from the Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery from June 1 through Aug. 26. The Ackland is the fourth and final stop and is the only Southeast location chosen to host the exhibition. A preview of the exhibition can be seen here.The selected finalists for the 2016 Outwin Boochever Portrait Competition finalists included in “The Outwin: American Portraiture Today” present a turning point in the advancement of American contemporary portraiture.

 

First-prize winner of the 2016 Outwin Boochever Portrait Competition Amy Sherald became the first woman to win the competition for her oil on canvas titled “Miss Everything (Unsuppressed Deliverance)” (2013). Former first lady Michelle Obama selected Sherald to create her official portrait for the National Portrait Gallery’s permanent collection, revealed in February 2018. Sherald and Moss will also participate in a public discussion on June 1 at 6:30 p.m. about modern portraiture in the age of the selfie and digitized personhood.

 

“We are thrilled to welcome “The Outwin” as the Museum’s major summer exhibition,” said Katie Ziglar, director of the Ackland Art Museum. “From the breadth of artistic medium to the diverse representations of participants and their subjects, this show reflects the Ackland’s commitment to providing experiences that spark insight into ourselves, each other, and the world.”

 

“The Outwin” is the latest art experience offered by the Ackland, a partner in the university’s Arts Everywhere initiative, which strives to make art accessible to the campus and wider community. Arts Everywhere is a signature initiative of the University’s $4.25 billion fundraising campaign, the Campaign for Carolina. Since January 2017 the Ackland has secured gifts valued at $69.2 million, including several Rembrandt drawings, paintings and prints by Joan Mitchell and a 1971 oil and charcoal on paper by Willem de Kooning. These gifts, among others, increased the Ackland’s growth by more than 500 percent over the prior four years, bolstering the museum’s position as the preeminent public university art museum in the country.

 

The Outwin: American Portraiture Today

Open June 1 – August 26, 2018

Ackland Art Museum

101 South Columbia St.

Chapel Hill, N.C.

 

Museum hours are Wednesday through Saturday 10 a.m. – 5 p.m., and Sundays 1 p.m. – 5 p.m. More information is available at ackland.org.

 

Discussion with artist Amy Sherald

Friday, June 1, 6:30 p.m.

Artist Amy Sherald and curator Dorothy Moss will host a public discussion

Sonja Haynes Stone Center for Black Culture and History

150 South Road

Chapel Hill, N.C.

 

This exhibition has been organized by the Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery, Washington, D.C. The competition and exhibition have been made possible by generous support from the Virginia Outwin Boochever Portrait Competition Endowment.

 

The Ackland presentation of this exhibition has been made possible by generous support from The Caldwell Family Fund for the Ackland Art Museum, The Seymour and Carol Levin Foundation, and Cathy and Hunter Allen.

 

-Carolina-

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill



The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 111 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 323,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and 149 countries. More than 169,000 live in North Carolina.

 

About the Ackland Art Museum

Featuring a year-round calendar of special exhibitions and dynamic public programs, the Ackland Art Museum on UNC-Chapel Hill’s historic campus is a local museum with a global outlook that bridges campus and community. Admission to the Ackland is free and accessible to all. The Ackland’s holdings include more than 18,000 works of art. The collection spans all cultures and time periods, showcasing the breadth of human creativity. A vital teaching resource, the museum’s mission is the art of understanding. Visitors can connect with the complexity and beauty of the wider world by getting close to art – the familiar, the unexpected, the challenging. The Ackland Art Museum is located at 101 South Columbia St. on the UNC-Chapel Hill campus. Museum hours are Wednesday through Saturday 10 a.m. – 5 p.m., and Sundays 1 p.m. – 5 p.m. The museum is open until 9 p.m. for Chapel Hill-Carrboro’s 2nd Friday ArtWalk. More information is available at ackland.org.

 

University Communications: Carly Miller, (919) 445-8555, mediarelations@unc.edu

Ackland Art Museum: Audrey Shore, (919) 843-3676, audrey.shore@unc.edu

 

Image: Amy Sherald, American, born 1973: Miss Everything (Unsuppressed Deliverance), 2013. Oil on canvas, 54 x 43-1/8 in., 2013. Frances and Burton Reifler © Amy Sherald.

 

UNC Health Care CEO, Medical School Dean Bill Roper Plans to Step Down in 2019

For immediate use

 

UNC Health Care CEO, Medical School Dean Bill Roper Plans to Step Down in 2019


Dr. Roper led expansion efforts in education, research, and clinical care that improved health for all North Carolinians

 

 

CHAPEL HILL, N.C.  – May 31, 2018 ­– Dr. William L. Roper, who has helped transform UNC Health Care and the UNC School of Medicine into one of the nation’s top academic medical institutions, plans to step down as CEO and dean in May 2019.

 

“It has been a high honor to serve with so many talented and committed people. I know that our team is well equipped to continue taking on the challenges of a rapidly evolving medical and health care landscape,” Roper said. “Our mission, our patients and our providers are in good hands.”

 

Roper joined UNC-Chapel Hill as dean of the School of Public Health in 1997. In 2004, he became CEO of UNC Health Care, dean of the School of Medicine and vice chancellor for medical affairs. In those roles, he has expanded the reach of the health care system and medical school and helped improve the health of all North Carolinians. He’s also been a passionate advocate for health issues that affect residents of North Carolina at the state and federal levels.

 

“Dr. Roper has championed a broad range of innovative teaching, treatment and patient-care initiatives that have expanded and rippled across our state to provide patients with quality, accessible and affordable health care,” said UNC-Chapel Hill Chancellor Carol L. Folt. “Bill has provided a remarkable record of leadership, always with the people of North Carolina in his heart and on his mind.”

 

Under Roper’s leadership, UNC Health Care has expanded into a statewide system with more than a dozen hospitals, more than 30,000 employees and nearly $5 billion in annual revenue. His commitment to teaching and training the next generation of physicians has improved access across the state, especially in rural areas.

 

“Without question, Dr. Roper has a proven track record of service to our state, our people and to our future health,” said Dale Jenkins, chair of the UNC Health Care Board of Directors. “Throughout a long career of public service, he has made an impact on health care nationally, but most importantly, he has elevated health care to new levels here in North Carolina.”

 

At the UNC School of Medicine, total research funding has increased more than 50 percent since 2004 to $441 million last year, making it one of the preeminent medical research programs in the country. Roper has spearheaded efforts to expand its footprint across the state. He has cultivated relationships with other medical leaders and opened doors for medical students to train in Asheville, Charlotte and Wilmington. Today, the medical school trains more than 2,400 inter-professional health care providers and medical students annually, including many who choose to practice in our state after their education. Roper also has helped expand and add numerous medical, teaching and research facilities at UNC-Chapel Hill and UNC Health Care.

 

“Since Dr. Roper arrived at UNC, he has leveraged his expertise, experience and political acumen to guide this institution’s medical program and the state’s health care system into the 21st century,” said UNC System President Margaret Spellings. “His robust vision has ensured that we will be ready to meet the needs of our state’s aging and growing population.”

 

Roper, who turns 70 this summer, plans to step down on May 15, 2019. The University and UNC Health Care soon will begin a national search for his successor.

 

Photo of Roper: https://tinyurl.com/roper-william

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 111 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 323,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and 149 countries. More than 169,000 live in North Carolina.

 

About UNC Health Care

UNC Health Care is an integrated health care system comprised of UNC Hospitals and its provider network, UNC Faculty Physicians, UNC Physicians Network, the clinical patient care programs of the UNC School of Medicine. Additional hospital entities and health care systems include UNC REX Healthcare, Chatham Hospital, Johnston Health, Pardee Hospital, High Point Regional Health, Caldwell Memorial, Nash Health Care, Wayne Memorial, UNC Lenoir Health Care and UNC Rockingham Health Care.

 

University Communications contact: Audrey Smith, (919) 445-8555, audrey.smith@unc.edu

UNC Health Care contact: Alan Wolf, (919) 218-7103, alan.wolf@unchealth.unc.edu

 

UNC-Chapel Hill experts available to discuss hurricane season

UNC-Chapel Hill experts available to discuss hurricane season

 

Hurricane season officially began on June 1 and is now hitting peak period as Tropical Storm Gordon approaches the central U.S. Gulf Coast. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill researchers and faculty are available to provide insight on storm surge and flooding, water quality, beach erosion and other storm-related issues.

 

Carolina experts are also available to discuss recovery-related research in the wake of hurricanes.

 

 

If you’d like to speak with an expert, call (919) 445-8555 or email mediarelations@unc.edu.

 

Norma Houston is a lecturer in public law and government at the UNC-Chapel Hill School of Government. Houston is an expert on the laws and authorities related to emergency management, including state of emergency declarations, and is often on the front lines with North Carolina public officials during hurricanes. She works closely with the North Carolina Division of Emergency Management year-round to help local governments prepare for natural disasters and she curates an emergency management website for North Carolina public officials. Houston is also an expert in local government law and procurement and, in the wake of Hurricane Matthew, has been helping local governments navigate federal procurement regulations around FEMA reimbursements. She can discuss what local governments are authorized to do during disasters, how they should prepare for scenarios like evacuations and debris removal, and federal regulations like FEMA contract requirements.

 

 

Rick Luettich is the director of UNC-Chapel Hill Institute of Marine Sciences in Morehead City, North Carolina and the lead investigator of the Department of Homeland Security’s Coastal Resilience Center. He is a leading global expert on storm surge and is on the front lines when it comes to predicting a storm’s potential impact, as co-developer of ADCIRC, a system of computer programs used to predict storm surge and flooding. These prediction models are updated every few hours – the most recent model can be found here. Agencies and organizations including Federal Emergency Management Agency, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Army Corps of Engineers, the U.S. Coast Guard and the emergency operations centers in several coastal states use Luettich’s model to assess risk, for design protection and to make decisions during storm events. He can discuss coastal risk, protection and forecasting storms.

 

Luettich’s research and ADCIRC model has also been used to design protection systems around New Orleans following Hurricane Katrina and around New York and New Jersey following Hurricane Sandy. Most recently ADCIRC provided extensive storm surge and flooding predictions for the major landfalling hurricanes during the 2017 hurricane season.

 

 

Rachel Noble is a distinguished professor at the UNC-Chapel Hill Institute of Marine Sciences. Her research focuses on public health issues surrounding water quality, including stormwater, drinking water and extreme conditions like those following a tropical storm or hurricane event. Her current work highlights the use of rapid tests to protect public health from waterborne diseases. She can discuss how to protect human health by better understanding pathogens and the risk they pose to the public, particularly after storm events.

 

Noble’s research and rapid method tests have been used on both coasts and the Great Lakes to protect public health. She is currently working with the Environmental Protection Agency on the implementation of methods to rapidly test E. coli at beaches. She is actively working with municipal wastewater agencies in California, North Carolina, Virginia, and Maryland on improved approaches to protect the public from contamination events in a more timely manner.

 

 

Hans Paerl is a distinguished professor of marine and environmental sciences at the UNC-Chapel Hill Institute of Marine Sciences. He is a water quality expert, focused on the harmful effects of toxic algae for both people and aquatic ecosystems. He can discuss the long-term impact of these blooms, including excessive nutrient inputs leading to algal blooms and their detrimental effects, including low oxygen (hypoxia), fish kills and toxicity of blooms, including digestive, liver and neurological impacts on human health.

 

Paerl’s recent study demonstrates that over the past 2 decades, tropical cyclones around the globe are increasing in both frequency and intensity. This has led to greater impacts to coastal watersheds including more fish kills, larger algal blooms, and larger low oxygen “dead zones.”

 

 

Carter Smith is a doctoral student at the UNC-Chapel Hill Institute of Marine Sciences. She studies the benefits of living shorelines, an alternative to seawalls, as a solution to combat erosion and property loss during storms. Living shorelines are both more cost effective than seawalls in the long-term and are ecologically more sustainable. She can discuss how homeowners and property managers can better protect coastal properties from hurricanes.

 

 

 

 

Gavin Smith is director of the Department of Homeland Security’s Coastal Resilience Center and a research professor in the department of city and regional planning at UNC-Chapel Hill. He leads the Hurricane Matthew Disaster Recovery and Resilience Initiative, working with federal, state and local leaders on addressing community needs after the 2016 storm. Following Hurricane Katrina, he worked in the Mississippi Office of the Governor and provided policy change recommendations to improve the delivery of post-disaster recovery and reconstruction activities. He also previously served as the assistant director for hazard mitigation for the state of North Carolina. He can discuss the disaster recovery and hazard mitigation process, particularly the role of states.

 

 

P: (919) 445-8555  |  E: mediarelations@unc.edu

 

 

UNC-Chapel Hill experts available to discuss mosquito and tick-borne diseases

UNC-Chapel Hill experts available to discuss mosquito and tick-borne diseases

 

Diseases transmitted by ticks, mosquitoes and fleas – which include Lyme disease, Zika and West Nile virus – have tripled in the U.S., according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. As warmer temperatures lead Americans to spend more time outdoors, it is important that people understand the risks and how to avoid getting bitten by mosquitoes and ticks. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill researchers and physicians are available to discuss the rise in vector-borne diseases, prevention recommendations and treatment options for these diseases, and meat allergies resulting from tick bites.

 

If you’d like to speak with an expert, call (919) 445-8555 or email mediarelations@unc.edu.

 

Dr. Ross Boyce is an infectious diseases fellow with the division of infectious diseases in the UNC School of Medicine. He studies malaria and dengue in East Africa. He can discuss prevention, diagnostics and treatment of vector-borne diseases as well as how climate change is impacting where these illnesses are found. He is currently studying tick-borne diseases in North Carolina.

 

 

 

Dr. Scott Commins is a professor of allergy and immunology in the UNC School of Medicine. He is a leading expert on alpha-gal meat allergy, which is believed to result from tick bites. He sees patients with this condition in the UNC Allergy and Immunology Clinic and he is one of a few experts in the U.S. who are conducting clinical research regarding this poorly understood yet often serious allergy. He is available to discuss alpha-gal.

 

 

 

Dr. Steve Meshnick is a professor of epidemiology in the UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health and a professor of microbiology and immunology in the UNC School of Medicine. He has spent the last 30 years researching tropical infectious diseases. He can discuss malaria, including drug resistance, prevention and pregnancy. He also studies tick-borne diseases and was part of a research team that showed that treating clothing with the long-lasting tick repellent permethrin can protect outdoor workers in North Carolina from ticks.

 

 

Dr. David Weber is a professor of epidemiology in the UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health and a professor of pediatrics and medicine in the UNC School of Medicine’s Division of Infectious Diseases and Department of Pediatrics. He is also a member of UNC Hospitals’ Zika Response Working Group. He can discuss the increase in tick, mosquito and flea-borne diseases in the U.S. and share a clinical perspective on Lyme disease, Zika and other vector-borne diseases, and recommendations for how to protect against insect bites.

 

 

 

P: (919) 445-8555  |  E: mediarelations@unc.edu