UNC-Chapel Hill inducts 137 into Phi Beta Kappa

For immediate use

 

UNC-Chapel Hill inducts 137 into Phi Beta Kappa

 

90 inductees from North Carolina

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C. – Nov. 15, 2016) – Phi Beta Kappa, the nation’s oldest and most honored college honorary society, has inducted 137 University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill students as new members.

 

The recent induction ceremony featured remarks by Chancellor Carol L. Folt and a keynote address by Dr. Kevin M. Guskiewicz, dean of the College of Arts and Sciences and Kenan distinguished professor of exercise and sport science. New members received certificates and Phi Beta Kappa keys, the organization’s symbol.

 

Phi Beta Kappa membership is open to undergraduates in the college and professional degree programs who meet stringent eligibility requirements.

 

A student who has completed 75 hours of course work in the liberal arts and sciences with a GPA of 3.85 or better (on a 4-point scale) is eligible for membership. Also eligible is any student who has completed 105 hours of course work in the liberal arts and sciences with a 3.75 GPA. Grades earned at other universities are not considered. Less than 1 percent of all college students qualify.

 

Past and present Phi Beta Kappa members include 17 American presidents and numerous artistic, intellectual and political leaders. Seven current U.S. Supreme Court justices are members.

 

Phi Beta Kappa has 286 chapters nationwide. Carolina’s chapter, Alpha of North Carolina, was founded in 1904 and is the oldest of seven chapters in the state. Each year, Phi Beta Kappa chapters and alumni associations across the country raise and distribute more than $1 million in awards, scholarships and prizes benefiting high school and college students.

 

Phi Beta Kappa officers at Carolina for 2016-2017 are students Aaron Homburger, president; Kylie Nowicki, vice president; and Guilia Curcelli, recording secretary. James L. Leloudis, professor of history, associate dean for Honors Carolina and director of the James M. Johnston Center for Undergraduate Excellence, is chapter executive secretary and faculty adviser.

 

Listed below are 133 inductees, 90 of whom are from North Carolina. The names appear below in alphabetical order by North Carolina county, then by state and country. All students study in the College of Arts and Sciences except where otherwise noted. Four students chose not to be listed.

 

Alamance County

  • K. Hunter Byrd, a senior with an exercise and sport science major, of Snow Camp.
  • Benjamin Franklin Lowe, III, a senior with biology and religious studies majors, son of Dr. Benjamin Lowe Jr. and Suzanne Lowe of Burlington.
  • Meredith Gracen Miller, a senior with art history and history majors, daughter of Mark Miller and Lisa Miller of Elon.
  • Kathryn Nakhle, a senior with a communication studies major and a social and economic justice minor, daughter of Amy Nakhle of Elon.

 

Buncombe County

  • Lauren Martina Chisdock, a senior with a nursing major, of Asheville.
  • Avram Asher Goldstein, a senior with a computer science major and an entrepreneurship minor, son of Dr. Jonas Goldstein and Dr. Meryl Goldstein of Asheville.
  • Alexander Scott Montgomery, a senior with political science and English majors and a history minor, son of Scott Montgomery and Susan Montgomery of Asheville.
  • Lacy Catherine Rardin, a senior with psychology and exercise and sport science majors, daughter of Dr. Duff Rardin and Angie Rardin of Asheville.

 

Cabarrus County

  • Kirsten Olivia Spencer, a senior with a psychology major and education and social and economic justice minors, daughter of Karen Meggs of Concord and Jerry Spencer of Pineville.

 

Cleveland County

  • Molly McConnell, a senior with an English major and creative writing and American studies minors, of Shelby.

 

Cumberland County

  • Monal Dinesh Depani, a senior with an environmental health sciences major and chemistry and biology minors, son of Dinesh Depani and Bhavna Depani of Fayetteville.
  • Michael Cory Strickland, a senior with philosophy and music majors, of Fayetteville.

 

Davidson County

  • Spencer Phillip Landfried, a senior with a computer science major and a mathematics minor, of Midway.

 

Duplin County

  • Stephen Thomas Lanier, a junior with mathematics and computer science majors and a creative writing minor, son of Col. Steve Lanier and Kristie Lanier of Beulaville.

 

Durham County

  • Emily Logan Bass, a senior with a psychology major and an anthropology minor, daughter of A. Lewis Bass, III and Margaret H. Bass of Durham.
  • Anthony Lawrence Vallario, a senior with computer science and mathematics majors, son of Peter Vallario and Phyllis Vallario of Durham.

 

Forsyth County

  • Mariana Abou-Rizk, a senior with French and communication studies majors, of Winston-Salem.
  • Leona Aisha Amosah, a senior with Russian language and culture and global studies majors, daughter of Ben Amosah and Nelli Amosah of Winston-Salem.
  • Anna Davis Caudill, a senior with global studies and political science majors and a Spanish for the professions minor, daughter of Mark Caudill and Virginia Caudill of Winston-Salem.
  • Alexandra Edens, a senior with exercise and sport science and psychology majors, daughter of Michael Edens and Mary Beth Edens of Winston-Salem.
  • Helina Wen Gan, a senior with biology and psychology majors and a chemistry minor, of Clemmons.
  • Lauren Grace Kent, a senior with media and journalism and political science majors and a philosophy, politics, and economics minor, of Winston-Salem.
  • Rachel Erin Lerner, a senior with psychology and communication studies majors, of Winston-Salem.

 

Franklin County

  • Molly Hendricks Boutwell, a senior with an exercise and sport science major and a chemistry minor, daughter of Raymond Boutwell and Gina Boutwell of Louisburg.

 

Gaston County

  • Caroline M. Fite, a May 2016 graduate with economics and political science majors and an English minor, daughter of Harold Fite of Belmont.

 

Guilford County

  • Brianna Bauchle, a senior with Hispanic linguistics and management and society majors, of Summerfield.
  • Amina Lawal Garba, a senior with a nutrition major and Arabic and chemistry minors, daughter of Mohammad Garba and Zuwaira Garba of Greensboro.
  • Hailey Kay Jacob, a May 2016 graduate with business administration and economics majors, daughter of a Phil Jacob and Dr. Sera Jacob of Greensboro.
  • Summer Ziad Hashem Najjar, a senior with public policy and Arab cultures majors, daughter of Ziad Najjar of Greensboro and Deborah Jackson of Danvers, Massachusetts.
  • Meredith Anne Park, a senior with a chemistry major and neuroscience and biology minors, daughter of Stan Park and Laura Park of Greensboro.
  • Jonathan Matthew Raab, Jr., a senior with economics and public policy majors, son of Matt Raab and Amy Raab of Greensboro.
  • Kristen Danielle Witkemper, a senior with a psychology major and a women’s and gender studies minor, daughter of Daniel Witkemper, II and Brenda Adams Witkemper of Jamestown.

 

Henderson County

  • Alexandra Christine Stewart, a May 2016 graduate with a linguistics major and speech and hearing sciences and music minors, daughter of Rick Stewart and Jan Stewart of Hendersonville.

 

Iredell County

  • Kathryn Ann Elkin, a senior with psychology and biology majors and a music minor, daughter of William Elkin, Jr. and Amy Elkin of Mooresville.

 

Mecklenburg County

  • Ashton Katherine Carrick, a senior with a communication studies major and writing for the screen and stage and creative writing minors, daughter of Kenneth Carrick, Jr. and Susan Carrick of Charlotte.
  • Akshay V. Daji, a senior with a biology major and neuroscience and chemistry minors, son of Vija Daji and Swati Daji of Charlotte.
  • Steven Scott Doerstling, a senior with a nutrition major and chemistry and Spanish for the professions minors, son of Scott Doerstling and Lesa Doerstling of Charlotte.
  • David Andrew Farrow, a senior with cultural studies and public policy majors, son of David Farrow and Elisabeth Farrow of Charlotte.
  • George D. Johnson, a May 2016 graduate with history and psychology majors, of Charlotte.
  • Luke Robert Miller, a senior with business administration and economics majors, son of Robert Miller and Tracy Miller of Charlotte.
  • Kara Patrice Mitchell, a senior with economics and public policy majors and a social and economic justice minor, of Charlotte.
  • Yoonha Shim, a senior with a clinical laboratory science major and a chemistry minor, daughter of Wee Shim and Mi Shim of Charlotte.
  • Mary Elizabeth Thurman, a senior with studio art and communication studies majors, daughter of David Thurman and Mary Beth Thurman of Charlotte.
  • Colleen Jivoff Watson, a senior with a psychology major and a Hispanic studies minor, daughter of Stuart Watson, Jr. and Lorraine Jivoff of Charlotte.
  • Reed Nicholas Williams, a senior with computer science and economics majors, son of Joann Williams of Charlotte.

 

New Hanover County

  • Jennifer Rose Jensen, a senior with biology and psychology majors and a chemistry minor, daughter of Carsten Jensen and Dr. Regina Jensen of Wilmington.
  • Audra Rose Killian, a senior with economics and women’s and gender studies majors and a politics, philosophy, and economics minor, daughter of Kevin Killian and Linda Killian of Wilmington.
  • Spencer A. Lewis, a senior with a computer science major, of Wrightsville Beach.

 

Orange County

  • Ranjitha Ananthan, a senior with a health policy and management major and a chemistry minor, daughter of Ananthan Ramasamy and Mala Ananthan of Chapel Hill.
  • Grant Hayden Cabell, a senior with biology and exercise and sport science majors and a chemistry minor, of Chapel Hill.
  • Anna Catherine Dallara, a senior with classics and rhetoric and digital composition majors, daughter of Dr. John Dallara and Dr. Amy Levine of Chapel Hill.
  • Stephen K. Garvey, a senior with political science and peace, war, and defense majors and a history minor, son of Donald Garvey and Evelyn Garvey of Granite Falls.
  • Alice Huang, a May 2016 graduate with economics and mathematics majors, daughter of Weishi Huang and Qinghong Yang of Chapel Hill.
  • Claire Kylstra Peterman, a senior with comparative literature and Spanish majors and an anthropology minor, daughter of Ken Peterman and Kimberly Kylstra of Chapel Hill.
  • William Frank Richardson, a senior with political science and economics majors and a classics minor, son of Craig Richardson of Chapel Hill.
  • Chiara Pancaldo Salemi, a senior with physics and mathematics majors, of Chapel Hill.
  • Sophie Antoinette Shaw, a senior with an English major and creative writing and Italian minors, daughter of Duncan Shaw and Jennifer Shaw of Hillsborough.
  • Alexandra Claiborne Willcox, a senior with environmental health sciences and French majors, daughter of Bill Willcox and Smaranda Willcox of Chapel Hill.
  • Maria Yao, a senior with a nutrition major and music and Spanish for the medical professions minors, daughter of Li Xu and Lixin Yao of Chapel Hill.
  • Alice Yunzi Ling Yu, a senior with a nutrition major and chemistry and music minors, daughter of Tongayn Li of Chapel Hill and Dr. Haibin Yu of Ningbo, China.

 

Pitt County

  • Jared Douglas Williams, a senior with chemistry and English majors, son of Keith Williams and Sandra Williams of Greenville.

 

Robeson County

  • Daniel Frederick Dana, a senior with education and English majors, son of Frederick Dana and Monica Dana of Lumberton.

 

Rockingham County

  • Timber Grey Beeninga, a senior with economics and global studies majors and a public policy minor, daughter of Scott Beeninga and Rose Beeninga of Summerfield.

 

Scotland County

  • Destinee Hope Grove, a senior with exercise and sport science and psychology majors, daughter of Ruby Clark of Wagram.

 

Stanly County

  • Lea Nicole Efird, a senior with Spanish and history majors and an English minor, of Albemarle.

 

Surry County

  • Elizabeth Dorothy Dinkins, a senior with business administration and chemistry majors and a biology minor, daughter of David Dinkins and Josie Dinkins of Mount Airy.

 

Union County

  • Adrienne Marlo Kronovet, a senior with history and global studies majors and a Spanish for the business professions minor, daughter of Neal Kronovet and Gail Kronovet of Waxhaw.
  • Caitlyn Nicole McHale, a senior with a communication studies major and a writing for the screen and stage minor, daughter of Paul McHale and Candy McHale of Stallings.

 

Wake County

  • Francis Marion Alcorn, IV, a junior with chemistry and physics majors, son of and Timothy Alcorn and Sarah Wetherby of Raleigh.
  • Felix H Allen, V, a junior with a music major, son of Hill Allen and Willa Allen and of Raleigh.
  • Willow Ky Barefoot, a senior with a communication studies major and global cinema and public policy minors, daughter of Bo Barefoot of Garner and Kim Barefoot of Cleveland, NC.
  • Claire Bennett, a May 2016 graduate with political science and public policy majors and a Hispanic studies minor, daughter of Brian Bennett and Betsy Bennett and of Raleigh.
  • Martha Elizabeth Blue, a senior with an environmental health science major and chemistry and biology minors, daughter of Donald Blue and Mary Prevost of Raleigh.
  • Regan Downey Buchanan, a senior with geography and global studies majors and a Hispanic studies minor, daughter of David Buchanan and Cheryl Buchanan of Raleigh.
  • Emma Frances Celentano, a May 2016 graduate with an exercise and sport science major and a coaching education minor, Peter Celentano and Aileen Celentano of Raleigh.
  • Anne Yichen Feng, a junior with biology and interdisciplinary studies majors and a chemistry minor, of Cary.
  • Jessica Maria Ferrall, a senior with a psychology major and Spanish for the professions and business administration minors, daughter of Dr. Robert Ferrall and Dr. Isabel Ferrall of Cary.
  • Sanjay Raaj Venkata Gadi, a junior with a nutrition major and studio art and chemistry minors, son of Jagadish Gadi and Sashi Gadi of Raleigh.
  • Devon Clare Genua, a senior with a public policy major, daughter of Dante Genua and Karen Genua of Apex.
  • Amy Zhang Guo, a senior with an environmental health sciences major and a music minor, daughter of Chunzhi Guo and Beirong Zhang of Cary.
  • Benjamin Laird Hutton Jones, a senior with a global studies major and biology and chemistry minors, of Raleigh.
  • Caroline Stanhope Wynne Lindquist, a senior with an environmental studies major and an urban studies and planning minor, of Raleigh.
  • Nicole Elise Martin, a senior with an English major and medieval and early modern studies and anthropology minors, daughter of John Martin and Debra Martin of Apex.
  • Jack Gentry Fenner Perisich, a junior with computer science and music performance majors and a mathematics minor, son of Mark Perisich and Christine Perisich of Raleigh.
  • Adarsh Vasudeva Rao, a junior with chemistry and biology majors and a mathematics minor, of Cary.
  • Medina Sadat, a senior with political science and global studies majors and an Arabic minor, daughter of Abdul Sadat and Maria Azamy of Cary.
  • Julia N. Shen, a senior with a biology major and a chemistry minor, of Morrisville.
  • Abigail Thurman, a senior with mathematics and political science majors and an Arabic minor, daughter of Walter Thurman and Rita Thurman of Raleigh.
  • Caroline Aunspaugh Woronoff, a senior with a global studies major and entrepreneurship and public policy minors, daughter of Robert Woronoff and Diane Woronoff of Raleigh.
  • Jerry Zhang, a junior with biochemistry and biophysics majors and a computer science minor, son of Zhong Zhang and Lihong Yu of Apex.

 

Alabama

  • Patricia McGee Dodson, a senior with an information science major and neuroscience and chemistry minors, daughter of William Dodson, Jr. and Patricia Dodson of Birmingham.
  • Margaret Alice Williams, a senior with a biology major and medical anthropology and chemistry minors, daughter of Jim Williams and Gwen Williams of Birmingham.

 

California

  • Abigail Deborah Kinnaman, a senior with economics and public policy majors and a Spanish for the business professions minor, daughter of John Kinnaman and Katherine Kinnaman of Palo Alto.
  • Alexi Morgan Wordell, a senior with an American studies major and urban studies and planning and geography minors, daughter of Kipp Wordell and Jenna Wordell of Nevada City.

 

Connecticut

  • Alan Samuel Luner, a junior with mathematics and chemistry majors, of Waterford.

 

Florida

  • Erica Nicole Diamond, a senior with a French and French literature major and a Hispanic studies minor, daughter of Alan Diamond and Laura Diamond of Melbourne.
  • Lauren Rachel Trushin, a junior with public policy and history majors and an Asian studies minor, daughter of Bradley Trushin and Suzanne Trushin of Miami.

 

Georgia

  • Virginia Blanton Hamilton, a senior with a nursing major and Hispanic studies and anthropology minors, daughter of John Hamilton and Susan Hamilton of Atlanta.
  • Emily Mulcahey Janeira, a senior with a chemistry major and biology and creative writing minors, of Woodstock.
  • Emily Grace Kelly, a senior with psychology and English majors, daughter of Tom Kelly and Dr. Cynthia Kelly of Sandy Springs.

 

Illinois

  • Elizabeth Helme Zwart, a senior with business administration and philosophy majors and a religious studies minor, daughter of Jay Zwart and Lori Zwart of Mooresville, NC.

 

Indiana

  • Lindsey Faye Wells, a junior with a biomedical and health sciences engineering major and chemistry and Spanish for the professions minors, of Zionsville.

 

Kansas

  • Lucas Michael Popp, a senior with an exercise and sport science major and chemistry and music minors, son of Michael Popp and Ann Popp of Wichita.

 

Maryland

  • Tamar Chukrun, a senior with a nutrition major and a chemistry minor, daughter of Michal Chukrun and Benny Chukrun of Rockville.
  • Peter Vicars Cooke, a senior with an Arab cultures major and chemistry and biology minors, of Baltimore.
  • Edgar Maxwell Faison, a junior with a biochemistry major and physics and biology minors, son of Russell Faison and Virginia Faison of Lusby.
  • Samara RME Green, an August 2016 graduate with a global studies major, of Potomac.
  • Holly Elizabeth Ozgun, a junior with a health policy and management major and chemistry and Spanish for the professions minors, of Finksburg.

 

Massachusetts

  • Brenda Miller Holmes, a senior with a studio art major, of Boston.

 

Missouri

  • Justin David Cole, a junior with economics and peace, war, and defense majors and a philosophy, politics, and economics minor, son of David Cole and Deborah Cole of Saint Louis.

 

New Jersey

  • Ezra Baeli-Wang, a senior with peace, war, and defense and Asian studies majors and a creative writing minor, of Hillsborough.
  • Emily Drake, a junior with environmental sciences and peace, war, and defense majors and a philosophy minor, of Mahwah.
  • Bryan M. Gerber, a junior with biology and business administration majors and a chemistry minor, of Warren.
  • Katlyn Geraldine McKay, a senior with biology and psychology majors and a neuroscience minor, daughter of David McKay and Diane McKay and of Holmdel.

 

South Carolina

  • Devin Blake Durham, a senior with an economics major and a history minor, son of Traci Durham of Gaffney and Adlai Durham of Jonesville.
  • Caroline Spears Jennings, a senior with a psychology major and biology and French minors, daughter of Dr. Harold Jennings, Jr. and Kristi Jennings of Greenville.

 

Tennessee

  • Hayley Nicole Carter, a senior with an economics major and an information systems minor, daughter of Stephen Carter and Sandra Carter of Chattanooga.
  • Niman Mann, a junior with psychology and religious studies majors and a chemistry minor, daughter of Daljit Mann and Dr. Anuradha Mann of Brentwood.

 

Texas

  • Christian Hugh Browning, a senior with physics and mathematics majors and a computer science minor, son of Dr. Iley Browning of Evansville, Indiana and Dr. Pamela Smith of Belhaven, North Carolina.
  • Samantha Leigh Night, a senior with a public policy major, daughter of Susan Night and Stacy Night of Austin.

 

Virginia

  • Chloe Alistair Karlovich, a senior with an English major and art history and comparative literature minors, daughter of John Karlovich and Donna Karlovich of Fredericksburg.
  • Annie Keller, a senior with music and dramatic art majors, daughter of David Keller, II. and Callie Keller of Charlottesville.
  • Nakisa Sadeghi, a senior with a French major and a business administration minor, daughter of Kyoko Ando of Alexandria.

 

Washington, D.C.

  • Jeanie Zhao, a May 2016 graduate with business administration and economics majors, daughter of Zhijiang Zhao and Qun Gu.

 

West Virginia

  • Austin Michael Mueller, a senior with history and economics majors and a Hispanic studies minor, son of Michael Mueller of Katy, Texas and Vicki Mueller of Vienna.

 

China

  • Guanzhong Du, a senior with mathematics and economics majors, son of Xinyang Li and Qiang Du of China.
  • Xuelan Wu, a senior with biochemistry and mathematics majors, of Hangzhou.
  • Siyu Zhao, a senior with philosophy and economics majors, of Shanghai.
  • Yongwei Zheng, a senior with computer science and mathematical decision sciences majors and a business administration minor, daughter of Zhiqiang Zheng and Shaojuan Li of Guangdong.

 

England

  • Harry Joe Edwards, a senior with economics and mathematics majors and a public policy minor, son of David Edwards and Anne Edwards of Cleckheaton, West Yorkshire.

 

Italy

  • Ottavia Zattra, a senior with a nutrition major and a chemistry minor, daughter of Luigi Zattra and Alessandra Edda Cariolato of Cornedo Vicentino.

 

South Korea

  • Sungwon Hwang, a senior with a chemistry major, son of Young-su Hwang and In-sook Hwang-Ha.

 

Switzerland

  • Felix Kimathi Murithi, a senior with a psychology major and journalism and global cinema minors, of Nyon.

 

 

-Carolina-

 

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 113 master’s, 68 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty – including two Nobel laureates – staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 317,000 alumni live in all 50 states and 150 countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

 

Phi Beta Kappa, Alpha of North Carolina Chapter contact: Jason Clemmons, (919) 843-7756, jclem@email.unc.edu

UNC Communications contact: MC VanGraafeiland (919) 962-7090, mc.vangraafeiland@unc.edu

 

 

 

 

Media invited to cover two ceremonies honoring the military at UNC-Chapel Hill

Not for publication

 

 

Media invited to cover two ceremonies honoring the military at UNC-Chapel Hill

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— Nov. 7, 2016) – In observance of Veterans Day, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill will hold two events this week honoring veterans and active duty military that offer media representatives an opportunity for news coverage.

 

Third Annual Tar Heel Tribute Ceremony

Thursday, Nov. 10

11:30 a.m. – 2:30 p.m.

Alumni Hall rooms of The Carolina Club, inside the George Watts Hill Alumni Center,

550 Stadium Dr.

 

This invitation-only event honors brave members of the Carolina community who have either served or are currently serving in the military. Chancellor Carol L. Folt will make opening remarks before an address by keynote speaker Imogene M. Jamison, former lieutenant colonel for the U.S. Army Judge Advocate General’s Corps and current associate general counsel with the U.S. Department of Defense Education Activity. The event will also include time to network, a complimentary lunch and guest speakers. Additional event details are available here.

 

Carolina Alumni Memorial Ceremony

Friday, Nov. 11

11 a.m.

Carolina Alumni Memorial in Memory to Those Lost in Service, located between Phillips and Memorial Halls on Cameron Avenue

Rain Site: Nelson Mandela Auditorium, inside the FedEx Global Education Center, 301 Pittsboro St.

 

Hosted by the University’s Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) programs, the ceremony honors all military members, both those currently serving and those who have served in the past. The featured speaker is Dr. Bruce Cairns, director of the North Carolina Jaycee Burn Center at UNC Health Care, John Stackhouse Distinguished Professor of Surgery at the School of Medicine, chair of the faculty and Navy veteran. Additional event details are available here.
 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 113 master’s, 68 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty – including two Nobel laureates – staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 317,000 alumni live in all 50 states and 150 countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

Tar Heel Tribute ceremony media contact: Karen Moon, (919) 962-8595, karen_moon@unc.edu

Carolina Alumni Memorial ceremony media contact: MC VanGraafeiland, (919) 962-7090, mc.vangraafeiland@unc.edu

 

 

Carolina Student Transfer Excellence Program moves forward with expansion to Robeson Community College

For immediate use

Carolina Student Transfer Excellence Program moves forward with expansion to Robeson Community College

Partnership to increase the number of students transferring to and graduating from Carolina

 (Chapel Hill, N.C.—June 16, 2016) – The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s Carolina Student Transfer Excellence Program (C-STEP) and Robeson Community College (RCC) in Lumberton are partnering to increase the number of RCC students transferring to and graduating from UNC-Chapel Hill. With this agreement, RCC becomes the 10th North Carolina community college to partner with C-STEP and Carolina.

 

Through C-STEP, talented low and moderate income high school and community college students who enroll in one of the program’s partner colleges are guaranteed eventual admission to Carolina if they are admitted to and complete the community college portion of the program successfully.

 

“We are excited about our new partnership with C-STEP,” said Dr. Pamela Hilbert, Robeson Community College president. “This partnership will open new doors of opportunity for hard-working students, many of whom are from a diverse population, throughout Robeson County and help improve the prosperity of our community for years to come.”

 

“Carolina will be a better place because of the talents and perspectives brought by more students from Robeson County,” said Stephen Farmer, vice provost for enrollment and undergraduate admission. “We look forward to working with RCC to help students excel at Carolina, thrive here and ultimately graduate, thus achieving their goals of better lives for themselves and their families.”

 

Students invited to participate in C-STEP agree to earn an appropriate associate degree and participate actively in the program. While pursuing their associate degrees, C-STEP offers students special events, advising and transition and support services both at their home college and at Carolina. The program also provides transition and support services once students have enrolled at Carolina and are pursuing their bachelor degrees.

 

Now in its 10th year, the Carolina Student Transfer Excellence Program was launched with the support of the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation in an effort to enable more community-college students to transfer to and graduate from Carolina. Approximately 800 transfer students enter UNC-Chapel Hill annually, with about 25 percent coming from North Carolina community colleges.

 

C-STEP currently serves almost 580 students; 489 of those have already enrolled at Carolina and 271 have graduated. The remaining students are expected to enroll after completing their community college courses. The average C-STEP graduate GPA is 3.0 and the overall graduation rate is 79 percent (2016). Recent C-STEP graduates have become nurses, teachers, lawyers, university administrators and entrepreneurs following graduation.

 

Current partners include: Alamance Community College; Cape Fear Community College; Carteret Community College; Central Carolina Community College; Craven Community College; Durham Technical Community College; Fayetteville Technical Community College; Sandhills Community College; and Wake Technical Community College.

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 113 master’s, 68 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty – including two Nobel laureates – staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 308,000 alumni live in all 50 states and 150 countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

UNC-CH Admissions contact: Ashley Memory, (919) 843-2531, amemory@admissions.unc.edu

RCC contact: Dennis Watts, (910) 272-3369, dwatts@robeson.edu

Communications and Public Affairs contact: Michael John, (919) 445-8555, michael.john@unc.edu

 

 

 

UNC-Chapel Hill Selects Barnes & Noble College to Manage UNC Student Stores

For immediate use

 

UNC-Chapel Hill Selects Barnes & Noble College to Manage UNC Student Stores

10-year, $30 million deal to quadruple contribution to need-based scholarships;
Deal retains all full-time employees; Expands Bull’s Head Bookshop

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C. – April 21, 2016) The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill has selected Barnes & Noble College Booksellers, a Barnes & Noble Education company (NYSE:BNED), to operate its UNC Student Stores. As part of a 10-year, $30 million agreement, all operations will transition on July 1, 2016, with the exception of the print shop and pharmacy, which the University will continue to operate. All 48 full-time staff members will maintain employment at their current salary either under Barnes & Noble College management or by remaining with UNC-Chapel Hill.

 

“Guaranteeing continued employment for existing staff, preserving the beloved qualities of Student Stores and significantly increasing the funds toward need-based scholarships are key elements of this partnership with Barnes & Noble College,” said Brad Ives, associate vice chancellor for campus enterprises. “We thank everyone at Student Stores for their service and commitment to the campus community and for their patience during our diligence process.”

 

Employees transitioning under Barnes & Noble College management are guaranteed employment for three years. Full-time staff who transition to new management and are within 18 months of their five-year state service mark or three years of their 30-year state service mark will remain on the UNC-Chapel Hill payroll until they meet those milestones. Staff members retained by UNC-Chapel Hill will be offered positions with comparable duties in other areas of the University.

 

Net proceeds from UNC Student Stores sales will continue to support need-based scholarships. Barnes & Noble College forecasts an annual payment to the university of more than $3 million, with a guaranteed minimum payment of $3 million annually for the first two years. After the university covers operating expenses, existing debt service of $800,000 annually and other support costs, the Student Stores expects to net out between $1.75 and $2 million, which will be contributed to need-based scholarships annually, quadrupling its recent contribution.

 

“Ensuring an affordable education for our students is a proud part of Carolina’s past and a cornerstone of our future,” said Shirley A. Ort, associate provost and director of scholarships and student aid and a member of the Student Stores Request for Proposals (RFP) Advisory Committee. “For decades, Student Stores has been a great partner in that effort by providing a vital source of scholarships for both undergraduate and graduate students, getting us to where we are today. For that we are enormously grateful, and to the staff who have also hired our students. But this plan for Student Stores will create millions of additional dollars in need-based scholarship funds for talented and deserving students – supplemental sources that we greatly need.”

 

The new design plans for UNC Student Stores include greater visibility for the Bull’s Head Bookshop, which will retain its name and move to larger space on the top floor. The new Bull’s Head Bookshop will stock 70,000 titles, more than double the current offerings, and continue to feature books by university faculty. The renovations will also include a gathering area for book talks and signings.

 

“The ideas for the Bull’s Head are remarkable and very consistent with what we heard people say they wanted,” said Ives. “Barnes & Noble agreed that the bookshop was underutilized, and they have plans to re-imagine it while preserving its local vibe that this campus has come to know and love.”

 

Financial terms of the agreement include:

  • $3.8 million to update and expand existing retail space and another $200,000 for technology.
  • $1 million signing bonus, which will go to need-based student scholarships.
  • $25,000 for annual textbook scholarships.

Other key terms include:

  • Maintaining the UNC Student Stores name without Barnes & Noble branding.
  • Offering a 10-percent discount on new and used textbooks for UNC-Chapel Hill students plus a price-match guarantee against national vendors.
  • Hiring a similar number of student employees at salaries comparable to their current pay.
  • Managing the UNC Student Stores website to deliver an innovative online shopping experience.
  • Establishing a UNC Student Stores advisory board, consisting of students, faculty and staff, to provide input on store programs, merchandise and services.
  • Expanding the coffee shop to include a large seating area on the main floor.

 

In January, the university issued an RFP to examine the possibility of third-party management of UNC Student Stores to address declining sales and increase the financial contribution to scholarships. Revenue has declined by more than 15 percent since 2007 and remained flat for the last five years.

 

“As a result of the overall declining sales and margins, contributions to scholarships have been inconsistent from year to year,” said Ives. “This inconsistency, combined with the rising cost of tuition, means we have not been able to keep pace with the growing need for scholarship funds, and we needed to explore other avenues.”

 

The university received and reviewed proposals in response to the RFP. Six firms and the management of the UNC Student Stores presented their proposals to a 13-member advisory committee, representing faculty, staff and students. The proposal from Barnes & Noble College received the committee’s unanimous endorsement.

 

“We are grateful to the advisory committee, which represented a cross section of the campus community and brought diverse perspectives about the Student Stores,” added Ives. “They really cared about making the right decision for Carolina.”

 

“We’re thrilled to partner with UNC-Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university,” said Max J. Roberts, Chief Executive Officer of Barnes & Noble College. “We’re looking forward to delivering an innovative retail experience and dynamic digital learning environment that supports the university’s superior quality and affordable academic programs. This complete support system will help nurture student success and serve the entire Carolina community.”

 

Barnes & Noble College operates bookstores at nearly 750 U.S. colleges and universities; 25 of those are in North Carolina, including four at other UNC system schools.

 

-Carolina-

 

Media/Video link: https://youtu.be/oqJCkUAPWBs

Fact sheet link: https://www.unc.edu/files/2016/04/UNC-Student-Stores-fact-sheet.pdf

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 113 master’s, 68 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty – including two Nobel laureates – staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 308,000 alumni live in all 50 states and 150 countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

About Barnes & Noble College

Barnes & Noble College, a Barnes & Noble Education company (NYSE:BNED), is a leading operator of college bookstores in the United States. Barnes & Noble College currently operates 748 campus bookstores and the school-branded e-commerce sites for each store, serving more than 5 million college students and faculty nationwide. As a strategic partner, Barnes & Noble College is committed to offering a complete support system and an unmatched retail and digital learning experience to foster student success in higher education.

 

General information on Barnes & Noble College can be obtained on the company’s website: www.bncollege.com.

 

UNC-Chapel Hill Division of Finance and Administration contact: Allison Reid, (919) 962-6288, allison_reid@unc.edu

Communications and Public Affairs contact: Jim Gregory, (919) 445-8555, jim.gregory@unc.edu

UNC-Chapel Hill rated among top 10 national public universities for African Americans

For immediate use

 

 

UNC-Chapel Hill rated among top 10 national public universities for African Americans

MONEY and Essence magazines’ analyzed more than 1,500 schools to single out the 50 best

 

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— April 14, 2016) – The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill – a top public research university with a strong focus on access and affordability and high graduation rates – ranks ninth among the nation’s best public universities for African Americans, according to MONEY and Essence magazines. The publications collaborated to analyze more than 1,500 four-year colleges and universities to single out the ones that offer the best value for African-American students.

 

 

To determine the 50 Best Schools for African Americans, the methodology focused on colleges and universities that offer both high value and a supportive environment measuring factors including graduation rates, affordability, earnings potential and representation. Among both national public and private institutions of higher education, Carolina ranked 22nd overall.

 

 

We are pleased to be acknowledged as one of the top institutions of higher education for African American students,” said Taffye Benson Clayton, associate vice chancellor for Diversity and Multicultural Affairs and chief diversity officer. “As the nation’s first public university, with a distinct southern history and a global footprint, we are gratified by the growth and important milestones achieved in matters of race, diversity and inclusion at Carolina. We are encouraged by this recognition and aspire to accomplish even greater successes for African American students and all students on our campus.”

 

 

U.S. News and World Report has ranked Carolina in the top five of national public universities for 15 consecutive years and Kiplinger’s Personal Finance has ranked the university first among the 100 best U.S. public colleges and universities that offer high-quality academics at an affordable price 15 times. The University also features 325 study abroad programs in 70 countries and it ranks among the nation’s most successful public universities in attracting research funding from federal agencies.

 

 

Additionally, Carolina provides outstanding access and affordability through signature programs like Carolina Covenant, UNC-Chapel Hill’s over a decade-long promise to low-income youth who earn admission that they can graduate debt-free with help from grants, scholarships and work-study jobs.

 

 

The university’s Carolina Firsts program has also created a pathway of opportunity for the almost 20 percent of UNC-Chapel Hill undergraduates who are the first in their family to attend college.

 

 

-Carolina-

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 113 master’s, 68 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty – including two Nobel laureates – staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 308,000 alumni live in all 50 states and 150 countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

Communications and Public Affairs contact: Michael John, (919) 445-8360, michael.john@unc.edu

MONEY contact: Kelsey Rohwer, (212) 522-2401, kelsey.rohwer@timeinc.com

 

 

UNC-Chapel Hill Douglass Hunt Lecture features nationally-known writer and political theorist on college free speech

For immediate use

 

UNC-Chapel Hill Douglass Hunt Lecture features nationally-known writer and political theorist on college free speech

Thursday, April 14, program at Sonja Haynes Stone Center is free and open to the public

 

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C. – April 7, 2016) – The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s Carolina Seminars 2016 Douglass Hunt Lecture Series is featuring Danielle Allen, Ph.D., political theorist, writer and director of Harvard University’s Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics, who will speak about the current challenges on college campuses working to honor both free speech and the need for safe space.

 

 

Allen’s speech – Difference without Domination: Reconciling Free Speech and Social Equality on College Campuses – questions if it is possible to reconcile free expression and an egalitarian campus culture, which are often seen as competing commitments. Allen concludes that it is possible as institutions work to re-cast arguments about the first amendment, offensiveness and safe spaces.

 

 

The Thursday, April 14, lecture will be held in the Hitchcock Multipurpose Room of the Sonja Haynes Stone Center at 5:30 p.m. and is free and open to the public.

 

A 2015 Macarthur “Genius Grant” recipient, Allen has published broadly in democratic theory, political sociology and the history of political thought. She was Dean of the Division of Humanities at the University of Chicago and a professor at the Institute for Advanced Study before joining the Harvard faculty. She is a contributing writer for The Washington Post.

 

 

Widely known for her work on justice and citizenship in both ancient Athens and modern America, Allen is the author of The World of Prometheus: the Politics of Punishing in Democratic Athens (2000), Talking to Strangers: Anxieties of Citizenship since Brown vs. the Board of Education (2004), Why Plato Wrote (2010), and Our Declaration (2014). She is co-editor (with Rob Reich) of Education, Justice, and Democracy (2013).

 

 

The program is co-sponsored by the Department of African, African American, and Diaspora Studies, Department of Political Science, Department of Sociology, Institute for the Arts and Humanities, Institute of African American Research, and the Parr Center for Ethics.

 

 

For additional information, please contact Carolina Seminars Director, Andrew Perrin, andrew_perrin@unc.edu

 

 

-Carolina-

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 113 master’s, 68 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty – including two Nobel laureates – staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 308,000 alumni live in all 50 states and 150 countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

About the Douglass Hunt Lecture Series
The Carolina Seminars program organizes the Douglass Hunt lectures. The events are free and open to the public.  On the occasion of the first Douglass Hunt Lecture, which was held on October 23, 1995, Chancellor Paul Hardin recognized the contributions of Douglass Hunt to the University and to higher education, “Douglass Hunt always was and still remains enormously useful to the University of North Carolina. Indeed, he can’t help being useful because his close association with the University and the trust he earns daily by his life and work and friendships combine to inspire all of us who are influenced by him to redouble our own efforts to be useful to our beloved University.”

 

Carolina Seminars contact: Amatullah King, (919) 962-2501, kingamat@email.unc.edu

Communications and Public Affairs contact: Michael John, (919) 445-8360, Michael.john@unc.edu

 

 

Two UNC-Chapel Hill students recognized by Goldwater Foundation

For immediate use

 

Two UNC-Chapel Hill students recognized by Goldwater Foundation

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— April 7, 2016) — The Barry Goldwater Scholarship and Excellence in Education Program named University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill third-year student Chiara Pancaldo Salemi as a 2016 Goldwater Scholar and Mike Lebhar, also a third-year student, as a 2016 Goldwater Honorable Mention.

 

This prestigious scholarship provides up to $7,500 per year for eligible educational expenses to students who excel in academics and who plan to pursue research careers in science, mathematics, engineering and computer disciplines.

 

“My congratulations go to Chiara and Mike on their prestigious recognition from the Goldwater Foundation,” said Chancellor Carol L. Folt. “They are perfect examples of next generation leaders and problem solvers who make an impact on a global scale. The diversity of their research, encompassing simulations as well as programming and data analysis, sets them apart as pioneers charting a new course for future breakthroughs in physics, mathematics and engineering.”

 

For 2016, the foundation selected 252 scholarship recipients. Salemi and Lebhar were chosen from a field of 1,150 students who were nominated by colleges and universities nationwide.

 

“Both students have exceptional academic qualifications and substantial practical research experience,” said Jason Reed, associate professor of biology and chair of UNC-Chapel Hill’s Goldwater selection committee.

 

Salemi, 20, is from Chapel Hill and is double majoring in physics and mathematics in the College of Arts and Sciences. Her research in nuclear and particle physics has taken her around the world. Salemi just returned from a semester abroad in Geneva where she analyzed data from the ATLAS detector, used in the search for fundamental particles, at the European Organization for Nuclear Research, also known as CERN.

 

She also spent a summer at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in California where she completed a research internship on a neutrinoless double-beta decay experiment.

 

Salemi has presented her work at talks at the Berkeley lab, at CERN and at the American Physical Society Conference. She plans to attend graduate school and study nuclear particle physics.

 

Lebhar, 21, is from Naples, Florida, and is majoring in biomedical engineering with minors in chemistry and neuroscience from the College of Arts and Sciences. He hopes to earn his doctoral degree and one day design artificial organs as tools for experimentation and drug screening. He is doing research on a “colon-on-a-chip” in vitro model of the colon functions. He is characterizing how well this model mimics a real colon and will then use the model to explore various questions about colon physiology.

 

In addition to his academic and research pursuits, Lebhar is also active in UNC-Chapel Hill’s Helping Hand Project to design and 3-D print prosthetic hands at low costs for patients in need.

Congress established the Goldwater scholarship program in 1986 to honor the late Barry M. Goldwater of Arizona who served in the U.S. Senate for 30 years. The first awards were given in 1989.

 

Click here for more information on UNC-Chapel Hill’s Office of Distinguished Scholarships.

 

 

-Carolina-

 

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 78 bachelor’s, 112 master’s, 68 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty – including two Nobel laureates – staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 308,000 alumni live in all 50 states and 150 countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

Goldwater Foundation announcement: https://goldwater.scholarsapply.org/sch-2016.php

 

Photos of recipients:

 

 

Office of Distinguished Scholarships contacts: Mary Floyd-Wilson, (919) 962-4034, floydwil@email.unc.edu; Alsace Gallop, (919) 843-7757, gallop@email.unc.edu
Communications and Public Affairs contact: Jeni Cook, (919) 962-2091, jeni.cook@unc.edu

Media invited to cover large-screen viewings of men’s championship basketball game Monday, April 4

Not for publication

 

Media invited to cover large-screen viewings of men’s championship basketball game Monday, April 4

 

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— April 3, 2016) – Media are invited to cover the men’s championship basketball game viewing event at the UNC-Chapel Hill Smith Center on Monday, April 4. Media may arrive at 6 p.m. to cover the large-screen viewing of the Carolina vs. Villanova game that begins at 9:19 p.m. The game will be shown on a large projection screen and on Smith Center video boards.

 

 

Cosponsored by Carolina Athletics and Late Night Carolina Programs at Student Wellness, the Smith Center will open for Carolina students, faculty and staff at 8 p.m. and the general public at 8:30 p.m.

 

 

RSVP: Media planning to cover the viewings are asked to RSVP by emailing mediarelations@unc.edu or calling the media line at (919) 445-8555.

 

 

Arrival: Please bring media credentials; enter through Entrance D beginning at 6 p.m., Monday, April 4.

 

 

Lights: Videographers are asked to refrain from directing TV lights into fans’ faces as they watch the game. Lights can be on before the game, during commercial breaks and halftime.

 

 

Filming: Live shots are permitted in the concourse area only. For the purposes of b-roll, camera crews may stand on the Smith Center floor or in the aisles of the stands before the game, during commercial breaks and halftime. Please do not block the view of the screen. Media representatives may sit anywhere in the stands.

 

 

Assistance on site: Call Jim Gregory at (703) 300-3350 or the media line at (919) 445-8555.

 

 

Media Parking: Satellite trucks may park behind the Smith Center. Media are asked to send only one truck per station. Set-up may begin after 6 p.m. Other media vehicles may park in the Morehead Planetarium and Science Center lot off E. Franklin Street. Parking is available for $5.00 in the Manning Lot, Bowles Lot, Craige Deck, Business School Deck and Rams Head Deck. Road closure and parking restriction information is available at the Transportation and Parking website here.

 

 

Cable: Approximately 500 feet of cable is needed to reach from trucks in the back lot to filming areas inside the Smith Center.

-Carolina-

 

Communications and Public Affairs contact: Michael John, (919) 445-8555, michael.john@unc.edu

 

Media invited to cover large-screen viewings of men’s Final Four basketball games Saturday, April 2

 

Not for publication

 

Media invited to cover large-screen viewings of men’s Final Four basketball games Saturday, April 2

 

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C.— March 31, 2016) – Media are invited to cover the men’s Final Four basketball game viewing events at the UNC-Chapel Hill Smith Center on Saturday, April 2. Media may arrive at 4 p.m. to cover the large-screen viewings of the Oklahoma vs. Villanova game that begins at 6:09 p.m. in Houston, followed by the Carolina vs. Syracuse game that begins at approximately 8:49 p.m. Both semifinal games will be shown on a large projection screen and on Smith Center video boards.

 

 

Cosponsored by Carolina Athletics and Late Night Carolina Programs at Student Wellness, the Smith Center will open for Carolina students, faculty and staff at 5 p.m. and the general public at 5:30 p.m. Filming is allowed in the Carolina Basketball Museum that will be open until 6 p.m.

 

 

RSVP: Media planning to cover the viewings are asked to RSVP by close-of-business Friday, April 1, by emailing mediarelations@unc.edu or calling the media line at (919) 445-8555.

 

 

Arrival: Please bring media credentials; enter through Entrance D beginning at 4 p.m., Saturday, April 2.

 

 

Lights: Videographers are asked to refrain from directing TV lights into fans’ faces as they watch the game. Lights can be on before the game and during commercials and between games.

 

 

Filming: Live shots are permitted in the concourse area only. For the purposes of b-roll, camera crews may stand on the Smith Center floor or in the aisles of the stands during commercial breaks, halftime and between games. Please do not block the view of the screen. Media representatives may sit anywhere in the stands.

 

 

Assistance on site: Call Jim Gregory at (703) 300-3350 or the media line at (919) 445-8555.

 

 

Media Parking: Satellite trucks may park behind the Smith Center. Media are asked to send only one truck per station. Set-up may begin after 4 p.m. Other media vehicles may park in the Morehead Planetarium and Science Center lot off E. Franklin Street. Parking is available for $5.00 in the Manning, Bowles, Craige and Rams Head parking lots. Road closure and parking restriction information is available on line.

 

 

Cable: Approximately 500 feet of cable is needed to reach from trucks in the back lot to filming areas inside the Smith Center.

-Carolina-

 

Communications and Public Affairs contact: Michael John, (919) 445-8555, michael.john@unc.edu

 

UNC-Chapel Hill Announces 2016 Public Service Awards

For immediate use

 

UNC-Chapel Hill honors 10 individuals and organizations for public service

 

(Chapel Hill, N.C. – March 30, 2016) – Programs to support Native American tribes in North Carolina, a mental health initiative for refugees and local youth programs are just some of the projects recognized by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill during the 2016 Public Service Awards. Sponsored by the Carolina Center for Public Service, individuals and organizations representing students, faculty, staff and community partners, were honored March 30 at the annual Public Service Awards celebration.

 

“The University’s three-part mission to research, educate and serve our local communities, state, nation and world is truly enhanced by our unwavering commitment to public service,” said Chancellor Carol Folt. “The recipients of this year’s Public Service Awards prove that public service and engaged scholarship enhance the research conducted, lessons taught and knowledge used to serve the public good at this university. I am incredibly proud to recognize the innovation, scholarship and dedication that each of today’s award recipients have displayed.”

 

Beverly Foster, clinical associate professor and director of undergraduate education in the School of Nursing, received the 2016 Ned Brooks Award for Public Service for more than 30 years of providing and supporting public service within UNC-Chapel Hill and across North Carolina. Foster remains active in many local and state agencies related to health and human services, having served for many years on the Orange County Board of Health and as chair and member of Healthy Carolinians in Orange County. At the state level, the governor appointed her to the Healthy Carolinians Advisory Board and she serves as board chair of the Foundation for Nursing Excellence. Her knowledge of public health and commitment to improving health outcomes created lasting impressions on the local and state levels.

 

The Center presented three Office of the Provost Engaged Scholarship Awards, which honor individuals and campus units for public service through engaged teaching, research and partnership.

 

Rhonda Lanning, clinical assistant professor in the School of Nursing, received the 2016 Office of the Provost Engaged Scholarship Award for engaged teaching. Her work on the Supporting the Childbearing Family course allows students to develop their skills and provide care to women and families at North Carolina Women’s Hospital where they are paired with professional doulas. This course collaborates with UNC Birth Partners to serve more families, including vulnerable populations such as incarcerated mothers, as well as women experiencing substance-use disorders and significant perinatal mood illnesses. Students who enrolled in this course conducted research that resulted in toolkits and workbooks used in the course and in the community.

 

Molly De Marco, research assistant professor of nutrition and project director in the Center for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention, received the 2016 Office of the Provost Engaged Scholarship Award for engaged research. The U.S. Department of Agriculture funds SNAP-Ed UNC: Healthy Food for All in North Carolina project, which DeMarco directs, to provide nutrition education to people eligible for SNAP benefits (formerly known as food stamps) in six predominately rural North Carolina counties. Intervention activities include implementing 18 community gardens, working with three farmers’ markets to remove barriers to use of SNAP benefits and increasing summer meals sites.

 

The American Indian Center and North Carolina Tribal Nations, received the 2016 Office of the Provost Engaged Scholarship Award for partnership. This award honors their partnership on successful efforts such as the Healthy Native North Carolinians Network, NC Native Asset Coalition and NC Native Leadership Institute. These initiatives support sustainable community change to address the health and wellbeing of North Carolina tribal nations and foster unity across all tribes and American Indian communities in North Carolina. The American Indian Center’s mission is to bridge the richness of American Indian cultures with the strengths of Carolina’s research, education and service.

 

The Robert E. Bryan Public Service Award recognizes individual students and faculty for exemplary public service efforts. This year’s Bryan awards go to four individuals and one organization:

 

Gayatri Rathod ’16, a biology major in the College of Arts and Sciences from Charlotte received the 2016 Robert E. Bryan Public Service Award for work with Tar Heel TABLE, an organization that provides healthy, emergency food aid to hungry preschool, elementary and middle-school children in Chapel Hill and Carrboro. In her two years as co-chair of Tar Heel TABLE, Rathod launched social media photo campaigns, food drives and news interviews to increase TABLE’s outreach and involvement. In all of her efforts, Rathod has emphasized involvement in TABLE with the hope of combatting hunger.

 

Catherine Schricker ’18 and Korry Tauber ‘18, both graduate students in the School of Dentistry, received the 2016 Robert E. Bryan Public Service Award for their work with North Carolina Missions of Mercy (NCMOM) Patient Oral Health Education Program. Tauber and Schricker created and implemented an oral health educational program to supplement the North Carolina Dental Society’s portable free dental clinic. They collaborated with community partners and UNC faculty mentors to develop their oral health education program, which is now a permanent component of the NCMOM clinics. Student volunteers provide personalized dental health instruction using visual aids in combination with interactive demonstrations.

 

Christopher Wallace, program coordinator at the Sonja Haynes Stone Center for Black Culture & History, received the 2016 Robert E. Bryan Public Service Award for his work with the Communiversity Youth Program. Communiversity draws on existing UNC resources and coordinates them so they can serve local children more effectively. The program exposes kindergarten through fifth-grade students to a college environment and provides them with academic and cultural tools to improve their performance in the classroom, social outlook and likelihood of success in a college environment.

 

Josh Hinson, clinical assistant professor in the School of Social Work, received the 2016 Robert E. Bryan Public Service Award for his work on UNC Global Transmigration – Refugee Mental Health and Wellness Initiative. This project trains graduate students to use an evidence-based refugee mental health screening instrument and collects data on the extent of refugees’ mental health needs and the effectiveness of mental health treatment. In 2015, Refugee Wellness began contracting with the North Carolina Division of Health and Human Services’ Refugee Office to provide mental health services to refugees throughout Wake, Durham and Orange counties.

 

Student Health Action Coalition (SHAC) received the 2016 Robert E. Bryan Public Service Award for its work as a student-led organization whose mission is to provide free health services to local, underserved individuals and communities; partner with communities to develop and implement sustainable health programs; and create an interdisciplinary service-learning environment for students in the health science programs at UNC. Established in 1967, SHAC operates weekly interdisciplinary acute medical and dental clinics, as well as chronic care and referral services and home health services. SHAC serves more than 1,100 patients annually through these clinical services.

 

In addition to these public service awards, several other groups will be recognized including six Bryan Fellowship teams involving 26 students; seven Community Engagement Fellowship projects created by eight students; the recipient of the 2016 Mingma Norbu Sherpa Fellowship; two students for the Davis Projects for Peace Award; and 10 North Carolina Outward Bound scholarship recipients.

 

The Bryan Fellowship is designed for undergraduate aspiring social change-makers who are interested in providing a significant contribution locally, nationally or internationally through the creation of an entrepreneurial project that addresses a community issue or need. Fellows receive up to $1,500 to launch their project, access to professional development funds, support from APPLES students and staff and invaluable leadership training and personal development.

 

The Community Engagement Fellowship awards up to $2,000 each year to selected graduate and professional students to develop and implement engagement or engaged scholarship projects that employ innovative, sustainable approaches to complex social needs and have an academic connection.

 

The Mingma Norbu Sherpa Fellowship is named for the late Mingma Norbu Sherpa, a pioneering conservationist in the Himalaya who served as an official with the World Wildlife Fund. The fellowship provides $1,250 to support a student conducting fieldwork independently or in cooperation with an organization.

 

The Davis Projects for Peace Award, funded by the late philanthropist Kathryn W. Davis, provides $10,000 to support a grassroots project for summer implementation.

 

Each year, the Carolina Center for Public Service awards North Carolina Outward Bound School (NCOBS) scholarships to participants in the Buckley Public Service Scholars program, Carolina Leadership Development program and the School of Education. Recipients receive full tuition to a 28-day course at the North Carolina Outward Bound School.

 

-Carolina-

 

 

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 113 master’s, 68 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty – including two Nobel laureates – staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s more than 308,000 alumni live in all 50 states and 150 countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

 

Carolina Center for Public Service contact: Rhonda Beatty, (919) 843-7568, rbeatty@unc.edu

Communications and Public Affairs contact: Jeni Cook, (919) 962-2091, jeni.cook@unc.edu